Home Office

The first duty of the government is to keep citizens safe and the country secure. The Home Office has been at the front line of this endeavour since 1782. As such, the Home Office plays a fundamental role in the security and economic prosperity of the United Kingdom.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

Priti Patel
Home Secretary

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Labour
Lord Rosser (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Home Affairs)
Lord Coaker (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Home Affairs)
Nick Thomas-Symonds (LAB - Torfaen)
Shadow Home Secretary
Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Home Affairs)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Bambos Charalambous (LAB - Enfield, Southgate)
Shadow Minister (Home Office)
Sarah Jones (LAB - Croydon Central)
Shadow Minister (Home Office)
Holly Lynch (LAB - Halifax)
Shadow Minister (Home Office)
Conor McGinn (LAB - St Helens North)
Shadow Minister (Home Office)
Jess Phillips (LAB - Birmingham, Yardley)
Shadow Minister (Home Office)
Ministers of State
Kit Malthouse (CON - North West Hampshire)
Minister of State (Home Office)
Lord Greenhalgh (CON - Life peer)
Minister of State (Home Office)
Baroness Williams of Trafford (CON - Life peer)
Minister of State (Home Office)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
Chris Philp (CON - Croydon South)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
Kevin Foster (CON - Torbay)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
Victoria Atkins (CON - Louth and Horncastle)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
Scheduled Event
Monday 6th September 2021
Home Office
Orders and regulations - Grand Committee
Alcohol Licensing (Coronavirus) (Regulatory Easements) (Amendment) Regulations 2021
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Scheduled Event
Wednesday 8th September 2021
09:25
Home Office
Fourth Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
8 Sep 2021, 9:25 a.m.
The draft Alcohol Licensing (Coronavirus) (Regulatory Easements) (Amendment) Regulations 2021
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Scheduled Event
Tuesday 14th September 2021
Home Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill – second reading
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Scheduled Event
Monday 18th October 2021
14:30
Home Office
Oral questions - Main Chamber
18 Oct 2021, 2:30 p.m.
Home Office (including Topical Questions)
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Debates
Thursday 22nd July 2021
Select Committee Docs
Friday 30th July 2021
00:00
Select Committee Inquiry
Thursday 8th April 2021
Investigation and prosecution of rape

As part of the Committee’s overarching work into violence against women and girls, the Committee wishes to explore the key …

Written Answers
Monday 2nd August 2021
Proceeds of Crime
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of Suspicious Activity Reports result in action by (1) police, or (2) other …
Secondary Legislation
Wednesday 28th July 2021
Misuse of Drugs and Misuse of Drugs (Designation) (Amendment) (England, Wales and Scotland) Regulations 2021
These Regulations amend the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001 (S.I. 2001/3998) (“the Regulations”) and the Misuse of Drugs (Designation) (England, …
Bills
Tuesday 6th July 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill 2021-22
Make provision about nationality, asylum and immigration; to make provision about victims of slavery or human trafficking; to provide a …
Dept. Publications
Tuesday 3rd August 2021
11:00

Home Office Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Jul. 12
Oral Questions
Jun. 29
Urgent Questions
Jul. 20
Westminster Hall
View All Home Office Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Home Office does not have Bills currently before Parliament


Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament

Introduced: 3rd March 2020

To make provision in relation to domestic abuse; to make provision for and in connection with the establishment of a Domestic Abuse Commissioner; to prohibit cross-examination in person in family proceedings in certain circumstances; to make provision about certain violent or sexual offences, and offences involving other abusive behaviour, committed outside the United Kingdom; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 19th March 2020

A Bill to make provision about the application of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 where a building contains two or more sets of domestic premises; and to confer power to amend that order in future for the purposes of changing the premises to which it applies.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 24th September 2020

A Bill to make provision for, and in connection with, the authorisation of criminal conduct in the course of, or otherwise in connection with, the conduct of covert human intelligence sources.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 1st March 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 5th March 2020

A Bill to make provision to end rights to free movement of persons under retained EU law and to repeal other retained EU law relating to immigration; to confer power to modify retained direct EU legislation relating to social security co-ordination; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 11th November 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 7th January 2020

A bill to create a power of arrest, without warrant, for the purpose of extraditing people for serious offences

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 22nd October 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 8th January 2020

To provide for the payment out of money provided by Parliament of expenditure incurred by the Secretary of State or a government department under, or in connection with, the Windrush Compensation Scheme.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 8th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Home Office - Secondary Legislation

These Regulations amend the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001 (S.I. 2001/3998) (“the Regulations”) and the Misuse of Drugs (Designation) (England, Wales and Scotland) Order 2015 (S.I. 2015/704) (“the Order”).
Part 2 of the Terrorism Act 2000 (c. 11) makes provision about proscribed organisations (including setting out offences in relation to such organisations in sections 11 to 13). An organisation is proscribed if it is listed in Schedule 2 to that Act or, in most cases, if it operates under the same name as an organisation so listed (section 3(1)).
View All Home Office Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
Petition Open
11,479 Signatures
(2,793 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
2,361 Signatures
(2,249 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
2,259 Signatures
(2,207 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
1,208 Signatures
(848 in the last 7 days)
Petitions with most signatures
Petition Debates Contributed
255,664
c. 1,765 added daily
257,255
(Estimated)
16 Sep 2021
closes in 1 month, 1 week

The right to peaceful assembly and protest are fundamental principles of any democracy and the proposed part of this bill that gives the police new powers to tackle disruptive peaceful protests should be removed from The Policing, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill.

134,933
Petition Closed
5 Sep 2020
closed 11 months ago

The Government's manifesto stated “we will make intentional trespass a criminal offence”: an extreme, illiberal & unnecessary attack on ancient freedoms that would threaten walkers, campers, and the wider public. It would further tilt the law in favour of the landowning 1% who own half the country.

The Government is refusing to release official research on the characteristics of grooming gangs, claiming it is not in the “public interest”.

We, the British public, demand the release of the official research on grooming gangs undertaken by the Government in full.

View All Home Office Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Home Affairs Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


11 Members of the Home Affairs Committee
Yvette Cooper Portrait
Yvette Cooper (Labour - Normanton, Pontefract and Castleford)
Home Affairs Committee Chair since 27th January 2020
Tim Loughton Portrait
Tim Loughton (Conservative - East Worthing and Shoreham)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Adam Holloway Portrait
Adam Holloway (Conservative - Gravesham)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Simon Fell Portrait
Simon Fell (Conservative - Barrow and Furness)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Laura Farris Portrait
Laura Farris (Conservative - Newbury)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Ruth Edwards Portrait
Ruth Edwards (Conservative - Rushcliffe)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Dehenna Davison Portrait
Dehenna Davison (Conservative - Bishop Auckland)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Diana Johnson Portrait
Diana Johnson (Labour - Kingston upon Hull North)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 11th May 2020
Andrew Gwynne Portrait
Andrew Gwynne (Labour - Denton and Reddish)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 11th May 2020
Diane Abbott Portrait
Diane Abbott (Labour - Hackney North and Stoke Newington)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 11th May 2020

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

19th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of Suspicious Activity Reports result in action by (1) police, or (2) other relevant authorities.

The UKFIU does not hold figures for the proportion of Suspicious Activity Reports resulting in action by (1) police, or (2) other relevant authorities. The UKFIU received over 700,000 SARs in 2020/21 and made these reports available for police and other authorities to access, including in some instances allocating particular high-risk reports to specific partners. The cost of establishing actions resulting from each SAR would be disproportionate, noting that:

• a SAR is a report of suspicion as assessed the reporter and is not evidence of criminal conduct.

• a single SAR may be used several times by several different agencies for different purposes e.g. the information within the same SAR may inform a) HMRC about taxation b) local police about fraud or theft and c) a government department about a regulatory issue or a weakness in a financial product.

  • some SARs provide new and immediate opportunities to stop crime and arrest offenders, others support existing investigations or help uncover potential criminality that could be investigated, while others provide intelligence useful at a point in the future.

  • some SARs are disseminated to foreign jurisdictions.

  • even if no criminal investigation is conducted, a SAR may contain information that contributes to understanding current threat trends or patterns. This helps reporters and law enforcement to plan and prevent against new crime trends.

Further information can be found in the Suspicious Activity Reports Annual Report 2020, including that last year almost £172m of assets were denied to suspected criminals as a result of SARs reporting.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) how many police officers are currently having to self-isolate after being COVID-19 contact traced, and (2) what is the total number of police officer working days lost due to self-isolation in 2020 and 2021.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested centrally.

The Home Office collects and publishes information on the number of police officers on long term sick absence as at 31st March each year, by police force area, in the annual ‘Police workforce’ statistical bulletin, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

The next release of ‘Police workforce’ statistics will be published on 28th July 2021, and will represent the picture as at 31 March 2021.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 April (HL15173) and 20 July (HL1825), whether they have assessed any mosques in the UK for evidence of the promotion of violence towards non-Muslims, including the dissemination of literature which encourages such violence; and if not, why not.

We assess all evidence of those that radicalise others though their support for or justification of violence, and will not tolerate those who spread divisive and harmful narratives. Any violent threat is assessed and managed by the police and security services based on the threat that it is deemed to pose.

Our work to counter radicalisation through Prevent works best when it is delivered in partnership with communities and civil society, including faith institutions.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Barran on 19 July (HL1970), what estimate they have made of the absolute number of (1) people, and (2) businesses, in the UK who were phished in the last period for which figures are available; and what proportion of such phishing attacks were successful.

The Home Office collects quarterly data on the number of fraud and Computer Misuse Act (CMA) offences made to Action Fraud which have been recorded as criminal offences by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB).

The most recently available data is available at Table A5 below: (and attached)

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

From information held centrally, it is not possible to separately identify offences of fraud and CMA offences in which phishing has been involved.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what they estimate they have made of the cost of policing Extinction Rebellion protests in (1) 2019, (2) 2020, and (3) 2021; and whether any of those costs have been met by the organisers of the protests.

The highly disruptive tactics used by some protesters cause a disproportionate impact on the surrounding communities and are a drain on public funds. The management of protests, including the tactics they use; their cost; and their resourcing, is an operational matter for the police.

During Extinction Rebellion’s protests of April and October 2019, the Metropolitan Police Service reported that policing operations for the two extended protests cost around £37m - more than twice the annual budget of London's violent crime taskforce.

The right to peaceful protest remains a fundamental tool of civic expression and will not be curtailed by this Government. Protesters are not charged for the costs of policing protests.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there is a Common Travel Area between the Republic of Ireland and the UK; whether there is freedom of movement between the Republic of Ireland and the EU; whether there are border checks on EU citizens travelling from the Republic of Ireland to Great Britain; and whether there are border checks on the movement of EU citizens, not from the Republic of Ireland, travelling through Northern Ireland to the rest of the UK.

The Common Travel Area (CTA) facilitates the free movement of people between the between the UK, Ireland and the Crown Dependencies (Isle of Man, Guernsey and Jersey).

As part of the CTA arrangements, the UK does not operate routine immigration controls on journeys from Ireland to the UK, including from Ireland to Great Britain. There are no immigration checks whatsoever on the Northern Ireland-Ireland land border. However, individuals arriving in the UK, regardless of where they enter from, must do so in line with the UK’s immigration framework and we work closely with the Irish Government to prevent abuse of the CTA.

There are no border controls for travel within the UK including from Northern Ireland to Great Britain.

Whether there is freedom of movement between Ireland and the EU is a matter for the Irish government.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 July (HL1628), whether someone (1) born in the EU, (2) with an EU Member State passport, (3) who is married to a UK citizen, and (4) has (a) resided, and (b) been employed, in the UK for over 20 years, including paying taxes or drawing pension payments, would automatically have "UK immigration status" by dint of those characteristics; or whether they might still need to apply for it under the EU Settlement Scheme.

An EU, European Economic Area (EEA) or European Free Trade Association (EFTA) national who was settled in the UK before 1 January 1973 may have acquired indefinite leave to enter or remain automatically under section 1(2) of the Immigration Act 1971.

Where they hold indefinite leave to enter or remain obtained in this way, or where an EU, EEA or EFTA national holds such leave obtained by applying for it under another immigration route, they do not need to apply for status under the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS), but they may do so if they wish given the benefits of doing so.

Indefinite leave to enter or remain granted under the EUSS (referred to as ‘settled status’) enables the holder to access additional rights in line with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements. For example, they can be absent from the UK for five consecutive years, rather than two years, before their settled status lapses, and they can sponsor certain family members to join them in the UK without meeting the requirements of the family Immigration Rules.

Where an EEA national was resident in the UK by 31 December 2020 based on free movement rights, they must apply to the EU Settlement Scheme for status under UK immigration law. The deadline for doing so was 30 June 2021, but late applications will be accepted where reasonable grounds exist for missing the deadline. This includes where someone has lived in the UK for many years and did not realise they needed to apply.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 July (HL1629), whether someone (1) born in an (a) European Economic Area, or (b) European Free Trade Area, state other than the UK, (2) who carries a non-UK passport, (3) who is married to a UK citizen, and (4) has (a) resided, and (b) been employed, in the UK for over 20 years including paying taxes or drawing pension payments, would automatically have "UK immigration status" by dint of those characteristics; or whether they might still need to apply for it under the EU Settlement Scheme.

An EU, European Economic Area (EEA) or European Free Trade Association (EFTA) national who was settled in the UK before 1 January 1973 may have acquired indefinite leave to enter or remain automatically under section 1(2) of the Immigration Act 1971.

Where they hold indefinite leave to enter or remain obtained in this way, or where an EU, EEA or EFTA national holds such leave obtained by applying for it under another immigration route, they do not need to apply for status under the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS), but they may do so if they wish given the benefits of doing so.

Indefinite leave to enter or remain granted under the EUSS (referred to as ‘settled status’) enables the holder to access additional rights in line with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements. For example, they can be absent from the UK for five consecutive years, rather than two years, before their settled status lapses, and they can sponsor certain family members to join them in the UK without meeting the requirements of the family Immigration Rules.

Where an EEA national was resident in the UK by 31 December 2020 based on free movement rights, they must apply to the EU Settlement Scheme for status under UK immigration law. The deadline for doing so was 30 June 2021, but late applications will be accepted where reasonable grounds exist for missing the deadline. This includes where someone has lived in the UK for many years and did not realise they needed to apply.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 July (HL1628 and HL1629), what are the additional rights available to EU, EEA and EFTA nationals under the Citizens’ Rights Agreements that they will not possess if they do not apply to the EU Settlement Scheme.

An EU, European Economic Area (EEA) or European Free Trade Association (EFTA) national who was settled in the UK before 1 January 1973 may have acquired indefinite leave to enter or remain automatically under section 1(2) of the Immigration Act 1971.

Where they hold indefinite leave to enter or remain obtained in this way, or where an EU, EEA or EFTA national holds such leave obtained by applying for it under another immigration route, they do not need to apply for status under the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS), but they may do so if they wish given the benefits of doing so.

Indefinite leave to enter or remain granted under the EUSS (referred to as ‘settled status’) enables the holder to access additional rights in line with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements. For example, they can be absent from the UK for five consecutive years, rather than two years, before their settled status lapses, and they can sponsor certain family members to join them in the UK without meeting the requirements of the family Immigration Rules.

Where an EEA national was resident in the UK by 31 December 2020 based on free movement rights, they must apply to the EU Settlement Scheme for status under UK immigration law. The deadline for doing so was 30 June 2021, but late applications will be accepted where reasonable grounds exist for missing the deadline. This includes where someone has lived in the UK for many years and did not realise they needed to apply.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 July (HL1628 and HL1629), how someone would check whether they had (1) "UK immigration status", and (2) indefinite leave to enter or remain in the UK.

A person who is issued with a UK Immigration status or Indefinite leave to Enter or Remain are provided with a visa in their passport, a biometric residence permit or an electronic visa confirming their status. Our decision notices also provide customers with details on their terms of leave.

A person who has applied to the EU Settlement Scheme or via the fully digital processes for the British Nationals (Overseas) and Points Based System routes, will have created a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) account. They can use their UKVI account credentials to log into the online View and Prove service.

If an individual has been notified they have a digital certificate of application, they are able to use the View and Prove service to prove their rights:

https://www.gov.uk/view-prove-immigration-status

The Home Office also publishes information to assist EU national customers understand their immigration status. Further information can be found on our website: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/view-and-prove-your-immigration-status-evisa/your-immigration-status-an-introduction-for-eu-eea-and-swiss-citizens-accessible-version

For longer-term settled residents who wish to replace their visa for a biometric residence permit, they can submit an application for a biometric residence permit. Further information can be found on the gov.uk website: https://www.gov.uk/biometric-residence-permits/replace-visa-brp

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to amend the Nationality and Borders Bill (1) to protect children who have been trafficked twice or more, (2) to support children who may have committed offences while suffering exploitation, and (3) to protect exploited foreign children by providing leave to remain of sufficient length to guard against further harm.

Within the Nationality and Borders Bill, we are proposing modern slavery measures to deliver a decision-making process and support system that is fair and provides support for those who genuinely need it.

We recognise that some victims of modern slavery may have had periods of high vulnerability and can have multiple, complex needs, with some individuals experiencing multiple forms of exploitation at different points in time. The proposed measures within the Bill therefore rightly allow for protection and support for individuals subject to repeated exploitation, including child victims whilst seeking to ensure that further support is only provided where needed.

We remain committed to tackling exploitation in all its forms. The Modern Slavery Act 2015 gives law enforcement agencies the tools to tackle modern slavery, including a maximum life sentence for perpetrators and enhanced protection for victims. Where children are found to be potential victims of human trafficking or modern slavery their safety and welfare are addressed as a priority. Local authorities are responsible for safeguarding and promoting the welfare of all children in their area, including child victims of modern slavery. In addition to this statutory support, the Government has rolled out Independent Child Trafficking Guardians (ICTGs), an additional source of advice and support for all potentially trafficked children, in two thirds of all local authorities in England and Wales.

We will seek to put into legislation for the first time the commitment that all confirmed victims, including children, without immigration status will be considered for a grant of temporary leave to remain in line with specific criteria.

This will bring clarity to decision makers and victims on the process for temporary leave to remain. We will continue to comply with our duties under Section 55 of the Borders, Citizenship, and Immigration Act 2009 to safeguard and promote the welfare of children.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish their response to their consultation on the New Plan for Immigration, published on 24 March; and what assessment they have made of their compliance with paragraph J of their Consultation Principles, published on 17 July 2012, in respect of their response to this consultation.

This has been published already.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether clergy are no longer permitted to register marriages conducted in their churches; if so, why not; and what consultations they undertook with the Church of England prior to the introduction of the electronic register for marriages.

As a result of changes implemented under The Civil Partnerships, Marriages and Deaths (Registration etc.) Act 2019 all marriages in England and Wales are registered in an electronic register by a registrar for the district in which the marriage took place rather than in hard copy registers.

The Church of England were fully involved in the development of this policy, including direct engagement with Home Office Ministers. The Church of England has been supportive of the move to an electronic system of registration, including the move to include Mothers on Marriage Certificates as part of this.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to provide funding to agencies and local authorities to support EU citizens facing problems accessing their rights and entitlements in the UK, including issues with the EU Settlement Scheme, given that the Independent Monitoring Authority for the Citizens’ Rights Agreements does not deal with individual cases.

The Home Office remains committed to ensuring those who are eligible can apply to the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS), including those who are vulnerable, need extra support or are harder to reach.

£22 million of funding, through to 30 September 2021, has been awarded to a network of 72 charities and local authorities across the UK, to ensure important information and assistance gets through to those who are hardest to reach, and no one is left behind. This support has continued beyond the 30 June 2021 deadline to ensure continuing support for vulnerable citizens applying late


Guidance on how to apply and details of the support available to applicants is available through the EU Settlement Resolution Centre (SRC), which is open seven days a week to provide assistance over the telephone and by email, and the SRC also provides a direct line for organisations, charities, social workers, and local authorities working with vulnerable groups.

We are working closely with the Grant-funded Network (GFN) and other key stakeholders, collating feedback, to help establish the needs and scale of support beyond September 2021.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 July (HL1628 and HL1629), how they are informing EU, EEA and EFTA nationals who acquired a right of permanent residence in the UK under EU law that (1) they need to apply for status under the EU Settlement Scheme, and (2) the benefits of applying.

Since the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS) opened in March 2019, the Home Office has undertaken a broad range of communications and stakeholder engagement activity to encourage EU, European Economic Area (EEA) and European Free Trade Association (EFTA) nationals, and their family members, to apply for status under the EUSS and to explain why they should do so and secure their rights under the Citizens’ Rights Agreements.

We launched a further wave of UK-wide advertising in mid-May to help ensure they were aware of the EUSS and its benefits and of how to apply and access support in doing so if they needed it, although existing ILR holders need not apply. This built on the successful campaign already delivered – with £7.9 million having now been invested in such activity – with targeted adverts appearing on social media, website banners, catch up TV and radio up to the application deadline of 30 June.

The Home Office has also made available £22 million in grant funding for a network of now 72 organisations across the UK, which includes charities, local authorities and community groups, to engage with vulnerable groups and help them apply to the EUSS.

We are also continuing to engage with local authorities, the Devolved Administrations, employers, community groups and others to raise awareness of the EUSS and encourage those eligible who are yet to apply to do so.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 July (HL1628 and HL1629), what steps they are taking to inform EU, EEA and EFTA nationals living in the UK about the benefits of the additional rights available to them under the Citizens’ Rights Agreements.

Since the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS) opened in March 2019, the Home Office has undertaken a broad range of communications and stakeholder engagement activity to encourage EU, European Economic Area (EEA) and European Free Trade Association (EFTA) nationals, and their family members, to apply for status under the EUSS and to explain why they should do so and secure their rights under the Citizens’ Rights Agreements.

We launched a further wave of UK-wide advertising in mid-May to help ensure they were aware of the EUSS and its benefits and of how to apply and access support in doing so if they needed it, although existing ILR holders need not apply. This built on the successful campaign already delivered – with £7.9 million having now been invested in such activity – with targeted adverts appearing on social media, website banners, catch up TV and radio up to the application deadline of 30 June.

The Home Office has also made available £22 million in grant funding for a network of now 72 organisations across the UK, which includes charities, local authorities and community groups, to engage with vulnerable groups and help them apply to the EUSS.

We are also continuing to engage with local authorities, the Devolved Administrations, employers, community groups and others to raise awareness of the EUSS and encourage those eligible who are yet to apply to do so.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government in what circumstances people may be (1) prosecuted, and (2) fined, for breaking COVID-19 regulations.

Decisions on prosecution is a matter for the Crown Prosecution Service, based on evidence provided to them by law enforcement agencies, including the Police.

On the question of fines, data on the Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) issued under the COVID-19 regulations by police forces in England and Wales is published by the National Police Chiefs' Council (NPCC) on a monthly basis and can be found on the NPCC website.

The latest publication from 28th June 2021 can be found here and displays a list of the reasons for FPNs being processed:

https://cdn.prgloo.com/media/fefef3f0ea8241018b9bda2d33fa95be.pdf

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 13 July (HL1749), how many vessels by (1) size, and (2) type, are operated by UK Border Force.

Border Force Maritime Command’s fleet includes five cutters and six coastal patrol vessels as well as niche capability in the form of tactical watercraft (TWC) and dedicated mobile RHIB capability. Each cutter carries a jet driven RHIB capable of delivering a boarding team. The type of asset deployed will reflect the operational task and may be deployed as a standalone asset or as a combination, to allow for a broad range of tactical options, that can respond to a specific threat or event.

Border Force Vessels undertake strategic patrols, tactical surveillance and enforcement activity in support of Border Force and other government agencies providing a law enforcement capability at sea.

As a minimum a Cutter and two CPV’s will be permanently deployed to the south east to the 30-mile stretch of coast covering the Dover Straits with additional vessels deployed as operationally required.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the establishment of a European Union Agency for Asylum.

We note the provisional agreement between the Portuguese Presidency of the EU Council and the European Parliament on a Regulation to create an EU asylum agency.

We will monitor further developments in relation to implementation of this legislation.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) departmental officials, and (2) Ministers, have undertaken the 'Face behind the case' training.

The ‘Face Behind the Case’ e-learning is for UKVI staff, to highlight the impact decisions have on our customers.

As of 28 June 2021, the training has been completed by 10,132 officials across the Home Office.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will provide finances for a reward for information on the case of British national Ben Needham who disappeared from the Greek Island of Kos on the 24th July 1991.

As this is an ongoing investigation, the decision to offer a reward for information, and other tactics deployed to further the work needed to bring a resolution to the case, is an independent operational matter for South Yorkshire Police.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to prevent (a) new county lines from starting up and (b) previous lines being resurrected by new prison leavers.

Since 2019 we have invested over £65m to tackle county lines and drug supply. Through our county lines programme we have surged our activity against these ruthless gangs. This has already resulted in more than 1,100 lines closed, over 6,300 arrests, and more than 1,900 vulnerable adults and children safeguarded.

The police have a range of orders available to respond to county lines activity, including Drug Dealing Telecommunications Restrictions Orders (DDTROs). Through our County Lines programme the National County Lines Coordination Centre has established a dedicated orders team to promote and maximise the use of civil orders to tackle county lines, with a particular focus on DDTROs.

We are also working collaboratively with HMPPS to ensure there is a co-ordinated and robust response to disrupt county lines, as well as safeguarding vulnerable individuals from being involved in this offending.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what additional support she will provide to the police in managing crowded areas in summer 2021 in response to the increased covid-19 infection rate.

The Home Office has been working closely with the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) throughout the Covid-19 pandemic to ensure forces have sufficient resourcing and guidance to operate safely. This includes managing crowded areas, such as during protests and other events. The NPCC also issued guidance to forces on the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to ensure that officers carrying out critical services are not put at risk.

We will continue to work extremely closely with police, alongside the NPCC, to ensure forces receive the equipment and guidance they need, when they need it, in order to carry out their jobs safely.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to prevent future losses of crime records.

Following the deletion of a number of No Further Action Cases the Home Secretary and I commissioned an independent review, led by an external panel chaired by Lord Hogan-Howe, to investigate how this happened and to ensure the necessary lessons are learned to avoid similar incidents in the future.

The review sets out a wide range of recommendations for both the Home Office as well as the Police to address the underlying factors that led to this unacceptable incident. Both the Home Office and the Police have accepted all the recommendations in full and work is already underway to take the necessary steps to respond to them.

A summary of the review was published in the House on 24 May.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason early years workers including nursery staff were not included in the shortage occupation list for the Skilled Worker visa; and what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect of that decision on the early years and childcare sector.

The independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) reviewed the Shortage Occupation List (SOL) in September 2020 and did not recommend adding early years workers to the UK SOL. A copy of the report can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-shortage-occupation-list-2020

The MAC found there was a low vacancy rate for primary and nursery teachers and a lack of evidence of shortage, although Gaelic medium teachers remain on the Scotland-only SOL.

An occupation does not need to be on the SOL to be sponsored for a Skilled Worker visa. Upon advice from the MAC, the Government broadened the eligibility of the route, enabling more roles to qualify in early years education and other sectors.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to preserve the right of familial reunification for asylum seekers regardless of the route of entry into the UK as part of the New Plan for Immigration, published on 24 March.

We have a proud history of providing protection to those who need it, in-line with our international obligations. But we have been clear that individuals in need of protection should avoid making dangerous journeys and claim asylum in the first safe country they reach – that is the fastest route to safety. The Nationality and Borders Bill will set up a range of measures to deter people from undertaking dangerous journeys via unauthorised routes.

As set out in the New Plan for Immigration, we are committed to review the refugee family reunion rules. Refugee family reunion will only be permitted where refusing would be a breach of our international obligations. In practice, this means refugees will be able to sponsor their spouse or partner and under-18 children if they can show there are insurmountable obstacles to their relationship continuing anywhere other than the UK and it is in the child’s best interests.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the New Plan for Immigration, published on 24 March, what assessment they have made of the risk of unaccompanied minors travelling to the UK via unauthorised routes for the purposes of reunification with relatives who previously entered through unauthorised routes.

We have a proud history of providing protection to those who need it, in-line with our international obligations. But we have been clear that individuals in need of protection should avoid making dangerous journeys and claim asylum in the first safe country they reach – that is the fastest route to safety. The Nationality and Borders Bill will set up a range of measures to deter people from undertaking dangerous journeys via unauthorised routes.

As set out in the New Plan for Immigration, we are committed to review the refugee family reunion rules. Refugee family reunion will only be permitted where refusing would be a breach of our international obligations. In practice, this means refugees will be able to sponsor their spouse or partner and under-18 children if they can show there are insurmountable obstacles to their relationship continuing anywhere other than the UK and it is in the child’s best interests.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to increase the number of safe routes into the country for those seeking asylum.

Since 2015 we have resettled more than 25,000 refugees through safe and legal resettlement routes direct from regions of conflict and instability - around half of whom were children. In addition to this our current family reunion policy has welcomed over 29,000 individuals to the UK in the last 5 years. The UK continues to welcome people through the global UK Resettlement Scheme (UKRS), as well as through the Community Sponsorship and Mandate Resettlement Schemes and our refugee family reunion policy. This commitment, alongside a fair but firm asylum system, will ensure we continue to offer safe and legal routes to the UK for refugees in need of protection.

The New Plan for Immigration will strengthen safe and legal protection routes to the UK by ensuring our resettlement schemes are accessible and fair, resettling refugees from countries where the need is greatest, increasing the integration support of those we welcome, increasing opportunities for community participation in resettlement, supporting access to work visas for highly skilled displaced people and providing more flexibility to help people in truly exceptional and compelling circumstances.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to support the work of the London Violence Reduction Unit's work during Summer 2021.

Over three years, the London Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) has been allocated £21 million from the Home Office’s Serious Violence Fund (SVF) to bring together key partners across health, education, policing, the criminal justice system, amongst others to identify the drivers of serious violence in London and deliver a tailored response to tackle them.

The VRU have utilised this funding to deliver a wide range of interventions which supported over 2750 young people in 2020/21. This includes innovative projects like the DIVERT programme, which engages with young people in custody immediately following a serious violence incident at a ‘teachable moment’ when they are expected to be most likely to change their behaviour.

This £21 million investment includes a £7 million allocation for London in the 2021/22 financial year. We have worked closely with the VRU on the development of their proposals for the year ahead, collaborating to ensure that effective interventions, structures, and partners are in place to respond to the root causes of violence across London’s 32 boroughs. These proposals have since been agreed and activity is being delivered throughout the summer months.

Future funding decisions are subject to the ongoing Spending Review, and we will engage with HM Treasury on proposals in due course as part of the departmental settlement. Whilst we cannot pre-empt the potential outcome of that process, we do recognise the need for VRUs to function as long-term, sustainable organisations and are working hard to achieve this.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their response to reported comments by the Assistant High Commissioner for Protection at the office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees that the UK appeared to be trying to "wash its hands" of its international responsibilities for refugees.

The UK has a long history of supporting refugees in need of protection. Our resettlement schemes have provided safe and legal routes for tens of thousands of people to start new lives in the UK.

The UK is a global leader in resettlement and resettled more refugees from outside Europe than any EU member state every year between 2016 and 2019.

Overall, since 2015, we have resettled more than 25,000 refugees through safe and legal routes direct from regions of conflict and instability - around half of whom were children.

The UK continues to welcome refugees through the global UK Resettlement Scheme (UKRS), as well as through the Community Sponsorship and Mandate Resettlement Schemes. This commitment, alongside a fair and firm asylum system, will ensure we continue to offer safe and legal routes to the UK for vulnerable refugees in need of protection. Our focus will remain on helping people directly from regions of conflict and instability.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the possibility of enabling people from endangered (1) ethnic, and (2) religious, communities in (a) Iraq, and (b) Syria, to be considered for resettlement in the UK; and how many people in each of these categories have been resettled to the UK in each year since 2014.

Refugee resettlement to the UK is based on need, as assessed by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) who adhere to humanitarian principles including impartiality, rather than any specific ethnicity or religion.

Refugee resettlement statistics are published through official statistics at quarterly intervals. These statistics can be broken down by nationality. We do not publish data on ethnicity or religious affiliation. The next set of statistics will be published in August and will include the number of people resettled up to end of June 2021. These are available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

As set out in the New Plan for Immigration, the UK will continue to work with the UNHCR to ensure our resettlement schemes are accessible and fair, resettling refugees from countries where the need is greatest, and ensuring those in need of resettlement can access it.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their response to reports that the United Nations regards their planned asylum overhaul as “almost neo-colonial”.

The UK has a long history of supporting refugees in need of protection. Our resettlement schemes have provided safe and legal routes for tens of thousands of people to start new lives in the UK.

The UK is a global leader in resettlement and resettled more refugees from outside Europe than any EU member state every year between 2016 and 2019.

Overall, since 2015, we have resettled more than 25,000 refugees through safe and legal routes direct from regions of conflict and instability - around half of whom were children.

The UK continues to welcome refugees through the global UK Resettlement Scheme (UKRS), as well as through the Community Sponsorship and Mandate Resettlement Schemes. This commitment, alongside a fair and firm asylum system, will ensure we continue to offer safe and legal routes to the UK for vulnerable refugees in need of protection. Our focus will remain on helping people directly from regions of conflict and instability.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether Chaggosians with family in the UK will be eligible for UK citizenship under the new discretionary adult registration route.

This proposed adult registration clause in the Nationality and Borders Bill would allow the Home Secretary discretion to grant citizenship in circumstances where a person could have become British but for historical legislative unfairness, an act or omission by a public authority, or exceptional circumstances of the particular individual.

This is one of a number of measures which need to be approved by Parliament, and so we cannot be specific at this time how the discretion will be used.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what (a) assessment she made of the potential effect of climate change on the displacement of people and (b) steps her Department is taking to prepare for future increases in refugees seeking safety in the UK in light of that issue.

Climate change is not recognised under the 1951 Refugee Convention and, therefore, cannot be used as a justification for requesting or granting international protection.

Evidence shows that climate extremes and environmental degradation are often amplifiers of other principal migration drivers (economic, social and political), but decisions to migrate are rarely mono-causal. As climate change increases its impact on migration it is imperative that efforts are redoubled to limit warming and to help vulnerable people to adapt to change. Climate change is a reality that requires greater and more coordinated adaptation and mitigation planning.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) they, or (2) the police, are paying for the protection of the Batley Grammar School teacher who has received threats on his life; if so, what is the cost of that protection; and if not, what steps they are taking to ensure his safety.

It would not be appropriate to provide information or details in relation to a specific case.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the threats to the Batley Grammar School teacher; and what steps they are taking to support the police to pursue those making such threats.

It would not be appropriate to provide information or details in relation to a specific case.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many criminals and terrorists have been identified as applying for the support available to victims of modern slavery since 2016.

There is more information on referrals available at: Modern Slavery: National Referral Mechanism and Duty to Notify statistics UK, end of year summary 2020 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

There is also information available on issues (including modern slavery) raised by people in immigration detention available at: Issues raised by people facing return in immigration detention - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to stop young people becoming involved in crime and violence.

It is vitally important that we prevent young people from being drawn into violent crime. The Government understands the importance of tackling this issue from all angles – whether that is providing support to prevent young people from getting involved in crime, or providing the police with the tools they need to bring knife offenders to justice.

Since 2018, we have invested £105.5m into multi-agency Violence Reduction Units (VRUs) in 18 areas most affected by serious violence. The VRUs bring together local partners to deliver an effective, joined up approach to tackling violent crime and its drivers – and they have reached over 100,000 young people in their first year.

We are investing up to £23m this year in new early intervention programmes that will help stop young people from being drawn into violence, and our Creating Opportunities Forum will provide meaningful employment-related opportunities and raise the aspirations of young people at risk of being drawn into serious violence and knife crime.

In addition, our £200m 10 year Youth Endowment Fund is testing what works to divert young people away from serious violence.

This year, we have provided an extra £30m this year for the police forces with the highest rates of serious violence in England and Wales. This funding is supporting the police to deter and disrupt knife crime in areas that need it most.

However, we know there is still more to do. The Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill includes a duty on public sector bodies to take a joined-up approach to addressing serious violence; the requirement for local agencies to review the circumstances when an adult homicide takes place involving an offensive weapon; and Serious Violence Reduction Orders, which give the police the authority to stop and search known knife and weapons carriers.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the impact on places of worship of the requirements of the Protect Duty; and what assessment she has made of the potential merits of mitigation measures for people in voluntary positions in places of worship and other organisations potentially required to comply with the Protect Duty.

The responses to the Protect Duty consultation, which closed on 2nd July, provides a basis for Government to consider the scope and requirements of the Protect Duty, alongside assessing the impacts on those parties potentially within scope. These considerations will also consider the potential for unintended consequences and indirect implications of introducing the Duty.

The Government is mindful places of worship differ significantly in the nature of their function and operation from other locations potentially within the scope of the Protect Duty proposals. This is balanced against the threat posed by terrorism, and a need to ensure there are effective security measures at public places, regardless of their nature.

The Government will be carefully considering the issues raised within the consultation and our engagement events, including those discussed with representatives of different faith communities, before considering next steps.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the Government's policy is on protecting the right to protest in (a) London and (b) Parliament Square.

The freedom to peacefully protest across the country is a fundamental right that this Government is proud to support.

However, this Government will strengthen police powers to tackle non-violent protests that cause significant disruption to essential services. This is why we are introducing powers in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill to establish a fair balance between the rights of protesters and the rights and freedoms of others.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to tackle people smuggling.

The Government stands resolute in its commitment to tackle Organised Immigration Crime (OIC). We continue to pursue the Organised Crime Groups (OCGs) who facilitate illegal travel to the UK and who exploit vulnerable migrants, knowingly putting people in life-threatening situations.

In March 2021, the Government published the New Plan for Immigration containing provisions to establish legislation to deter illegal entry into the UK, thereby breaking the business model of criminal people smuggling networks and protecting the lives of those they endanger. In July 2021, the Government introduced this legislation through the Nationality and Borders Bill.

We continue to take action against the highly dangerous and illegal entry methods facilitated by these gangss. Police patrols on French beaches and enhanced intelligence sharing between our security and law enforcement agencies has helped to prevent around 8,000 people from making the Channel crossing to the UK so far this year

The Government has taken steps to tackle organised crime on social media platforms, reducing the space in which gangss operate. In March 2021, I met with the National Crime Agency and senior representatives from social media companies to discuss how they can more effectively tackle oraganised crime online and a planned approach is being finalised.

Reinforcing this commitment, in June 2021 the Home Secretary wrote to CEOs of key social media companies urging them to do substantially more to proactively identify and remove posts promoting organised crime , particularly illegal Channel crossings.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish information on which legal routes are available to asylum seekers in camps in Greece’s Aegean Islands who are seeking to be reunited with family in the UK.

The UK already provides a safe and legal route to bring families together through its refugee family reunion policy. The current refugee family reunion policy allows a partner and children under 18 of those granted protection in the UK to join them here, if they formed part of the family unit before the sponsor fled their country. Over 29,000 visas have been issued under this policy in the last 5 years. Under the family reunion policy, we do not restrict where someone has to be in order to make an application.

As set out in the New Plan for Immigration, the Government committed to review safe and legal routes to the UK and has a statutory duty to conduct a public consultation on family reunion for UASC in the EU. We have now completed the consultation as part of the wider consultation on the New Plan for Immigration. We have carefully considered the responses and a report, laid in Parliament on 22 July 2021, on the outcome of the review of safe and legal routes confirms the UK wants to be bold and ambitious in the safe and legal routes it provides.

New Plan for Immigration - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to remove foreign national offenders.

The Government is clear foreign nationals who abuse our hospitality by committing crimes should be in no doubt of our determination to deport them.

Any foreign national who is convicted of a crime and given a prison sentence is considered for deportation at the earliest opportunity and since January 2019 we have removed 7,985.

For non-European Economic Area (EEA) nationals, deportation will be pursued where it is conducive to the public good including where a person receives a custodial sentence of 12 months or more, commits an offence that caused serious harm or is a persistent offender. European Economic Area (EEA) and Swiss citizens, and their family members, who are protected by the EU Withdrawal Agreement Act 2020 are considered for deportation on public policy and public security grounds where it concerns conduct (including any criminal convictions relating to it) committed on or before 31 December 2020.

Our New Plan for Immigration and provisions in the Nationality and Borders Bill will make it easier to deport foreign criminals with no right to be in the UK and keep our citizens safe. Further information can be found in New Plan for Immigration: policy statement (accessible) - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a child rights impact assessment was carried out for the Nationality and Borders Bill; and if it was, whether it will be published.

This Government has a strong track record of helping child asylum seekers. In the year ending March 2021, we granted protection or other leave to over 2,333 vulnerable children, and over 46,000 since 2010.

Through the Nationality and Borders Bill, we will strengthen our ability to help those who need our help, while preventing abuse of the system and the criminality associated with it.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to conclude a bespoke visa waiver agreement with the EU for the creative sector.

UK citizens going to the EU for shorts stays and EU, EEA and Swiss citizens visiting the UK are already visa free. Musicians and performers can already undertake short-term touring without visas and permits in at least 18 Member States.

EU visa waiver agreements are also subject to the provisions of Article 6 (3) of REGULATION (EU) 2018/1806 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL which sets out an individual Member State may still decide to require a visa for short stays for people carrying out a paid activity during their stay.

The EU’s draft text for the Trade and Cooperation Agreement included a visa waiver agreement, which would have prohibited the parties from introducing visa requirement on visitors from the other party unless those visitors were carrying out a paid activity (i.e. service supply or performance) during their stay. In the event they were carrying out a paid activity individual Member States could apply a visa requirement to this category of service suppliers. The ability of the UK to apply visas would have been restricted only to reciprocating by applying a visa requirement to the same category supplier for the individual member state.

The EU’s proposal would also have prevented the UK from introducing or maintaining visit visas on any future EU Member State, not just on existing ones. In effect handing to the European Union the ability to make a country a non-visa national for travel to the UK without the consent or approval of the UK.

The Government is now focusing on bilateral engagement with Member States to encourage them to more closely align with the UK's generous regime.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate Sir Craig Mackey made of how much additional funding would be required to enable UK law enforcement to successfully tackle serious and organised crime.

My department published the key findings of Sir Craig Mackey’s Review on 16 March 2021. The recent Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy set out the Government’s priorities for tackling serious and organised crime in response to Sir Craig’s Review, including strengthening the NCA and increasing regional and local policing capacity. We will assess future funding needed as part of the next spending review.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many full-time equivalent staff have been employed by the National Crime Agency to tackle economic crime in each of the last three years.

In terms of the operational response, the Agency has a wide range of capabilities and functions that operate across different threat areas including economic crime. We are unable to provide a figure for the number of full-time equivalent staff who have been employed by the National Crime Agency (NCA) to tackle economic crime for the past three years as many units contribute to the efforts in different and varying amounts.

However, we are able to report on the number of staff within the Economic Crime Command which includes the National Economic Crime Centre (NECC) and the UK Financial Intelligence Unit (UKFIU).

The following table contains the approximate number of full time equivalent (FTE) staff for the Economic Crime Command, UK Financial Intelligence Unit and NECC since 2018. This is therefore a partial figure that does not reflect, for example, officers in Intelligence and Investigations Commands who conduct work in this threat area.

ECC (NECC and UKFIU) FTE (approximate)

2019 FY end

240

2020 FY end

300

2021 FY end

350

An important element of tackling economic crime and illicit finance is by denying criminals the benefit of their crimes. This disrupts organised crime groups and illicit finance flows and on this we have achieved some significant successes. The NCA’s success in denying criminal assets over the same three years totals £646.5m, which could have derived from any serious and organised crime threat. This demonstrates one element of our impact across all illicit finance for which we have readily available data.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much and what proportion of the National Crime Agency's budget has been spent on tackling economic crime in each of the last three years.

The National Crime Agency (NCA)’s overall budget is distributed across the agency according to need and operational priority. As serious and organised crime threats change, the agency retains the ability to flex its resources to react. It is not possible to provide a breakdown of budget allocated to tackling economic crime as there are a number of agency wide capabilities and functions that all commands have access to. We are, however, able to provide the total expenditure by the National Economic Crime Centre (NECC) which provides a partial figure of expenditure for our overall response to tackling economic crime.

The NCA Annual Report and Accounts provide the following Gross Expenditure over the past three years:

2018/19 - Gross expenditure for the Prosperity Command - £22.0m (Note the NECC was formally launched on 31 October 2018, before which the NCA’s Prosperity Command fulfilled some of the same functions. In the 2019/20 Annual Report, an apportionment of £6.7m in 2018/19 was made for the NECC.)

2019/20 - Gross expenditure for the NECC - £30.0m

2020/21 – Gross expenditure for the NECC - £35.5m

An important element of tackling economic crime and illicit finance is by denying criminals the benefit of their crimes. This disrupts organised crime groups and illicit finance flows and on this we have achieved some significant successes. The NCA’s success in denying criminal assets over the same three years totals £646.5m, which could have derived from any serious and organised crime threat. This demonstrates one element of our impact across all illicit finance for which we have readily available data.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she or any of the Ministers of her Department use personal email addresses to conduct Government business.

Home Office Ministers have confirmed they do not use personal accounts to conduct government business.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)