HM Treasury

HM Treasury is the government’s economic and finance ministry, maintaining control over public spending, setting the direction of the UK’s economic policy and working to achieve strong and sustainable economic growth.



Secretary of State

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Labour
Rachel Reeves (LAB - Leeds West)
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer

Liberal Democrat
Baroness Kramer (LDEM - Life peer)
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Treasury and Economy)
Christine Jardine (LDEM - Edinburgh West)
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Treasury)

Scottish National Party
Alison Thewliss (SNP - Glasgow Central)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Treasury)

Democratic Unionist Party
Sammy Wilson (DUP - East Antrim)
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Treasury)

Labour
Lord Tunnicliffe (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Treasury)

Plaid Cymru
Ben Lake (PC - Ceredigion)
Shadow PC Spokesperson (Treasury)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Scottish National Party
Peter Grant (SNP - Glenrothes)
Shadow SNP Deputy Spokesperson (Treasury - Chief Secretary)

Labour
Bridget Phillipson (LAB - Houghton and Sunderland South)
Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury
James Murray (LAB - Ealing North)
Shadow Financial Secretary (Treasury)

Scottish National Party
Richard Thomson (SNP - Gordon)
Shadow SNP Deputy Spokesperson (Treasury - Financial Secretary)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Pat McFadden (LAB - Wolverhampton South East)
Shadow Economic Secretary (Treasury)
Abena Oppong-Asare (LAB - Erith and Thamesmead)
Shadow Exchequer Secretary (Treasury)
Ministers of State
John Glen (CON - Salisbury)
Minister of State (Treasury) (City)
Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
Michael Ellis (CON - Northampton North)
Paymaster General
Lucy Frazer (CON - South East Cambridgeshire)
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
Lord Agnew of Oulton (CON - Life peer)
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
John Glen (CON - Salisbury)
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
Helen Whately (CON - Faversham and Mid Kent)
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
Scheduled Event
Monday 25th October 2021
15:00
Treasury Committee - Oral evidence - Select & Joint Committees
25 Oct 2021, 3 p.m.
Future of Financial Services
View calendar
Scheduled Event
Monday 25th October 2021
15:45
HM Treasury
Legislation - Grand Committee
25 Oct 2021, 3:45 p.m.
Critical Benchmarks (References and Administrators' Liability) Bill [HL] – committee stage
View calendar
Scheduled Event
Wednesday 27th October 2021
HM Treasury
Financial Statement - Main Chamber
Budget statement
View calendar
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 2nd November 2021
HM Treasury
Legislation - Main Chamber
Critical Benchmarks (References and Administrators' Liability) Bill [HL] – report stage – Lord Agnew of Oulton
View calendar
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 2nd November 2021
11:30
HM Treasury
Oral questions - Main Chamber
2 Nov 2021, 11:30 a.m.
HM Treasury (including Topical Questions)
Save to Calendar
View calendar
Scheduled Event
Wednesday 3rd November 2021
16:45
HM Treasury
Debate - Grand Committee
3 Nov 2021, 4:45 p.m.
The economy in the light of the Budget Statement
View calendar
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 7th December 2021
11:30
HM Treasury
Oral questions - Main Chamber
7 Dec 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Treasury (including Topical Questions)
Save to Calendar
View calendar
Debates
Wednesday 20th October 2021
Access to Cash
Westminster Hall
Select Committee Inquiry
Monday 9th November 2020
Work of the Financial Ombudsman Service

As part of its ongoing scrutiny of the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS), the Treasury Committee holds hearings with the Chief …

Written Answers
Friday 22nd October 2021
Insurance: Floods
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 20 September 2021 to Question 49075 on Insurance: …
Secondary Legislation
Friday 15th October 2021
Packaged Retail and Insurance-based Investment Products (UCITS Exemption) (Amendment) Regulations 2021
These Regulations amend Regulation (EU) No 1286/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 November 2014 on …
Bills
Wednesday 8th September 2021
Health and Social Care Levy Act 2021
A Bill to make provision imposing a tax (to be known as the health and social care levy), the proceeds …
Dept. Publications
Thursday 21st October 2021
17:00

HM Treasury Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Sep. 07
Oral Questions
Oct. 19
Written Statements
Oct. 20
Westminster Hall
View All HM Treasury Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

HM Treasury does not have Bills currently before Parliament


Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament

Introduced: 8th September 2021

A Bill to make provision imposing a tax (to be known as the health and social care levy), the proceeds of which are payable to the Secretary of State towards the cost of health care and social care, on amounts in respect of which national insurance contributions are, or would be if no restriction by reference to pensionable age were applicable, payable; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 20th October 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 12th May 2021

A Bill to provide for the payment out of money provided by Parliament of expenditure incurred by the Treasury for, or in connection with, the payment of compensation to customers of London Capital & Finance plc; provide for the making of loans to the Board of the Pension Protection Fund for the purposes of its fraud compensation functions; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 20th October 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 30th June 2021

A Bill to authorise the use of resources for the year ending with 31 March 2022; to authorise both the issue of sums out of the Consolidated Fund and the application of income for that year; and to appropriate the supply authorised for that year by this Act and by the Supply and Appropriation (Anticipation and Adjustments) Act 2021.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 19th July 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 9th March 2021

A Bill to grant certain duties, to alter other duties, and to amend the law relating to the national debt and the public revenue, and to make further provision in connection with finance.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 10th June 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 21st October 2020

A Bill to make provision about financial services and markets; to make provision about debt respite schemes; to make provision about Help-to-Save accounts; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 9th March 2021

A Bill to make provision increasing the maximum capital of the Contingencies Fund for a temporary period.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 15th March 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 10th March 2021

A Bill to authorise the use of resources for the years ending with 31 March 2019, 31 March 2020, 31 March 2021 and 31 March 2022; to authorise the issue of sums out of the Consolidated Fund for the years ending 31 March 2020, 31 March 2021 and 31 March 2022; and to appropriate the supply authorised by this Act for the years ending with 31 March 2019, 31 March 2020 and 31 March 2021.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 15th March 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 4th February 2021

A Bill to make provision for payments to or in respect of Ministers and holders of Opposition offices on maternity leave.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 1st March 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 8th December 2020

A Bill to make provision (including the imposition and regulation of new duties of customs) in connection with goods in Northern Ireland and their movement into or out of Northern Ireland; to make provision amending certain enactments relating to value added tax, excise duty or insurance premium tax; to make provision in connection with the recovery of unlawful state aid in relation to controlled foreign companies; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 17th December 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 9th July 2020

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 22nd July 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 13th July 2020

A Bill to make provision to reduce for a temporary period the amount of stamp duty land tax chargeable on the acquisition of residential property.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 22nd July 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 17th March 2020

A Bill to grant certain duties, to alter other duties, and to amend the law relating to the national debt and the public revenue, and to make further provision in connection with finance.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 22nd July 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 24th March 2020

A Bill to make provision increasing the maximum capital of the Contingencies Fund for a temporary period.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 25th March 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 2nd March 2020

A Bill to authorise the use of resources for the years ending with 31 March 2020 and 31 March 2021; to authorise the issue of sums out of the Consolidated Fund for those years; and to appropriate the supply authorised by this Act for the year ending with 31 March 2020.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 16th March 2020 and was enacted into law.

HM Treasury - Secondary Legislation

These Regulations amend Regulation (EU) No 1286/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 November 2014 on key information documents for packaged retail and insurance-based investment products (PRIIPs) (PRIIPs Regulation). They extend an existing exemption for management and investment companies and persons advising on, or selling, Undertakings for Collective Investment in Transferable Securities (UCITS) funds from the requirements of the PRIIPs Regulation. The current exemption is being extended by five years to 31st December 2026.
This Order amends the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (Exemption) Order 2001 (S.I. 2001/1201) (“the Principal Order”).
View All HM Treasury Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
Petition Open
650 Signatures
(477 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
688 Signatures
(31 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
1,939 Signatures
(30 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
8,263 Signatures
(26 in the last 7 days)
Petitions with most signatures
Petition Open
17,148 Signatures
(2 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
8,263 Signatures
(26 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
3,091 Signatures
(8 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
1,939 Signatures
(30 in the last 7 days)
Petition Debates Contributed

Extending the Stamp Duty Holiday for an additional 6 months will assist many buyers who are looking to move to a property that they will not be able to afford otherwise.
This will help to stabilise the housing market

The government is helping private firms to protect jobs by paying up to 80% of staff wages through this crisis. If it can do this why can it not help key workers who will be putting themselves/their families at risk and working extra hard under extremely challenging and unprecedented circumstances.

Being the first to close and still no clue as to when we can open, this seasonal industry is losing its summer profits that allows them to get through the first quarter of next year.

Even if we are allowed to open in December, 1 months profit won't be enough to keep us open in 2021. We need help

View All HM Treasury Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Treasury Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


11 Members of the Treasury Committee
Mel Stride Portrait
Mel Stride (Conservative - Central Devon)
Treasury Committee Chair since 27th January 2020
Alison Thewliss Portrait
Alison Thewliss (Scottish National Party - Glasgow Central)
Treasury Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Julie Marson Portrait
Julie Marson (Conservative - Hertford and Stortford)
Treasury Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Angela Eagle Portrait
Angela Eagle (Labour - Wallasey)
Treasury Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Felicity Buchan Portrait
Felicity Buchan (Conservative - Kensington)
Treasury Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Anthony Browne Portrait
Anthony Browne (Conservative - South Cambridgeshire)
Treasury Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Harriett Baldwin Portrait
Harriett Baldwin (Conservative - West Worcestershire)
Treasury Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Rushanara Ali Portrait
Rushanara Ali (Labour - Bethnal Green and Bow)
Treasury Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Siobhain McDonagh Portrait
Siobhain McDonagh (Labour - Mitcham and Morden)
Treasury Committee Member since 11th May 2020
Emma Hardy Portrait
Emma Hardy (Labour - Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
Treasury Committee Member since 20th April 2021
Gareth Davies Portrait
Gareth Davies (Conservative - Grantham and Stamford)
Treasury Committee Member since 19th October 2021
Treasury Committee: Upcoming Events
Treasury Committee - Oral evidence
Future of Financial Services
25 Oct 2021, 3 p.m.
At 3.15pm: Oral evidence
Anne Boden - Chief Executive Officer at Starling Bank
John Collins - Chief Legal and Regulatory Officer at Santander UK
Matthew Conway - Director for Strategy and Policy at UK Finance
David Livingstone - Chief Executive Officer, Europe, Middle East and Africa at Citigroup
Nigel Terrington - Chief Executive Officer at Paragon Banking Group

View calendar
Treasury Committee: Previous Inquiries
Spring Budget 2020 Economic Crime Regional Imbalances in the UK economy The Work of the Debt Management Office Appointment of Richard Hughes as Chair of the Office for Budget Responsibility Reappointment of Professor Silvana Tenreyro to the Monetary Policy Committee Reappointment of Andy Haldane to the Monetary Policy Committee Appointment of Jonathan Hall to the Financial Policy Committee Appointment of Nikhil Rathi as Chief Executive of the Financial Conduct Authority UK Customs Policy Infrastructure Appointment of Andrew Bailey as Governor of the Bank of England Work of Government Actuary’s Department Work of the Financial Ombudsman Service Access to Cash Review Bank of England Financial Stability Reports Bank of England Inflation Reports Consumers’ Access to Financial Services Decarbonisation of the UK Economy and Green Finance Economic Crime The effectiveness of gender pay gap reporting HMRC Annual Report and Accounts inquiry Tax enquiries and resolution of tax disputes IT failures in the financial services sector Appointment of Dame Colette Bowe to the Financial Policy Committee Re-appointment of Professor Anil Kashyap to the Financial Policy Committee Work of the Financial Services Compensation Scheme Spending Round 2019 The impact of Business Rates on business Work of the Court of the Bank of England Independent Review of the Co-Operative Bank Regional Imbalances in the UK Economy Re-appointment of Michael Saunders to the Monetary Policy Committee Re-appointment of Ben Broadbent as Deputy Governor for Monetary Policy, Bank of England Maxwellisation RBS's Global Restructuring Group and its treatment of SMEs SME Finance Spring Statement 2019 The future of the UK’s financial services HM Treasury Annual Report and Accounts Service Disruption at TSB The UK's economic relationship with the European Union VAT The work of the Bank of England The work of the Chancellor of the Exchequer The work of the Financial Conduct Authority The Work of the Treasury The work of the Prudential Regulation Authority

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment has he made of the level of funding available to build the HS2 eastern leg to Leeds.

The Spending Review will set out Government’s plans for public spending. The Integrated Rail Plan will set out how rail connectivity will be improved in the North and the Midlands. Details will be set out in due course.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Answer of 28 April 2021 to Question 187297 on National Savings and Investments, what estimate he has made of the date on which the NS&I Green Savings Bond will be available to customers.

The Green Savings Bonds were made available to customers via National Savings and Investments on 22 October and will be on sale for a minimum of three months. The 3-year fixed-term savings product with an interest rate of 0.65% will give UK savers the opportunity to take part in the collective effort to tackle climate change. Customers can invest between £100 and £100,000.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 20 September 2021 to Question 49075 on Insurance: Floods, whether the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is classed as a saving in a Business Interruption claim.

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) is the independent non-governmental body responsible for regulating and supervising the financial services industry. The FCA’s rules require insurers to handle claims fairly and promptly and settle claims quickly once settlement terms are agreed.

Insurers should calculate claims payments due to the policyholder in accordance with the terms and conditions of the relevant policy.

Policyholders who feel that their claim has not been handled fairly may be able to refer the matter to the Financial Ombudsman Service, an independent body set up to provide arbitration in such cases.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the correspondence addressed to the previous Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office dated 10 August 2021 from the Hon. Member for Enfield North on the Government's international aid cuts and the UK’s Special Drawing Rights allocation, reference FC8050.

A response to the relevant correspondence was issued on 12 October 2021.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the letter dated 13 August 2021 from the hon. Member for West Lancashire, regarding funeral plan regulation, reference ZA56841.

I responded to the Honourable Member’s correspondence on 18 October 2021.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the finding of Scope and the Disabled Children’s Partnership’s report entitled The Gap Widens, published in October 2021, that there is a £2.1 billion funding gap in disabled children’s health and social care, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Education, ahead of the upcoming Spending Review, on tackling unmet need in disabled children’s health and care services.

HM Treasury Ministers and officials regularly meet with other government departments and a range of stakeholders, which includes discussions around support for children.

The government has to date provided the NHS with over £32 billion to support its response to and recovery from COVID-19, which includes the provision of healthcare services to disabled children. This is part of the overall £97 billion support for health services since the start of the pandemic.

The government has also given over £6 billion in un-ringfenced funding directly to councils to support them with the immediate and longer-term impacts of COVID-19 spending pressures, including children’s services. At last year’s Spending Review, the government provided councils with access to over £1 billion of spending for social care through £300 million of new social care grant and the ability to introduce a 3% adult social care precept. This funding was additional to the £1 billion social care grant announced in 2019 which was maintained in line with the government's manifesto.

HM Treasury will continue to work with other government departments, including the Department for Health and Social Care, Department for Education and Department of Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, to ensure the Spending Review reflects the requirements of children’s health and care services in the longer term.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to mandate large bank investment through social lenders such as Community Development Finance Institutions.

The Treasury recognises the vital role that non-banks, including Community Development Financial institutions (CDFIs), and challenger banks play in the provision of credit to SMEs. I would like to take the opportunity to reaffirm that the Government recognises the vital role that CDFIs play in the provision of credit to SMEs and is grateful for the way the sector has responded to the current crisis. It is worth noting the Government remains committed to promoting competition and widening the funding options available to UK businesses.

Whilst there are no plans at this time to mandate large bank investment through social lenders like CDFIs, I should be clear that all lenders accredited under the government-backed Recovery Loan Scheme can benefit from the transfer and assignment of the guarantee, which is something that alternative lenders requested to support their ability to access funding.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions he has had with the insurance industry on explicitly excluding (a) commutable diseases, (b) coronaviruses and (c) pandemics from insurance policies; and what assessment he has made of the impact of those exclusions on people purchasing insurance.

The Government is committed to ensuring consumers can access the insurance products that suit their needs and is in continual dialogue with the insurance industry on its response to the Covid-19 crisis.

The Government has taken the position that it would not intervene in the insurance market unless the inability to secure appropriate cover represented the last barrier for the sector to reopen. At various stages throughout this crisis, the government has launched successful insurance interventions.

Moving forward, HM Treasury is learning lessons about the impacts of Covid-19 on the insurance market and the availability of cover. This will be crucial when considering our approach for how we build greater economic resilience against certain risks in the future.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to use the comprehensive spending review on 27 October 2021 to announce a new, lower rate of duty for draught beer.

The Treasury is considering the merits of potential reforms to alcohol duties as part of its alcohol duty review. We are currently analysing responses provided by stakeholders to our call for evidence and will provide further updates in due course.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on what date he last made an assessment of the effectiveness of existing legislation in preventing the demutualisation of financial mutuals; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is a strong supporter of the mutuals sector. Mutuals offer a different way of running a business, with their clear focus on their members needs and serving their local communities.

The Government routinely considers the effectiveness of legislation, including that for financial mutuals, and if any amendments are necessary. The Government is open to discussions about legislative reforms to support mutuals and other proposals to develop the sector. Treasury officials recently met with the Association of Financial Mutuals, which has put together a working group dedicated to exploring the impact of legislation and regulation on mutuals and friendly societies.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions officials in his Department have held with representatives of the co-operative and mutual sector on increasing safeguards for financial mutuals against demutualisation; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is a strong supporter of the mutuals sector. Mutuals offer a different way of running a business, with their clear focus on their members needs and serving their local communities.

The Government routinely considers the effectiveness of legislation, including that for financial mutuals, and if any amendments are necessary. The Government is open to discussions about legislative reforms to support mutuals and other proposals to develop the sector. Treasury officials recently met with the Association of Financial Mutuals, which has put together a working group dedicated to exploring the impact of legislation and regulation on mutuals and friendly societies.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he made of the number of (a) individuals and (b) businesses in Ilford North constituency that will be affected by the planned increase to National Insurance Contributions.

The final costing of the policy, as well as the impacts on individuals and businesses, are due to be set out in the upcoming Autumn Budget.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the amount of additional revenue that will be received as a result of his planned increase to National Insurance Contributions from (a) businesses and (b) individuals in Ilford North constituency.

The final costing of the policy, as well as the impacts on individuals and businesses, are due to be set out in the upcoming Autumn Budget.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the impact of the implementation of IR35 on the number of drivers in the haulage industry.

The Tax Information and Impact Note published in March 2021 sets out expected impacts of the April 2021 reform of the off-payroll working rules: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/off-payroll-working-rules-from-april-2021/off-payroll-working-rules-from-april-2021.

The Government committed to commission independent research into the short-term impacts of the reform by October 2021 during the debate on the Finance Bill 2020. That research has now been commissioned, and the findings will be published once complete.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many new claims for (a) statutory paternity pay, (b) statutory maternity pay and (c) maternity allowance were approved in each quarter of financial year 2020-21.

The information is not held in the form requested. HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) does hold information on claimants of statutory maternity pay and statutory paternity pay, but this is not limited to new claims. Quarterly counts of claims would include claimants in each quarter in which they received the statutory payment. HMRC does not hold any information on payments of Maternity Allowance.

The Department for Work and Pensions publishes statistics about benefits, including average caseloads for Statutory Maternity Pay and Maternity Allowance:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/benefit-expenditure-tables

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the impact on small and medium sized enterprises of delays by insurance companies in settling in full covid-19 related claims that have been upheld by the Financial Ombudsman; and if he will make it his policy to look at providing these businesses with support, including a government backed loan scheme offered via primary lenders and which would give businesses the chance to consolidate their covid related debts and negotiate affordable payment plans.

The Financial Ombudsman Service is an independent body set up to provide arbitration in disputes between customers and financial services firms. Following a consumer's acceptance of an ombudsman's final decision, the decision becomes binding on the firm.

The Financial Conduct Authority’s (FCA) rules require businesses to co-operate with the ombudsman – this includes complying with any decision that the ombudsman may make.

The Government continues to work closely with the FCA to ensure that the rules are being upheld during this crisis and fully supports the regulator in its role.

Under the Government’s Recovery Loan Scheme (RLS), eligible businesses can take out a loan and use part of this facility to refinance their existing loans. Businesses in this situation should speak to lenders about their financing options. Businesses can use any of the accredited RLS lenders to refinance, and not just the lender they have the existing loan with. More information regarding accredited lenders under RLS is available on the British Business Bank’s website.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, who are the two independent experts assigned to the Financial Conduct Authority to assess the potential merits of the proposed the sale of LV (Liverpool Victoria); what assessment he has made of their remit in that assessment; and if he will make a statement.

The Scheme of Arrangement and Member Vote independent expert is Oliver Gillespie from Milliman. The Part VII independent expert is Simon Grout from FTI Consulting. The independent experts are appointed by LV= (and in the case of the Part VII independent experts approved by the PRA, in consultation with the FCA) and their review of the proposed transaction is not only for the regulators but also for the courts and the members and policyholders of LV=. They are required to perform their role in line with regulatory requirements for independent experts.

The approval of the sale of LV= to Bain Capital, including consideration of the independent experts’ reports, is a matter for the members of LV=, as well as the financial services regulators and the courts, both of whom are independent of Government. It is therefore not appropriate for the Government to comment on the substance of an ongoing process.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to extend the Term Funding Scheme to non-bank lenders to improve alternative financing options.

The Term Funding Scheme (TFS) is a monetary policy tool of the independent Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) of the Bank of England. Therefore, it is not appropriate for the Government to comment on its conduct or effectiveness.

The separation of fiscal and monetary policy is a key feature of the UK’s economic framework, and essential for the effective delivery of monetary policy.

We will continue to work with non-bank lenders to support their participation in the new Recovery Loan scheme following the closure of the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS), the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CLBILS), and the Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS).

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to Answer of 15 September to Question 45291, how many (a) high-street bank and (b) building society branches that were in operation in Enfield North for each of the past 10 years.

The Government recognises the continued importance of access to over-the-counter financial services. However, HM Treasury does not make direct assessments of banks’ or building societies’ branch networks.

Decisions on opening and closing branches are a commercial issue for banks and building societies, but firms are expected to engage closely with the Financial Conduct Authority to carefully consider the impact of planned branch closures on their customers’ everyday banking and cash access needs and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

Alternative options for access include the Post Office. The Post Office Banking Framework allows 95% of business and 99% of personal banking customers to deposit cheques, check their balance and withdraw and deposit cash at 11,500 Post Office branches in the UK.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what (a) financial and (b) tax incentives he has put in place to enable the conversion of the 23 per cent of homes in Ynys Môn constituency which are heated by oil to the renewable liquid fuel HVO.

Biofuels such as liquid fuel hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) may play a role in future off-gas-grid decarbonisation. However, further evidence is needed to consider the extent of this. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy will publish a new Biomass Strategy in 2022, which will review the amount of sustainable biomass the UK will have access to, including liquid biofuels, and how this could be best used across the economy to achieve our net zero target.

As part of the Net Zero Strategy, the Government announced the new £450 million Boiler Upgrade Scheme to support the uptake of heat pumps

The Government keeps all taxes under review, and any changes are made in the round at fiscal events.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to announce the outcome of the effect of Air Passenger Duty on regional air routes in the aviation tax reform proposals.

The Government recently consulted on aviation tax reform. As part of the consultation, the Government outlined its initial view that the effective rate of Air Passenger Duty (APD) on domestic flights should be reduced in order to support Union and regional connectivity and that the number of international distance bands should be increased in order to align APD more closely with our environmental objectives.

The consultation sought evidence on the potential impacts of these proposals, including on regional air routes, and closed on 15 June. The Government will update on next steps in due course.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much funding has been provided in grants by the SME Brexit Support Fund to each region of the UK.

As of 6 October 2021, 5,352 businesses have been offered a grant by the SME Brexit Support Fund.

A regional breakdown of the figures shows that businesses in England have been offered £7,289,018, in Scotland £476,539, in Wales £230,159 and in Northern Ireland £434,234.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to reduce VAT on energy bills for families in the UK.

In recognition of the fact that families should not have to bear all the VAT costs they incur to meet their energy needs, the Government already maintains a reduced rate of 5 per cent VAT on the supply of domestic energy, at a cost of £5 billion per year to the public finances.

Going further would impose additional pressure on the public finances and that cost would have to be balanced by increased taxes elsewhere, or by reductions in Government spending.

The Government keeps all taxes under review.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will reconsider the no right to appeal rule for those who are denied Self-Employment Income Support Scheme grants from HMRC.

The Government has provided generous support to the self-employed during the COVID-19 pandemic through the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS). The SEISS has helped nearly 3 million self-employed individuals with claims totalling over £27 billion.

Customers can ask HMRC to review their SEISS claim. However, HMRC have limited discretion in operating the SEISS and this discretion can only be used in exceptional circumstances. Such circumstances could include situations where HMRC have made an error that has affected an individual’s eligibility for, or amount of, a SEISS grant.

There is no legal right of appeal against decisions made in relation to the SEISS, and there is also no legal provision for ‘reasonable excuse’ within the legal framework for the SEISS.

The fifth and final SEISS grant closed on 30th September 2021.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions officials in his Department have had with representatives of online retailers on online sales taxes.

The Government published a Call for Evidence on 21 July 2020, as part of its Fundamental Review of Business Rates, to gather views from stakeholders on all elements of the Business Rates system and alternatives, including an Online Sales Tax.

Officials engaged with a broad range of stakeholders including online retailers as part of that process.

The Government provided a summary of responses to the Call for Evidence in March 2021. The review will conclude later this year.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 22 September regarding Treasury civil servants working remotely (HL2572), what plans they have to investigate the possibility of cost savings by employing non-British staff working from homes overseas.

HMT applies Civil Service central policy in relation to working from other countries.

All HMT staff are contracted to attend offices on a regular basis and there are no current plans to investigate the possibility of employing staff who live overseas.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
13th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to extend the 12.5 per cent rate of VAT on hospitality until 2024 to help rebuild the nightlife sector.

The temporary reduced rate of VAT was introduced on 15 July 2020 to support the cash flow and viability of around 150,000 businesses and protect over 2.4 million jobs in the hospitality and tourism sectors. As announced at Budget 2021, the Government has extended the temporary reduced rate of VAT of 5% for the tourism and hospitality sector. This relief ended on 30 September 2021. On 1 October 2021, a new reduced rate of 12.5% was introduced to help ease affected businesses back to the standard rate. This new rate will end on 31 March 2022.

This relief will cost over £7 billion and, while the Government keeps all taxes under review, there are no plans to extend the 12.5% reduced rate of VAT. Applying this relief for a longer period would come at a very significant further cost, with any reduction in tax paid resulting in a reduction in the money available to support important public services, including the NHS and policing.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many staff on a (a) FTE and (b) headcount basis work for the National Infrastructure Bank (i) as at 1 October 2021 and (ii) for each month of its operation.

The UK Infrastructure Bank (UKIB) formally launched on 17th June 2020. The UKIB will publish details of its headcount in the usual way in their first set of Annual Reports & Accounts, due to be published next year.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing tax incentives to encourage the (a) sorting and (b) biological treatment of waste before landfill for the purpose of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

The government is committed to reducing waste going to landfill. The Resources and Waste Strategy 2018 set out commitments to eliminate all avoidable waste to landfill by 2050 and to reduce the amount of municipal waste landfilled to 10% of total municipal waste by 2035.

Landfill Tax provides an incentive for waste to be diverted away from landfill and has contributed to a reduction in local authority waste sent to landfill in England of 90% since 2000.

The government is also introducing a world leading tax on plastic packaging from April 2022. The tax will encourage the use of recycled plastic instead of new plastic within packaging. It will create greater demand for recycled plastic, and in turn stimulate increased levels of recycling and collection of plastic waste, diverting it away from landfill or incineration.

While the government has no immediate plans to introduce further tax incentives for waste management, the government will review aspects of the Landfill Tax in England and Northern Ireland in due course, as announced in spring 2021. This will ensure the tax continues to support the government’s ambitious environmental objectives.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many financing arrangements have been made by the National Infrastructure Bank (a) since it was set up and (b) in each month of its operation; and what is (i) the total amount of financing advanced (i) since it was set up and (ii) in each month of its operation.

The UK Infrastructure Bank (UKIB) launched in June and is open for business. The UKIB is actively engaging with the private sector and local authorities and is in live conversations about a number of projects. UKIB has taken over management of the UK Guarantee Scheme, consisting of 9 guarantees totalling £1.8 billion of Treasury-backed infrastructure bonds and loans, supporting over £4 billion worth of investment. The Bank also operates the Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund and the Digital Infrastructure Investment Fund – previously managed by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions officials in his Department have held with relevant stakeholders on changing the classification of long-term assets in the maritime sector.

The Treasury maintains regular contact with HMRC about all aspects of capital allowances policy.

HMRC does not classify which assets should be written down at the main or special rate of writing down allowances. Instead, businesses should identify whether an asset they have acquired has a useful economic life (UEL) of more or less than 25 years when new.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions officials in his Department have held with relevant stakeholders on HMRC's enforcement of classification of long- and short-term assets for commercial maritime vessels.

The Treasury maintains regular contact with HMRC about all aspects of capital allowances policy.

HMRC does not classify which assets should be written down at the main or special rate of writing down allowances. Instead, businesses should identify whether an asset they have acquired has a useful economic life (UEL) of more or less than 25 years when new.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions officials in his Department have held with HMRC on the classification of long- and short-term vessels under the Capital Allowance scheme for commercial maritime vessels.

The Treasury maintains regular contact with HMRC about all aspects of capital allowances policy.

HMRC does not classify which assets should be written down at the main or special rate of writing down allowances. Instead, businesses should identify whether an asset they have acquired has a useful economic life (UEL) of more or less than 25 years when new.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether debt relief for Sudan will be counted as Official Development Assistance (ODA) in (a) 2021-22 and (b) future financial years; and how much ODA it will be counted as.

As part of the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative, the UK will provide debt cancellation on Sudan’s bilateral debt owed to the UK.

Sudan owes the UK a total of £861m (as of August 2020).

HM Treasury does not hold any of the debt owed to the UK by Sudan and the debt relief for Sudan will not appear in HM Treasury’s annual report and accounts.

The UK reports all ODA eligible spend in line with international rules set by the OECD.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether debt relief for Sudan has been included in his Department's accounts for (a) 2021-22, (b) 2022-23 and (c) 2023-24.

As part of the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative, the UK will provide debt cancellation on Sudan’s bilateral debt owed to the UK.

Sudan owes the UK a total of £861m (as of August 2020).

HM Treasury does not hold any of the debt owed to the UK by Sudan and the debt relief for Sudan will not appear in HM Treasury’s annual report and accounts.

The UK reports all ODA eligible spend in line with international rules set by the OECD.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether debt relief for Sudan will be counted as contributing to the target of 0.5 per cent of Gross National Income being spent on Official Development Assistance.

As part of the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative, the UK will provide debt cancellation on Sudan’s bilateral debt owed to the UK.

Sudan owes the UK a total of £861m (as of August 2020).

HM Treasury does not hold any of the debt owed to the UK by Sudan and the debt relief for Sudan will not appear in HM Treasury’s annual report and accounts.

The UK reports all ODA eligible spend in line with international rules set by the OECD.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the contribution of the Scotch Whisky industry to (a) the Scottish and (b) UK economies in the last three years.

The Government recognises the important contribution the spirits sector makes to the economy. This is why we announced a freeze on spirit duties at March Budget 2021, making the price of a typical bottle of Scotch whisky 30p lower than it would have been had prices risen with inflation. When added to the cuts and freezes made in the last five years, this means that the price of a typical bottle of Scotch Whisky in 2021 will be £2.15 lower than it otherwise would have been since ending the spirits escalator in 2014.

To further support Scotch, the Chancellor has announced £1 million of additional funding for the promotion of Scottish food and drink products overseas, and £10 million of research and development funding to help the distilling sector transition to net zero emissions.

More broadly, the Government keeps all taxes under review. We are continuing to monitor emerging public health data and will provide further updates on our alcohol duty review in due course.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the impact on the purchasing of alcohol through consumers being charged different amounts of tax per unit of alcohol consumed in line with the Chief Medical Office's guidelines; and what assessment his Department has made of that policy on sales of spirits as the highest taxed category of alcohol.

The Government recognises the important contribution the spirits sector makes to the economy. This is why we announced a freeze on spirit duties at March Budget 2021, making the price of a typical bottle of Scotch whisky 30p lower than it would have been had prices risen with inflation. When added to the cuts and freezes made in the last five years, this means that the price of a typical bottle of Scotch Whisky in 2021 will be £2.15 lower than it otherwise would have been since ending the spirits escalator in 2014.

To further support Scotch, the Chancellor has announced £1 million of additional funding for the promotion of Scottish food and drink products overseas, and £10 million of research and development funding to help the distilling sector transition to net zero emissions.

More broadly, the Government keeps all taxes under review. We are continuing to monitor emerging public health data and will provide further updates on our alcohol duty review in due course.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the contribution of Scotch Whisky distilleries as job creators in rural Scottish communities in each of the last three years.

The Government recognises the important contribution the spirits sector makes to the economy. This is why we announced a freeze on spirit duties at March Budget 2021, making the price of a typical bottle of Scotch whisky 30p lower than it would have been had prices risen with inflation. When added to the cuts and freezes made in the last five years, this means that the price of a typical bottle of Scotch Whisky in 2021 will be £2.15 lower than it otherwise would have been since ending the spirits escalator in 2014.

To further support Scotch, the Chancellor has announced £1 million of additional funding for the promotion of Scottish food and drink products overseas, and £10 million of research and development funding to help the distilling sector transition to net zero emissions.

More broadly, the Government keeps all taxes under review. We are continuing to monitor emerging public health data and will provide further updates on our alcohol duty review in due course.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what support he is making available for small businesses paying high bank card processing fees to prevent them reverting to cash-only transactions.

The Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) was established in 2015, with statutory objectives to promote competition, innovation, and to ensure that payment systems are operated in a way that considers the interests of all the businesses and consumers that use them.

The PSR is currently carrying out a market review into card acquiring services to examine how effectively competition is working in the provision of these services. This includes an assessment of the fees that small and medium-sized businesses pay, including card scheme and interchange fees, and the quality of service they receive. The Government looks forward to the final PSR report and recommendations later this year.

Furthermore, the Government has legislated to ensure the interchange fees businesses pay remain capped for all UK domestic card transactions where both the card issuer and acquirer are located in the UK. This was facilitated through the Interchange Fee (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 made under the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018. UK interchange fee caps are therefore at the same levels as before the end of the Transition Period.

It remains the individual retailer’s choice as to whether to accept or decline any form of payment, including cash or card.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that banks are accountable for overseeing the accounts of disabled and vulnerable people for irregularities and fraudulent activity.

The Government is working with industry to close down the vulnerabilities that fraudsters exploit and ensure members of the public have the information they need to spot a scam and stand up to fraudsters. This is a shared endeavour between Government, law enforcement and the private sector. It is vital we ensure that disabled and vulnerable customers are included in this effort, but there are no additional requirements on a bank to check for irregularities or fraudulent activity if a customer is disabled or vulnerable.

UK banks’ and building societies’ treatment of their customers is governed by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) in its Principles for Businesses. This includes a general requirement for firms to provide a prompt, efficient and fair service to all of their customers.

The FCA’s Guidance for firms on the Fair Treatment of Vulnerable Customers also requires that firms should understand what harms their customers are likely to be vulnerable to and ensure that customers in vulnerable circumstances receive the same fair treatment and outcomes as other customers.

If a firm has doubts about a consumer’s ability to understand a product or service, suspects they do not have capacity to make decisions or that they are acting as a result of fraud or coercion, the firm should assess whether it should allow the consumer to proceed. It may be appropriate for firms to contact, or act on the instructions of, a family member, friend or other third party.

In addition, like all service providers, banks and building societies are bound under the Equality Act 2010 to make reasonable adjustments, where necessary, in the way they deliver their services. This may include allowing for a carer or deputy to act for the disabled person.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has plans to extend the Term Funding Scheme to non-bank lenders to improve alternative financing options.

The Term Funding Scheme (TFS) is a monetary policy tool of the independent Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) of the Bank of England. Therefore, it is not appropriate for the Government to comment on its conduct or effectiveness.

The separation of fiscal and monetary policy is a key feature of the UK’s economic framework, and essential for the effective delivery of monetary policy.

We will continue to work with non-bank lenders to support their participation in the new Recovery Loan scheme following the closure of the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS), the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CLBILS), and the Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS).

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to support proposals to establish a global centre for secure intelligent regulatory technologies in Northern Ireland.

The government is committed to maintaining the UK’s position a world-leading destination for fintech.

In line with this ambition, the Government is taking forward key recommendations of the independent Kalifa Review of UK Fintech as part of ensuring the UK remains at the global cutting edge of technology and innovation in financial services.

Government funding for future years will be confirmed as part of the Spending Review which will be announced on 27th October.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions he has had with relevant stakeholders on tackling the discrepancy between the 5 per cent VAT incurred for home charging for electric vehicles and 20 per cent VAT for on-street electric vehicle charging.

Electricity supplied at electric vehicle charging points in public places is subject to the standard rate of VAT (twenty per cent). In order to keep costs down for families, the supply of electricity for domestic use, including charging electric vehicles at home, attracts the reduced rate of VAT (five per cent).

Expanding the relief would come at a cost. VAT makes a significant contribution towards the public finances, raising around £130 billion in 2019/20, and helps fund the Government's priorities including the NHS, schools, and defence. Any loss in tax revenue would have to be balanced by a reduction in public spending, increased borrowing or increased taxation elsewhere.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to take steps to tackle the discrepancy between the 5 per cent VAT incurred for home charging for electric vehicles and 20 per cent VAT for on-street electric vehicle charging.

Electricity supplied at electric vehicle charging points in public places is subject to the standard rate of VAT (twenty per cent). In order to keep costs down for families, the supply of electricity for domestic use, including charging electric vehicles at home, attracts the reduced rate of VAT (five per cent).

Expanding the relief would come at a cost. VAT makes a significant contribution towards the public finances, raising around £130 billion in 2019/20, and helps fund the Government's priorities including the NHS, schools, and defence. Any loss in tax revenue would have to be balanced by a reduction in public spending, increased borrowing or increased taxation elsewhere.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent representations he has received on the discrepancy between the 5 per cent VAT incurred for home charging for electric vehicles and 20 per cent VAT for on-street electric vehicle charging.

Electricity supplied at electric vehicle charging points in public places is subject to the standard rate of VAT (twenty per cent). In order to keep costs down for families, the supply of electricity for domestic use, including charging electric vehicles at home, attracts the reduced rate of VAT (five per cent).

Expanding the relief would come at a cost. VAT makes a significant contribution towards the public finances, raising around £130 billion in 2019/20, and helps fund the Government's priorities including the NHS, schools, and defence. Any loss in tax revenue would have to be balanced by a reduction in public spending, increased borrowing or increased taxation elsewhere.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on employment in the hospitality sector when VAT is returned to 20 per cent for this sector.

The temporary reduced rate of VAT was introduced on 15 July 2020 to support the cash flow and viability of around 150,000 businesses and protect over 2.4 million jobs in the hospitality and tourism sectors. As announced at Budget 2021, the Government has extended the temporary reduced rate of VAT of 5% for the tourism and hospitality sector. This relief ended on 30 September. On 1 October 2021, a new reduced rate of 12.5% was introduced to help ease affected businesses back to the standard rate. This new rate will end on 31 March 2022.

This relief will cost over £7 billion and, while all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to extend the 12.5% reduced rate of VAT. The Government has been clear that this relief is a temporary measure designed to support the cash flow and viability of sectors that have been severely affected by COVID-19. It is appropriate that as restrictions are lifted and demand for goods and services in these sectors increases, the temporary tax reliefs are first reduced and then removed in order to rebuild and strengthen the public finances.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of a higher rate of VAT on debt repayment by businesses in the hospitality and retail sectors.

The temporary reduced rate of VAT was introduced on 15 July 2020 to support the cash flow and viability of around 150,000 businesses and protect over 2.4 million jobs in the hospitality and tourism sectors. As announced at Budget 2021, the Government has extended the temporary reduced rate of VAT of 5% for the tourism and hospitality sector. This relief ended on 30 September. On 1 October 2021, a new reduced rate of 12.5% was introduced to help ease affected businesses back to the standard rate. This new rate will end on 31 March 2022.

This relief will cost over £7 billion and, while all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to extend the 12.5% reduced rate of VAT. The Government has been clear that this relief is a temporary measure designed to support the cash flow and viability of sectors that have been severely affected by COVID-19. It is appropriate that as restrictions are lifted and demand for goods and services in these sectors increases, the temporary tax reliefs are first reduced and then removed in order to rebuild and strengthen the public finances.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend the 12.5 per cent VAT rate for the hospitality sector beyond 31 March 2022.

The temporary reduced rate of VAT was introduced on 15 July 2020 to support the cash flow and viability of around 150,000 businesses and protect over 2.4 million jobs in the hospitality and tourism sectors. As announced at Budget 2021, the Government has extended the temporary reduced rate of VAT of 5% for the tourism and hospitality sector. This relief ended on 30 September. On 1 October 2021, a new reduced rate of 12.5% was introduced to help ease affected businesses back to the standard rate. This new rate will end on 31 March 2022.

This relief will cost over £7 billion and, while all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to extend the 12.5% reduced rate of VAT. The Government has been clear that this relief is a temporary measure designed to support the cash flow and viability of sectors that have been severely affected by COVID-19. It is appropriate that as restrictions are lifted and demand for goods and services in these sectors increases, the temporary tax reliefs are first reduced and then removed in order to rebuild and strengthen the public finances.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)