Home Office

The first duty of the government is to keep citizens safe and the country secure. The Home Office has been at the front line of this endeavour since 1782. As such, the Home Office plays a fundamental role in the security and economic prosperity of the United Kingdom.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

Priti Patel
Home Secretary

 Portrait

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Labour
Yvette Cooper (LAB - Normanton, Pontefract and Castleford)
Shadow Secretary of State for the Home Department
Lord Rosser (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Home Affairs)
Lord Coaker (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Home Affairs)
Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Home Affairs)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Sarah Jones (LAB - Croydon Central)
Shadow Minister (Home Office)
Holly Lynch (LAB - Halifax)
Shadow Minister (Home Office)
Jack Dromey Jess Phillips (LAB - Birmingham, Yardley)
Shadow Minister (Home Office)
Naz Shah (LAB - Bradford West)
Shadow Minister (Home Office)
Ministers of State
Lord Greenhalgh (CON - Life peer)
Minister of State (Home Office)
Damian Hinds (CON - East Hampshire)
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
Baroness Williams of Trafford (CON - Life peer)
Minister of State (Home Office)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
Kevin Foster (CON - Torbay)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
Rachel Maclean (CON - Redditch)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 25th January 2022
Home Office
Orders and regulations - Grand Committee
Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (Amendment) Order 2022
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Scheduled Event
Tuesday 25th January 2022
Home Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill - third reading
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Scheduled Event
Wednesday 26th January 2022
09:45
Home Affairs Committee - Oral evidence - Select & Joint Committees
26 Jan 2022, 9:45 a.m.
Spiking
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Scheduled Event
Thursday 27th January 2022
Home Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Nationality and Borders Bill – committee stage (day 1)
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Scheduled Event
Tuesday 1st February 2022
Home Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Nationality and Borders Bill - committee stage (day 2)
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Scheduled Event
Thursday 3rd February 2022
Home Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Nationality and Borders Bill - committee stage (day 3)
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Scheduled Event
Tuesday 8th February 2022
Home Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Nationality and Borders Bill – committee stage (day 4)
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Scheduled Event
Thursday 10th February 2022
Home Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Nationality and Borders Bill – committee stage (day 5)
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Select Committee Docs
Thursday 20th January 2022
00:00
19 January 2022
Oral Evidence
Select Committee Inquiry
Thursday 9th December 2021
Spiking

As part of the Committee’s overarching work into violence against women and girls, the Committee wishes to explore the …

Written Answers
Friday 21st January 2022
Roads Policing Review
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to implement the recommendations of …
Secondary Legislation
Friday 19th November 2021
Terrorism Act 2000 (Proscribed Organisations) (Amendment) (No. 3) Order 2021
Part 2 of the Terrorism Act 2000 (c. 11) makes provision for the proscription of organisations (including setting out offences …
Bills
Tuesday 6th July 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill 2021-22
Make provision about nationality, asylum and immigration; to make provision about victims of slavery or human trafficking; to provide a …
Dept. Publications
Friday 21st January 2022
13:04
Treaty
Wednesday 20th January 2021

Home Office Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Jan. 17
Oral Questions
Nov. 22
Urgent Questions
Jan. 12
Westminster Hall
Dec. 16
Adjournment Debate
View All Home Office Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Home Office does not have Bills currently before Parliament


Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament

Introduced: 3rd March 2020

To make provision in relation to domestic abuse; to make provision for and in connection with the establishment of a Domestic Abuse Commissioner; to prohibit cross-examination in person in family proceedings in certain circumstances; to make provision about certain violent or sexual offences, and offences involving other abusive behaviour, committed outside the United Kingdom; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 19th March 2020

A Bill to make provision about the application of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 where a building contains two or more sets of domestic premises; and to confer power to amend that order in future for the purposes of changing the premises to which it applies.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 24th September 2020

A Bill to make provision for, and in connection with, the authorisation of criminal conduct in the course of, or otherwise in connection with, the conduct of covert human intelligence sources.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 1st March 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 5th March 2020

A Bill to make provision to end rights to free movement of persons under retained EU law and to repeal other retained EU law relating to immigration; to confer power to modify retained direct EU legislation relating to social security co-ordination; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 11th November 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 7th January 2020

A bill to create a power of arrest, without warrant, for the purpose of extraditing people for serious offences

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 22nd October 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 8th January 2020

To provide for the payment out of money provided by Parliament of expenditure incurred by the Secretary of State or a government department under, or in connection with, the Windrush Compensation Scheme.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 8th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Home Office - Secondary Legislation

Part 2 of the Terrorism Act 2000 (c. 11) makes provision for the proscription of organisations (including setting out offences in relation to proscribed organisations in sections 11 to 13). An organisation is proscribed if it is listed in Schedule 2 to the Act or, in most cases, it operates under the same name as an organisation so listed (section 3(1)).
This Order amends the Births and Deaths Registration Act 1926 (c. 48) (the “1926 Act”) and the Births and Deaths Registration Act 1953 (c. 20) (the “1953 Act”) to enable the use of electronic communications and storage for certain documents used in connection with the registration of births and deaths.
View All Home Office Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
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3,344 Signatures
(2,798 in the last 7 days)
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12,276 Signatures
(2,108 in the last 7 days)
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320,321 Signatures
(974 in the last 7 days)
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1,018 Signatures
(638 in the last 7 days)
Petitions with most signatures
Petition Open
320,321 Signatures
(974 in the last 7 days)
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16,116 Signatures
(74 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
12,276 Signatures
(2,108 in the last 7 days)
Petition Debates Contributed
256,645
Petition Closed
16 Sep 2021
closed 4 months, 1 week ago

The right to peaceful assembly and protest are fundamental principles of any democracy and the proposed part of this bill that gives the police new powers to tackle disruptive peaceful protests should be removed from The Policing, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill.

The Government is refusing to release official research on the characteristics of grooming gangs, claiming it is not in the “public interest”.

We, the British public, demand the release of the official research on grooming gangs undertaken by the Government in full.

Illegal immigrants are entering the UK in many different ways, including small boats from France which are not stopped by either French or British forces.

View All Home Office Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Home Affairs Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


11 Members of the Home Affairs Committee
Diana Johnson Portrait
Diana Johnson (Labour - Kingston upon Hull North)
Home Affairs Committee Chair since 15th December 2021
Tim Loughton Portrait
Tim Loughton (Conservative - East Worthing and Shoreham)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Adam Holloway Portrait
Adam Holloway (Conservative - Gravesham)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Simon Fell Portrait
Simon Fell (Conservative - Barrow and Furness)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Laura Farris Portrait
Laura Farris (Conservative - Newbury)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Diana Johnson Portrait
Diana Johnson (Labour - Kingston upon Hull North)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 11th May 2020
Andrew Gwynne Portrait
Andrew Gwynne (Labour - Denton and Reddish)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 11th May 2020
Diane Abbott Portrait
Diane Abbott (Labour - Hackney North and Stoke Newington)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 11th May 2020
Gary Sambrook Portrait
Gary Sambrook (Conservative - Birmingham, Northfield)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd November 2021
James Daly Portrait
James Daly (Conservative - Bury North)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd November 2021
Home Affairs Committee: Upcoming Events
Home Affairs Committee - Oral evidence
Spiking
26 Jan 2022, 9:45 a.m.
At 10.30am: Oral evidence
Joy Allen - Durham Police and Crime Commissioner, Joint Lead on Addictions and Substance Misuse, The Association of Police and Crime Commissioners
Dean Ames - Forensic Drugs Operations Manager at Metropolitan Police Service
Deputy Chief Constable Jason Harwin - Lead for drugs at National Police Chiefs' Council

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50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many responses to the public consultation on extending the use of Napier Barracks as asylum accommodation for a further further years will be taken into account, given that the extension on its use came into force on 21 September 2021.

The Home Office has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to publish data on the number of people deprived of citizenship status under section 40(2) of the British Nationality Act 1981 in 2019 and 2020.

Data concerning the number of people deprived of their British citizenship is published by the Government in its Transparency Report on Disruptive Powers.

The Government is committed to publishing the annual Transparency Report on Disruptive Powers. The 2020 report will be published in due course.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason a public consultation on extending the use of Napier Barracks as asylum accommodation for a further five years was not held prior to the decision to proceed with the extension of its use.

The Home Office has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, in the context of the drone attack on Abu Dhabi airport, if she will proscribe Ansar Allah, the Houthi Movement, as a terrorist organisation under the Terrorism Act 2000.

The Government does not routinely comment on intelligence matters, including whether an organisation is or is not under consideration for proscription. The Government keeps the list of proscribed organisations under review.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police forces in England and Wales currently operate recruitment procedures for police constables where it is possible for no face-to-face contact with the applicant to take place prior to the offer of a position.

The Home Office has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of community-based alternatives to detention for female asylum seekers in response to the unpublished findings of the Action Access pilot which concluded in March 2021.

The Home Office has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
13th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will take steps to add further exemptions to her Department's absence policy to include absence related to reactions and side effects caused by covid-19 booster vaccination.

There is an existing exemption in our attendance management policy covering the acute phase of Covid infection.

For absences relating to reactions to, or side effects from, Covid vaccination (which are likely to be of short duration), managers are encouraged to take a sympathetic approach under the normal provisions of our attendance management policy. We have no plans to introduce an exemption covering reactions to Covid vaccinations.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to implement the recommendations of HMICFRS's July 2020 report, Roads Policing: Not optional - An inspection of roads policing in England and Wales.

Two of the recommendations of the HMICFRS Roads Policing Report were addressed directly to the Home Office.

The Home Office considers that using the powers under section 7(4) of the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011 to require locally elected PCCs to include specific policing issues in their Police and Crime plans needs to be balanced with a proper regard for local autonomy and the will of local voters. PCC’s are directly elected and must consult their communities in developing a Police and Crime Plan that reflects local circumstances.

The Strategic Policing Requirement (SPR) will set clear direction to policing on the contribution they need to make to respond to priority national threats including terrorism, serious and organised crime and child sexual abuse. Following the SPR review that we concluded last year, we are considering the national threats and policing capabilities, such as roads policing, that are included in the SPR. The revised SPR will be published in due course.

The remainder of the recommendations were addressed to the Department for Transport, Chief Constables and the College of Policing. The Home Office is committed to working closely with these bodies to consider what further improvements can be made to the effectiveness of roads enforcement in England and Wales and reduce road traffic casualties.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has carried out of the ability of Interpol to carry out its functions with independence, impartiality and respect for democratic values following the election of Ahmed Nasser Al-Raisi as President.

The Government strongly supports INTERPOL’s efforts to ensure systems are in place that protect individuals’ human rights in line with Article 3 of INTERPOL's Constitution which strictly forbids any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character.

The Home Office continues to work with INTERPOL and the National Crime Agency (NCA), which acts as the UK’s National Central Bureau (NCB) for INTERPOL, to monitor the effectiveness of existing safeguards. We encourage INTERPOL to uphold international human rights obligations and we won’t hesitate to recommend further reforms to INTERPOL as necessary.

During the G7 Interior and Security Ministers’ meeting in London on 7-9 September we also secured commitments from international partners to strengthen our collective efforts to deter the misuse of INTERPOL systems and support organisational reform and governance at INTERPOL.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the vulnerability of Interpol to abuse from member states following the election of Ahmed Nasser Al-Raisi as President.

The Government strongly supports INTERPOL’s efforts to ensure systems are in place that protect individuals’ human rights in line with Article 3 of INTERPOL's Constitution which strictly forbids any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character.

The Home Office continues to work with INTERPOL and the National Crime Agency (NCA), which acts as the UK’s National Central Bureau (NCB) for INTERPOL, to monitor the effectiveness of existing safeguards. We encourage INTERPOL to uphold international human rights obligations and we won’t hesitate to recommend further reforms to INTERPOL as necessary.

During the G7 Interior and Security Ministers’ meeting in London on 7-9 September we also secured commitments from international partners to strengthen our collective efforts to deter the misuse of INTERPOL systems and support organisational reform and governance at INTERPOL.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan nationals relocated to the UK via (a) Operation Pitting and (b) the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy are waiting for Indefinite Leave to Remain to be granted.

The Home Office has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department plans to proceed with the procurement of cutters to police UK borders; and whether that responsibility will be moved to the Ministry of Defence.

The Government is determined to prevent further loss of life in the Channel and break the business model of dangerous criminal people smugglers.

The UK armed forces already work closely with Border Force in these operations, given their expertise and experience in maritime operations.

This is a complex global issue requiring a response across the whole of government, and it is right that we pursue all options to prevent illegal crossings and protect life at sea.

It is right that we pursue all options to prevent illegal crossings and protect life at sea.

The Government’s New Plan for Immigration will help deter illegal migration and break the business model of the criminal gangs.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment his Department made of animal welfare within the operation of large-scale dog farming factories in the UK; and what steps his Department is taking to stop the testing of animals for scientific research.

The breeding and selling of dogs (other than for scientific purposes) is regulated in England under the Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 and the 2006 Animal Welfare Act. Since 2019 anyone in the business of breeding and selling dogs and/or who breeds three or more litters in a twelve-month period needs to have a valid licence from their local authority. Local authorities provide management and enforcement of this licensing regime and of the Animal Welfare Act. Any breeder failing to meet these standards may have additional licensing restrictions applied, have their licence revoked, or in extreme cases be prosecuted and potentially subject to the increased five -year custodial penalty the Animal Welfare (Sentencing) Act brought into force on the 29 June 2021.

The breeding of dogs to be used for scientific purposes is separately regulated under The Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 (ASPA). The Government has published a code of practice for the care and accommodation of animals (including dogs) used for scientific purposes. The appropriate regulators operationalise and enforce ASPA through licensing and compliance assurance activities. A range of remedies are used if licence holders are found to be non-compliant, including suspension or revocation of licences.

This government believes, in line with the current scientific position, that there is a need to continue to use animals in some areas of research where there are no non- animal alternatives, to advance scientific discovery and protect human and animal health and the environment. There is a robust regulatory regime to protect these animals and we continue to invest in the development and uptake of non-animal alternatives. Therefore, this government have no current plans to hold a review into the use of animals in science

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the amount of money lost to fraud conducted (a) through phone calls, (b) by text message and (c) online in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020 and (iv) 2021.

Estimates for total monetary fraud losses to specific fraud channels is not held centrally by the Home Office. According to the Crime Survey for England and Wales, from year ending March 2017 to year ending March 2020, median losses for all fraud, regardless of the type or channel, where a victim has experienced a monetary loss are as follows:

YE Mar 17

YE Mar 18

YE Mar 19

YE Mar 20

£123

£180

£167

£150

Information on the number of police staff dedicated specifically to working on cases of scams conducted online and through telephones is not held centrally by the Home Office.

More broadly, the Home Office collects and publishes data on the size of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Information on the number of police officers, police staff and Police Community Support Officers by function is published annually in tables F1, F2 and F3 accompanying the police workforce statistics as at 31 March. These include the number of police staff working under function 7c – Investigations (Economic Crime).

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of specialist police officers assigned to scams conducted (a) through phone calls, (b) by text message and (c) online in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020 and (iv) 2021.

Estimates for total monetary fraud losses to specific fraud channels is not held centrally by the Home Office. According to the Crime Survey for England and Wales, from year ending March 2017 to year ending March 2020, median losses for all fraud, regardless of the type or channel, where a victim has experienced a monetary loss are as follows:

YE Mar 17

YE Mar 18

YE Mar 19

YE Mar 20

£123

£180

£167

£150

Information on the number of police staff dedicated specifically to working on cases of scams conducted online and through telephones is not held centrally by the Home Office.

More broadly, the Home Office collects and publishes data on the size of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Information on the number of police officers, police staff and Police Community Support Officers by function is published annually in tables F1, F2 and F3 accompanying the police workforce statistics as at 31 March. These include the number of police staff working under function 7c – Investigations (Economic Crime).

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of restricting the sale of nitrous oxide capsules to prevent their illegal use.

The Government takes the supply of substances for their psychoactive effect seriously. There are legitimate uses for nitrous oxide, such as in medicine, dentistry and as a propellant for whipped cream canisters, but those who supply nitrous oxide who know, or who are reckless as to whether, it will be used for its psychoactive effect may be subject to a maximum sentence of seven years’ imprisonment, an unlimited fine, or both under the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016.

On 3 September, the Government asked the independent statutory advisory body, the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs, to provide an updated assessment of the harms of nitrous oxide, including whether it should be controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. The ACMD is independent of Government and provides a broad range of recommendations, including advice on legislative changes. The Government will consider the ACMD’s advice carefully before deciding how to proceed.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been issued penalties or received sanctions for breaching Coronavirus restrictions since April 2020.

Data on the number of Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) issued under the COVID-19 regulations by police forces in England and Wales is collected by policing and published by the National Police Chiefs' Council (NPCC) on a monthly basis and can be found on the NPCC website.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to Part One of the National Disability Strategy, published July 2021, what progress her Department has made towards a review into the protections and support available to adults abused in their own homes by people providing their care.

The Home Office is working jointly with Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) to lead and deliver the review. The government is committed to ensuring people receive quality care with positive outcomes, which includes preventing and addressing any instances of abuse or exploitation by the people providing that care, in this case in their homes, a place where adults should feel safe.

The government is analysing the existing protections for adults abused in their own homes by people providing their care, and the support available to victims of such abuse. The review team are engaging with a range of stakeholders, collecting inputs from across-Government and particularly from those groups representing deaf and disabled people and carers to understand their lived experiences.

The review will be completed later this year and Parliament will be updated as it progresses.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to help ensure that local authorities have adequate resources to effectively respond to local anti-social behaviour issues.

The Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 provides a range of flexible tools and powers to local agencies to tackle anti-social behaviour. Local areas decide how best to deploy these powers depending on the specific circumstances of each individual case.

The provisional Local Government Finance Settlement for 2022-23 makes available an additional £3.5 billion to councils, including funding for adult social care reform. This is an increase of over 4% in real terms, which will ensure councils across the country have the resources they need to deliver key services. In total, we expect Core Spending Power to rise to £53.9 billion in 2022-23, against £50.4 billion in 2021-22.

The Government is also providing around £1.6 billion additional grant in 2022-23. This includes additional funding for Supporting Families and Cyber Resilience, which will be distributed outside of this Settlement. We are allocating most of that funding through the provisional Settlement, including through a one-off 2022/23 Services Grant to councils to spend on vital frontline services, worth £822 million.

This funding will be given to councils to spend as they see fit, recognising that councils are placed to deal with local issues. The Government aims to publish a final settlement confirming allocations to individual local authorities in February 2022.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to publish their assessment of section 60 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994.

The Government supports the police to use section 60 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 to tackle serious violence and keep the streets safe. A decision on publication of materials supporting the Government’s assessment of police use of section 60 will be taken in due course.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghans evacuated under Operation Pitting are waiting to be granted indefinite leave to remain.

Between 15 and 29 August, the UK evacuated over 15,000 people from Afghanistan, with people continuing to be evacuated from third countries.

In view of the urgency of the situation the majority of those who entered the UK during the evacuation phase were initially granted limited leave to enter with access to public funds and employment. This status is not a bar to them being permanently housed or to starting their life in the UK, including taking employment.

The Home Office has now started the process to support them in applying for and being granted Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR). Our aim is to conclude this process before individuals’ leave to remain expires. All those evacuated will be provided with ILR.

Communications have been issued advising individuals of next steps to progress permanent residence in the UK. They also provide links to guidance and information on how prospective employers and landlords can contact the Home Office to confirm individuals’ right to take employment and rented accommodation.

The data on those waiting to be granted ILR is not currently available but once published we will direct to the publication.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, in cases involving the extradition of a UK citizen to the United States where there is an outstanding judgment in the UK High Court, the Home Secretary is entitled to await such judgment before making a decision on extradition.

Extradition requests between the UK and the US are governed by Part 2 of the Extradition Act 2003. This sets out the factors that the Home Secretary must consider before making a decision on an extradition request.

Under the Act, the Home Secretary may seek an extension from the court to the time permitted to consider a request.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following reports that the Home Secretary will seek to change how non-crime hate incidents are recorded, what plans they have to compensate people who have been recorded as having committed such incidents; and how any such compensation would be calculated.

The Government recognises the concern surrounding the recording of non-crime hate incidents (NCHIs). We have also noted the recent Court of Appeal judgment in the Harry Miller v College of Policing case that was handed down on 20 December 2021. The Court found that the recording of non-crime hate incidents is lawful provided that there are robust safeguards in place so that the interference with freedom of expression is proportionate.

Accordingly, we are bringing forward amendments to the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill to ensure that the recording of NCHIs is governed by a Code of Practice that is subject to Parliamentary approval. The content of the Code will be drafted in due course, and will make the processes surrounding the recording and retention of NCHI data more transparent and subject to stronger safeguards.

There are no plans to introduce a compensation scheme.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to grant leave to remain to all confirmed victims of trafficking.

The Government remains committed to ensuring that the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) provides appropriate support for victims of modern slavery to help them to recover from their exploitation. Discretionary leave is currently considered, via our non-statutory guidance ‘Discretionary leave for victims of modern slavery’ on an automatic basis, for all confirmed victims (those with a positive Conclusive Grounds decision) without immigration status. Part 5 of the Nationality and Borders Bill, currently before Parliament, focuses on modern slavery and will help to ensure that all victims are identified and supported as quickly as possible. Clause 64 sets out, for the first time in primary legislation, the circumstances in which a confirmed victim of modern slavery will be entitled to a grant of leave where it is necessary for the purpose of:

  • assisting the person in their recovery from physical or psychological harm arising from the relevant exploitation;
  • enabling the person to seek compensation in respect of the relevant exploitation; or
  • enabling the person to co-operate with a public authority in connection with an investigation or criminal proceedings in respect of the relevant exploitation.
The inclusion of this clause in the Bill will provide clarity for both decision-makers and victims around the circumstances in which confirmed victims qualify for temporary leave to remain.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress her Department has made in assessing outstanding Turkish Businessperson visas, for applications made in 2020.

We received a significant increase in Turkish ECAA overseas applications before the route closed. Caseworking teams in UKVI continue to process ECAA applications and are focused on resolving them as quickly as possible.

At times, we may identify further information which is required in individual applications and need to contact applicants for this.

Some applications also require additional checks to be undertaken by the Home Office which may cause delays pending these essential checks being undertaken.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when people with outstanding Turkish Businessperson visa applications will receive a decision on their application.

We received a significant increase in Turkish ECAA overseas applications before the route closed. Caseworking teams in UKVI continue to process ECAA applications and are focused on resolving them as quickly as possible.

At times, we may identify further information which is required in individual applications and need to contact applicants for this.

Some applications also require additional checks to be undertaken by the Home Office which may cause delays pending these essential checks being undertaken.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when will she publish details of her proposal to use the Royal Navy to deter asylum seekers from crossing the English Channel illegally.

The Government is determined to prevent further loss of life in the Channel and break the business model of dangerous criminal people smugglers.

The UK armed forces already work closely with Border Force in these operations, given their expertise and experience in maritime operations.

This is a complex global issue requiring a response across the whole of government, and it is right that we pursue all options to prevent illegal crossings and protect life at sea.

The Government’s New Plan for Immigration will help deter illegal migration and break the business model of the criminal gangs.

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution from the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Home Affairs on 5 January 2022, Official Report, volume 706, column 80WH, when she will publish the medium term review on the impact of the minimum income requirement on armed forces personnel and their families.

The family Immigration Rules include a minimum income requirement to ensure financial independence and encourage integration.

The minimum income requirement was implemented in July 2012, following advice from the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), and has not changed since its introduction.

The Home Secretary has committed to a medium term review of the impact of the minimum income requirement on armed forces families which is likely to form part of a wider review of the policy, and is considering commissioning the Migration Advisory Committee to undertake this review. Timescales are to be confirmed.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) how many e-scooters have been seized for illegal use, and (2) how many fines have been imposed, in each of the last three months in England.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of motoring offences in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, which can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales. However, the Home Office does not hold information on the numbers and types of vehicle seized for illegal use, or figures for the number of fines imposed for the illegal use of e-scooters.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what responsibility the devolved administrations have for supervising the allocation of temporary homes for refugees within their respective nation.

The Home Office works closely with the devolved administrations, as well as strategic migration partnerships and local authorities, on the allocation of both short and long term accommodation for refuges resettled to the UK.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will publish their plans to implement the Afghan citizens resettlement scheme.

As set out in my Oral Statement to the House on 6th January, the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) has now been launched: https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/oral-statement-on-the-afghan-citizens-resettlement-scheme. The ACRS will provide up to 20,000 women, children and others at risk with a safe and legal route to resettle in the UK.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to introduce standard tests for safeguarding for organisations in order to provide evidence of nationally recognised levels of attainment.

Safeguarding relates to a wide range of activity in a variety of settings, and covers a number of potentially vulnerable groups. It is right that organisational safeguarding policies are able to reflect specific sector needs, within clear regulatory frameworks.

A number of government departments lead on setting safeguarding standards, guidance and training across the sectors for which they have policy responsibility. For example, the Home Office oversees safeguarding from a policing perspective, the Department for Education leads on safeguarding within education settings, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport are responsible for safeguarding within civil society organisations, and the Department of Health and Social Care assure that the NHS is meeting its safeguarding responsibilities.

Government departments work closely together to share learning and feedback on safeguarding policy and standards across different settings. For example, there is close collaboration between the Home Office, DHSC and DfE on the implementation of local multi-agency safeguarding arrangements for children, ensuring robust join-up across local authorities, health and policing.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Court of Appeal ruling that the College of Policing guidance on non-crime hate incidents was unlawful, what plans they have to suspend any guidance issued by the College of Policing.

The Government recognises the concern surrounding the recording of non-crime hate incidents (NCHIs). We have also noted the recent Court of Appeal judgment in the Harry Miller v College of Policing case that was handed down on 20 December 2021. The Court found that the recording of NCHIs is lawful provided that there are robust safeguards in place so that the interference with freedom of expression is proportionate.

Accordingly, we have tabled amendments to the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill to ensure that the recording of NCHIs is governed by a Code of Practice that is subject to Parliamentary approval. The content of the Code will be drafted in due course, and will make the processes surrounding the recording and retention of NCHI data more transparent and subject to stronger safeguards.

The College of Policing will also reflect on the Court of Appeal’s judgment carefully and make any changes that are necessary to its existing guidance which will remain in force in the interim period before the new Code enters into effect.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made, if any, of the 110,000 people who have been recorded as having committed non-crime hate incidents; and what plans they have, if any, to assist such individuals in bringing legal action against the College of Policing.

The Government recognises the concern surrounding the recording of non-crime hate incidents (NCHIs). We have also noted the recent Court of Appeal judgment in the Harry Miller v College of Policing case that was handed down on 20 December 2021. The Court found that the recording of NCHIs is lawful provided that there are robust safeguards in place so that the interference with freedom of expression is proportionate.

Accordingly, we have tabled amendments to the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill to ensure that the recording of NCHIs is governed by a Code of Practice that is subject to Parliamentary approval. The content of the Code will be drafted in due course, and will make the processes surrounding the recording and retention of NCHI data more transparent and subject to stronger safeguards.

The College of Policing will also reflect on the Court of Appeal’s judgment carefully and make any changes that are necessary to its existing guidance which will remain in force in the interim period before the new Code enters into effect.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to suspend guidance produced by the College of Policing until such guidance can be laid before Parliament as regulations.

The Government recognises the concern surrounding the recording of non-crime hate incidents (NCHIs). We have also noted the recent Court of Appeal judgment in the Harry Miller v College of Policing case that was handed down on 20 December 2021. The Court found that the recording of NCHIs is lawful provided that there are robust safeguards in place so that the interference with freedom of expression is proportionate.

Accordingly, we have tabled amendments to the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill to ensure that the recording of NCHIs is governed by a Code of Practice that is subject to Parliamentary approval. The content of the Code will be drafted in due course, and will make the processes surrounding the recording and retention of NCHI data more transparent and subject to stronger safeguards.

The College of Policing will also reflect on the Court of Appeal’s judgment carefully and make any changes that are necessary to its existing guidance which will remain in force in the interim period before the new Code enters into effect.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to remove the people recorded as having committed non-crimes hate incidents from police records.

The Government recognises the concern surrounding the recording of non-crime hate incidents (NCHIs). We have also noted the recent Court of Appeal judgment in the Harry Miller v College of Policing case that was handed down on 20 December 2021. The Court found that the recording of NCHIs is lawful provided that there are robust safeguards in place so that the interference with freedom of expression is proportionate.

Accordingly, we have tabled amendments to the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill to ensure that the recording of NCHIs is governed by a Code of Practice that is subject to Parliamentary approval. The content of the Code will be drafted in due course, and will make the processes surrounding the recording and retention of NCHI data more transparent and subject to stronger safeguards.

The College of Policing will also reflect on the Court of Appeal’s judgment carefully and make any changes that are necessary to its existing guidance which will remain in force in the interim period before the new Code enters into effect.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, (1) to investigate, and (2) to dismiss, those in the College of Policing who approved the non-crime hate incidents guidance.

The Government recognises the concern surrounding the recording of non-crime hate incidents (NCHIs). We have also noted the recent Court of Appeal judgment in the Harry Miller v College of Policing case that was handed down on 20 December 2021. The Court found that the recording of NCHIs is lawful provided that there are robust safeguards in place so that the interference with freedom of expression is proportionate.

Accordingly, we have tabled amendments to the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill to ensure that the recording of NCHIs is governed by a Code of Practice that is subject to Parliamentary approval. The content of the Code will be drafted in due course, and will make the processes surrounding the recording and retention of NCHI data more transparent and subject to stronger safeguards.

The College of Policing will also reflect on the Court of Appeal’s judgment carefully and make any changes that are necessary to its existing guidance which will remain in force in the interim period before the new Code enters into effect.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 20 December 2021 (HL4820), how many arrests were made of people identified using CCTV footage and other sources following the Euro 2020 final between England and Italy on 11 July 2021; and what assessment they have made of the report by Baroness Casey of Blackstone published in December 2021 in relation to these arrests.

We do not hold data that categorises arrests made following the Euro 2020 final as CCTV related or resulting from other sources.

The Government is considering the recommendations that Baroness Casey of Blackstock’s report contains.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of people in each of the last five years who would have been deprived of their citizenship if there had been no requirement to give prior notification.

Prior to the recent High Court decision in the case of D4, the relevant regulations governing service of notice in deprivation cases, provided adequately for a variety of situations, meaning that there had been no cases where the notification requirement had prevented deprivation action from taking place.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many appeals against deprivation of citizenship orders under section 40(2) of the British Nationality Act 1981 have been made in each of the last five years; and how many of those appeals were upheld.

Figures for numbers of conducive deprivation orders, which are made under Section 40(2) of the 1981 British Nationality Act (BNA 1981), have been published as part of the HM Government Transparency Report: Disruptive and Investigatory Powers. Four reports have been published to date in 2015, 2017, 2018 and 2020 which provide the number of deprivation of citizenship orders made up until the end of 2018.

Figures are provided on an annual basis and we do not break those figures down further into sub-categories. However, data on the number of people who appealed against a deprivation of British citizenship decision under both Section 40(2) and 40(3) of the BNA 1981 has been published. The table shows a breakdown by year of appeals lodged between 05/03/2011 and 31/12/2018 against deprivation decisions and orders.

Year

No of people who lodged an appeal

2011

5

2012

5

2013

10

2014

29

2015

37

2016

41

2017

37

2018

88

Total

252

The following notes should be considered when viewing this data:

  1. These statistics have been taken from a live operational database. As such, numbers may change as information on that system is updated.
  2. Data extracted on 17/05/2021.
  3. Date relates to the number of people who lodged an appeal between 05/03/2011 and 31/12/2018 against a decision made on a deprivation case.
  4. Data relates to main applicants only.

A number of the appeals in relation to deprivations under Section 40(2) of the BNA 1981 are ongoing. Therefore, we are unable to provide a partial figure of upheld appeals whilst litigation is ongoing.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people were deprived of their citizenship under section 40(2) of the British Nationality Act 1981 for each year from 2010 to 2018, broken down by (1) the grounds upon which those deprivation orders were made, (2) whether or not the individual had previously been granted refugee status, discretionary leave or humanitarian protection in the UK, (3) whether or not the individual was under the age of 18, and (4) whether the individual was in the UK at the time of the deprivation.

Figures for numbers of conducive deprivation orders, which are made under Section 40(2) of the 1981 British Nationality Act, have been published as part of the HM Government Transparency Report: Disruptive and Investigatory Powers. Four reports have been published to date in 2015, 2017, 2018 and 2020 which provide the number of deprivation of citizenship orders made up until the end of 2018.

Year

Number of Individuals

2010

5

2011

6

2012

5

2013

8

2014

4

2015

5

2016

14

2017

104

2018

21


Figures are provided on an annual basis and we do not break those figures down further into sub-categories.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when information relating to the use of deprivation of citizenship orders under section 40(2) of the British Nationality Act 1981 in (1) 2019, (2) 2020, and (3) 2021, will be published.

Figures for numbers of conducive deprivation orders, which are made under Section 40(2) of the 1981 British Nationality Act, have been published as part of the HM Government Transparency Report: Disruptive and Investigatory Powers. Four reports have been published to date in 2015, 2017, 2018 and 2020 which provide the number of deprivation of citizenship orders made up until the end of 2018.

A further publication which includes the more recent data is due to be published shortly.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 13 December 2021 (HL4899), what assessment they have made of how the creation of an Immigration Enforcement Competent Authority will streamline decision making with regard to the identification of victims of trafficking through the National Referral Mechanism.

The Immigration Enforcement Competent Authority (IECA) was created to streamline decision-making and ensure, wherever possible, that the various factors which may be pertinent to decisions about an individual are taken by those who can consider their circumstances most fully.

The data on decisions taken by the IECA will be set out in the quarterly publication of NRM statistics and a breakdown by competent authority will be published once there is sufficient data to ensure individuals are not identifiable. We will regularly review this data to understand the impact of the change and ensure polices are being applied consistently.

The creation of the IECA was an internal restructure within the Home Office. A full assessment of the Public Sector Equality Duty was undertaken and, in line with our ongoing duty, will be kept under review.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Statement by the Minister for Afghan Resettlement on the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme, 6 January 2022, Official Report, column 185, by what date (a) Chevening alumni and (b) British Council and GardaWorld contractors will be notified about their applications to the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme and receive information about arrangements for safe passage.

As the Minister for Afghan Resettlement set out on 6 January, the FCDO will shortly be contacting those individuals from these cohorts who are eligible to be considered, in order to set out next steps.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether (a) her Department will assist people referred by hon. Members' offices to apply to the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme or (b) other referral routes should be used.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will prioritise those who have assisted UK efforts in Afghanistan and stood up for UK values such as democracy, women’s rights, freedom of speech and rule of law; and vulnerable people such as women and girls at risk, and members of minority groups (including ethnic/religious minorities and LGBT+).

There will not be an application process for the ACRS. Instead, eligible people will be prioritised and referred for resettlement through one of three pathways. More detail can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/afghan-citizens-resettlement-scheme.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions she has had with (a) SMMT and (b) other major motor manufacturers on the issue of catalytic converter theft.

The Office for National Statistics publish estimates, sourced from the Crime Survey for England and Wales, on catalytic converter theft. However, being based on a sample survey it is not possible to produce reliable estimates at local authority level.

The Government is committed to tackling the theft of catalytic converters and is working closely with police and motor manufacturers through the National Vehicle Crime Working Group to bear down on this crime. The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) is represented on the National Vehicle Crime Working Group.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many catalytic converter thefts have occurred in each local authority in each of the last 12 months.

The Office for National Statistics publish estimates, sourced from the Crime Survey for England and Wales, on catalytic converter theft. However, being based on a sample survey it is not possible to produce reliable estimates at local authority level.

The Government is committed to tackling the theft of catalytic converters and is working closely with police and motor manufacturers through the National Vehicle Crime Working Group to bear down on this crime. The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) is represented on the National Vehicle Crime Working Group.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps he has taken to ensure that the Warm Welcome initiative continues for refugees who remain in bridging hotels.

Operation Warm Welcome is a significant cross-government effort, working with local authorities, NGOs and the commercial sector, and will continue over the coming months to ensure those evacuated from Afghanistan can settle permanently, contribute to their communities and rebuild their lives here in the UK. The UK Government will continue to work with our international partners and use every lever at our disposal to fulfil our moral obligations, and we will provide a warm welcome to those who have fled persecution.

We are engaging with Local Authorities and housing organisations to explore options to meet the need for housing. We are working closely with Department for Levelling Up Housing and Communities and other stakeholders to identify a range of alternative accommodation options to minimise the use of hotels and enable people to get into accommodation which enables them to settle into their new lives in the UK as quickly as possible.

DLUHC have created a new Housing Portal to make it easier for councils to assess the suitability of properties prior to contacting landlords. Offers of property are triaged by DLUHC and sent directly to councils. We are also looking at ways to make more suitable homes available in the private rental sector by engaging with landlords, letting agencies and industry bodies to promote the housing portal and encourage participation in the resettlement programme. We are also working with the Estate Agent Rightmove to identify potential properties available in the private rental sector.

There is a huge effort underway to get families into permanent homes as soon as we can so they can settle and rebuild their lives, and to ensure those still temporarily accommodated in hotels have access to healthcare, education, any essential items they need as well as employment opportunities or Universal Credit.

The length of time that a family will remain in bridging hotels is dependent on a number of factors including the availability of appropriate housing. We expect that whilst the hotel estate will reduce, there will be an ongoing need to provide temporary housing in hotels for a small number of families for several months. Where possible we prioritise matching properties to certain categories including those that are pregnant and have given birth.

As of the (6 January 2022), the latest available data shows there are over 12,000 people in around 80 bridging hotels. While work is ongoing to resettle families permanently as quickly as possible, they are receiving the necessary support required to integrate into society.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason Afghan refugees who have given birth have been returned to a bridging hotel rather than rehomed.

Operation Warm Welcome is a significant cross-government effort, working with local authorities, NGOs and the commercial sector, and will continue over the coming months to ensure those evacuated from Afghanistan can settle permanently, contribute to their communities and rebuild their lives here in the UK. The UK Government will continue to work with our international partners and use every lever at our disposal to fulfil our moral obligations, and we will provide a warm welcome to those who have fled persecution.

We are engaging with Local Authorities and housing organisations to explore options to meet the need for housing. We are working closely with Department for Levelling Up Housing and Communities and other stakeholders to identify a range of alternative accommodation options to minimise the use of hotels and enable people to get into accommodation which enables them to settle into their new lives in the UK as quickly as possible.

DLUHC have created a new Housing Portal to make it easier for councils to assess the suitability of properties prior to contacting landlords. Offers of property are triaged by DLUHC and sent directly to councils. We are also looking at ways to make more suitable homes available in the private rental sector by engaging with landlords, letting agencies and industry bodies to promote the housing portal and encourage participation in the resettlement programme. We are also working with the Estate Agent Rightmove to identify potential properties available in the private rental sector.

There is a huge effort underway to get families into permanent homes as soon as we can so they can settle and rebuild their lives, and to ensure those still temporarily accommodated in hotels have access to healthcare, education, any essential items they need as well as employment opportunities or Universal Credit.

The length of time that a family will remain in bridging hotels is dependent on a number of factors including the availability of appropriate housing. We expect that whilst the hotel estate will reduce, there will be an ongoing need to provide temporary housing in hotels for a small number of families for several months. Where possible we prioritise matching properties to certain categories including those that are pregnant and have given birth.

As of the (6 January 2022), the latest available data shows there are over 12,000 people in around 80 bridging hotels. While work is ongoing to resettle families permanently as quickly as possible, they are receiving the necessary support required to integrate into society.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)