Diana Johnson Portrait

Diana Johnson

Labour - Kingston upon Hull North

First elected: 5th May 2005


Protection from Sex-based Harassment in Public Bill
8th Feb 2023 - 22nd Feb 2023
Offenders (Day of Release from Detention) Bill
1st Feb 2023 - 8th Feb 2023
Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament
13th Jul 2020 - 9th Feb 2022
Dormant Assets Bill [HL]
15th Dec 2021 - 11th Jan 2022
Draft Domestic Abuse Bill (Joint)
27th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Health and Social Care Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Draft Health Service Safety Investigation Bill (Joint Committee)
17th Apr 2018 - 27th Jul 2018
Draft Health Service Safety Investigations Bill (Joint Committee)
17th Apr 2018 - 27th Jul 2018
Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
18th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)
8th Oct 2010 - 18th Sep 2015
Shadow Minister (Health)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Children, Schools and Families) (Schools)
9th Jun 2009 - 13th May 2010
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
2nd Jul 2007 - 10th Jun 2009
Public Accounts Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 5th Dec 2005


Oral Question
Monday 4th December 2023
14:30
Oral Question No. 25
What recent discussions he has had with local authorities on setting council tax levels for the 2024-25 financial year.
Division Votes
Wednesday 29th November 2023
Data Protection and Digital Information Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 140 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 194 Noes - 275
Speeches
Tuesday 28th November 2023
Net Migration Figures
Although today we are discussing one single set of net migration figures, we know that net migration has hugely varying …
Written Answers
Tuesday 28th November 2023
Gaza: Civilians
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what steps his Department is taking to help support …
Early Day Motions
Monday 16th October 2017
CONTAMINATED BLOOD INQUIRY
That this House welcomes the Prime Minister's announcement of an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal; thanks the Rt. Rev …
Bills
Monday 20th June 2022
Telecommunications Infrastructure (Consultation) Bill 2022-23
A Bill to make provision about mandatory local consultation in relation to the installation of telecommunications infrastructure in residential areas; …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 20th March 2023
1. Employment and earnings
12 January 2023, received £225 for completing a survey in November 2022. Hours: 1 hr. Fee, net of tax, donated …
EDM signed
Monday 12th October 2020
Debenhams redundancies
That this House condemns the way in which Debenhams has implemented the redundancies of thousands of workers during the Coronavirus …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 13th June 2023
Spiking Bill 2022-23
A Bill to make provision about the law in relation to administering or attempting to administer drugs, alcohol or any …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Diana Johnson has voted in 629 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Diana Johnson Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(52 debate interactions)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
(41 debate interactions)
Penny Mordaunt (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(39 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(132 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(85 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(59 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(47 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Illegal Migration Act 2023
(5,429 words contributed)
Criminal Justice Bill 2023-24
(2,141 words contributed)
Dormant Assets Act 2022
(1,591 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Diana Johnson's debates

Kingston upon Hull North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Kingston upon Hull North signature proportion
Petitions with most Kingston upon Hull North signatures
Diana Johnson has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Diana Johnson

12th October 2020
Diana Johnson signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 12th October 2020

Debenhams redundancies

Tabled by: Andrew Gwynne (Labour - Denton and Reddish)
That this House condemns the way in which Debenhams has implemented the redundancies of thousands of workers during the Coronavirus outbreak; notes that staff were told via conference call that they would be made redundant with 3 days’ notice and 3 days’ pay and that there was no consultation or …
29 signatures
(Most recent: 10 Nov 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 22
Scottish National Party: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Independent: 1
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
14th July 2020
Diana Johnson signed this EDM on Wednesday 22nd July 2020

Restoration of online democracy and equal rights for MPs

Tabled by: Geraint Davies (Independent - Swansea West)
That this House believes that the decision to discontinue the ability of elected MPs to participate remotely in parliamentary debates, bill committees and by electronic voting is unlawful and discriminatory because it means that up to 250 elected MPs, who are clinically shielded to protect themselves or their families from …
66 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Sep 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 33
Scottish National Party: 13
Liberal Democrat: 8
Independent: 5
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alba Party: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Conservative: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Diana Johnson's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Diana Johnson, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


3 Urgent Questions tabled by Diana Johnson

3 Adjournment Debates led by Diana Johnson

Wednesday 17th March 2021
Wednesday 22nd January 2020

8 Bills introduced by Diana Johnson


A Bill to make provision about mandatory local consultation in relation to the installation of telecommunications infrastructure in residential areas; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Monday 20th June 2022

A Bill to criminalise paying for sex; to decriminalise selling sex; to create offences relating to enabling or profiting from another person's sexual exploitation; to make associated provision about sexual exploitation online; to make provision for support services for victims of sexual exploitation; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 9th December 2020
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the law relating to abortion in England and Wales, and Northern Ireland; to remove criminal liability in respect of abortion performed with the consent of the pregnant woman up to the twenty-fourth week of pregnancy; to repeal sections 59 and 60 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861; to create offences of termination of a pregnancy after its twenty-fourth week and non-consensual termination of a pregnancy; to amend the law relating to conscientious objection to participation in abortion treatment; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 23rd October 2018
(Read Debate)

A Bill to regulate the termination of pregnancies by medical practitioners and to repeal certain criminal offences relating to such terminations; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Monday 13th March 2017
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to make provision to include education about sex and relationships, resilience against bullying and sexual abuse and ending violence against women and girls in the national curriculum; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 21st October 2014

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for the statutory regulation of sex establishments; to amend the Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1982; to require local authorities to adhere to the existing voluntary licensing framework for sex establishments; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 28th January 2014

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to enable women to be consecrated as bishops in the Church of England; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 13th March 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to make provision to include relationship, drug and alcohol education in the national curriculum; and for connected purposes

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 17th October 2012

21 Bills co-sponsored by Diana Johnson

Spiking Bill 2022-23
Sponsor - Richard Graham (Con)

Same Sex Marriage (Church of England) Bill 2022-23
Sponsor - Ben Bradshaw (Lab)

Lithium-ion Battery Storage (Fire Safety and Environmental Permits) Bill 2022-23
Sponsor - Maria Miller (Con)

Fertility Treatment (Transparency) Bill 2022-23
Sponsor - Alex Davies-Jones (Lab)

Employment Equality (Insurance etc) Bill 2022-23
Sponsor - Natalie Elphicke (Con)

Community Wealth Fund Bill 2021-22
Sponsor - Paul Howell (Con)

Tibet (Reciprocal Access) Bill 2019-21
Sponsor - Tim Loughton (Con)

Local Electricity Bill 2019-21
Sponsor - Peter Aldous (Con)

Company Transparency (Carbon in Supply Chains) Bill 2019-21
Sponsor - Karen Bradley (Con)

Demonstrations (Abortion Clinics) Bill 2019-21
Sponsor - Rupa Huq (Lab)

Reservoirs (Flood Risk) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Holly Lynch (Lab)

Health Impacts (Public Sector Duty) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Luciana Berger (LD)

Public Sector Supply Chains (Project Bank Accounts) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Debbie Abrahams (Lab)

Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act 2018
Sponsor - Karen Buck (Lab)

Local Health Scrutiny Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Gareth Snell (LAB)

Representation of the People (Young People's Enfranchisement and Education) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Jim McMahon (LAB)

Fetal Dopplers (Regulation) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Antoinette Sandbach (LD)

Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act 2018
Sponsor - Chris Bryant (Lab)

Unlawful Killing (Recovery of Remains) Bill 2016-17
Sponsor - Conor McGinn (Ind)

Financial Regulation of Funeral Services Bill 2016-17
Sponsor - Neil Gray (SNP)

House of Lords Reform (Exclusion of Hereditary Peers) Bill 2015-16
Sponsor - David Hanson (Lab)


1099 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps the Government is taking to tackle the rise in the prevalence of spiking.

This is an issue which the government takes very seriously. The public have a right to feel safe on the streets and they expect the government, law enforcement, and the private sector to ensure this.

Action which the Government is already taking on spiking includes:

  • Supporting the rollout of pilot initiatives to improve the safety of women in public spaces, including in the night-time economy.
  • Working with the police to better understand the nature of spiking. This will inform a statutory report on the nature and prevalence of spiking. The report is due 12 months from the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill receiving Royal Assent.
  • The Home Office is also considering the case for a criminal offence to target spiking directly. We will not hesitate to legislate if necessary.
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Second Interim Report of the Infected Blood Inquiry, published 5 April 2023, if he will take steps to establish an Arms Length Body to administer the compensation scheme for individuals (a) infected and (b) affected by contaminated blood.

The Government has committed to responding to the recommendations in the second interim report, including the recommendation to establish an arms-length body, following the publication of the Inquiry’s final report.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
16th Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many meetings (a) he and (b) his Department has had with individuals infected and affected by contaminated blood in each of the last five years.

It is a measure of the scale of the infected blood scandal that the statutory Inquiry has over 2,000 infected and affected core participants. My predecessors as Ministers responsible for the Infected Blood Inquiry held formal roundtable meetings with groups of infected and affected people and representatives of campaign groups in 2019, 2020, 2021 and 2023, at which my predecessors were able to hear directly from infected and affected people. Further meetings took place with individuals and their Members of Parliament once each in 2021 and 2022.

In addition to this, my predecessors have had informal meetings with groups of individuals while attending hearings of the Inquiry and in the margins of a Westminster Hall debate. My officials often correspond with and speak to individuals and campaigners in the course of their work.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
16th Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when his Department will implement Recommendation 12 of the Second Interim Report of the Infected Blood Inquiry, published 5 April 2023.

Work is currently underway across Government to give thorough consideration to each of the recommendations that Sir Brian made in his second interim report. The Government is committed to acting swiftly in response to the final report of the Infected Blood Inquiry, and is awaiting its publication by the Inquiry.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
3rd May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish a copy of his ministerial diary for the period between January and March 2023 prior to its publication on gov.uk.

I thank the Rt Hon Lady for her questions. I appreciate the Rt Hon Lady has also raised related issues in business questions and in a point of order.

I initially made a statement on the infected blood scandal to the House on 15 December in which on behalf of the Government I accepted that there is a moral case for compensation to be paid.

I followed this up by meeting victims of the scandal on 7 March. I am most grateful to the APPG, with the Rt Hon Lady and the Father of the House in the Chair, for facilitating this meeting.

At a very early date after the publication of Sir Brian Langstaff’s Second Interim Report, I came to the House to make a further statement on 19 April to give Rt Hon and Hon Members the opportunity to react to the report and ask questions of the Government.

I wrote to the Rt Hon Lady following publication of the report setting out that I looked forward to further engagement.

I made clear in my statement that I was open to further meetings with the victims of this scandal while we progress the work required to respond to Sir Brian.

I would like to assure the Rt Hon Lady, as I made clear in the statement, of my determination to progress this issue and respond as swiftly as possible. Work continues on the formulation of policy to achieve this objective, including ministerial level meetings chaired by me as sponsor minister for the Inquiry. As is usual, I do not intend to publish details of internal government meetings conducted to inform policy decisions.

On the specific issue of the Devolved Administrations and as I set out in my answer to PQ181290, PQ181291, PQ181293 and PQ181294, we worked closely with the Devolved Administrations to achieve the successful payment of interim compensation to infected victims. Liaison has continued since then at official level.

I anticipated meeting Ministers in the Devolved Administrations following the publication of the Second Interim Report, and I look forward to doing so and hearing their input towards our consideration of the Report. However, I would draw the Rt Hon Lady’s attention to the fact that both Sir Robert Francis and Sir Brian Langstaff recommend a compensation scheme established and funded by the Government of the United Kingdom.

It is also the case, as I said in my statement of 19 April, that Sir Brian differs significantly from Sir Robert in recommending a single UK scheme whereas Sir Robert recommended the utilisation of the existing payment structures operated, inter alia, by the Devolved Administrations. The Rt Hon Lady will appreciate that on this as in many areas of Sir Brian’s Second Interim Report there are significant policy issues that need to be considered by the UK Government as we formulate our response, on which we are working at pace.

3rd May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to publish his full ministerial diary including internal meetings for the period between January to March 2023.

I thank the Rt Hon Lady for her questions. I appreciate the Rt Hon Lady has also raised related issues in business questions and in a point of order.

I initially made a statement on the infected blood scandal to the House on 15 December in which on behalf of the Government I accepted that there is a moral case for compensation to be paid.

I followed this up by meeting victims of the scandal on 7 March. I am most grateful to the APPG, with the Rt Hon Lady and the Father of the House in the Chair, for facilitating this meeting.

At a very early date after the publication of Sir Brian Langstaff’s Second Interim Report, I came to the House to make a further statement on 19 April to give Rt Hon and Hon Members the opportunity to react to the report and ask questions of the Government.

I wrote to the Rt Hon Lady following publication of the report setting out that I looked forward to further engagement.

I made clear in my statement that I was open to further meetings with the victims of this scandal while we progress the work required to respond to Sir Brian.

I would like to assure the Rt Hon Lady, as I made clear in the statement, of my determination to progress this issue and respond as swiftly as possible. Work continues on the formulation of policy to achieve this objective, including ministerial level meetings chaired by me as sponsor minister for the Inquiry. As is usual, I do not intend to publish details of internal government meetings conducted to inform policy decisions.

On the specific issue of the Devolved Administrations and as I set out in my answer to PQ181290, PQ181291, PQ181293 and PQ181294, we worked closely with the Devolved Administrations to achieve the successful payment of interim compensation to infected victims. Liaison has continued since then at official level.

I anticipated meeting Ministers in the Devolved Administrations following the publication of the Second Interim Report, and I look forward to doing so and hearing their input towards our consideration of the Report. However, I would draw the Rt Hon Lady’s attention to the fact that both Sir Robert Francis and Sir Brian Langstaff recommend a compensation scheme established and funded by the Government of the United Kingdom.

It is also the case, as I said in my statement of 19 April, that Sir Brian differs significantly from Sir Robert in recommending a single UK scheme whereas Sir Robert recommended the utilisation of the existing payment structures operated, inter alia, by the Devolved Administrations. The Rt Hon Lady will appreciate that on this as in many areas of Sir Brian’s Second Interim Report there are significant policy issues that need to be considered by the UK Government as we formulate our response, on which we are working at pace.

25th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish his ministerial diary for the period between January and March 2023.

Ministers regularly meet with departmental officials and external stakeholders. As is precedent, details of Ministerial meetings with external organisations and individuals are published quarterly in arrears on GOV.UK.

20th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, who attends the cross-departmental meetings overseeing the work coordinated by the Cabinet Office on the Infected Blood Inquiry.

The Cabinet Office chairs a range of cross governmental meetings at official and ministerial level from departments across Whitehall to coordinate the Government’s response on the Infected Blood Inquiry. The issue of compensation is complex, and we are working at pace across Government to ensure that we are able to respond quickly to Sir Brian Langstaff’s final report.

I refer the honourable Member to the statement made on Wednesday April 19 2023, in response to the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry’s Second Interim Report.

20th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, who is the chair of the cross-departmental group overseeing the work informed by the Infected Blood Inquiry.

The Cabinet Office chairs a range of cross governmental meetings at official and ministerial level from departments across Whitehall to coordinate the Government’s response on the Infected Blood Inquiry. The issue of compensation is complex, and we are working at pace across Government to ensure that we are able to respond quickly to Sir Brian Langstaff’s final report.

I refer the honourable Member to the statement made on Wednesday April 19 2023, in response to the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry’s Second Interim Report.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many meetings he held with the devolved Administrations on the infected blood (a) inquiry and (b) compensation framework in March 2023.

The UK Government liaised closely with the Devolved Administrations on the interim compensation paid in October 2022. Sir Brian Langstaff has recommended that there should be a single UK-wide scheme to issue compensation whilst maintaining the existing support schemes. As I said in my December statement, the Government is committed to liaising with the Devolved Administrations on this issue, and we will continue to do so.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many meetings he held with the devolved Administrations on the infected blood (a) inquiry and (b) compensation framework in February 2023.

The UK Government liaised closely with the Devolved Administrations on the interim compensation paid in October 2022. Sir Brian Langstaff has recommended that there should be a single UK-wide scheme to issue compensation whilst maintaining the existing support schemes. As I said in my December statement, the Government is committed to liaising with the Devolved Administrations on this issue, and we will continue to do so.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many meetings he held with the devolved Administrations on the infected blood (a) inquiry and (b) compensation framework in January 2023.

The UK Government liaised closely with the Devolved Administrations on the interim compensation paid in October 2022. Sir Brian Langstaff has recommended that there should be a single UK-wide scheme to issue compensation whilst maintaining the existing support schemes. As I said in my December statement, the Government is committed to liaising with the Devolved Administrations on this issue, and we will continue to do so.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many meetings he held with the devolved administrations on the infected blood inquiry or infected blood compensation framework in December 2022.

The UK Government liaised closely with the Devolved Administrations on the interim compensation paid in October 2022. Sir Brian Langstaff has recommended that there should be a single UK-wide scheme to issue compensation whilst maintaining the existing support schemes. As I said in my December statement, the Government is committed to liaising with the Devolved Administrations on this issue, and we will continue to do so.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many meetings the Cross-Departmental group overseeing the Government's infected blood inquiry response have been held since September 2022.

Meetings continue to be held at Ministerial and Official level to progress the Government’s response to Sir Brian Langsatff’s work. As set out in the statement of Wednesday 19th April, this is a priority for the Government.

22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether it is his policy for the Buying Better Foods framework to encourage SMES into the market; and if he will make a statement.

We are increasing opportunities for SMEs in a variety of ways - from transparently publishing contract pipelines to simplifying bidding processes. The new procurement regime this Conservative government is putting in place with our new freedoms outside the European Union will create a simpler and significantly more transparent system that will further open up public procurement to SMEs so that they can compete for and win more public contracts.

The latest procurement figures for 2020/21 show that £19.3bn was paid to SMEs to help deliver vital public services. This figure is an increase of £3.7bn on the previous year and the highest since a Conservative led Government began recording the amount spent on SMEs in 2013, something not done under the last Labour government.

SMEs in the food supply chain have been consulted as part of supplier engagement activities for the proposed Buying Better Foods framework. Feedback from these activities shaped the procurement strategy for the framework agreement. SME producers will have increased opportunities to work with the public sector.

Customers will be able to request nominated local products (subject to the local supplier/producer meeting the minimum technical standards). These products would be consolidated into a single delivery with their food order. This is in addition to the SME’s already supplying the Wholesale market. This agreement will further support SMEs as KPIs will be established within the procurement evaluation to establish and monitor SME participation with action plans for growth; giving more data and transparency within the sector.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will take steps to increase the proportion of public procurement spending that goes to small and medium enterprises; and what assessment he has made of the potential impact of the single buyer agreement for public sector food on those businesses.

We are increasing opportunities for SMEs in a variety of ways - from transparently publishing contract pipelines to simplifying bidding processes. The new procurement regime this Conservative government is putting in place with our new freedoms outside the European Union will create a simpler and significantly more transparent system that will further open up public procurement to SMEs so that they can compete for and win more public contracts.

The latest procurement figures for 2020/21 show that £19.3bn was paid to SMEs to help deliver vital public services. This figure is an increase of £3.7bn on the previous year and the highest since a Conservative led Government began recording the amount spent on SMEs in 2013, something not done under the last Labour government.

SMEs in the food supply chain have been consulted as part of supplier engagement activities for the proposed Buying Better Foods framework. Feedback from these activities shaped the procurement strategy for the framework agreement. SME producers will have increased opportunities to work with the public sector.

Customers will be able to request nominated local products (subject to the local supplier/producer meeting the minimum technical standards). These products would be consolidated into a single delivery with their food order. This is in addition to the SME’s already supplying the Wholesale market. This agreement will further support SMEs as KPIs will be established within the procurement evaluation to establish and monitor SME participation with action plans for growth; giving more data and transparency within the sector.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what food and drink wholesale companies were consulted on the Buying Better Food Agreement PIN.

A cross-section of the food and drink supply chain has been engaged and consulted through CCS market engagement process. These include micro SME producers, who this Conservative Government knows are the backbone of the national food system, to Tier 1 national providers.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what comparative assessment he has made of the potential impact the (a) single supplier Buying Better Foods framework and (b) existing supplier landscape will have on levelling up outcomes.

This is a national agreement, and will serve customers across the UK. Distribution points will be regionally located to service these needs, providing employment and supporting local communities in all regions.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
27th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking with Cabinet colleagues to support veterans and their families with the cost of living crisis.

Through its Veterans’ Welfare Service, Veterans UK provides one-to-one welfare support and advice to veterans or anyone supporting a veteran, their families and dependants. We are also working with the charitable sector to continue to signpost dedicated support available to veterans.

We are also providing significant support to help people through these tough times by holding down energy bills and delivering up to £1,350 in direct cash payments to millions of vulnerable households.

The Government is committed to supporting all households with the current cost of living, through the Help for Households initiative. This includes serving personnel and veterans. Veterans are able to access all the support that the rest of the UK is eligible for, including the Energy Price Guarantee, Cost of Living Payment and the Disability Cost of Living Payment.

Tackling inflation is this government’s number one priority. We have a plan that will help to more than halve inflation this year and lay the foundations for long-term growth to improve living standards for everyone, including veterans.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
27th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the UK's cyber resilience.

As the Government outlined in the National Cyber Strategy 2022, significant progress has been made in the last decade in improving the UK’s cyber resilience but further work remains.

The Strategy sets out the Government’s ambitions to raise levels of resilience across all sectors by 2025, with a particular focus on our Critical National Infrastructure and making government an exemplar. We are also strengthening protections to online services and connected consumer devices to reduce the cyber security burden on UK citizens.

The Government continually assesses cyber risk and implementation of the National Cyber Strategy and we will publish annual reports on our progress.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
27th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make an assessment of the value for money of the use of external consultants by the civil service.

Consultants can bring highly valuable expertise to support Government in delivering outstanding public projects. It is essential that Government continues to be able to access the right skills at the right time, but also that we do so in the right way and deliver the desired outcomes. Government is committed to working together to get the most value from our spend and to achieve the highest quality results.

The Consultancy Playbook, published in May 2021 alongside the Sourcing Playbook, provides additional guidance when buying consultancy services. This supports Government’s agenda to commission and engage with consultants more effectively, achieving better outcomes, better value for money, and improved civil service capability through the transferral of knowledge and skills.

Consultancy spend by department is published on GOV.UK

27th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has taken recent steps to help support small and medium-sized enterprises bidding for public contracts.

The Procurement Bill, currently being considered by Parliament, significantly strengthens the grounds under which suppliers that present unacceptable risks can be prevented from participating in a procurement.

As part of this, a new ground for exclusion will allow contracting authorities to exclude suppliers which pose a threat to national security. The Bill also provides flexibility for contracts to be upgraded to refresh technology and avoid gaps in capability.

The Government has taken steps to help support small and medium-sized enterprises bidding for public contracts in a variety of ways - from transparently publishing contract pipelines to simplifying bidding processes. The new procurement regime will create a simpler and significantly more transparent system that will give opportunities for businesses of all sizes to compete for public sector work.The Bill includes a specific duty on contracting authorities to have regard to the particular barriers facing SMEs and strengthens prompt payment with 30 day payment terms applying contractually throughout the public sector supply chain.

This is one of the ways we are helping grow the economy, creating better-paid jobs and opportunity right across the country - one of the Government’s five key priorities.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
27th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Government is taking to increase cyber resilience in public procurement.

The Procurement Bill, currently being considered by Parliament, significantly strengthens the grounds under which suppliers that present unacceptable risks can be prevented from participating in a procurement.

As part of this, a new ground for exclusion will allow contracting authorities to exclude suppliers which pose a threat to national security. The Bill also provides flexibility for contracts to be upgraded to refresh technology and avoid gaps in capability.

The Government has taken steps to help support small and medium-sized enterprises bidding for public contracts in a variety of ways - from transparently publishing contract pipelines to simplifying bidding processes. The new procurement regime will create a simpler and significantly more transparent system that will give opportunities for businesses of all sizes to compete for public sector work.The Bill includes a specific duty on contracting authorities to have regard to the particular barriers facing SMEs and strengthens prompt payment with 30 day payment terms applying contractually throughout the public sector supply chain.

This is one of the ways we are helping grow the economy, creating better-paid jobs and opportunity right across the country - one of the Government’s five key priorities.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
27th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Government is taking to strengthen national security through public procurement.

The Procurement Bill, currently being considered by Parliament, significantly strengthens the grounds under which suppliers that present unacceptable risks can be prevented from participating in a procurement.

As part of this, a new ground for exclusion will allow contracting authorities to exclude suppliers which pose a threat to national security. The Bill also provides flexibility for contracts to be upgraded to refresh technology and avoid gaps in capability.

The Government has taken steps to help support small and medium-sized enterprises bidding for public contracts in a variety of ways - from transparently publishing contract pipelines to simplifying bidding processes. The new procurement regime will create a simpler and significantly more transparent system that will give opportunities for businesses of all sizes to compete for public sector work.The Bill includes a specific duty on contracting authorities to have regard to the particular barriers facing SMEs and strengthens prompt payment with 30 day payment terms applying contractually throughout the public sector supply chain.

This is one of the ways we are helping grow the economy, creating better-paid jobs and opportunity right across the country - one of the Government’s five key priorities.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
27th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent assessment he has made of the level of compliance with the Ministerial code.

The Prime Minister expects all Ministers to act in accordance with the Code and demonstrate integrity, professionalism and accountability. He has appointed Sir Laurie Magnus as the Independent Adviser on Ministers’ Interests to advise on matters relating to the Code.

27th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent discussions he has had with the chair of the covid-19 public inquiry on the progress of that inquiry.

The Cabinet Office, as sponsor department, has supported the Covid Inquiry with its practical set up. Under the Inquiries Act, the process, procedure and timing of the inquiry’s stages are matters for the independent inquiry Chair. Progress is well underway and details relating to the Inquiry’s planned and current work are available on the Covid-19 Inquiry’s website.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
30th Nov 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, with reference to his oral contribution of 17 November on G20, Official Report, column 835, when he plans to write to the Rt hon. Member for Kingston upon Hull North about unaccompanied children under the age of eight being held at Manston on 17 November.

A reply has been sent.

Rishi Sunak
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
26th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether every individual affected by the infected blood scandal who is eligible for an interim compensation payment of £100,000 will receive their payment by the end of October 2022.

I can confirm infected individuals and bereaved partners who are registered with any of the four UK infected blood support schemes received their payments by 28 October.

4th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent assessment he has made of the rates of economic inactivity within Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities in the UK.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Rt hon. Member's Parliamentary Questions of 4 July is attached.

4th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent estimate he has made of the rates of economic inactivity within Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities in the UK.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Rt hon. Member's Parliamentary Questions of 4 July is attached.

17th Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish Sir Robert Francis' Infected Blood Compensation Study before the Easter recess 2022.

It is my intention to publish Sir Robert Francis’ study alongside the Government’s response. Before I am able to do so, you will understand that work must be undertaken within Government to formalise our response. That work is already underway.

I recognise how important it is for the Inquiry and its core participants to have sufficient time to consider the study before Sir Robert gives evidence to the Inquiry. It is my intention to publish the study alongside the Government’s response as soon as possible.

1st Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to Answer of 24 February 2022 to Question 125039, what plans he has to publish Sir Robert Francis' Infected Blood compensation framework study before the publication of the Government's response.

I refer the hon Member to the answer I gave on 24 February to PQ 125060.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department plans to publish Sir Robert Francis' Infected Blood compensation framework study on the same day that it receives it.

The study will report to the Paymaster General no later than 14 March 2022. The Government will give full consideration to Sir Robert's study - which is separate from the independent public inquiry. The Government's response and Sir Robert's study will be published.

2nd Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the Government plans to respond to the final report from Sir Robert Francis’s study on a compensation framework for people affected by contaminated blood products.

I refer the Hon. member to the answer given to PQ97058 on 7 January 2022.

2nd Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to publish the final report from Sir Robert Francis’s study on a compensation framework for people affected by contaminated blood products.

I refer the Hon. member to the answer given to PQ97058 on 7 January 2022.

19th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people under 30 with pre-existing conditions who died from covid-19.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

19th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people under the age of 30 without pre-existing medical conditions who died from covid-19.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

13th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Written Statement of 25 March 2021 HCWS895 on Infected Blood Update, if he will publish the appeals processes to be used by the devolved Nations of the UK in respect of infected blood support schemes where people disagree with an assessment.

Discussions were held between officials from across the United Kingdom to understand the current non-discretionary support offered by the four support schemes and the changes that would be required to bring greater parity of support for those infected and affected by the contaminated blood tragedy. During discussions the principle of uplifting beneficiaries to the most generous support provided across the four schemes where possible was applied, resulting in the changes announced on 25 March 2021.

The support schemes are devolved and each scheme has its own appeals process, except for Northern Ireland, who use the English appeals panel. These processes are stated on their respective websites, which are publicly available. Northern Ireland has a bespoke process and the details are available directly from the Scheme manager.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to Written Ministerial Statement on Infected Blood Update, published 25 March 2021, if he will detail the process that was used by the different nations of the UK infected blood support schemes to calculate parity payments.

Discussions were held between officials from across the United Kingdom to understand the current non-discretionary support offered by the four support schemes and the changes that would be required to bring greater parity of support for those infected and affected by the contaminated blood tragedy. During discussions the principle of uplifting beneficiaries to the most generous support provided across the four schemes where possible was applied, resulting in the changes announced on 25 March 2021.

The support schemes are devolved and each scheme has its own appeals process, except for Northern Ireland, who use the English appeals panel. These processes are stated on their respective websites, which are publicly available. Northern Ireland has a bespoke process and the details are available directly from the Scheme manager.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
18th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 17 May 2021 to Question 140, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of adopting a zero covid-19 strategy; and whether the Government made such an assessment as part of its public health strategy.

On 22 February, the Government published the ‘COVID-19 Response - Spring 2021’, providing a roadmap out of lockdown restrictions in England. I refer the hon. Member to the Prime Minister’s statement when presenting this to Parliament, where he said that there is no credible route to a zero-covid Britain.

In the meantime, the vaccination programme continues at pace. However as we have set out in our roadmap, no vaccine is 100% effective and, even when vaccinated, there is still a chance people can contract the virus and pass it on. In time, scientists expect COVID-19 to become endemic, meaning the virus will reach a stable, and hopefully manageable level.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
11th May 2021
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of adopting a zero covid-19 strategy.

On 22 February, the Government published the ‘COVID-19 Response - Spring 2021’, providing a roadmap out of lockdown restrictions in England. I refer the hon. Member to the Prime Minister’s statement when presenting this to Parliament.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, pursuant to the Answer of 4 March 2021 to Question 160582, when he plans to respond to the letters from the hon. Member for Kingston upon Hull North, of 25 February 2021 and 11 March 2021, on changes in the level of funding for Transport for the North.

A reply has been sent.

10th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department is taking to provide additional funding to (a) Scotland, (b) Wales and (c) Northern Ireland to support improvements and equality in the infected blood support schemes.

Work is currently underway across government to address the concerns of people infected and affected by infected blood, and the House will be updated shortly.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent progress has been made in making long-term, specialist psychological support available to people infected or affected by the contaminated blood scandal.

Work is currently underway across government to address the concerns of people infected and affected by infected blood, and the House will be updated shortly.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department has taken to include bereaved parents and children in the infected blood support schemes.

Work is currently underway across government to address the concerns of people infected and affected by infected blood, and the House will be updated shortly.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what progress has been made on ensuring that access to the infected blood support schemes is fair and equal throughout the UK.

Work is currently underway across government to address the concerns of people infected and affected by infected blood, and the House will be updated shortly.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, with reference to his oral contribution on 24 February 2021, Official Report, col 911, if he will make an assessment of the compatibility of his policies and the funding letter from the Department for Transport, sent to Transport for the North, dated 4 January 2021.

A reply will be sent in due course. Transport for the North’s overall funding means they will have access to over £70 million this coming financial year alone. We are building on the £29 billion we have invested in transport in the north since 2010 with: the Integrated Rail Plan bringing together HS2, Northern Powerhouse Rail, and our multi-billion-pound rail investment programme; our £5 billion investment into local bus and cycle links, including in the North; our £4.8 billion Levelling Up Fund which will benefit communities across the region; and our £4.2 billion intra-city transport fund, benefitting bus, train, and tram services across our 8 largest city regions. And at Budget, we reaffirmed our commitment to northern infrastructure, with:

  • The launch of the UK Infrastructure Bank, headquartered in Leeds;
  • A new government economic campus in Darlington;
  • Investment in offshore wind port infrastructure in Teesside and Humberside;
  • And over £450 million in Towns Fund Deals for towns across the north – investing in infrastructure and culture from Middlesbrough to Bolton, to Rochdale and Scunthorpe.
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, with reference to his oral contribution on 24 February 2021, Official Report, col 911, when he plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Kingston upon Hull North dated 25 February 2021 on changes in the level of funding for Transport for the North.

A reply will be sent in due course. Transport for the North’s overall funding means they will have access to over £70 million this coming financial year alone. We are building on the £29 billion we have invested in transport in the north since 2010 with: the Integrated Rail Plan bringing together HS2, Northern Powerhouse Rail, and our multi-billion-pound rail investment programme; our £5 billion investment into local bus and cycle links, including in the North; our £4.8 billion Levelling Up Fund which will benefit communities across the region; and our £4.2 billion intra-city transport fund, benefitting bus, train, and tram services across our 8 largest city regions. And at Budget, we reaffirmed our commitment to northern infrastructure, with:

  • The launch of the UK Infrastructure Bank, headquartered in Leeds;
  • A new government economic campus in Darlington;
  • Investment in offshore wind port infrastructure in Teesside and Humberside;
  • And over £450 million in Towns Fund Deals for towns across the north – investing in infrastructure and culture from Middlesbrough to Bolton, to Rochdale and Scunthorpe.
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions his Department (a) has had and (b) plans to have with local authority leaders on ensuring that the May 2021 local elections are covid-secure.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. The Government has confirmed that the set of local and PCC elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

The Government has published a clear Delivery Plan for the May elections, setting out how the Government will support local elections teams to deliver effective polls that are covid-secure for voters and staff.

Further guidance for all those involved in the elections will be available in due course and well in advance of the polls.

As has been the case under successive administrations, details of internal discussions are not usually disclosed. Details of ministers' meetings with external organisations and individuals are published on gov.uk periodically.

Julia Lopez
Minister on Leave (Minister of State)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what guidance his Department plans to issue to local authorities in the event that they are unable to secure insurance cover for covid-19 for volunteers and employees attending buildings used (a) as polling stations and (b) for counts during the local elections in May 2021.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. The Government has confirmed that the set of local and PCC elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

The Government has published a clear Delivery Plan for the May elections, setting out how the Government will support local elections teams to deliver effective polls that are covid-secure for voters and staff.

Further guidance for all those involved in the elections will be available in due course and well in advance of the polls.

As has been the case under successive administrations, details of internal discussions are not usually disclosed. Details of ministers' meetings with external organisations and individuals are published on gov.uk periodically.

Julia Lopez
Minister on Leave (Minister of State)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment his Department has made of the steps required to make buildings used (a) as polling stations and (b) for counts during the local elections in May 2021 covid-secure.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. The Government has confirmed that the set of local and PCC elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

The Government has published a clear Delivery Plan for the May elections, setting out how the Government will support local elections teams to deliver effective polls that are covid-secure for voters and staff.

Further guidance for all those involved in the elections will be available in due course and well in advance of the polls.

As has been the case under successive administrations, details of internal discussions are not usually disclosed. Details of ministers' meetings with external organisations and individuals are published on gov.uk periodically.

Julia Lopez
Minister on Leave (Minister of State)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when his Department plans to publish advice for returning officers organising the counts of the local elections in May 2021.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. The Government has confirmed that the set of local and PCC elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

The Government has published a clear Delivery Plan for the May elections, setting out how the Government will support local elections teams to deliver effective polls that are covid-secure for voters and staff.

Further guidance for all those involved in the elections will be available in due course and well in advance of the polls.

As has been the case under successive administrations, details of internal discussions are not usually disclosed. Details of ministers' meetings with external organisations and individuals are published on gov.uk periodically.

Julia Lopez
Minister on Leave (Minister of State)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment his Department has made of the number of people who can safely attend the counts of the local elections in May 2021 in the context of the covid-19 outbreak.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. The Government has confirmed that the set of local and PCC elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

The Government has published a clear Delivery Plan for the May elections, setting out how the Government will support local elections teams to deliver effective polls that are covid-secure for voters and staff.

Further guidance for all those involved in the elections will be available in due course and well in advance of the polls.

As has been the case under successive administrations, details of internal discussions are not usually disclosed. Details of ministers' meetings with external organisations and individuals are published on gov.uk periodically.

Julia Lopez
Minister on Leave (Minister of State)
12th Nov 2020
What plans the Government has to implement the recommendations of the Intelligence and Security Committee’s report on Russia.

The Government welcomed the ISC’s report on Russia. The Government's response to the report was published on the same day as its release.

22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to Answer of 2 June 2020 to Question 48959, when the Government plans to lift covid-19 restrictions to allow small, socially distant weddings to take place.

The Government understands the huge significance of weddings. We recognise that because weddings have not been able to take place in recent months this has caused difficulty and distress for many people. As set out in the Government’s COVID-19 recovery strategy, published in May, the Government has been examining how to enable people to gather in slightly larger groups better to facilitate small weddings. We have worked closely with faith leaders and local government on how best to achieve this. The Prime Minister announced on 23 June that wedding and civil partnership ceremonies will be able to take place in England from 4 July. People should avoid having a large ceremony, and should invite no more than thirty family and friends. Venues should ensure they are COVID-19 secure.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many covid-19 deaths have been recorded in care homes in Hull since the start of the outbreak.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

19th May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if the Government will make an assessment of the potential merits of easing covid-19 restrictions to allow weddings to take place with a limited number of attendees.

As stated in 'Our Plan To Rebuild', the Government's COVID-19 Recovery Strategy, the Government is examining how to enable people to gather in slightly larger groups to better facilitate small weddings.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
14th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of the inclusion of gender equality provisions in a future Free Trade Agreement with the Gulf Cooperation Council.

The Government is committed to advancing women’s economic empowerment globally, and Free Trade Agreements can help to address barriers faced disproportionately by women in trade.

In UK-Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations we seek to: promote women’s access to the FTA’s full benefits and opportunities as workers, business owners, entrepreneurs and consumers; recognise the importance of advancing women’s economic empowerment in trade; and uphold existing commitments relating to gender equality.

The UK and GCC are negotiating on these issues, and the Secretary of State has raised them with her counterparts, including during her visit to the GCC in May.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what discussions she has had with the Gulf Cooperation Council on including gender equality provisions in negotiations for a future Free Trade Agreement.

The Government is committed to advancing women’s economic empowerment globally, and Free Trade Agreements can help to address barriers faced disproportionately by women in trade.

In UK-Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations we seek to: promote women’s access to the FTA’s full benefits and opportunities as workers, business owners, entrepreneurs and consumers; recognise the importance of advancing women’s economic empowerment in trade; and uphold existing commitments relating to gender equality.

The UK and GCC are negotiating on these issues, and the Secretary of State has raised them with her counterparts, including during her visit to the GCC in May.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of solid carbon sequestration.

True solid carbon sequestration involves reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon, for example by using liquid metal reductants, before the solid carbon is stored in a carbon storage facility. This approach requires a high energy input and has not been studied in detail by the Department. Lower-energy methods of storing carbon as a solid are through the production of biochar or through mineralisation and the Department supports the development of these technologies through the Net Zero Innovation Portfolio.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero whether his Department is taking steps to support the scaling up of hydrogen production pathways beyond blue and green methods.

To get the scale and cost reductions needed to meet the UK's carbon budget and net zero commitments, the UK supports multiple hydrogen production routes. This includes blue and green hydrogen as well as less-established technologies, such as bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), thermochemical water splitting and methane pyrolysis, which could also play a role in the production mix. Further detail is set out in July 2022’s Hydrogen Strategy Update to the Market. The UK's low carbon hydrogen standard will ensure all supported technologies make a real contribution to our decarbonisation goals.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of placing local area energy planning on a statutory footing.

The Government is considering the role of local energy plans, working closely with Ofgem as part of its ongoing governance review into local energy institutions, and with other key stakeholders including the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities and UK Research and Innovation.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps he is taking to accelerate the installation of home insulation measures before winter 2023-24.

The Government is investing £6.6 billion over this parliament on decarbonising heat and energy efficiency measures and intends to launch the ECO+ scheme around spring 2023 running until March 2026 to provide further support for households to reduce their energy bills.

In 2022 a zero-rate of VAT was introduced on energy efficiency measures, and the Government launched a digitally led service ‘find ways to save energy in your home' ( https://www.gov.uk/improve-energy-efficiency). The site provides guidance helping consumers make their homes greener and cheaper to run, supported by a call centre for assistance.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps his Department has taken to help ensure the net zero strategy aligns with the air quality strategy.

In the period leading up to the publication of the Net Zero Strategy, there were numerous cross-government discussions, including on air quality, reflecting the contribution that every sector of the UK economy needs to make to climate change mitigation.

As set out in the Strategy, the Government will pursue options that leave the environment in a better state for the next generation by improving biodiversity, air quality, water quality, natural capital, and resilience to climate change where appropriate.

Air quality policy is led by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). The Department for Energy Security and Net Zero continues to engage regularly with Defra on a range of issues relating to improving air quality.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will take steps to put the local net zero forum on a statutory footing.

The Government recognises that local authorities can, and do, play an essential role in driving local climate action, with significant influence in many of the national priorities across energy, housing, and transport, which will be needed to achieve net zero. The Net Zero Strategy sets out the Government's commitments to enable local areas to deliver net zero.

The Local Net Zero Forum has met three times at official level and held a ministerial level meeting on 09 February. There are no plans to make the Forum a statutory body.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps he has taken to facilitate meetings with the net zero local forum.

The Government recognises that local authorities can, and do, play an essential role in driving local climate action, with significant influence in many of the national priorities across energy, housing, and transport, which will be needed to achieve net zero. The Net Zero Strategy sets out the Government's commitments to enable local areas to deliver net zero.

The Local Net Zero Forum has met three times at official level and held a ministerial level meeting on 09 February. There are no plans to make the Forum a statutory body.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
21st Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to give people who feature in pornographic material the right to withdraw their consent to that material being (a) published and (b) distributed.

The Online Safety Act, which received Royal Assent on 26 October, will bring in a new offence for intimate image abuse, which will criminalise the sharing of intimate images or films without consent.

Additionally, the government has committed to undertaking a review of pornography legislation, regulation and enforcement, which will assess whether the regulation of online pornography in the UK is fit for purpose in tackling exploitation and abuse.

Saqib Bhatti
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to require websites to verify that every person featured in pornographic content on their platform (a) is an adult and (b) gave their permission for the content to be published on that platform.

Any material featuring the sexual exploitation and abuse of children is captured by the criminal law. The Online Safety Act, which received Royal Assent on 26 October, requires in-scope services to put in place proactive, preventative measures to limit people’s exposure to child sexual exploitation and abuse content and remove it expeditiously. The Act will also bring in a new offence for intimate image abuse, which will criminalise the sharing of intimate images or films without consent.

Additionally, the government has committed to undertaking a review of pornography legislation, regulation and enforcement, which will assess whether the regulation of online pornography in the UK is fit for purpose in tackling exploitation and abuse.

Saqib Bhatti
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
16th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what the terms of reference are for the Pornography Review announced on 3 July 2023; and which Minister has lead responsibility for that review.

The Government is committed to undertaking the comprehensive review of pornography regulation, legislation, and enforcement in a timely fashion.

The review will be led by an independent lead reviewer and the Government will consider the eventual findings. The details of the lead reviewer and the review’s Terms of Reference will be announced in due course.

Saqib Bhatti
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, which Minister in which Department has lead responsibility for the pornography review.

Further details on the leadership of the Review will be set out in due course.

6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an estimate of the total funding provided through the Energy Bill Support Scheme in Kingston upon Hull.

The Government publishes monthly data about the payments made under the Energy Bills Support Scheme in England, Wales and Scotland. The EBSS payment data is collected from suppliers and broken down by energy supplier and payment type, but the Government does not collect or hold data relating to specific regions. The latest data were published on 20 December and monthly updates can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-bills-support-scheme-payments-made-by-electricity-suppliers-to-customers.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of businesses are owned by women in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

In the UK in 2021, 19% of SMEs with employees (a three-percentage point increase on 2020) and 20% of firms with no employees (21% in 2020) were female-led. The government does not hold regional data relating to the proportion of female-led business.

The Rose Review is supported by the industry-led ‘Rose Review Council for Investing in Female Entrepreneurs’ that aims to coordinate industry-led action to increase investment into female-led businesses.

The Government has set an ambition to increase the number of female entrepreneurs by half by 2030, equivalent to 600,000 new entrepreneurs.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of (a) conducting a review of postage stamp prices and (b) implementing a cap on price increases of stamps.

As a private business, Royal Mail’s management sets the prices for its services. The Government does not have a role in Royal Mail’s commercial decisions.

In setting prices, Royal Mail must observe the regulatory framework set by Ofcom, the independent regulator. This framework imposes prices controls, ‘safeguard caps’, on certain second-class products to ensure a basic universal service is available to all at affordable prices and users of postal services, especially vulnerable consumers, are protected from on-going price rises.

Ofcom will conduct a review of the safeguard caps, including a consultation, during 2023/24.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the (a) number and (b) proportion of businesses that are owned by women in Hull North.

In the UK in 2021, 19% of SMEs with employees (a three-percentage point increase on 2020) and 20% of firms with no employees (21% in 2020) were female-led. The government does not hold regional data relating to the number or proportion of female-led business.

The Rose Review is supported by the industry-led ‘Rose Review Council for Investing in Female Entrepreneurs’ that aims to coordinate industry-led action to increase investment into female-led businesses.

The Government has set an ambition to increase the number of female entrepreneurs by half by 2030, equivalent to 600,000 new entrepreneurs.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has had recent discussions with the Minister for Women and Equalities on taking steps to help improve accessibility to (a) entrepreneurship and (b) business ownership for people with protected characteristics in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

The Government is fully committed to supporting businesses and creating the best conditions for enterprise so that everyone, whatever their background, has the means and know-how to start and grow a business.

We are supporting early-stage entrepreneurs from all backgrounds through the Start-Up Loans Company which provides funding and intensive support to new entrepreneurs.

Since 2012, 40% of Start Up Loans have gone to women, worth over £344m and 20% of loans worth 187m have gone to Black, Asian, and Ethnic-minority business and 220 SMEs in Kingston Upon Hull North have received loans to the value of £1,708,761 (as of November 2022).

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Green Deal projects were classified as live in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as of 24 November 2022.

BEIS estimates that at the end of October 2022, there were 38 ‘live’ Green Deal plans (all measures installed) and 22 'completed' plans (all measures installed and paid off) in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many projects have been completed through the Green Deal in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as of 24 November 2022.

BEIS estimates that at the end of October 2022, there were 38 ‘live’ Green Deal plans (all measures installed) and 22 'completed' plans (all measures installed and paid off) in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes were retrofitted with funding through the Local Authority Delivery Scheme in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as of 21 November 2022.

There were 150 homes retrofitted in Kingston upon Hull North constituency through the Local Authority Delivery (LAD) scheme. These figures use the same data as the latest November statistics release.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes were retrofitted using funding through the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund Demonstrator in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as of 24 November 2022.

The Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund Demonstrator and Wave 1 awarded a combined total of around £240m of grant funding to Local Authorities, with data held on local authority-led projects rather than at a constituency level. The SHDF Wave 2.1 competition, which closed on 18th November 2022, will allocate up to £800m of grant funding, with successful projects likely to be notified in March 2023.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes have had ECO scheme measures installed in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as of 24 November 2022.

BEIS publishes information on the number of households in receipt of ECO measures by Parliamentary Constituency in Table 4.5 accompanying the latest Household Energy Efficiency Statistics release. It is estimated that 4,343 households have had ECO measures installed in Kingston upon Hull North constituency up to end September 2022.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many people had received the Warm Homes Discount in Kingston upon Hull North as of 24 November 2022.

Energy suppliers are responsible for providing rebates to eligible households and are only required to report on the number of rebates provided in England, Scotland and Wales. The Government does not hold data on the number of rebate recipients by constituency.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding through grants the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme had provided to public sector bodies in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as of 24 November 2022.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy does not hold a breakdown of Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme funding by constituency. Lists of all projects funded through the scheme can be found on the scheme’s gov.uk page: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/public-sector-decarbonisation-scheme

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that small and medium-sized enterprises are receiving the correct level of support from the Energy Bill Relief Scheme in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

The Energy Bill Relief Scheme is in legislation and will be applied in a uniform way by all licensed suppliers. The regulations include a robust compliance and enforcement regime to ensure requirements are being met. Suppliers are also required to inform customers about the details of support, including the amount of the discount and discounted supply price.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to increase funding for renewable energy sources in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

Grant funding for renewable innovation or community-based renewable schemes is open for both local authorities and private investors to bid. The Contract for Difference scheme, the Government’s main mechanism for supporting low carbon generation, is awarded through a competitive process, ensuring that the most cost-effective projects are supported regardless of their location.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of jobs that have been created in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as a result of the implementation of the ten point plan for a green industrial revolution, published on 18 November 2020.

The Government is providing significant investment for the offshore renewable, low-carbon, energy production and carbon capture industries across East Yorkshire and the Humber.

Zero Carbon Humber has been awarded £21m of Government funding to support its aim to turn the Humber region into a net zero cluster by 2040. Zero Carbon Humber also collaborates on the East Coast Cluster, selected as one of the first two carbon capture, usage, and storage clusters to be taken forward by the UK government.

The Humber Freeport will also support low carbon economic growth whilst creating over 1,000 high-quality employment opportunities.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which industry in Kingston upon Hull North constituency receives the most Government funding as of 7 December 2022.

The Government does not collect data on industrial investment at constituency level. Residents in Kingston upon Hull North benefit from numerous streams of funding to support local growth including £19.5m through the Levelling Up Fund for the regeneration of Hull City Centre and £10.6m through the UK Shared Prosperity Fund to focus on local priorities. To support research, development and innovation, £28 million of UK Research and Innovation funding has been invested in East Yorkshire and Northern Lincolnshire between 2019 and 2021. Regional data is not yet available for UK Research and Innovation investment beyond this.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of homes that have had solar power panels installed in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as of 31 October 2022.

At the end of October 2022, there were 1,016 domestic installations of solar panels recorded in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding his Department has provided for research and development in Kingston upon Hull North constituency in the 2022-23 financial year.

The University of Hull, which has a campus in the constituency received £9,792,327 for the academic year in Quality-related research (QR) funding and Higher Education Innovation Funding (HEIF) delivered through Research England. UK Research and Innovation do not yet have full data for competitive grants in the current financial year 2022/23.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many small and medium-sized enterprises in Kingston upon Hull North constituency have received Government funding for support during the cost of living crisis in 2022.

The Government recognises the impact rising prices are having on businesses.


Businesses in Kingston upon Hull North will have benefitted from the Government’s reversal of the National Insurance rise, saving SMEs approximately £4,200 on average; the cut to fuel duty for 12 months; and the Energy Bill Relief Scheme to protect SMEs from high energy costs over the winter. In addition, the Recovery Loan Scheme is available to SMEs across the UK. The Employment Allowance was increased to £5,000 from April and we have continued to provide business rate relief worth over £7bn, freezing the business rates multiplier for a further year.


The Government is also providing financial support through the Start Up loan scheme - 537 SMEs in Kingston upon Hull have received loans to the value of £ 4,042,768 as of November 2022.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has had recent discussions with businesses in Kingston upon Hull North constituency on the potential impact of the cost of living crisis on those businesses.

The Government recognises the impact rising prices are having on businesses, including those in Kingston upon Hull North, and is engaging with businesses across the UK to understand these challenges and explore ways to mitigate them.

The Government has reversed the National Insurance rise, saving SMEs £4,200 on average; cut fuel duty for 12 months; and brought in the Energy Bill Relief Scheme which is shielding businesses across the country from soaring energy prices, saving some around half of their wholesale energy costs. The Employment Allowance was increased to £5,000 from April and we have continued to provide business rate relief worth over £7bn, freezing the business rates multiplier for a further year.


We have also announced £13.6 billion of support for businesses over the next five years, reducing the burden of business rates for SMEs.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of businesses that are owned by black and ethnic minority people in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

The Government does not hold regional information on the proportion of BME-owned businesses in Kingston upon Hull North. Government is aware of the challenges faced by ethnic minority businesses and is taking action to support them. Ministers regularly engage with ethnic minority business leaders and networks to better understand the issues facing them.

We are working with stakeholders to agree interventions to improve access to finance. Since its launch (2012) the Start Up Loans programme has issued around 20% of its loans to Black, Asian, and Ethnic-minority business worth £187,043,936.

We are also delivering actions set out in the Inclusive Britain report (2022), which aim to support ethnic minority entrepreneurs.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps to increase the number of green jobs in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

The Government does not collect data with the level of granularity required to discuss green employment figures for Kingston upon Hull North specifically. BEIS is working with DfE and local partners to ensure green skills are considered through Local Skills Improvement Plans. The Secretary of State for Education may only approve a Plan if satisfied that net zero targets, adaptation to climate change, and other environmental goals have been considered.

Latest official statistics show there are already around 430,000 jobs in low carbon businesses and their supply chains across the country, and the Government is working with the Green Jobs Delivery Group to explore how central government, local government and businesses can further support local areas to deliver a successful net zero labour market transition.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes in Kingston upon Hull North constituency have had heat pumps installed as of 31 October 2022.

The Microgeneration Certification Scheme Installations Database shows that as of 31 October 2022, 39 heat pump installations were registered in the Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

The database does not include all heat pump installations, for example, those installed without Government funding support, such as in new buildings, which are not typically recorded in the Microgeneration Certification Scheme Installations Database.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to increase the number of homes with energy efficiency measures installed in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

The Government is committed to improving the energy performance of homes across the country, including in Kingston Upon Hull North.

The Government is already investing £6.6 billion over this parliament on decarbonising heat and energy efficiency measures.

An additional £6 billion of new Government funding, announced in the Autumn Statement, will be made available from 2025 to 2028. This provides long-term funding certainty, supporting the growth of supply chains, and ensuring we can scale up our delivery over time.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of homes that have been retrofitted through the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund in the Kingston upon Hull North constituency since the introduction of that fund.

The Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund (SHDF) Demonstrator and Wave 1 awarded a combined total of around £240m of grant funding to Local Authorities, with data held on local authority-led projects rather than at a constituency level. The SHDF Wave 2.1 competition, which closed on 18th November 2022, will allocate up to £800m of grant funding, with successful projects likely to be notified in March 2023.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of which wards in Kingston upon Hull North constituency have the highest number of homes with retrofitting measures installed.

BEIS estimates that Orchard Park is the ward in Kingston upon Hull North constituency with the highest number of retrofitting measures installed through the following government schemes: Energy Company Obligation (ECO), Green Homes Grant (GHG) schemes, Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) and the Boiler Upgrade Scheme (BUS). The order from highest to lowest ward is as follows:

  1. Orchard Park
  2. Avenue
  3. North Carr
  4. West Carr
  5. Beverley & Newland
  6. University
  7. Bricknell
  8. Central
  9. Kingswood
  10. Sutton
Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of which ward in Kingston upon Hull North constituency has had the highest proportion of homes fitted with external wall insulation.

BEIS estimates that under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Green Homes Grant (GHG) government schemes, around 800 cavity wall insulation measures, 1,400 loft insulation measures, 100 under floor insulation measures and 1,400 external wall insulation measures have been installed in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as at end of September 2022.

Under these schemes, Orchard Park is the ward in Kingston upon Hull North that has had the highest proportion of external wall insulation measures installed.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of homes that have had external wall insulation installed in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as of 31 October 2022.

BEIS estimates that under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Green Homes Grant (GHG) government schemes, around 800 cavity wall insulation measures, 1,400 loft insulation measures, 100 under floor insulation measures and 1,400 external wall insulation measures have been installed in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as at end of September 2022.

Under these schemes, Orchard Park is the ward in Kingston upon Hull North that has had the highest proportion of external wall insulation measures installed.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of homes that have had under floor insulation installed in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as of 31 October 2022.

BEIS estimates that under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Green Homes Grant (GHG) government schemes, around 800 cavity wall insulation measures, 1,400 loft insulation measures, 100 under floor insulation measures and 1,400 external wall insulation measures have been installed in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as at end of September 2022.

Under these schemes, Orchard Park is the ward in Kingston upon Hull North that has had the highest proportion of external wall insulation measures installed.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes in Kingston upon Hull North constituency with lofts had had loft insulation installed as of 31 October 2022.

BEIS estimates that under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Green Homes Grant (GHG) government schemes, around 800 cavity wall insulation measures, 1,400 loft insulation measures, 100 under floor insulation measures and 1,400 external wall insulation measures have been installed in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as at end of September 2022.

Under these schemes, Orchard Park is the ward in Kingston upon Hull North that has had the highest proportion of external wall insulation measures installed.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes in Kingston upon Hull North constituency with cavity walls have been insulated as of 31 October 2022.

BEIS estimates that under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Green Homes Grant (GHG) government schemes, around 800 cavity wall insulation measures, 1,400 loft insulation measures, 100 under floor insulation measures and 1,400 external wall insulation measures have been installed in Kingston upon Hull North constituency as at end of September 2022.

Under these schemes, Orchard Park is the ward in Kingston upon Hull North that has had the highest proportion of external wall insulation measures installed.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the time that would be taken for shale gas extraction to have a significant impact on the level of energy supply; and what recent assessment he has made of the role that can be played by shale gas extraction in supporting the UK's energy needs.

The Government has confirmed that it is adopting a presumption against issuing any further hydraulic fracturing consents. This position, an effective moratorium, will be maintained until compelling new evidence is provided which addresses concerns around the prediction and management of induced seismicity. The Government is taking other measures to build energy security and affordability.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the potential benefits for energy security of implementing an accelerated transition to UK-grown renewable and nuclear power sources.

The British Energy Security Strategy, published in April, builds on the 10 Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution and sets out our ambitions for deployment of low-carbon energy, including nuclear and renewables.

Nuclear is a generator of continuous power which provides stability to the grid, providing a solid foundation for power generation on which renewable technologies can build. The Government has an ambition to deploy up to 24GW of nuclear by 2050. The Government has also announced an increased ambition for offshore wind, to deploy up to 50GW by 2030. More renewables and nuclear will ensure the UK is less reliant on foreign imports of oil and gas.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Net Zero Strategy: Build Back Greener, published in October 2022 and the High Court judgment on the strategy of 18 July 2022, for what reason the Government did not provide the level of analysis required in that strategy on its plans for reaching net zero.

The Net Zero Strategy included a mix of quantified proposals and policies, as well as some additional emerging proposals and policies at earlier stages of development which we were unable to quantify. It is inherently difficult to quantify the emission reductions that a particular proposal or policy will generate over time with certainty. This was especially the case for meeting the sixth carbon budget, given that it was 12-16 years ahead. The Government is seeking permission from the Court of Appeal to appeal the judgment.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if the Government will increase support for (a) the ventilation and insulation of buildings and (b) other climate change mitigation measures following the summer 2022 heatwave.

In the Heat and Buildings Strategy the Government set out plans to decarbonise the UK’s 30 million homes and workplaces and committed to considering current and possible future scenarios including overheating risks and indoor air quality risks when developing future policies. BEIS plans to undertake further research in this area.

The Government has committed £6.6 billion across this Parliament to decarbonise heat and buildings. All measures installed under Government schemes must meet the latest Publicly Available Specification PAS2035/2030:2019 standards. These standards adopt a whole-house approach to home retrofit, requiring adequate ventilation throughout the dwelling and steps to mitigate against overheating risks.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to increase the feed-in tariff for people with solar panels.

The FIT tariff rates are adjusted annually in line with the Retail Prices Index (RPI) and there are no current plans to adjust this policy.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support small businesses in Hull affected by the covid-19 pandemic.

The Government delivered a package of support for business including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, business rates relief, grants and loans. Hull City Council received £120m in grant support, reporting payments worth £99m to their businesses.

Two years on, and thanks to our successful vaccination programme, the immunity built up in the population and antiviral and therapeutics tools, the UK is in the strongest position to learn how to live with COVID-19 and end government regulation.

8th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the role of the UK’s net zero targets in meeting COP26 commitments.

My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State regularly meets with Cabinet colleagues to discuss net zero targets and progress towards these. The Government’s Net Zero Strategy is a cross-economy strategy which keeps the Government on track for meeting carbon budgets and the UK’s 2030 Nationally Determined Contribution.

The Government’s leadership on climate change at home, including reducing emissions faster than any other G7 economy, means that the Government is well placed not just to meet commitments made at COP26, but also to continue to drive forward international action and encourage others to deliver on their commitments in this critical decade of delivery.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department made available for hairdressers in response to business disruptions as a result of the omicron variant of covid-19.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave the hon. Member for Batley and Spen on 27 January 2022 to Question 110644.

While the Omicron Hospitality and Leisure Grant focused on sectors where social mixing was a primary motivation for consumers, Local Authorities were encouraged to support the personal care sector through the Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG) scheme. Local Authorities reported that close to 750,000 payments of ARG, worth a total of over £2 billion, had been made to businesses by 31 March 2022, the scheme closure date.

The additional measures announced on 21 December 2021 reinforced the existing package of wider Government support.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason hairdressers were not included in the additional grant for hospitality and leisure businesses impacted by the covid-19 omicron variant over the 2021-22 winter period.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave the hon. Member for Batley and Spen on 27 January 2022 to Question 110644.

While the Omicron Hospitality and Leisure Grant focused on sectors where social mixing was a primary motivation for consumers, Local Authorities were encouraged to support the personal care sector through the Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG) scheme. Local Authorities reported that close to 750,000 payments of ARG, worth a total of over £2 billion, had been made to businesses by 31 March 2022, the scheme closure date.

The additional measures announced on 21 December 2021 reinforced the existing package of wider Government support.

8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps she plans to take to support people in fuel poverty following the removal of the £20 uplift to the standard allowance of universal credit.

The Government recognises that approximately 3.1 million households in England are experiencing fuel poverty. This is why we have committed £1.3 billion this year alone to improving the efficiency of fuel-poor and other low-income homes through stimulus schemes such as the Local Authority Delivery Scheme, the Social Housing Decarbonisation fund and the Home Upgrade Grant.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that hospitality businesses in (a) Kingston upon Hull North constituency and (b) the UK do not close down as a result of covid-19 restrictions in advance of those restrictions being eased.

The Government has brought forward a substantial package of financial support for the hospitality sector over the last year. My Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer will be making further announcements on the next phase of our economic support package in his Budget on 3 March.

26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support Kingston upon Hull to become the location of Europe’s first rare earth processing plant.

On 26th January, Pensana Rare Earths plc submitted a planning application for a proposed rare earth oxide separation facility at the Saltend Chemicals Park, Humber, Yorkshire. This will create Europe’s first rare earth processing plant, generating 100 new jobs and establishing a UK source of critical materials for the powerful magnets needed for offshore wind turbines and electric vehicles.

16th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if her Department will roll out the Youth Investment Fund by August 2022.

Phase Two of the Youth Investment Fund is expected to open in summer 2022.

Phase One, administered by BBC Children in Need, has already delivered £12 million of funding this year to over 400 local youth organisations in levelling up priority areas in England. The funding has enabled local youth providers to invest in small-scale capital projects, including equipment and small redevelopments, that expand the reach, number and range of services they currently offer.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Government’s Covid-19 guidance for Performing arts and non-professional activities updated on 18 May 2021, what the scientific basis is for six-person capacity limits on non-professional singing indoors.

I know that the restrictions on singing are frustrating to large numbers of amateur choirs and performance groups across the country and that many people have made sacrifices in order to drive down infections and protect the NHS over the last year. I can assure you that everyone across the government wants to ease these restrictions as soon as possible.

However, it is important that we take a cautious approach in easing restrictions. We are aware, through the NERVTAG and PERFORM studies that singing can increase the risk of COVID-19 transmission through the spread of aerosol droplets. This was backed up by a consensus statement from SAGE, resulting in the suggested principles of safer singing being published.

All of these studies highlight the key factors of physical distancing, ventilation and volume, which is why we have published the suggested principles of safer singing.

Since these studies and the work from SAGE, the COVID context has changed with the emergence of more transmissible strains. This would include the so-called Alpha variant B.1.1.7 which research suggests may be 70% more transmissible, and now the Delta variant B1.617.2 which looks to be even more transmissible. This means the risks associated with transmission have increased since these studies were undertaken.

We will continue to keep guidance and restrictions under review, in line with the changing situation. Further detail on step 4 will be set out as soon as possible.

1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Government’s Covid-19 guidance for Performing arts and non-professional activities updated on 18 May 2021, what assessment his Department has made of the financial impact of six-person capacity limits for non-professional singing indoors on music directors who facilitate those groups.

I know that the restrictions on singing are frustrating to large numbers of amateur choirs and performance groups across the country, including music directors, and that many people have made sacrifices in order to drive down infections and protect the NHS over the last year. I can assure you that everyone across the government wants to ease these restrictions as soon as possible.

Last year, the government announced the unprecedented £1.57 billion support package for the culture sector which is now reaching organisations and individuals across the country. This funding is supporting the arts and culture sector to survive the pandemic and continue operating. To date, over £1.2 billion has now been allocated to over 5000 organisations and sites across the country. Many working in the sector also continue to benefit from the significant cross-economy package of support that has been made available throughout this pandemic, including the generous employment schemes, grants, loans, and business rates relief.

We will continue to keep guidance and restrictions under review, in line with the changing situation. Further detail on step 4 will be set out as soon as possible.

24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on covid-19 case rates of spectators at (a) school sports days and (b) Euro 2021 football matches held at Wembley Stadium.

In order to gain entry to the EURO 2020 football matches held at Wembley stadium, all attendees must either provide proof of a negative NHS Lateral Flow Device (LFD) test taken within 48 hours of the time the stadium gates open; OR proof of two vaccinations with the second vaccination being given at least two weeks prior to entry of the event via the NHS App; OR have natural immunity, based upon a positive PCR test within 180 days of the event.

In addition to existing entry requirements, the FA will be conducting additional spot checks on ticket holders for the remaining matches at Wembley, and asking for additional LFD tests where necessary.

Public safety is our main priority, and we continue to work closely with the local authorities, DHSC, and PHE to closely monitor attendees; this includes monitoring any potential prevalence of COVID-19 as a result of the events. Where cases have been identified across Events Research Programme pilot events, public health teams have swiftly followed up on them. We are unable to comment on individual cases.

The Events Research Programme report was published on Friday 25 June and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/events-research-programme-phase-i-findings

In respect of school sports, as per our response to PQ21844, schools that are planning sports days this term should complete thorough risk assessments and ensure that they are run in line with their system of controls. These are the actions that have been in place since the autumn term and that all schools must take to reduce risks and create an inherently safer environment. The system of controls are set out in the Department’s guidance to schools, available to view here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/schools-coronavirus-covid-19-operational-guidance#system-of-controls (opens in a new tab).

The Department for Education has worked closely with the Department of Health and Social Care and Public Health England (PHE) to develop guidance for schools. We work with PHE to continually review the measures, which are informed by the latest scientific evidence and advice, and update the guidance accordingly.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department (a) has made and (b) plans to make an assessment of how many video-on-demand platforms apply the BBFC age ratings framework; and what discussions he has had with relevant stakeholders on the proposed timeline for further platforms to adopt the BBFC classification system.

As the designated body for age classification of film content, the Government has great trust in the British Board of Film Classification’s (BBFC) best practice age ratings.

A number of video-on-demand services currently use BBFC ratings for some of their content, including Amazon Prime Video, Apple TV+, Curzon Home Cinema and BFI Player. In December 2020, Netflix became the first video-on-demand service to achieve complete coverage of their content under the BBFC’s ratings.

We have not made an assessment of the number of services that use these ratings, though we have discussed with the BBFC and individual companies their current and potential future use of these ratings. We continue to engage with industry to encourage other platforms to adopt the BBFC’s ratings across all of their content, and will keep the evidence for legislation in this area under review.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will consult representatives of the British Board of Film Classification on best practice on age labelling for online streaming sites; and if he will urge all platforms operating in the UK to display ratings that accord with that organisation's guidelines.

The British Board of Film Classification’s (BBFC) age ratings are currently used by a number of video on demand providers and, although adoption is voluntary, we welcome their use. Over the past year, we have been working with the BBFC and industry to drive the voluntary adoption of the BBFC’s age rating symbols to video on demand services. We were particularly pleased to see Netflix announce on 1 December 2020 that they have become the first video on demand service to achieve complete coverage of their content under the BBFC’s ratings.

The UK’s Audiovisual Media Services Regulations 2020, which transposed the revised EU Audiovisual Media Services Directive, were made and laid in Parliament on 30 September 2020. Following Parliament’s approval, the video sharing platform regime, for which Ofcom is the regulator, came into force on 1 November 2020. UK-established video sharing platforms must now take appropriate measures to protect the public, including minors, from illegal and harmful material.

Video sharing platforms are not currently mandated to adopt BBFC ratings, nor is it expected that they will be mandated to do so under Ofcom’s regulatory regime for video sharing platforms. In order to comply with the video sharing platform regime, age assurance measures may be adopted by video sharing platforms along with other measures such as age ratings and parental controls. Age assurance measures comprise a broad range of technical measures which can be used by a service to establish the age of their users. Under the video sharing platform regime, services must take into account freedom of expression and should consider what measures are most appropriate and proportionate prior to introducing them.

Ofcom and the BBFC have a strong collaborative relationship when working on audience protection issues. The BBFC is engaging actively with both Ofcom and video sharing platforms to share their expertise on emerging technologies and the applicability of content ratings on those platforms.

Protecting children is at the heart of our online harms agenda and of wider government priorities. Where sites host user-generated content or facilitate online user interaction such as video and image sharing, commenting and live streaming, then that content will be subject to the new duty of care to be introduced under the Online Safety Bill. The government is working at pace to prepare the Bill, which will be ready this year.

We will continue to engage with industry to encourage platforms to use BBFC ratings to keep children safe online. We will keep the evidence for legislation in this area under review.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to provide targeted support to (a) cinemas and (b) entertainment venues while they remain closed as a result covid-19 restrictions.

Throughout the Covid pandemic the government has recognised the significant cultural and economic value of cinemas and entertainment venues.

On February 19 2020, DCMS announced that more than 200 independent cinemas had received £21 million in the first round of the Culture Recovery Fund for Independent Cinemas, part of the wider £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund (CRF). The CRF has also made over 690 awards to the music sector totalling £170 million, and within that over £54 million has been awarded to over 300 music venues. Funding was also allocated for a second round of support worth up to £14 million for cinemas, with other entertainment venues being able to apply for Arts Council England’s second round fund of £250 million.

Together with pan-economy measures, including the VAT cut on tickets and concessions and a business rates holiday, these measures have supported the sector and we hope enabled it to reopen in line with the Government’s roadmap.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment the Government has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on people’s access to broadband; and what steps the Government is taking to (a) ensure the affordability of broadband and (b) reduce the digital divide.

In response to Covid-19, the Government and Ofcom agreed a set of commitments with the UK’s major broadband and mobile providers to support vulnerable consumers during the pandemic. Providers committed to working with customers who are finding it difficult to pay their bill as a result of Covid-19 to ensure that they were treated fairly and appropriately supported. They also committed to removing fixed broadband data caps, in addition to providing new and generous landline and mobile offers, such as free or low cost mobile data boosts.

There are already social tariffs available which offer low cost landline and broadband services for those on certain means-tested benefits. However, in line with Ofcom’s recommendation in their Affordability Report published in December 2020, the Government is encouraging those providers who do not currently offer social tariff packages to do so.

In addition, Government and Ofcom have taken action to help support switching to more affordable services.

The Government has promoted the DevicesDotNow campaign, which worked with community organisations to distribute devices to vulnerable adults and help them get online. The aim was to enable elderly and vulnerable people, particularly those to who are shielding, to communicate with the outside world and get access to vital services.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of requiring broadband providers to offer affordable tariffs for people on low incomes.

The government recognises the importance of digital connectivity, particularly during this difficult period. We have worked closely with industry to develop a number of voluntary commitments. Providers have committed to working with customers who are finding it difficult to pay their bill as a result of COVID-19, to ensure that customers were treated fairly and appropriately supported. This is in addition to lifting all fixed broadband data caps and providing new and generous landline and mobile offers, such as free or low cost mobile data boosts.

In line with Ofcom’s recommendation in their Affordability Report published in December 2020, the government encourages those providers who do not currently offer social tariff packages to do so and we will monitor the situation closely.

26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what long-term plans his Department is making to tackle inequalities throughout the UK in access to (a) broadband, (b) digital devices and (c) digital skills training.

Ofcom is reviewing affordability issues in the communications market, and intends to publish recommendations in the first half of this year. This will improve the evidence base of where households face difficulty, and inform any future Government interventions.

Public libraries are also a vital component in providing access to the internet. There are around 2,900 public libraries in England providing a trusted network of accessible locations offering free Wi-Fi, computers, and other technology. The library staff, supported by volunteers, have been trained on digital skills to enable them to provide library users with support in using digital. Their vital role has been recognised with the new regulations enabling libraries to continue some services during this lockdown period including access to public PCs for essential purposes.

The Government has introduced a new digital entitlement for adults with no or low digital skills to undertake specified digital qualifications, up to Level 1, free of charge. Essential Digital Skills qualifications (EDSQs) are funded under the digital entitlement and based on new national standards which set out the digital skills people need to get on in life and work. We also support the provision of basic digital skills training for adults in community settings through the Adult Education Budget.

In April 2020 we also introduced the Skills Toolkit, an online platform which is already providing free courses to help individuals build the skills that are most sought after by employers. We have recently expanded the platform so that people can now choose from over 70 courses, covering digital, adult numeracy, employability and work readiness skills, which have been identified as the skills employers need the most. These courses will help people stay in work, or take up new jobs and opportunities.

30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to Tier Three covid-19 restrictions that will be in place from the 2 December 2020, whether an indoor sports facility that would be required to cease group activity and classes are permitted to (a) teach a one-on-one class and (b) hire out their facility for self-directed and socially distant practice.

Sports and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health, and are a vital weapon against coronavirus. That’s why we made sure that people could exercise at least once a day even during the height of the first period of enhanced national restrictions and why we opened up grassroots sport and leisure facilities as soon as it was safe to do so.

As the Prime Minister said on 23 November national restrictions will end on Wednesday 2 December, and gyms and sport facilities will reopen across all tiers. Under Tier 3 you must not meet socially indoors or in most outdoor places with anybody you do not live with, or who is not in your support bubble, this includes in any private garden or at most outdoor venues. Gyms and sports facilities will be open for individual exercise and exercise in single households or support bubbles only. Indoor group activities and exercise classes should not take place. You can continue to do unlimited exercise alone, or in an outdoor public place in groups up to 6.

There are exceptions for the following, which can take place in any number:

  • disability sport

  • sports as part of the curriculum in education

  • supervised sport and physical activity for under-18s (including those who were under 18 on 31 August 2020)

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he had had with (a) Cineworld and (b) trade unions on financial support for staff affected by the planned partial closure of that company's cinemas.

The government deeply regrets the unfortunate news of Cineworld’s temporary closure and is in direct and regular contact with the screen industry, including distributors and exhibitors, as well as through the BFI Screen Sector Task Force.

The government has supported cinemas through the VAT cut on tickets and concessions, business rates holiday and Bounce back loans. Independent cinemas are also eligible for a share of £30m from our unprecedented £1.57bn Culture Recovery Rund, and funding has started to be allocated already.

We recognise that cinemas need an incoming stream of new releases to show and we are supporting production by establishing a £500 million in a UK-wide Film and TV Production Restart Scheme to help get productions back up and running again. This will support the creation of new content which can be released into cinemas of all sizes.

Unless subject to local restrictions, cinemas are open for business and Covid secure. We urge the British public to support their local cinema and save jobs by visiting and enjoying a film in accordance with the guidance.

13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the planned partial closure of Cineworld's cinemas during the covid-19 outbreak, what plans his Department has to work with HM Treasury to provide further financial support to the film and screen industry.

The government deeply regrets the unfortunate news of Cineworld’s temporary closure and is in direct and regular contact with the screen industry, including distributors and exhibitors, as well as through the BFI Screen Sector Task Force.

The government has supported cinemas through the VAT cut on tickets and concessions, business rates holiday and Bounce back loans. Independent cinemas are also eligible for a share of £30m from our unprecedented £1.57bn Culture Recovery Rund, and funding has started to be allocated already.

We recognise that cinemas need an incoming stream of new releases to show and we are supporting production by establishing a £500 million in a UK-wide Film and TV Production Restart Scheme to help get productions back up and running again. This will support the creation of new content which can be released into cinemas of all sizes.

Unless subject to local restrictions, cinemas are open for business and Covid secure. We urge the British public to support their local cinema and save jobs by visiting and enjoying a film in accordance with the guidance.

14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish guidance for dance studios, who are due to reopen on 25 July 2020, on (a) partner dancing if couples are from the same household and (b) differentiation in high, medium and low impact sports and the class size restrictions and space requirements for each.

Sports and physical activity facilities play a crucial role in supporting adults and children to be active. As announced on 9 July, from 11 July, outdoor swimming pools will be able to open and from 25 July indoor gyms, dance studios, leisure centres (including sports halls) and swimming pools in England should be able to reopen. These facilities will be able to offer on-site services to customers, provided they are COVID-secure and follow Government guidance.

Those dancing within their own household group should follow current guidelines on social mixing, and can refer to the Performing Arts guidance. The updated guidance can be found at the GOV.UK website.

Guidance for providers of grassroots sport and gym/leisure facilities includes mitigating risk measures such as:

  • Reducing the number of people each person has contact with by using ‘fixed teams or partnering’ (so each person works with only a few others).

  • Maximum capacity should be based on the government requirement for social distancing, nature of activities (i.e. if the activity is static vs. requiring a range of movement) and equipment layout and the configuration of facilities.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when ten pin bowling alleys will be allowed to reopen subject to social distancing arrangements as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Physical activity facilities play a crucial role in supporting adults and children to be active. From 1 August, we will reopen bowling alleys.

The Government is committed to reopening leisure facilities and visitor attractions, including bowling alleys, as soon as it is safe to do so. The Sport Working Group and the Visitor Economy Working Group both feed into the Cultural Renewal Taskforce, and ensure strong sector and expert support for the co-development of guidance. This will help ten pin bowling alleys become Covid-19 Secure and re-open as early as possible.

As with all aspects of the Government’s response to Covid-19, our decisions will continue to be based on scientific evidence and public health assessments.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the different roles and facilities of (a) dance studios and (b) dance schools accredited by OFQAL in guidance issued on the covid-19 outbreak.

Sports and physical activity facilities play a crucial role in supporting adults and children to be active. As announced on 9 July, from 11 July, outdoor swimming pools will be able to open and from 25 July indoor gyms, dance studios, leisure centres (including sports halls) and swimming pools in England should be able to reopen. These facilities will be able to offer on-site services to customers, provided they are COVID-secure and follow Government guidance.

The updated guidance can be found at the GOV.UK website and includes advice for providers of pool, gym and leisure facilities on cleaning, social distancing, and protection for staff to help venues get back up and running safely.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what guidance can the Government plans to provide to charities, to allow them to operate their charity shops safely during the covid-19 outbreak.

The government is working with the charity sector to support it as it begins to recommence activities in line with government guidance on COVID-19 and social distancing. Alongside other non-essential retail, charity shops are planning to start reopening from 15th June. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has published guidance on the reopening of non-essential retail which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/shops-and-branches. In addition to this, the Charity Retail Association has produced guidance to specifically support the reopening of charity shops which can be found here: https://www.charityretail.org.uk/we-have-published-our-reopening-pack/.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many teachers in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in Kingston Upon Hull North constituency do not have qualified teacher status.

Information on the school workforce in England is published in the annual ‘School Workforce in England’ national statistics release, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

The number of teachers without qualified teacher status in all state funded schools in England, including a breakdown by primary and secondary, and by local authority, is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/29d83b82-2aba-44c7-bb82-08db371944c7.

Data relating to schools in individual constituencies can be found in the ‘teacher and support staff numbers by school’ file, within the additional supporting files section, available at: https://content.explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/api/releases/0728fb07-f014-492c-aac9-fd11bb441601/files/2dfcc772-c410-46ac-cb9d-08da713e9200.

There are 24,000 more teachers now than in 2010. The quality of teaching is the most important in school factor in improving outcomes for children, especially for those from disadvantaged backgrounds. Evidence is clear that high quality professional development can lead to improved pupil attainment.

The Department has invested in transforming training for teachers and head teachers. Every teacher and head teacher now has access to high quality, evidence based training and professional development at every stage of their career, starting with initial teacher training (ITT).

By 2024, a reformed ITT provider market will be delivering quality assured training leading to qualified teacher status (QTS) that places a greater emphasis than ever before on embedding structured practice into courses, ensuring trainees are ready to thrive in the classroom.

A new system of higher quality training provider partnerships will be supported by £36 million to introduce new Quality Requirements, including better training for mentors and the delivery of new, cutting edge, intensive training, and practice activity. Every teaching school hub will be involved in ITT to ensure that training places are available across the country.

QTS is considered desirable for teachers in most schools in England. In some schools, including academies, free schools, and independent schools, QTS is not a legal requirement. Academies have a fundamental freedom to employ talented people who do not necessarily have QTS.

Most teachers in all schools, including academies, have QTS and have undertaken initial teacher training. In the 2021/22 academic year, the latest data available, 14,771 teachers (headcount) did not have qualified teacher status, equivalent to 2.9% of teachers.

20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to improve support for children with special educational needs and disabilities and their families.

On 29 March 2022, the department published the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Green Paper, which sets out plans to improve the experience and outcomes for children and young people with SEND and those who need AP, within a fairer and more financially sustainable system.

The Green Paper consultation closed on 22 July 2022. The department is currently reviewing the feedback received and using this, along with continued engagement with the system, to inform the next stage of delivering improvements for children, young people and their families.

The department is committed to publishing a full response to the Green Paper in an Improvement Plan in early 2023.

The department will continue to support the system in the immediate term to deliver change and continue to improve the experience and outcomes for children and young people with SEND, and those who need AP.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the effects of increases in the cost of living on improving access to higher education for students from (a) diverse and (b) disadvantaged backgrounds.

The department recognises the additional cost of living pressures that have arisen this year and that have impacted students. Many higher education (HE) providers have hardship funds that students can apply to for assistance. There is £261 million of student premium funding available this academic year to support disadvantaged students who need additional help. The department is also working with the Office for Students to ensure universities support students in hardship using both hardship funds and drawing on the student premium.

All households will save on their energy bills through the Energy Price Guarantee and the £400 Energy Bills Support Scheme discount. Students who buy their energy from a domestic supplier are eligible for the energy bills discount. The Energy Prices Act passed on 25 October includes the provision to require landlords to pass benefits they receive from energy price support, as appropriate, onto end users. Further details of the requirements under this act are set out in the legislation.

A HM Treasury-led review is being undertaken to consider how to support households and businesses with energy bills after April 2023.

Decisions on student support are taken on an annual basis. The government has continued to increase living costs support each year with a 2.3% increase to maximum loans and grants for living and other costs for this academic year, 2022/23.

Students who have been awarded a loan for living costs for the 2022/23 academic year that is lower than the maximum, and whose household income for the tax year 2022-23 has dropped by at least 15% compared to the income provided for their original assessment, can apply for their entitlement to be reassessed.

The government is currently considering options for changes to loans and grants for living and other costs for the 2023/24 academic year starting in August 2023 and an announcement will follow in due course.

The UCAS end of cycle report shows that in 2022 we had record numbers of 18-year-olds getting into university, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds. An English 18-year-old from a disadvantaged background today is 86% more likely to go to university than in 2010.

The department’s widening participation publication from 2022 shows that progression to HE has increased across all students, including those from ethnic minority backgrounds. Black pupils have seen the greatest increase in the proportion entering HE by age 19, increasing from 44.1% in 2009/10 to 62.1% in 2020/21.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps she has taken to help support students with increases in the cost of living.

The department recognises the additional cost of living pressures that have arisen this year and that have impacted students. Many higher education (HE) providers have hardship funds that students can apply to for assistance. There is £261 million of student premium funding available this academic year to support disadvantaged students who need additional help. The department is also working with the Office for Students to ensure universities support students in hardship using both hardship funds and drawing on the student premium.

All households will save on their energy bills through the Energy Price Guarantee and the £400 Energy Bills Support Scheme discount. Students who buy their energy from a domestic supplier are eligible for the energy bills discount. The Energy Prices Act passed on 25 October includes the provision to require landlords to pass benefits they receive from energy price support, as appropriate, onto end users. Further details of the requirements under this act are set out in the legislation.

A HM Treasury-led review is being undertaken to consider how to support households and businesses with energy bills after April 2023.

Decisions on student support are taken on an annual basis. The government has continued to increase living costs support each year with a 2.3% increase to maximum loans and grants for living and other costs for this academic year, 2022/23.

Students who have been awarded a loan for living costs for the 2022/23 academic year that is lower than the maximum, and whose household income for the tax year 2022-23 has dropped by at least 15% compared to the income provided for their original assessment, can apply for their entitlement to be reassessed.

The government is currently considering options for changes to loans and grants for living and other costs for the 2023/24 academic year starting in August 2023 and an announcement will follow in due course.

The UCAS end of cycle report shows that in 2022 we had record numbers of 18-year-olds getting into university, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds. An English 18-year-old from a disadvantaged background today is 86% more likely to go to university than in 2010.

The department’s widening participation publication from 2022 shows that progression to HE has increased across all students, including those from ethnic minority backgrounds. Black pupils have seen the greatest increase in the proportion entering HE by age 19, increasing from 44.1% in 2009/10 to 62.1% in 2020/21.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to help ensure childcare is (a) accessible and (b) affordable.

The department is committed to improving the availability and affordability of childcare which is why we have spent more than £20 billion over the last five years to support families with the cost of childcare. This means that thousands of parents are benefitting from government childcare support.

In the 2021 Spending Review, the department announced additional funding of £160 million in financial years 2022/23, £180 million in 2023/24 and £170 million in 202425, compared to the 2021/22. This is for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers, reflecting cost pressures and changes in the number of eligible children anticipated at the time of the review.

For 2023/24, the department will invest an additional £20 million into early years funding, on top of the additional £180 million for 2023/24. Taken together, this will help support providers at a national level with the additional National Living Wage costs associated with delivering the free childcare entitlements in 2023.

In July, the department announced measures to reduce the costs and barriers facing providers and ensure families can access government support to save them money on their childcare bills.

This included the launch of a new £1.2 million communications campaign via the childcare choices website to ensure every parent knows about the government funded support they are eligible for. This is accessible here: https://www.childcarechoices.gov.uk/.

The department continues to work across government, looking at ways to make childcare more affordable and accessible to ensure that families benefit from the government-funded support they are entitled to.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the effect of increases in energy costs on further education college budgets.

The department knows that one of the biggest challenges facing some colleges is the rising cost of energy. The potential impacts of the rising cost of energy on educational providers is being kept under review by the department.

Further education (FE) colleges are autonomous institutions responsible for their own financial sustainability.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has outlined the range of support on energy cost increases that will be available for businesses, the public sector and households. As part of that, the Energy Bill Relief Scheme will provide a price reduction to ensure that all businesses and other non-domestic customers, including colleges, are protected from high energy bills this winter. Discounts will be applied to energy usage initially between 1 October 2022 and 31 March 2023.

Schools and colleges in England will also be allocated a share of £500 million in capital funding in the 2022/23 financial year. This comprises £447 million for schools and sixth form colleges and £53 million for FE colleges to spend on energy efficiency upgrades.

These upgrades will not only help schools and colleges save money, but they will also make schools and colleges more energy efficient during the cold period and increase winter resilience for future years. A FE college group will receive £290,000 on average from that additional funding. Allocations were published on 6 December 2022 to help colleges plan and payments are expected to be made in January 2023.

The department assesses and reviews colleges’ financial health on a regular basis and uses this information to determine where support and intervention from the department, Education Skills Funding Agency and FE Commissioner can help colleges to improve their position. More information is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/college-oversight-support-and-intervention.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken to investigate the reasons for the delayed results for vocational and technical exam and assessment results in 2022.

This is a matter for Ofqual, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation. I have asked its Chief Regulator, Dr Jo Saxton, to write to the right hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to improve the recruitment and retention of teachers.

The number of teachers remains high, with over 465,500 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) teachers working in state funded schools across the country. This is 24,000 more than in 2010.

The Department recognises there is more to do to ensure teaching remains an attractive, high status profession, and to recruit and retain teachers in key subjects. Reforms are aimed not only at increasing teacher recruitment through an attractive pay offer and financial incentives such as bursaries, but also at ensuring teachers stay and succeed in the profession.

The Department remains committed to delivering £30,000 starting salaries to attract and retain the best teachers.

The Department is investing £181 million in financial incentives. For those starting initial teacher training (ITT) in the 2023/24 academic year, there are bursaries worth up to £27,000 and scholarships worth up to £29,000 to encourage talented trainees to apply to train in key secondary subjects such as mathematics, physics, chemistry and computing. The Department has also expanded the offer to international trainees in physics and languages.

The Department also offers a Levelling Up Premium worth up to £3,000 annually for mathematics, physics, chemistry, and computing teachers in the first five years of their careers who work in disadvantaged schools.

The Department launched its new digital service, ‘Apply for teacher training’ in autumn 2021, enabling a more streamlined, user friendly application route, to make it easier for people to train to become teachers.

The Department is also taking action to enable teachers to succeed through transforming their training and support. The Department will deliver 500,000 teacher training and development opportunities by the end of 2024, giving all teachers and school leaders access to quality, evidence based training and professional development at every stage of their career.

To support retention in the first few years of teaching, the Department has rolled out the Early Career Framework (ECF) nationally, providing the foundations for a successful career in teaching. This is backed by over £130 million a year in funding.

The Department’s reforms are aimed not only at increasing teacher recruitment across all areas, but also at ensuring teachers stay and succeed in the profession. The Department has published a range of resources to help address teacher workload and wellbeing, and support all schools to introduce flexible working practices. These resources include the Education Staff Wellbeing Charter, which the Department is encouraging schools to sign up to as a shared commitment to promote staff wellbeing, and the school workload reduction toolkit, developed alongside head teachers. The Charter is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/education-staff-wellbeing-charter, and the toolkit is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/school-workload-reduction-toolkit.

20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment her Department has made of the impact of inflation on (a) school budgets and (b) the cost to parents associated with the school day.

Schools will receive an additional £2 billion in each of 2023/24 and 2024/25 academic years as a result of the 2022 Autumn Statement. The core schools budget, which covers schools’ day-to-day running costs, including schools’ energy bills and the costs of providing income-related free school meals, has risen from £49.8 billion in 2021/22 to £53.8 billion in 2022/23 and will continue to rise to £57.3 billion in 2023/24 and £58.8 billion in 2024/25. By 2024/25, funding per pupil will have risen to its highest ever level in real terms. These increases provide support to schools to deal with the effects of inflation on their budgets.

In September 2022, the Government announced unprecedented support to protect households and businesses from high energy prices. The Energy Price Guarantee and the Energy Bill Discount Scheme, the successor to the Energy Bill Relief Scheme, are supporting millions of households and businesses.

The Department is clear that school uniforms should be affordable. No school uniform should be so expensive that pupils or their families feel unable to apply to or attend a school of their choice. In November 2021, the Department issued statutory guidance on the cost of school uniforms to ensure the cost of school uniforms is reasonable. The guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cost-of-school-uniforms/cost-of-school-uniforms. Governing boards should be compliant with much of the guidance by September 2022 and fully compliant by summer 2023.

The Government has announced further support, worth £26 billion, for next year. This is designed to target the most vulnerable households and families. This is on top of the £37 billion cost of living support provided by the Government this year.

7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she has had recent discussions with the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on improving skills training in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

The department regularly discusses skills matters with other government departments, including the Department for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy, but not specifically about individual constituencies.

The department is investing £3.8 billion more in further education and skills over the Parliament to ensure individuals across the country, including those living in Kingston upon Hull North, have access to the skills they need to build a fulfilling career in jobs the economy needs.

The department has boosted funding by an extra £1.6 billion for 16-to-19 education in 2024/25 compared with 2021/22. This is the biggest increase in 16-to-19 funding in a decade, and will help to fund the additional students anticipated in the system, 40 extra hours per student, and an affordable increase in funding rates per 16-to-19 student.

This additional funding will help providers such as Hull College, Wyke Sixth Form College, and Wilberforce Sixth Form College, who serve the Kingston upon Hull area. Collectively, their curriculum offer includes T Levels, apprenticeships, an extensive range of qualifications from Entry Level to Higher Education, and adult education programmes. Across each institution, their provision is shaped in collaboration with local employers to ensure it meets local skills needs.

Within Kingston upon Hull, there are several providers that are offering T Levels or preparing to do so. Wyke Sixth Form College and Wilberforce Sixth Form College commenced delivery of T Levels in 2021. Hull College, Ron Dearing UTC and St Mary’s College (academy) all plan to commence T Level delivery in 2023. There are also several other local further education colleges offering T Levels to students in the area, such as East Riding College (Part of TEC Partnership) and Bishop Burton College who are both located in Beverley, East Riding of Yorkshire.

The department is increasing investment in apprenticeships to £2.7 billion by 2024/25 and supporting employers in all sectors and all areas of the country to use apprenticeships to develop the skilled workforces they need. Since May 2010, there have been a total of 11,880 apprenticeship starts in Kingston upon Hull North.

The department has also introduced the Free Courses for Jobs scheme, which enables adult learners nationwide without a level 3 qualification (or learners with any qualification level but earning below the National Living Wage) to gain a qualification for free.

In addition, there is the introduction of Skills Bootcamps which are free, flexible courses of up to 16 weeks, giving people the opportunity to build up sector-specific skills and fast-track to an interview with an employer. Residents in the Kingston upon Hull North Constituency can access engineering Skills Bootcamps being delivered in the city, such as Fibre Engineer and Heat Pump Engineer Skills Bootcamps as well as a range of Skills Bootcamps available online.

The department is continuing to invest in education and skills training for adults through the Adult Education Budget (AEB) with funding of £1.34 billion in the 2022/23 academic year. The AEB fully funds or co-funds skills provision for eligible adults aged 19 and above from pre-entry to level 3, to help them gain the skills they need for work, an apprenticeship or further learning.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to mandate higher education institutions and local authorities to work together to ensure appropriate provisions are in place to house the numbers of students that universities are admitting.

Neither the Department for Education nor the Department for Levelling up, Housing and Communities have made such an assessment. It is for local areas, through their Local Plans, and in response to local needs and concerns, to determine the level of student accommodation required in their area.

Universities and private accommodation providers are autonomous. The department plays no direct role in the provision of student residential accommodation, whether the accommodation is managed by universities or private sector organisations.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the Government plans to introduce an emergency cost of living provision to the student maintenance loan; and what plans the Government has to review the maintenance loan increase in future years to ensure that it reflects rising inflation.

Decisions on student support are taken on an annual basis. The department has continued to increase living costs support with a 2.3% increase for maximum loans and grants for living and other costs for the current academic year, 2022/23. Students who have been awarded a loan for living costs for the 2022/23 academic year that is lower than the maximum, and whose household income for the tax year 2022/23 has dropped by at least 15% compared to the income provided for their original assessment, can apply for their entitlement to be reassessed.

In addition, maximum tuition fees and the subsidised loans available from the department to pay them, remain at £9,250 for the 2022/23 academic year in respect of standard full-time courses.

The department is also freezing maximum tuition fees for the 2023/24 and 2024/25 academic years. By 2024/25, maximum fees will have been frozen for seven years. As well as reducing debt levels for students, the continued fee freeze will help to ensure that the Higher Education (HE) system remains sustainable while also promoting greater efficiency at providers.

The department is reviewing options for uprating maximum loans and grants for the 2023/24 academic year, and an announcement will follow in the Autumn. We need to ensure the HE student finance system remains financially sustainable and the costs of HE are shared fairly between students and taxpayers, not all of whom have benefited from going to university. At a time of tight fiscal restrictions, we will need to consider spending on student finance alongside other priorities.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if the Government will review student maintenance loan household income thresholds and outline a plan update those thresholds to reflect the real terms value compared with 2008.

Decisions on student support are taken on an annual basis. The department has continued to increase living costs support with a 2.3% increase for maximum loans and grants for living and other costs for the current academic year, 2022/23. Students who have been awarded a loan for living costs for the 2022/23 academic year that is lower than the maximum, and whose household income for the tax year 2022/23 has dropped by at least 15% compared to the income provided for their original assessment, can apply for their entitlement to be reassessed.

In addition, maximum tuition fees and the subsidised loans available from the department to pay them, remain at £9,250 for the 2022/23 academic year in respect of standard full-time courses.

The department is also freezing maximum tuition fees for the 2023/24 and 2024/25 academic years. By 2024/25, maximum fees will have been frozen for seven years. As well as reducing debt levels for students, the continued fee freeze will help to ensure that the Higher Education (HE) system remains sustainable while also promoting greater efficiency at providers.

The department is reviewing options for uprating maximum loans and grants for the 2023/24 academic year, and an announcement will follow in the Autumn. We need to ensure the HE student finance system remains financially sustainable and the costs of HE are shared fairly between students and taxpayers, not all of whom have benefited from going to university. At a time of tight fiscal restrictions, we will need to consider spending on student finance alongside other priorities.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will take steps to help ensure that the potential impact of the cost of living crisis on school meals does not affect the health of children.

The provision of healthy school meals, free to those children who are eligible for them, is of the utmost importance to the government. The department is holding regular meetings with other government departments and food industry representatives, covering a variety of issues, including public sector food supplies.

All contracts for school food are held at school, multi-academy trust, or local authority level. Schools are responsible for the provision of both free and paid-for meals, and how much to spend on school food provision.

Under the benefits-related criteria, the department provides a free healthy meal to around 1.9 million children, ensuring they are well-nourished and can concentrate and learn. The department also spends around £600 million per year ensuring around 1.25 million infants enjoy a free, healthy, and nutritious meal at lunchtime, following the introduction of the Universal Infant Free School Meal policy in 2014.

The government understands the pressures people are facing with the cost of living. These are global challenges, and this is why the government is providing over £15 billion in further support, targeted particularly at those with the greatest need. This package is in addition to the over £22 billion announced previously, with government support for the cost of living now totalling over £37 billion this year. This includes an additional £500 million to help households with the cost of household essentials, on top of what the department has provided since October 2021. This brings total funding for this support to £1.5 billion. In England, this will take the form of an extension to the Household Support Fund backed by £421 million, running from 1 October 2022 to 31 March 2023. Devolved administrations will receive £79 million through the Barnett formula.

16th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to improve the current provision of education on sexual health.

The introduction of compulsory relationships, sex, and health education (RSHE) in schools from September 2020 will increase young people’s knowledge in several areas of men's and women's health. The department is clear in its ‘Relationships and sex education and health education’ statutory guidance that pupils in secondary schools should be taught the facts and the law about sex, sexuality, and sexual health in an age-appropriate and inclusive way. This guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/relationships-education-relationships-and-sex-education-rse-and-health-education.

The department has given schools the flexibility to design the content of their curriculum to support their cohort of pupils and have signposted them to expert advice on reproductive health.

It is important that teachers have the confidence to teach RSHE effectively, including teaching about sexual health. To help schools with this, the department has published a range of online teacher training modules covering each of the key subject areas. The modules are available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/teaching-about-relationships-sex-and-health. The module on ‘Intimate and sexual relationships, including sexual health’ indicates that by the end of secondary school, pupils should know the facts about reproductive health, including fertility, and the potential impact of lifestyle on fertility for men and women.

In September 2020, the department also published non-statutory implementation guidance, ‘Plan your relationships, sex and health curriculum’, and funded the delivery of a train the trainer and peer support programme to schools from April 2020 to July 2021. The programme reached 4,800 schools.

The department has contracted with IFF Research to undertake a national survey of school leaders, RSHE leads and RSHE teachers, supported by qualitative research with school staff and pupils. The research will test whether schools are implementing the requirements with sufficient quality and help us to understand barriers and facilities to quality implementation, to inform any further support offers.

Additionally, the Schools White Paper commits to further strengthening RSHE and Ofsted plans to undertake a review of personal development in schools, which includes RSHE. The report will be published later this year.

20th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer to Question 141156 on Overseas Students: Ukraine, whether students who arrive in the UK on the (a) Homes for Ukraine Scheme and (b) the family route are eligible for student finance.

We are extending access to higher education (HE) student support, home fee status, tuition fee caps, Advanced learner loans and further education 19+ funding for those who are granted leave under one of the three schemes for Ukrainians introduced recently by the Home Office.

This ensures Ukrainians who have been affected by the war in Ukraine can access support on the same basis as those within other protection-based categories (such as refugees).

In line with those within existing protection-based categories, these persons would not be required to meet a three-year period of ordinary residence for HE support, Advanced Learner Loans or further education 19+ funding but would need only to have been ordinarily resident in the UK since their grant of leave.

Access to student support is crucial in enabling them to attend education to improve their skills and enhance the ability of Ukrainians to contribute to the UK, or to the rebuilding of their home country.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
16th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department is providing to Universities on providing support and advice for Ukrainian students.

The department has been working closely with the education sector and across government to ensure that Ukrainian students in the UK are supported during this difficult time. This includes new visa options for Ukrainian nationals, including students, announced by the Home Office. These will provide them with an opportunity to extend their leave or switch to a Graduate visa without having to leave the UK.

Many higher education (HE) providers have hardship funds that students can apply to for assistance, should individuals’ finances be affected in the 2021/22 academic year. We continue to encourage providers to accept hardship applications from international students, including those from Ukraine, in the same way they did for the £85 million of additional hardship funding made available by the government last academic year to ensure support is given where it is most needed.

I reconvened the higher education (HE) taskforce, bringing together representatives from across the sector to discuss how we can work together in supporting Ukrainian students. We are encouraging HE providers to be as flexible as possible to support prospective students impacted by the situation in Ukraine. There are still many courses available through UCAS that students can apply for. We would encourage them to engage in conversations with their preferred providers to understand the full range of options available specifically to them.

The government will look to support Ukrainian students as they reassess their options in the UK.

The department recognises that the current uncertainty means that many students may experience additional mental health challenges. Protecting student and staff wellbeing is vital. It is important students continue to be able to access the mental health and wellbeing support they need.

We encourage students to stay in touch with their HE provider’s welfare teams, as these services are likely to continue to be an important source of support. Providers are not only experts in their student population, but are also best placed to identify the needs of their students.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
16th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether Ukrainian nationals who wish to study at university and who have been granted leave under the (a) Family route and (b) Homes for Ukraine route will have access to student finance.

The government will look to support Ukrainian students as they reassess their options in the UK.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
11th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on what date music hubs will be informed of their funding settlement for the 2022-23 financial year.

The refreshed National Plan for Music Education will be co-published by the Department for Education and Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) later this year. It will shape the future of music education in this country so that more children and young people have access to a good quality music education.

The government appointed an expert panel last summer, which includes experts representing schools, music education hubs, and the music industry. The panel’s remit is to ensure the refreshed plan supports the government’s aims for all young people to have access to a high-quality music education, and opportunities to explore music as far as their interest and talents allow. The government also published the consultation response on music education to inform the refreshed plan. The department is grateful for the panel’s time and expertise.

The department has announced that it will continue to invest around £115 million per annum in cultural education over the next three financial years, through its music, arts and heritage programmes, including music hubs, working closely with DCMS, Arts Council England and others.

The department’s partner organisations, including the Arts Council as the Music Education Hub fundholder, will be updated shortly to confirm funding allocations for the 2022/23 financial year, following the outcome of the department’s business planning.

11th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the remit is of the expert panel working on the refreshed national plan for music education.

The refreshed National Plan for Music Education will be co-published by the Department for Education and Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) later this year. It will shape the future of music education in this country so that more children and young people have access to a good quality music education.

The government appointed an expert panel last summer, which includes experts representing schools, music education hubs, and the music industry. The panel’s remit is to ensure the refreshed plan supports the government’s aims for all young people to have access to a high-quality music education, and opportunities to explore music as far as their interest and talents allow. The government also published the consultation response on music education to inform the refreshed plan. The department is grateful for the panel’s time and expertise.

The department has announced that it will continue to invest around £115 million per annum in cultural education over the next three financial years, through its music, arts and heritage programmes, including music hubs, working closely with DCMS, Arts Council England and others.

The department’s partner organisations, including the Arts Council as the Music Education Hub fundholder, will be updated shortly to confirm funding allocations for the 2022/23 financial year, following the outcome of the department’s business planning.

13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many times the expert advisory panel on music education has met since it was formed in August 2021.

On 6 August, the government announced plans to work with a panel of experts from across the music education sector to develop a refreshed national plan for music education. This will shape the future of music education in this country, so that more children and young people have access to a good quality music education. The refreshed plan will be published early next year.

The announcement follows the publication of the non-statutory Model Music Curriculum in March, and the publication of the music education consultation report published in August, based on responses to the call for evidence to inform the refreshed plan and conducted between February and March 2020.

The advisory panel includes teachers and representatives from the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain and UK Music, as well as Darren Henley, Chief Executive of Arts Council England, whose independent Review of Music Education in England informed the original national plan. To date, the panel have met on three occasions.

13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he will publish his National Plan for Music Education.

On 6 August, the government announced plans to work with a panel of experts from across the music education sector to develop a refreshed national plan for music education. This will shape the future of music education in this country, so that more children and young people have access to a good quality music education. The refreshed plan will be published early next year.

The announcement follows the publication of the non-statutory Model Music Curriculum in March, and the publication of the music education consultation report published in August, based on responses to the call for evidence to inform the refreshed plan and conducted between February and March 2020.

The advisory panel includes teachers and representatives from the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain and UK Music, as well as Darren Henley, Chief Executive of Arts Council England, whose independent Review of Music Education in England informed the original national plan. To date, the panel have met on three occasions.

16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has had discussions with Ministerial colleagues in the Treasury on increasing the annual net earned income threshold for Free School Meals.

The department supports over 1.7 million pupils from the lowest income families to concentrate, learn, and achieve in the classroom through the provision of free school meals. An additional 1.3 million infants receive a free meal under the Universal Infant Free School Meals policy.

In 2018, the government introduced new eligibility criteria for families on Universal Credit, following a consultation in 2017. It was estimated that this will be more generous in its reach by 2022, in comparison to the legacy benefit system. Further to this, we included generous protections which mean any family eligible for free school meals transitioning to Universal Credit from a legacy benefit will continue to have access to free school meals even if they move above the earnings threshold.

The government will fully consider the recommendations of the National Food Strategy, which included recommendations around free school meal eligibility, and will respond in due course.

16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of children whose parents are in receipt of Universal Credit who do not receive a free school meal.

The department supports over 1.7 million pupils from the lowest income families to concentrate, learn, and achieve in the classroom through the provision of free school meals. An additional 1.3 million infants receive a free meal under the Universal Infant Free School Meals policy.

In 2018, the government introduced new eligibility criteria for families on Universal Credit, following a consultation in 2017. It was estimated that this will be more generous in its reach by 2022, in comparison to the legacy benefit system. Further to this, we included generous protections which mean any family eligible for free school meals transitioning to Universal Credit from a legacy benefit will continue to have access to free school meals even if they move above the earnings threshold.

The government will fully consider the recommendations of the National Food Strategy, which included recommendations around free school meal eligibility, and will respond in due course.

16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make it his policy to increase the threshold for Free School Meals in line with the National Food Strategy recommendations.

The department supports over 1.7 million pupils from the lowest income families to concentrate, learn, and achieve in the classroom through the provision of free school meals. An additional 1.3 million infants receive a free meal under the Universal Infant Free School Meals policy.

In 2018, the government introduced new eligibility criteria for families on Universal Credit, following a consultation in 2017. It was estimated that this will be more generous in its reach by 2022, in comparison to the legacy benefit system. Further to this, we included generous protections which mean any family eligible for free school meals transitioning to Universal Credit from a legacy benefit will continue to have access to free school meals even if they move above the earnings threshold.

The government will fully consider the recommendations of the National Food Strategy, which included recommendations around free school meal eligibility, and will respond in due course.

15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions his Department has had with HM Treasury on increasing funding for Free School Meals, in response to the recent increase in the National Living Wage.

The department supports over 1.7 million pupils from the lowest income families to concentrate, learn, and achieve in the classroom through the provision of free school meals.

The National Funding Formula (NNF) includes a free school meal factor value of £460 per eligible pupil. This factor value will increase to £470 per eligible pupil as part of the overall increase to the core schools budget for financial year 2022-23. Local authorities distribute this money to schools through their local funding formula, which must include additional funding for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds, such as those eligible for free school meals.

The department is investing a further £4.7 billion by financial year 2024-25 for the core schools budget in England, over and above the Spending Review 2019 settlement for schools in 2022-23.

The £4.7 billion investment includes a further £1.6 billion in financial year 2022-23, on top of the year on year increase already announced as part of the 2019 spending round. This additional funding will help the school sector respond to the pressures we know they are facing.

The NNF continues to distribute this fairly, based on the needs of schools and their pupil cohorts. The department will make announcements on the breakdown of the financial years 2023-24 and 2024-25 core school budgets in due course, as well as the distribution of the additional £1.6 billion of funding confirmed for 2022-23.

15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential implications of (a) funding and (b) supply chain pressures in the school meals industry.

Department officials hold regular meetings with other government departments and with food industry representatives, covering a variety of issues including public sector food supplies.

The department routinely considers contingency arrangements and expect schools and catering companies supplying them to do the same.

Schools are responsible for the provision of school meals and may enter individual contracts with suppliers and caterers to meet this duty. We are confident that schools will continue providing pupils with nutritious school meals as required by the School Food Standards.

There is no evidence to suggest widespread disruption to education as a result of issues with food supply but in the event of any disruption to supply, we will work with councils and the sector to ensure nutritious meals can continue to be provided.

15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has contingencies in place in the event that school meal providers go out of business as a result of increasing funding pressures.

Department officials hold regular meetings with other government departments and with food industry representatives, covering a variety of issues including public sector food supplies.

The department routinely considers contingency arrangements and expect schools and catering companies supplying them to do the same.

Schools are responsible for the provision of school meals and may enter individual contracts with suppliers and caterers to meet this duty. We are confident that schools will continue providing pupils with nutritious school meals as required by the School Food Standards.

There is no evidence to suggest widespread disruption to education as a result of issues with food supply but in the event of any disruption to supply, we will work with councils and the sector to ensure nutritious meals can continue to be provided.

15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues in the Treasury on funding challenges in the school meals industry.

Department officials hold regular meetings with other government departments and with food industry representatives, covering a variety of issues including public sector food supplies.

The department routinely considers contingency arrangements and expect schools and catering companies supplying them to do the same.

Schools are responsible for the provision of school meals and may enter individual contracts with suppliers and caterers to meet this duty. We are confident that schools will continue providing pupils with nutritious school meals as required by the School Food Standards.

There is no evidence to suggest widespread disruption to education as a result of issues with food supply but in the event of any disruption to supply, we will work with councils and the sector to ensure nutritious meals can continue to be provided.

5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021, what steps his Department is taking to measure the progress of the restoration of disabled children’s social care services to pre-pandemic levels.

From day one of the COVID-19 outbreak, the government’s priority for vulnerable children has been to keep them safe, protect their welfare and put their best interests at the heart of every decision.

This is why we kept schools open for children with a social worker and children with special educational needs and disabilities, ensured that social workers observe those that do not attend, and that children needing social care support have continued to be identified. The government also provided more than £6 billion in non-ringfenced funding directly to councils during COVID-19 to support them with the immediate and longer-term impacts of COVID-19 spending pressures, including children’s social care, further to their core spending power.

Local authorities set their own children’s services budget from this core spending power, based on local need and priorities. This year, councils have access to £51.3 billion for their services, including a £1.7 billion grant for social care.

My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced at Spending Review 2021 that the government will provide local authorities with £4.8 billion of new grant funding over the next Spending Review period, which is intended to help meet the costs of delivering care for our most vulnerable children. This will enable the sector to maintain vital frontline services, including disabled children’s social care services.

5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the new family hubs are able to meet the specific needs of disabled children, young people and their families.

The government announced £82 million to create a network of family hubs. This is part of a wider £300 million package to transform services for parents and babies, carers and children in half of the local authorities across England. The family hubs investment is in addition to the £34 million we had already committed to champion family hubs.

Family hubs are a way of joining up locally and bringing existing family help services together to improve access to services, connections between families, professionals, services, and providers, and putting relationships at the heart of family help. Family hubs bring together services for families with children of all ages (0 to 19 years old) or those with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) from 0 to 25 years old, with a great Start for Life offer at their core. How services are delivered varies from place to place, but they can include services for disabled children, young people and their families. The decision on how best to meet the needs of the local population will be for the local council concerned. The SEND Review is looking at ways in which to improve outcomes for children and young people with SEND. Proposals for consultation will be published in the first three months of next year.

16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress has been made on the implementation of statutory relationships and sex education (RSE) in schools; how many schools have completed training; what quality assurance of providers has been undertaken; and how much funding has been allocated to schools for the delivery of that subject.

Since September 2020, it has been compulsory for schools to teach relationships education to primary school-aged pupils, relationships and sex education to secondary school-aged pupils and health education to all pupils in state-maintained schools. The department has been clear that, whilst it was appropriate last academic year for schools to prioritise relationship, sex and health education (RSHE) teaching to meet the needs of pupils, schools must deliver a full RSHE curriculum from September 2021.

The department does not collect information on how many schools in total have completed RSHE training. The department’s package of support to help develop teacher capability and competence to teach high quality RSHE included a training and peer support programme delivered by 20 lead teaching schools covering all eight regions in England. These teaching schools were appointed following a rigorous selection process based on an assessment of the quality of their training provision and experience and expertise. The programme was delivered in the last academic year and reached 3,800 schools. Provisional data for the fourth wave, which ended in July, shows that a further 1,000 schools have been supported. This is a cascade model of training whereby those trained are expected to share the training with other teachers in their school and wider school networks. Teaching schools’ training materials were based on the department’s training modules, which were developed with subject experts. Teaching schools have made their training materials and other resources freely available on their websites. We also published training modules which are freely available for all schools to download.

The department invested over £3 million in support for RSHE between the 2019-20 and 2020-21 financial years, and is investing up to £250,000 in 2021-22 for an additional wave of training. As with other aspects of the curriculum, schools have flexibility over how they deliver RSHE, so they can develop an integrated approach that is sensitive to the needs and background of their pupils.

To support this flexibility, schools are also free to determine how they use their core funding allocated to them, including investing in RSHE training for teachers.

8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the finding of the Child Action Poverty Group's August 2021 report, Fixing lunch: the case for expanding free school meals, that one million children living in poverty are not eligible for free school meals, if he will take steps to broaden the eligibility criteria for free school meals.

We think it is important that free school meal support is targeted at those that need it most. Free school meals (FSM) are an integral part of our provision for families on low incomes and our wider actions to promote social mobility.

Under the benefits-related criteria, there are currently around 1.7 million pupils eligible for and claiming FSM. An additional 1.3 million infants receive a free meal under the universal infant free school meal policy.

We introduced new eligibility criteria in April 2018 in recognition of the transition to Universal Credit, the arrangements in place are forecasted to reach more children, notwithstanding the current economic circumstances in which more children will be able to benefit from FSM.

Further to this we included generous protections, which mean any family eligible for FSM transitioning to Universal Credit from a legacy benefit will continue to have access to FSM even if they move above the earnings threshold.

7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to help ensure that the Comprehensive Spending Review allows education, health and social care agencies to have the resources necessary to (a) meet the legal timescales for Education, Health and Care Plan assessments and (b) deliver the support for disabled children identified in those assessments.

The Special Educational Needs and Disability Regulations 2014 make clear that local authorities must complete an education, health, and care plan (EHCP) assessment within twenty weeks from when the request is received, unless certain prescribed exceptional circumstances that are spelt out in paragraph 9:42 of the special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) code of practice, apply.

We use data to monitor local authority performance and to provide challenge and support to those local authorities where there are long-standing delays. Each year we also deliver a training programme to local authorities, health, and social care staff on their statutory duties for EHCPs and reviews, and we have continued to do this on a virtual basis.

In addition, Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission re-started their revisit programme to areas that received a Written Statement of Action in May, with the full inspection programme re-starting in June. Our team of SEND advisers and colleagues in NHS England are continuing to work with authorities with a Written Statement of Action to help improve performance.

More broadly, The Department for Education is currently undertaking a review of the SEND system, which is making good progress in identifying the reforms needed to ensure that schools and colleges are able to deliver the support for disabled children identified through those assessments, with the appropriate interventions from health and social care agencies.

6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the arts premium for secondary schools will be included in the upcoming Spending Review.

Due to the focus on new priorities as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, the arts premium is now subject to this year’s Spending Review.

Between 2016 and 2021, the Department has spent over £620 million on a diverse range of music and cultural education programmes. This includes Music Education Hubs, the Music and Dance Scheme and cultural education programmes such as Saturday art and design clubs, the National Youth Dance Company, and the British Film Institute’s Film Academy programme.

6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the potential effect of falling numbers of GCSE and A-level music entries on the delivery of a broad and balanced curriculum.

Music education is a statutory subject from ages 5 to 14 in the National Curriculum, and pupils have an entitlement to study at least one arts subject at Key Stage 4 in maintained schools.

The proportion of pupils in state-funded schools in England taking at least one arts GCSE since 2010 has fluctuated across years, but has remained broadly stable.

It is up to individual schools and colleges to decide which A level courses to offer, and as part of that they may wish to work together with other providers in the area to combine resources and maximise their offers.

In March 2021, the Department published the Model Music Curriculum, a detailed non-statutory music curriculum for Key Stages 1, 2 and 3, developed by an independent panel of experts and musicians, with the aim to refresh music lessons with rich and diverse content.

The teaching of a broad and ambitious music curriculum will form a key part of the refreshed National Plan for Music Education.

6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what timeline is for the development and delivery of the new National Plan for Music Education.

The Government is committed to ensuring that all children and young people have access to a good quality music education.

On 6 August 2021, the Department announced plans to work with a panel of experts from across the music education sector to develop a refreshed National Plan for Music Education. This will shape the future of music education, and follows the publication of the non-statutory Model Music Curriculum for Key Stages 1, 2 and 3 on 26 March 2021.

The Department also published our music education consultation report, which will help to inform the refreshed National Plan. The plan will be published early next year. The timeline for the delivery will be published as part of the National Plan.

24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what criteria was used to publish guidance on holding school sports days during the covid-19 outbreak in summer 2021; and what assessment he has made of whether that guidance is consistent with the guidance published for other larger sporting events.

Schools that are planning sports days this term should complete thorough risk assessments and ensure that they are run in line with their system of controls. These are the actions that have been in place since the autumn term and that all schools must take to reduce risks and create an inherently safer environment. The system of controls are set out in the Department’s guidance to schools, available to view here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/schools-coronavirus-covid-19-operational-guidance#system-of-controls.

The Department for Education has worked closely with the Department of Health and Social Care and Public Health England (PHE) to develop guidance for schools. We work with PHE to continually review the measures, which are informed by the latest scientific evidence and advice, and update the guidance accordingly.

Pupils must remain grouped in their class or year-group ‘bubbles’ and sports equipment should be regularly cleaned throughout the event. Any spectators must adhere to current social distancing requirements. Where events take place outdoors, spectators can gather in separate groups of up to 30, which is the current legal gathering limit. Dependent on the size of the area available, multiple groups of 30 may attend as long as there is no mixing between groups at any stage.

Elite sporting competitions follow a protocol produced by a working group of leaders, Chief Medical Officers and partner organisations. This protocol is available to view here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-phased-return-of-sport-and-recreation/elite-sport-return-to-domestic-competition-guidance. A set of minimum standards must be in place for these events to go ahead and, while the Government works to ensure guidance is coherent between sectors, differences in approach are sometimes needed due to the different circumstances involved.

22nd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps is his Department taking to ensure implementation of statutory relationships and sex education guidance in schools includes factual-based discussion of the full range of contraceptive options.

The Government wants to support all young people to be happy, healthy and safe and to equip them for adult life.

From September 2020, relationships education became compulsory for all primary school pupils, relationships and sex education (RSE) became compulsory for all secondary school pupils, and health education became compulsory for pupils in all state-funded schools. The statutory guidance sets out that as part of relationships, sex and health education, secondary pupils should be taught about contraception, wellbeing and the key facts about the menstrual cycle. The statutory guidance can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/relationships-education-relationships-and-sex-education-rse-and-health-education.

Under the topic of intimate and sexual relationships, including sexual health, secondary school pupils will be taught how the different sexually transmitted infections are transmitted, how risk can be reduced, and the importance of and facts about testing. Pupils should also know how to get further advice, including how and where to access confidential sexual and reproductive health advice and treatment.

The Department is committed to supporting schools to teach the new subjects and has published non-statutory implementation guidance titled ‘Plan your Relationships, Sex and Health Education Curriculum’, alongside teacher training materials. Both are designed to provide teachers with further clarity and practical advice on how to implement the RSHE curriculum, to help all teachers increase their confidence and quality of teaching. The support is available on a one-stop page for teachers on GOV.UK and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/teaching-about-relationships-sex-and-health.

11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to implement sharia-compliant alternative finance product, first proposed by the Government in 2014.

I refer the right hon. Member for Kingston Upon Hull North to the answer I gave on 9 June 2021 to Question 10312.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of funding additional respite care for the families of disabled children to help alleviate exhaustion and social isolation.

I refer the right hon. Member for Kingston upon Hull North to the answer I gave on 2 June 2021 to Question 7328.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of allocating funding to the provision of additional therapies for disabled children.

We know how important access to therapy services are for pupils and students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), which is why we are clear in our guidance that specialists, therapists, clinicians and other support staff should provide interventions as usual. The guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-for-full-opening-special-schools-and-other-specialist-settings.

Additionally, in the Chief Nurse’s letter of 7 October 2020 to Directors of Nursing, she made it clear that maintaining support for families is a priority and that professionals supporting children and families should not be redeployed to other services.

We are committed to helping all children and young people with SEND and have prioritised those who attend specialist settings by providing additional uplifts both in the 2020 Catch-up Premium and in the 2021 Recovery Premium. They, along with the pupil premium funding, can be used to support disadvantaged children and young people’s wider needs if required, including the provision of therapies. Additionally, specialist settings will also receive an uplift to deliver summer schools and will have the flexibility to plan provision based on pupils need.

We continue to encourage schools and colleges to work collaboratively with their local authority, clinical commissioning group and health providers to ensure that children and young people with SEND have access to appropriate therapies and support.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to invest in improving the (a) emotional well-being and (b) mental health of school children as part of the schools recovery plan.

Children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing is a priority for this government. The support schools are providing to their pupils following the return to face-to-face education should include time devoted to supporting mental health and wellbeing, which will play a fundamental part in supporting recovery. We want schools to have the freedom to decide what wider pastoral and extra-curricular activity to put in place, based on the needs of their pupils and drawing on evidence of effective practice. The return to education settings was supported by a £700 million package, which includes a new one-off Recovery Premium for state primary, secondary and special schools to use as they see best to support disadvantaged students. This will help schools to provide their disadvantaged pupils with a one-off boost to the support, both academic and pastoral, that has been proved most effective in helping them recover from the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak and can be used for mental health and wellbeing support.

We have supported schools to put the right pastoral support in place through the Wellbeing for Education Return scheme in academic year 2020/21, which funded expert advisors in every English local authority to offer training, support and resources for staff dealing with children and young people experiencing additional pressures from the last year – including trauma, anxiety, or grief. Our Mental Health in Education Action Group highlighted that schools and colleges continue to need help to understand, navigate and access the range of provision available locally, so we provided an additional £7 million funding to local authorities to provide further expert support to do this through the Wellbeing for Education Recovery programme.

On 10 May 2021 we confirmed that up to 7,800 schools and colleges in England will be offered funding worth £9.5 million to train a senior mental health lead from their staff in the next academic year, which is part of the government’s commitment to offering this training to all state schools and colleges by 2025. Training will provide senior leads with the knowledge and skills to develop or introduce a whole school or college approach to mental health and wellbeing in their setting, which encourages staff to develop their own understanding of issues affecting their pupils, giving young people a voice in how their school or college addresses wellbeing and working with parents and monitoring pupils where appropriate. We will also fund an adapted ‘Link' programme which is designed to improve partnerships between health and education leaders in local areas, raise awareness of mental health concerns and improve referrals to specialist help when needed.

This is in addition to the £79 million funding boost for NHS England children and young people’s mental health support announced in March, which will include increasing the number of Mental Health Support Teams. The number of support teams will grow from the 59 set up by last March to around 400 by April 2023, supporting nearly 3 million children. This increase, on top of the investment in mental health services set out in the NHS 10-year plan, means that millions of children and young people will have access to significantly expanded mental health services.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps is he taking to help disabled children recover lost progress in managing their conditions as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

We recognise that extended school and college restrictions have had a substantial impact on children and young people’s learning, health and wellbeing, particularly those with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). We are committed to supporting them and their families.

On 2 June 2021 we announced £1.4 billion new funding in addition to the £1.7 billion already committed, bringing total investment announced for education recovery over the past year to over £3 billion.

We have consistently prioritised children who attend specialist settings by providing additional uplifts to these settings, both in the 2020 Catch-up Premium and in the 2021 Recovery Premium, where specialist settings will also receive an uplift to deliver summer schools, at 3 times the normal rate. In mainstream settings, school leaders are able to target these initiatives to vulnerable children and are able to use the recovery premium to meet wider non-academic needs.

New funding for school-led tutoring will provide greater flexibility to schools to take on local tutors or use existing staff to supplement those employed through the existing National Tutoring Programme. We anticipate that this will especially benefit children and young people with SEND in all settings, where tutors familiar to these children can support them to realise the benefits of tuition.

Additional funding for training will ensure that teachers in schools and early years settings are able to access high quality training and professional development, designed around how to support all pupils to succeed. This includes children and young people with SEND in all settings. We know that high quality teaching is the best way to support all students, including those with SEND.

The 16-19 Tuition Fund will continue to support students with SEND as at present through small group tuition. Pupils with SEND in year 13 with an education, health and care plan will also be eligible to repeat up to a year where they have missed out due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Given the importance of therapists (such as speech and language or occupational therapy) and other health professionals in supporting children and young people with SEND, we are reminding settings that specialists, therapists, clinicians and other support staff for pupils and students with SEND should provide interventions as usual.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when all university students will be able to return to campus and resume in-person teaching as lockdown restrictions are eased during the covid-19 outbreak.

Following the review into when the remaining higher education students can return to in-person teaching and learning, the government has announced that the remaining students should return to in-person teaching no earlier than 17 May 2021, alongside Step 3 of the roadmap. Students and institutions will be given at least a week’s notice of any further return in accordance with the timing of Step 3 of the roadmap.

The government roadmap is designed to maintain a cautious approach to the easing of restrictions to reduce public health risks and ensure that we can maintain progress towards full reopening. However, the government recognises the difficulties and disruption that this may cause for many students and their families and that is why the government is making a further £15 million of additional student hardship funding available for this academic year 2020/21. In total we have made an additional £85 million of funding available for student hardship.

We are supporting universities to provide regular twice weekly asymptomatic testing for all students and staff on-site and, from May, at home. This will help break chains of transmission of the virus.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many 16 to 19 year old students attracted (a) Disadvantage Block 1 funding, (b) Disadvantage Block 2 funding and (c) Disadvantage Block 1 and 2 funding in the latest year for which figures are available.

The table below sets out the number of funded 16-19 students attracting disadvantage block 1 and block 2 funding.

The numbers are taken from the latest full year data we hold (2019 to 2020 individualised learner record R14 and 2019 to 2020 school census).

16-19 students attracting Disadvantage Block 1 funding only

16-19 students attracting Disadvantage Block 2 funding only

16-19 students attracting both Disadvantage Block 1 & 2 funding

177,084

242,822

180,294

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2021 to Question 156534 on the 16 to 19 Tuition Fund, how many 16 to 19 year olds are studying in (a) further education colleges, (b) sixth form colleges, (c) 16 to 19 academies and free schools, (d) school and academy sixth forms and (e) other institutions in the 2020-21 academic year.

National statistics showing the numbers of young people aged 16 to 18 who are participating in education and training in 2020/21 are scheduled to be published at the end of June 2021, as part of a series on participation in education and training, and employment. More information can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/participation-in-education-and-training-and-employment.

The latest data published is for the academic year 2019/20:

Participation of 16 to 18 year olds in education by institution type, England, end 2019 (provisional)

Full- and part-time education

End 2019 (provisional)

State funded schools

450,200

Local Authority Maintained schools

78,000

Sponsor Academies and City Technology Colleges

52,800

Converter Academies

294,600

Free schools

24,100

Special schools

16,500

Independent schools

87,100

Sixth form colleges

109,100

General further education, tertiary and specialist colleges

515,300

Higher education institutions

219,400

Total

1,397,600

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2021 to Question 156534 on the 16 to 19 Tuition Fund, how much funding under the 16-19 Tuition Fund has been allocated to (a) further education colleges, (b) sixth form colleges, (c) 16 to 19 academies and free schools, (d) school and academy sixth forms and (e) other institutions for the academic year 2020-21.

We have made up to £96 million available for the 16 to 19 tuition fund enabling schools, colleges and other 16 to 19 providers to provide small group tuition for disadvantaged students whose learning has been disrupted as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. Providers were required to opt-in to receive an allocation and need to comply with the guidance for the fund. The guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/16-to-19-funding-16-to-19-tuition-fund.

The attached table shows the data on the funding claimed and allocated. The data available shows the amounts for different kinds of academy, and for maintained schools, but does not consistently differentiate 16 to 19 only schools and academies from those with pre-16 as well as post-16 provision.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the provision of mental health services for students at university.

Protecting student and staff wellbeing is vital during these difficult times and it is important students can still access the mental health and wellbeing support they need. We recognise that many students are facing additional mental health challenges due to the disruption and uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 outbreak.

It is for higher education (HE) providers as autonomous bodies to identify and address the needs of their student body and decide what mental health and wellbeing support to put in place. HE providers have a duty of care towards their staff and students, including legal requirements under the Equality Act 2010, to take all reasonable steps to protect the health and safety and welfare of students to prevent harm. HE providers are best placed to understand and cater for their student body including providing mental health support for lower-level needs.

The Department of Health and Social Care has overall policy responsibility for young people’s mental health. We continue to work closely with them to take steps to develop mental health and wellbeing support.

The government is committed, through the NHS Long Term Plan, to investing at least £2.3 billion of extra funding a year into mental health services by financial year 2023-24. This will see an additional 345,000 children and young people, and adults, able to access support through NHS-funded services. This year the NHS will receive around an additional £500 million, to address waiting times for mental health services, give more people the mental health support they need, and invest in the NHS workforce. More detail will be provided in due course.

We have also worked with the Office for Students (OfS) to provide Student Space, which has been funded by up to £3 million by the OfS. Student Space is a mental health and wellbeing platform designed to bridge any gaps in support for students arising from this unprecedented situation and works alongside existing services. I am delighted they have extended the platform to support students for the whole 2020/21 academic year.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that school pupils who have not had access to digital devices to learn from home are fairly graded in their (a) GCSE and (b) A-levels this year.

Given the ongoing disruption to education caused by the COVID-19 outbreak, the Department announced in January 2021 that GCSE, AS and A level exams will not go ahead as planned this summer. The Department and Ofqual launched a joint consultation on 15 January on how to award grades in 2021 so they are robust and fair. We received over 100,000 responses from pupils, parents, teachers, head teachers and other stakeholders. There was widespread support for our approach.  Pupils will receive grades determined by their teachers. Teachers have the flexibility to use a range of evidence, including the use of optional questions provided by exam boards, mock exams, non-examined assessment, or in-class tests set by the school which align closely with the specification.

We know there has been differential learning loss, as some pupils have suffered more disruption to their education than others. Because of this, pupils will only be assessed on the content they have been taught, and not what they have missed.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people. To date, over 1.2 million laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, academy trusts, local authorities and further education providers. The Government is providing this significant injection of laptops and tablets on top of an estimated 2.9 million already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Where remote education has been needed and pupils continued to experience barriers to digital remote education, we have expected schools and FE colleges to work to overcome these barriers. This could include distributing school or FE college-owned laptops or supplementing digital provision with different forms of remote education such as printed resources or textbooks. This should be supplemented with other forms of communication to keep pupils and students on track or answer questions about work.

Some pupils and students who have difficulty engaging in remote education may be considered to be vulnerable children and young people and therefore eligible to attend provision: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-educational-provision/guidance-for-schools-colleges-and-local-authorities-on-maintaining-educational-provision#vulnerable-children-and-young-people. It is up to the child or young person’s education provider or local authority to make this decision. The decision would be based on the needs of the child or young person and their family, and a range of other factors, as set out in the guidance.

25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken to reassure school pupils that the grading of GCSEs and A-levels will be fair and equitable.

On 25 February 2021 the Government confirmed this year's cohort of GCSE, AS and A level students will receive grades based on teachers’ judgements of their performance based on a range of evidence, details of which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/awarding-qualifications-in-summer-2021. Fairness to young people is fundamental to the Department and Ofqual’s decision making. We want to ensure all young people have the confidence that, despite exams not going ahead, they will receive a grade that reflects their ability and enables them to progress.

Exam boards will provide teachers with a package of training and support materials in March 2021 on how to make judgements fairly. The guidance will also provide schools and colleges with support and training on how to minimise the risk of bias and malpractice.

Grades must reflect what a student knows, understands, and can do, and they must be widely understood and respected. Teachers will not be asked to judge the grade a student might have achieved had the COVID-19 outbreak not occurred or to measure potential. Exam boards will also provide grade descriptors, to help teachers to make accurate and fair judgements.

There will be a process to check teachers are doing what is needed and headteachers will have to confirm this to the exam boards. Exam boards will challenge schools where grades seem too low or too high. Every student who believes their grade does not reflect their performance or has not been properly determined will have a clear route to appeal this year.

25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that potential discrepancy between the grading of GCSE and A-level examinations by different schools is minimised.

On 25 February 2021 the Government confirmed this year's cohort of GCSE, AS and A level students will receive grades based on teachers’ judgements of their performance based on a range of evidence, details of which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/awarding-qualifications-in-summer-2021. Fairness to young people is fundamental to the Department and Ofqual’s decision making. We want to ensure all young people have the confidence that, despite exams not going ahead, they will receive a grade that reflects their ability and enables them to progress.

Exam boards will provide teachers with a package of training and support materials in March 2021 on how to make judgements fairly. The guidance will also provide schools and colleges with support and training on how to minimise the risk of bias and malpractice.

Grades must reflect what a student knows, understands, and can do, and they must be widely understood and respected. Teachers will not be asked to judge the grade a student might have achieved had the COVID-19 outbreak not occurred or to measure potential. Exam boards will also provide grade descriptors, to help teachers to make accurate and fair judgements.

There will be a process to check teachers are doing what is needed and headteachers will have to confirm this to the exam boards. Exam boards will challenge schools where grades seem too low or too high. Every student who believes their grade does not reflect their performance or has not been properly determined will have a clear route to appeal this year.

25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the provision of tutors reaches all pupils that require additional tuition due to the covid-19 outbreak.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) has been developed to support some of our most disadvantaged children and young people who are at risk of falling further behind due to lost time in education.

Our delivery partner, the Education Endowment Foundation, has approved 33 Tuition Partners who offer high-quality, subsidised tuition to schools. There is a good blend of both national and regional providers that can offer support to schools across all regions in England and 16 of the Tuition Partners are national providers. The Tuition Partners offer a variety of tuition models for schools to choose from, including online, face-to-face, small-group and one-to-one tuition.

Schools in the most disadvantaged areas of England have also been supported by Teach First to employ in-house Academic Mentors to provide intensive small group and one-to-one tuition.

The Department has undergone an extensive communications and engagement process with schools to ensure that as many as possible know about the programme and understand how to apply.

Tuition has continued throughout the national lockdown, with the majority of Tuition Partners offering online tuition at home. Academic Mentors have also continued to work with pupils in line with their individual school policy. Where it has been appropriate to do so, support has also continued for vulnerable and critical worker children at the school.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that schools are adequately ventilated to make them covid-19-secure when school pupils return on 8 March 2021.

At each stage of the Department's response to the COVID-19 outbreak, we have listened to the latest medical and scientific advice. The Department has worked closely with other Government departments, including Public Health England (PHE) and the Department of Health and Social Care, as well as stakeholders across the sector, to ensure that our policy is based on the latest scientific and medical advice, and to continue to develop comprehensive guidance based on the PHE-endorsed ‘system of controls’ and to understand the impact and effectiveness of these measures on staff, pupils and parents.

It is important to ensure that schools are well ventilated and that a comfortable teaching environment is maintained.

Current evidence recommends that the way to control COVID-19 is the same, even with the current new variants. The PHE-endorsed ‘system of controls’ which have been in use throughout the COVID-19 outbreak set out in our published guidance, which includes ventilation, continue to be the right measures to take. These measures create an inherently safer environment for children, young people, and staff where the risk of transmission of infection is substantially reduced. PHE keeps all these controls under review, based on the latest evidence. Schools therefore need to continue to implement these controls to the fullest extent. The guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak.

Our guidance signposts to further advice from the Health and Safety Executive on air conditioning and ventilation during the COVID-19 outbreak. The guidance can be found here: https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation.htm.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the evidential basis is for the decision to have all school pupils return on 8 March 2021 rather than a staggered approach.

The Government’s wider decision making is set out in the Government’s ‘COVID-19 Response – Spring 2021’ Roadmap, where the step by step plan to ease restrictions in England cautiously, starting with schools and colleges, is set out. It can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-response-spring-2021.

SAGE regularly publishes minutes and papers, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/scientific-evidence-supporting-the-government-response-to-coronavirus-covid-19. In addition, a summary of the evidence in relation to children, young people and education settings is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/evidence-summary-covid-19-children-young-people-and-education-settings.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that school pupils who are required to self-isolate due to the covid-19 outbreak do not fall behind at school.

We recognise teachers have been working exceptionally hard and making tremendous efforts to provide high quality remote education with much being achieved in recent months.

Until 8 March 2021, we continue to expect all primary and secondary schools in England to provide remote education for the majority of their pupils, with the exception of vulnerable children and young people and the children of critical workers, who can attend school in person. Where vulnerable children and young people and children of critical workers do not attend school, we expect schools to provide them with remote education.

From 8 March 2021, attendance will be mandatory for all pupils of compulsory school age. Schools affected by the remote education temporary continuity direction are still required to provide remote education for pupils where their attendance would be contrary to government guidance or legislation around COVID-19. This includes, for example, where such guidance means that a class, group or small number of pupils need to self-isolate, or that clinically extremely vulnerable children need to shield.

Where secondary schools are operating a phased return of pupils during week commencing 8 March to allow for testing, we expect schools to provide remote education for all pupils not yet expected to attend on-site.

Where it is needed, both now and after 8 March, schools are expected to offer pupils 3 to 5 hours of remote education that includes time for independent study and also either recorded or live direct teaching. This includes either recorded or live direct teaching alongside time for pupils to work independently to complete assignments that have been set. Online video lessons do not necessarily need to be recorded by teaching staff at the school. Oak National Academy lessons, for example, can be provided in lieu of school-led video content.

Schools are expected to have a system in place for checking on a daily basis whether pupils are engaging actively with their work. Schools will need to work with families to swiftly identify where pupil engagement is a concern and find effective solutions. A comprehensive package of support continues to be available to schools to help them meet these expectations. Schools can find further support via the Get Help with Remote Education page on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/get-help-with-remote-education.

In January 2021, my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, committed to working with parents, teachers and schools to develop a long-term plan to help support pupils make up their learning over the course of this parliament.

We also recognise that extended restrictions on attendance at schools and colleges have had a substantial impact on children and young people’s education. The Department has appointed Sir Kevan Collins as Education Recovery Commissioner, to advise on this plan and will say more on this in due course. More immediately, we are making available £700 million to put in place a range of additional measures to give nurseries, schools and colleges the tools they need to target support to their pupils.

In addition, we announced a catch-up package on 24 February 2021 which will build on the £1 billion catch up package announced in June 2020 and form part of the wider response to help pupils make up their lost learning over the course of this Parliament.

Finally, a range of high-quality online resources will be available for all teachers and pupils, starting from the summer term and throughout summer holidays, provided by Oak National Academy, to help give pupils the confidence they are ready for the next academic year.

3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what support his Department is going to give to students who will be taking exams in 2022.

The Government remains clear that exams are the fairest method to assess students. We know that students and teachers will be working hard in preparation for exams or assessments in 2022, and we will make sure that the interests of students are at the centre of our considerations. It is important that students in this cohort are able to obtain qualifications safely and fairly. We will continue to monitor the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on all students to ensure that those due to take exams in 2022 are supported to move to the next stage of their lives fairly.

To support students to catch up with their education, the Government has announced a catch-up package worth £1 billion to support children and young people. This includes a ‘Catch-up Premium’ worth £650 million and a £350 million National Tutoring Programme for disadvantaged pupils. We have also announced that we will provide a further programme of catch-up over the next financial year. This will involve a further £300 million of new money to early years, schools and providers of 16-19 further education for tutoring and we will work in collaboration with the education sector to develop, as appropriate, specific initiatives for summer schools and a COVID premium to support catch-up.

We recognise that these extended school and college closures have had a huge impact on children and young people’s education, which will take more than a year to make up. We will work in collaboration with the wider education sector to develop a long-term plan to make sure children and young people have the chance to make up their education over the course of this Parliament.

We have also appointed an Education Recovery Commissioner, Sir Kevan Collins, who will advise Ministers on the approach for education recovery, with a particular focus on helping students catch up on learning lost as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Understanding the impact of the COVID-19 disruption is a key priority for the Government. The Department has commissioned an independent research agency to analyse catch-up needs and monitor progress over this academic year.

3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment his Department has made of whether exams will be able to take place in the 2021-22 academic year.

The Government remains clear that exams are the fairest method to assess students. We know that students and teachers will be working hard in preparation for exams or assessments in 2022, and we will make sure that the interests of students are at the centre of our considerations. It is important that students in this cohort are able to obtain qualifications safely and fairly. We will continue to monitor the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on all students to ensure that those due to take exams in 2022 are supported to move to the next stage of their lives fairly.

To support students to catch up with their education, the Government has announced a catch-up package worth £1 billion to support children and young people. This includes a ‘Catch-up Premium’ worth £650 million and a £350 million National Tutoring Programme for disadvantaged pupils. We have also announced that we will provide a further programme of catch-up over the next financial year. This will involve a further £300 million of new money to early years, schools and providers of 16-19 further education for tutoring and we will work in collaboration with the education sector to develop, as appropriate, specific initiatives for summer schools and a COVID premium to support catch-up.

We recognise that these extended school and college closures have had a huge impact on children and young people’s education, which will take more than a year to make up. We will work in collaboration with the wider education sector to develop a long-term plan to make sure children and young people have the chance to make up their education over the course of this Parliament.

We have also appointed an Education Recovery Commissioner, Sir Kevan Collins, who will advise Ministers on the approach for education recovery, with a particular focus on helping students catch up on learning lost as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Understanding the impact of the COVID-19 disruption is a key priority for the Government. The Department has commissioned an independent research agency to analyse catch-up needs and monitor progress over this academic year.

3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the provision of sex education for secondary school children who have learning disabilities.

In September 2020, relationships education became compulsory for all primary school pupils, relationships and sex education compulsory for all secondary school pupils, and health education compulsory for pupils in all state-funded schools. However, schools have flexibility up to the summer term 2021 before they start teaching the new subjects to accommodate school closures due to the COVID-19 outbreak. We have not conducted a formal review of relationships, sex, and health education (RSHE) as it is too early to be able make an accurate assessment of the impact on pupils, including those with learning disabilities.

Those who teach pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) are used to adapting materials to meet the varied needs of their pupils and the RSHE statutory guidance is clear that the curriculum must be accessible to all pupils. We recognise that some teachers may need additional support when covering sensitive topics in the RSHE curriculum and last summer the Department organised a webinar for teachers of pupils with SEND, teaching assistants and SEND coordinators. The webinar was attended by over 2400 people and covered an overview of the RSHE curriculum, SEND curriculum planning, relationships and sex education and mental wellbeing. It is available to view on the PSHE Association’s SEND Hub: https://www.pshe-association.org.uk/content/send-hub.

The Department is currently working with teachers, SEND subject experts and SEND stakeholders to support all schools to build their expertise and increase their confidence to deliver the curriculum to those with more complex needs. This work includes the development of a SEND-specific RSHE module that will sit alongside the other RSHE teacher training modules available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/teaching-about-relationships-sex-and-health and working with SEND stakeholders to run regional workshops to allow teachers and other practitioners to share best practice and provide peer support.

3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has in place to make schools covid-19 secure when they reopen to students.

At each stage of its response to the COVID-19 outbreak, the Government has listened to and acted on the latest medical and scientific advice. The Government has always been clear that it will not hesitate to take swift and decisive action to control the virus and save lives.

The way to control this virus is the same, even with the current new variants. Current evidence suggests that the Public Health England-endorsed ‘system of controls’, that has been in use throughout the autumn term and which is set out in guidance, continues to be the right measures to take. This includes minimising contact with individuals who are unwell, use of face coverings in corridors and communal areas, cleaning hands and good respiratory hygiene, regular thorough cleaning of the school, minimising contact, ventilation and use of personal protective equipment where specifically advised. The latest schools’ guidance is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/957766/Restricting_attendance_during_the_national_lockdown-_schools.pdf.

Schools will already be familiar with much of this guidance, which they have been implementing since the start of the autumn term. If schools continue to assess risk and implement the measures set out in the guidance, they will effectively reduce risks in their school and create an inherently safer environment.

The Department will continue to keep our guidance and advice to schools under review to help ensure they remain as safe as possible.

3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's consultation on how GCSE, AS and A level grades should be awarded in summer 2021, which closed on 15 January 2021, when he plans to publish the findings of that consultation.

In light of the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, the Government considers that examinations cannot be held in a way which is fair. The Department has therefore announced that GCSE, AS and A level exams will not go ahead this summer as planned.

The Department has already confirmed that students taking GCSE, AS and A levels, regulated by Ofqual in the Summer 2021 series, should be awarded grades based on an assessment by their teachers.

To ensure that our approach is developed with the sector, Ofqual and the Department have now concluded a two week consultation on how to ensure all pupils are supported to move to the next stage of their lives. The Department is working at pace to provide further clarity of the sector and details of alternative arrangements to examinations will be confirmed in our response to the consultation, which will be published by the end of February 2021.

29th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many dongles have been provided to secondary school children who are learning from home and require internet access in (a) Kingston upon Hull, (b) Hull City, (c) Yorkshire and the Humber and (d) England.

The Government has provided over 54,000 4G wireless routers across England, with free data for the academic year 2020-21, and continues to provide further 4G wireless routers where children need to access remote education. Data regarding the number of routers delivered will be published shortly.

In addition to providing wireless routers, we have partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home.

We are grateful to EE, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, Vodafone, BT Mobile and Lycamobile for supporting this offer. We are continuing to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many dongles has been provided to primary school children who are learning from home and require internet access in (a) Kingston upon Hull North, (b) Hull City, (c) Yorkshire and the Humber and (d) nationally.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

As of Monday 8 February 2021, this includes over 980,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to schools, academy trusts and local authorities.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts or local authorities, who can lend these to children and young people who need them most during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Figures on the number of devices already delivered are available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data. This includes 1,749 delivered to the City of Hull local authority. The Department have also delivered devices to academy trusts, including schools in Yorkshire and the Humber, which are not included in this figure.

Regional figures for delivery of devices are currently not available for the period requested and figures by Parliamentary constituency are also not available.

Where schools need additional devices to support disadvantaged children, they should contact the Department for Education’s service team at covid.technology@education.gov.uk. They should include the number of pupils in Years 3 to 13 who require support and an explanation of how they have gathered this evidence.

To support access to the internet, the Department have partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online, as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home. The Department are grateful to EE, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, Vodafone, BT Mobile and Lycamobile for their collaboration. We are currently engaged with additional mobile network operators and continue to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate he has made of the number of digital devices provided for secondary school pupils who are learning from home in (a) Kingston upon Hull North, (b) Hull City, (c) Yorkshire and the Humber and (d) nationally.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

As of Monday 8 February 2021, this includes over 980,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to schools, academy trusts and local authorities.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts or local authorities, who can lend these to children and young people who need them most during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Figures on the number of devices already delivered are available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data. This includes 1,749 delivered to the City of Hull local authority. The Department have also delivered devices to academy trusts, including schools in Yorkshire and the Humber, which are not included in this figure.

Regional figures for delivery of devices are currently not available for the period requested and figures by Parliamentary constituency are also not available.

Where schools need additional devices to support disadvantaged children, they should contact the Department for Education’s service team at covid.technology@education.gov.uk. They should include the number of pupils in Years 3 to 13 who require support and an explanation of how they have gathered this evidence.

To support access to the internet, the Department have partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online, as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home. The Department are grateful to EE, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, Vodafone, BT Mobile and Lycamobile for their collaboration. We are currently engaged with additional mobile network operators and continue to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate he has made of the number of digital devices made available for primary school children who are learning at home in (a) Kingston upon Hull North, (b) Hull City, (c) Yorkshire and the Humber and (d) nationally.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

As of Monday 8 February 2021, this includes over 980,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to schools, academy trusts and local authorities.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts or local authorities, who can lend these to children and young people who need them most during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Figures on the number of devices already delivered are available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data. This includes 1,749 delivered to the City of Hull local authority. The Department have also delivered devices to academy trusts, including schools in Yorkshire and the Humber, which are not included in this figure.

Regional figures for delivery of devices are currently not available for the period requested and figures by Parliamentary constituency are also not available.

Where schools need additional devices to support disadvantaged children, they should contact the Department for Education’s service team at covid.technology@education.gov.uk. They should include the number of pupils in Years 3 to 13 who require support and an explanation of how they have gathered this evidence.

To support access to the internet, the Department have partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online, as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home. The Department are grateful to EE, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, Vodafone, BT Mobile and Lycamobile for their collaboration. We are currently engaged with additional mobile network operators and continue to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer.

26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to increase the speed of the rollout of (a) digital devices and (b) access to the internet to children who are not in school as a result of the covid-19 outbreak in (a) Yorkshire and The Humber, (b) Kingston Upon Hull and (c) the UK.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

As of Monday 25 January, this includes over 870,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to schools, trusts and local authorities.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, trusts or local authorities who can lend these to children and young people who need them most, during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Figures on the number of devices already delivered is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data/2021-week-4. We have also delivered devices to academy trusts that include schools in Yorkshire and Humber, which are not included in this figure.

Regional figures for delivery of devices are currently not available for the period requested and figures by Parliamentary constituency are also not available.

Where schools need additional devices, in order to support disadvantaged children, they should contact the Department for Education’s service team at covid.technology@education.gov.uk. They should include the number of pupils in years 3-13 who require support and an explanation of how they’ve gathered this evidence.

To support access to the internet we have partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home.

We are grateful to EE, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, Vodafone, BT Mobile and Lycamobile for their collaboration. We are currently engaged with additional mobile network operators and continue to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer.

16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether dance schools can open for (a) training and rehearsal without an audience and (b) supervised activities for children during the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown.

Dance can be undertaken in schools that provide a full-time education, during the period of national restrictions, but safety precautions should be undertaken. Advice is provided in the actions for schools during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools#music-dance-and-drama-in-school.

In addition, qualifications in dance can take place in England during this period provided they are conducted in line with the public health guidance on autumn exams: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/responsibility-for-autumn-gcse-as-and-a-level-exam-series/public-health-arrangements-for-autumn-exams.

Schools may also continue to offer before and after school educational provision to their pupils (including dance), to enable their parents or carers to work, seek work, attend education or training, or where the provision is to support respite care (for vulnerable children). Where schools are offering these activities, they should advise parents that they should only be using them for these purposes.

Providers of supervised activities for children, such as those providing out-of-school activities (including dance classes), may also continue to operate during the period of national restrictions, as outlined in the guidance for education and childcare settings on new national restrictions from 5 November: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/education-and-childcare-settings-new-national-restrictions-from-5-november-2020#ooss. However, providers of these activities should ensure they are only being accessed for face-to-face provision by parents if their primary purpose is registered childcare, or where they are providing other activities for children, where it is reasonably necessary to enable parents to work or search for work, or to undertake training or education; or for the purposes of respite care.

Providers that continue to operate face-to-face provision during this period should continue to undertake risk assessments and implement the system of controls set out in the protective measures for holiday clubs and after-school clubs and other out-of-school clubs for children during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak/protective-measures-for-out-of-school-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

All other out-of-school activities, not being primarily used by parents for these purposes and that can offer remote education, should close for face-to-face provision for the duration of the national restrictions. This will minimise the amount of mixing between different groups of people and therefore reduce the risk of infection and transmission of the virus.

13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if his Department will publish data on the number of university students living in campus accommodation who have tested positive for covid-19 in each local authority area in England.

Universities are currently reporting to us on the number of positive student cases in their institutions and the numbers they are aware of that are self-isolating, and these are currently not broken down by local authority campus zones. From next week, the Office for Students will be gathering data on COVID-19 outbreaks and we will consider how best to report that information in line with data sharing protocols.


Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many University of Hull students have tested positive for covid-19 since the academic year began on 14 September 2020.

In order to balance the need for accurate information with reducing data burdens on universities, we have asked for additional information only from universities with cumulative outbreaks of 25 or more positive student COVID-19 cases. We have received no response from the University of Hull and external sources indicate that there have been fewer than 25 positive student cases at the university so far.

From the week commencing 19 October 2020, the Office for Students will be gathering data on COVID-19 outbreaks, and we will consider how best to report that information in line with data-sharing protocols.


Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on steps the Government is taking to limit the spread of covid-19 on university campus grounds.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, has regular discussions on minimising the transmission of COVID-19 within higher education (HE) providers with his Cabinet colleagues, including with my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care. Departmental officials and I have regular meetings and discussions with ministers and officials in the Department for Health and Social Care, and with sector representatives, on a range of measures to limit the spread of COVID-19.

The safety and wellbeing of staff and students in HE is always our priority. The government is doing all it can to minimise the risks to those working and studying in our HE institutions in this unprecedented situation, whilst mitigating the impact on education.

We have drawn on the expertise of the HE taskforce that we set up, and we have been providing robust public health advice and regular updates to the HE sector to help providers to plan carefully to keep students and staff as safe as possible. We issued updated guidance for providers on reopening campuses, which provides advice on teaching, accommodation and student services. The guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses.

Our system of HE tiers, as set out in guidance, intends to help universities identify the appropriate restrictions to impose on their educational provision in response to an outbreak. We have worked to ensure that all universities have outbreak plans. These plans have been shared with local Directors of Public Health and continue to be reviewed and updated based on emerging lessons and local situations.

The plans cover a range of scenarios and will ensure that HE providers are prepared to respond quickly to an outbreak in their educational setting or wider community. We are working with Public Health England to monitor those universities that have outbreaks and to make sure that universities and Directors of Public Health are working together to respond appropriately to any outbreaks.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken to ensure adequate supplies of covid-19 tests are available for students living in grouped university accommodation.

The safety and wellbeing of staff and students in higher education (HE) is always our priority. The government is doing all it can to minimise the risks to those working and studying in our HE institutions in this unprecedented situation, whilst mitigating the impact on education.

Capacity for COVID-19 testing is the highest it has ever been and we are seeing significant demand. The department continues to work closely with the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC), and with sector representatives, to ensure that any students who display COVID-19 symptoms can have quick and easy access to testing.

The government has set a target of 500,000 tests a day by the end of October. Local testing sites will be most accessible to students and have the quickest test result turnaround. DHSC plan to increase the total number of sites to 150 by the end of October, and to 400 sites by the end of January 2021. Many of these new testing sites will be located near universities. In addition, there are 258 mobile testing units. Where there is a mobile testing unit in the vicinity of the university, students and staff will also be able book a test at one of these units. We are working closely with DHSC and NHS Test and Trace towards a position in which all universities have access to testing within 1.5 miles of their campus, where possible.

We have drawn on the expertise of the HE taskforce that we set up, and we have been providing robust public health advice and regular updates to the HE sector to help providers plan carefully to keep students and staff as safe as possible. We have updated our guidance for providers on reopening campuses, which provides advice on teaching, accommodation and student services. Our guidance takes account of the latest advice from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, which has been considering the risks of reopening higher education providers. The guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses. As with all of our education settings, we continue to monitor the situation closely and follow the latest scientific advice, adapting policies as the situation changes.

We have worked with universities to ensure that they all have outbreak response plans. These have been or are being agreed with local Directors of Public Health. The plans cover a range of scenarios and will ensure providers are prepared to respond quickly to a COVID-19 outbreak in their educational setting or wider community. The situation is constantly changing, but we are working with Public Health England to monitor those universities that have COVID-19 outbreaks and to make sure universities and Directors of Public Health are working together to respond appropriately to any outbreaks.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken to respond to covid-19 outbreaks in group university accommodation.

The safety and wellbeing of staff and students in higher education (HE) is always our priority. The government is doing all it can to minimise the risks to those working and studying in our HE institutions in this unprecedented situation, whilst mitigating the impact on education.

Capacity for COVID-19 testing is the highest it has ever been and we are seeing significant demand. The department continues to work closely with the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC), and with sector representatives, to ensure that any students who display COVID-19 symptoms can have quick and easy access to testing.

The government has set a target of 500,000 tests a day by the end of October. Local testing sites will be most accessible to students and have the quickest test result turnaround. DHSC plan to increase the total number of sites to 150 by the end of October, and to 400 sites by the end of January 2021. Many of these new testing sites will be located near universities. In addition, there are 258 mobile testing units. Where there is a mobile testing unit in the vicinity of the university, students and staff will also be able book a test at one of these units. We are working closely with DHSC and NHS Test and Trace towards a position in which all universities have access to testing within 1.5 miles of their campus, where possible.

We have drawn on the expertise of the HE taskforce that we set up, and we have been providing robust public health advice and regular updates to the HE sector to help providers plan carefully to keep students and staff as safe as possible. We have updated our guidance for providers on reopening campuses, which provides advice on teaching, accommodation and student services. Our guidance takes account of the latest advice from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, which has been considering the risks of reopening higher education providers. The guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses. As with all of our education settings, we continue to monitor the situation closely and follow the latest scientific advice, adapting policies as the situation changes.

We have worked with universities to ensure that they all have outbreak response plans. These have been or are being agreed with local Directors of Public Health. The plans cover a range of scenarios and will ensure providers are prepared to respond quickly to a COVID-19 outbreak in their educational setting or wider community. The situation is constantly changing, but we are working with Public Health England to monitor those universities that have COVID-19 outbreaks and to make sure universities and Directors of Public Health are working together to respond appropriately to any outbreaks.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many universities in England have reported covid-19 outbreaks on campus grounds.

The safety and wellbeing of staff and students in higher education (HE) is always our priority. The government is doing all it can to minimise the risks to those working and studying in our HE institutions in this unprecedented situation, whilst mitigating the impact on education.

Capacity for COVID-19 testing is the highest it has ever been and we are seeing significant demand. The department continues to work closely with the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC), and with sector representatives, to ensure that any students who display COVID-19 symptoms can have quick and easy access to testing.

The government has set a target of 500,000 tests a day by the end of October. Local testing sites will be most accessible to students and have the quickest test result turnaround. DHSC plan to increase the total number of sites to 150 by the end of October, and to 400 sites by the end of January 2021. Many of these new testing sites will be located near universities. In addition, there are 258 mobile testing units. Where there is a mobile testing unit in the vicinity of the university, students and staff will also be able book a test at one of these units. We are working closely with DHSC and NHS Test and Trace towards a position in which all universities have access to testing within 1.5 miles of their campus, where possible.

We have drawn on the expertise of the HE taskforce that we set up, and we have been providing robust public health advice and regular updates to the HE sector to help providers plan carefully to keep students and staff as safe as possible. We have updated our guidance for providers on reopening campuses, which provides advice on teaching, accommodation and student services. Our guidance takes account of the latest advice from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, which has been considering the risks of reopening higher education providers. The guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses. As with all of our education settings, we continue to monitor the situation closely and follow the latest scientific advice, adapting policies as the situation changes.

We have worked with universities to ensure that they all have outbreak response plans. These have been or are being agreed with local Directors of Public Health. The plans cover a range of scenarios and will ensure providers are prepared to respond quickly to a COVID-19 outbreak in their educational setting or wider community. The situation is constantly changing, but we are working with Public Health England to monitor those universities that have COVID-19 outbreaks and to make sure universities and Directors of Public Health are working together to respond appropriately to any outbreaks.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) laptops, (b) tablets and (c) 4G wireless routers were provided to children attending (i) Hull City Council schools or (ii) Kingston upon Hull academy trust schools through the Government since schools closed on 20 March 2020 due to the covid-19 outbreak.

In the summer term, the Department delivered over 220,000 laptops and tablets and over 50,000 4G wireless routers to children who would not have otherwise had online access, as part of over £100 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care. This information can be viewed here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/912888/Devices_and_4G_wireless_routers_progress_data_as_of_27_August_2020.pdf.

This includes information about devices delivered to Kingston upon Hull and academy trusts within Kingston upon Hull.

The laptops and tablets were an injection of support to help local authorities and academy trusts provide access to education and social care during COVID-19 restrictions.

Where devices were distributed to a local authority for disadvantaged year 10 pupils, the local authority was responsible for allocating and delivering devices to local authority maintained schools.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether private music teachers are able to resume working from (a) their home and (b) a student's homes with effect from 4 July 2020 if they comply with the covid-secure guidance.

As of 4 July, providers offering out-of-school activities to children, including private music teachers, have been able to open for both indoor and outdoor provision with safety measures in place. We have published guidance for providers of these activities on the measures they should put in place to ensure they are operating as safely as possible, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak/protective-measures-for-out-of-school-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

If a private music teacher normally offers provision in their own home or students’ homes, they should also refer to the government guidance on working safely during COVID-19 in other people’s homes, available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/homes.

Providers should note that there may be an additional risk of infection in environments where people are singing, chanting, playing wind or brass instruments or shouting. This applies even if individuals are at a distance.

As the risk of transmission is considerably lower outdoors, providers who normally run sessions indoors should consider whether they are able to do so safely outside. However, if this is not possible then private music teachers working from their own home should consider whether a specific, well-ventilated room could be designated for lessons.

Providers should also be aware that at this time they should not be permitting live performances, including music, to take place in front of a live audience.

9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of removing covid-19 lockdown restrictions for dance schools to resume teaching where there is capacity for social distancing.

A dance school which operates for fewer than 18 hours per week would generally be considered to be an out-of-school setting. As my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, confirmed in his announcement on 23 June, out-of-school settings which run community activities, holiday clubs, after-school clubs, tuition and other out-of-school provision for children can operate over the summer holiday, with safety measures in place. Providers of these activities have been able to open since 4 July, provided that they follow the protective measures set out by the Government. However, providers should check the latest Government guidelines on which businesses and venues can open and for which purposes as some premises may only be able to open for certain limited purposes:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/further-businesses-and-premises-to-close/further-businesses-and-premises-to-close-guidance.

As announced on the 9 July, indoor gyms, sports courts and fitness and dance studios will be able to reopen from 25 July. They cannot be used for holiday clubs and activities for children until that point.

Protective measures guidance for out-of-school settings can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

Providers who offer indoor sports activities for children should also refer to the guidance for keeping workers, volunteers and customers safe during COVID-19 for providers of grassroots sports and gym or leisure facilities:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/providers-of-grassroots-sport-and-gym-leisure-facilities.

9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Department for Education guidance on the reopening of after school clubs, including dance classes, published on 1 July 2020, what assessment he has made of the ability of dance schools to reopen safely as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

A dance school which operates for fewer than 18 hours per week would generally be considered to be an out-of-school setting. As my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, confirmed in his announcement on 23 June, out-of-school settings which run community activities, holiday clubs, after-school clubs, tuition and other out-of-school provision for children can operate over the summer holiday, with safety measures in place. Providers of these activities have been able to open since 4 July, provided that they follow the protective measures set out by the Government. However, providers should check the latest Government guidelines on which businesses and venues can open and for which purposes as some premises may only be able to open for certain limited purposes:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/further-businesses-and-premises-to-close/further-businesses-and-premises-to-close-guidance.

As announced on the 9 July, indoor gyms, sports courts and fitness and dance studios will be able to reopen from 25 July. They cannot be used for holiday clubs and activities for children until that point.

Protective measures guidance for out-of-school settings can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

Providers who offer indoor sports activities for children should also refer to the guidance for keeping workers, volunteers and customers safe during COVID-19 for providers of grassroots sports and gym or leisure facilities:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/providers-of-grassroots-sport-and-gym-leisure-facilities.

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to respond to Question 60723, tabled by the hon. Member for Kingston upon Hull North on 17 June 2020.

Written parliamentary question 60723 was answered on 09 July 2020.

2nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has published for universities on furloughing employees on zero hours contracts during the covid-19 outbreak.

During and after the COVID-19 outbreak, our aim is for higher education (HE) providers to continue to deliver HE provision and to support the needs of staff and students, both on-campus and off-campus.

The department issued guidance on 17 April for HE providers so that they are aware of the support available to them and can apply for it. The guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care.

This guidance confirms that HE providers can access the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help safeguard staff jobs. The linked guidance from Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs confirms that employers can claim for employees on any type of employment contract, including full-time, part-time, agency, flexible or zero-hour contracts.

In developing this guidance, the department worked with trade unions as well as Universities UK and the Universities and Colleges Employers Association. We continue to work with the sector to provide further clarification as necessary to help providers understand how they can access the range of measures on offer.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
2nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his oral statement of 12 May 2020 on the extension of the coronavirus job retention scheme, whether term-time workers in education are eligible for furlough during July and August.

State funded schools have continued to receive their budgets as usual, regardless of any periods of partial or complete closure. That will ensure that they are able to continue to pay their staff, and meet their other regular financial commitments, as we move through these extraordinary times.

As public funds continue to be paid, HMRC‘s guidance for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-for-wage-costs-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme) states that public bodies, including schools, should not furlough staff via the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme if their wages are paid from public funds.

Staff in schools whose wages are not paid from public funds, and whose employer has already furloughed, may continue to be furloughed via the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, subject to criteria set out here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care#state-funded-schools.

23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 1 May 2020 to Question 40805, if he will provide a detailed update on the future of the National Plan for Music Education; and what steps he is taking to provide long-term financial support for music education hubs and peripatetic teachers who are dependent on funding via that plan which ends in 2020.

The Government believes all pupils should have access to an excellent, well-rounded education and the arts and music are central to this. The findings from the Call for Evidence on the National Plan for Music Education, which closed on 13 March 2020, will inform the development of proposals for the refreshed Plan. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the refresh of the Plan is on hold, but this position remains under review. Until the Plan is formally refreshed, Music Education Hubs will continue to fulfil their roles as set out in the existing Plan, taking into account current Government guidance on the COVID-19 outbreak.

The Department is committed to the continuation of high-quality education for all pupils during this difficult time and it is supporting schools and parents through a number of initiatives. The Department’s published list of online resources is one such initiative and is intended to support parents and teachers to navigate through the wide range of online educational resources available so that they can identify the right tools and resources to meet their specific needs. For this reason, we have chosen to limit our list to include free online resources to the following: English, Mathematics, science, PE, mental wellbeing and special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). These resources are available here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-online-education-resources.

The online resources list forms part of a wider range of support available to support education at home including a package of support by the Oak National Academy and enhanced educational provision from the BBC, which both include content for music. Subject associations and professional bodies are also able to signpost to resources for a wider span of subjects. For music, Music Mark and the Incorporated Society of Musicians have done so already, and the Department has signposted to these organisations through social media.

23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason music and creative learning was not included in the online educational resources for schools and parents to help children to learn at home during the covid-19 outbreak; and what steps he is taking to promote online educational resources created by third sector organisations to support music learning during that outbreak.

The Government believes all pupils should have access to an excellent, well-rounded education and the arts and music are central to this. The findings from the Call for Evidence on the National Plan for Music Education, which closed on 13 March 2020, will inform the development of proposals for the refreshed Plan. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the refresh of the Plan is on hold, but this position remains under review. Until the Plan is formally refreshed, Music Education Hubs will continue to fulfil their roles as set out in the existing Plan, taking into account current Government guidance on the COVID-19 outbreak.

The Department is committed to the continuation of high-quality education for all pupils during this difficult time and it is supporting schools and parents through a number of initiatives. The Department’s published list of online resources is one such initiative and is intended to support parents and teachers to navigate through the wide range of online educational resources available so that they can identify the right tools and resources to meet their specific needs. For this reason, we have chosen to limit our list to include free online resources to the following: English, Mathematics, science, PE, mental wellbeing and special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). These resources are available here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-online-education-resources.

The online resources list forms part of a wider range of support available to support education at home including a package of support by the Oak National Academy and enhanced educational provision from the BBC, which both include content for music. Subject associations and professional bodies are also able to signpost to resources for a wider span of subjects. For music, Music Mark and the Incorporated Society of Musicians have done so already, and the Department has signposted to these organisations through social media.

23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether visiting music teachers who receive income through public funds via the pupil premium can claim that part of their income through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

As both my right hon. Friends, the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer have made clear, the Government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID-19.

State funded schools will continue to receive their budgets for the coming year, as usual, regardless of any periods of partial or complete closure. That will ensure that they are able to continue to pay their staff, and meet their other regular financial commitments, as we move through these extraordinary times.

The Coronavirus (COVID-19): financial support for education, early years and children’s social care guidance (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care#state-funded-schools) states that if you have staff costs that are publicly funded, schools should use that money to continue paying staff, and not furlough them.

Where schools receive a mixture of private and public funds, schools can, subject to conditions set out in the guidance above, use the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to claim grants for the proportion of its pay bill which could be considered to have been funded by the school’s private income.

23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that music teachers who work in state-funded schools and colleges but are paid through (a) parents' fees and (b) other private income are being furloughed through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme; and if the Government will reconfirm to education providers that atypical workers who meet those conditions are eligible for such furlough payments.

As both my right hon. Friends, the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer have made clear, the Government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID-19.

State funded schools will continue to receive their budgets for the coming year, as usual, regardless of any periods of partial or complete closure. That will ensure that they are able to continue to pay their staff, and meet their other regular financial commitments, as we move through these extraordinary times.

We do not, in general, expect schools to furlough staff. However, we understand that, in some instances, schools may have a separate private income such as music teachers paid through parent fees. Where this income has either stopped or been reduced and there are staff that are typically paid from those private income streams, it may be appropriate to furlough staff.

Schools should first seek to make the necessary savings from their existing budget or consider options to redeploy these staff before furloughing them. Only after all other potential options have been fully considered should schools furlough those members of staff and seek support through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Further information on school’s accessing support through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme can be found in the publication:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care#state-funded-schools.

23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that (a) education providers undertake appropriate risk assessments in relation to teaching music in education settings which are (i) shared with all staff and their representatives before any individual can be required to return to work during the covid-19 outbreak and (ii) take account of risks arising from (A) choirs and singing, (B) wind ensembles and (C) other circumstances specific to music teaching and (b) no music teacher is penalised or suffers detriment for raising or acting on health and safety concerns in respect of that outbreak.

On 2 July we published guidance to help schools plan for a full return of all pupils in September, which includes guidance on music lessons. Schools are advised to note that there may be an additional risk of infection in environments where individuals are singing, chanting, playing wind or brass instruments or shouting. This applies even if individuals are at a distance. Schools should consider how to reduce the risk, particularly when pupils are playing instruments or singing in small groups such as in music lessons by, for example, physical distancing and playing outside wherever possible, limiting group sizes to no more than 15, positioning pupils back-to-back or side-to-side, avoiding sharing of instruments, and ensuring good ventilation. Singing, wind and brass playing should not take place in larger groups such as school choirs and ensembles, or school assemblies. The Department plans to publish further guidance regarding music lessons shortly.

The guidance for full opening of schools in September can be read at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools#introduction.

19th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has for the future of the Primary PE & Sport Premium funding; and if he will make a statement.

The Government will confirm arrangements for the Primary PE and Sport Premium in the 2020-21 academic year as soon as possible. The position for the 2021-22 academic year and beyond will be considered at the forthcoming Spending Review.

17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has plans to extend the funding of free school meals over the 2020 summer holiday to students studying in (a) sixth form colleges and (b) 16-19 academies.

Provision for free school meals is ordinarily term time only. However, owing to the COVID-19 outbreak, the government fully understands that children and parents face an unprecedented situation over the summer. To reflect this, we will be providing additional funding for a COVID Summer Food Fund which will enable families with school children who are eligible for free school meals to receive food vouchers covering the six-week holiday period.

Our guidance on the COVID Summer Food Fund is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/covid-summer-food-fund.

More information on free school meals for students in 16 to 19 provision over the summer will be announced shortly.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to respond to the letter of 7 April 2020 from the hon. Member for Kingston upon Hull North, on the University of Hull.

I can confirm that the letter, received into the Department on 8 April 2020, from the hon. Member for Kingston upon Hull North has been responded to.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to respond to the letter of 28 April 2020 from the hon. Member for Kingston upon Hull North, on student healthcare workers' student loans.

I can confirm that the letter, addressed to my right hon. Friends, the Secretary of State for Education and the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, received into the Department on 28 April 2020, from the hon. Member for Kingston upon Hull North has been responded to.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to support the families of pupils on free school meals in Kingston upon Hull North during the school summer holidays in 2020.

I refer the hon. Members to the answer I gave on 23 June 2020 to Question 54195.

18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government is taking to ensure the protection and support of children known to be living in households affected by domestic abuse in the event of school closures during the covid-19 outbreak.

Domestic abuse is a devastating crime and we fully recognise the impact it has on children and young people who may feel even more vulnerable if they are unable to attend school.

We want to prioritise supporting those most in need at this very difficult time and ensuring that vulnerable children remain protected is a top priority for government. Schools have been asked to continue to provide care for vulnerable children including those who are supported by social work, those with safeguarding and welfare needs, including child in need plans, on child protection plans, ‘looked after’ children, young carers, disabled children, and those with education, health and care plans.

We will work with schools and local authorities to help identify the children who most need support at this time.

Local authorities have the key day-to-day responsibility for delivery of children’s social care. Social workers will continue to work with vulnerable children in this difficult period and support these children to access provision in schools, and any other support they require.

The latest guidance on vulnerable children and young people can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-for-schools-and-other-educational-settings.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what support his Department provided to the children's social services department at Kingston upon Hull City Council (a) during the period that those services were graded by Ofsted as requires improvement, (b) since those services were graded by Ofsted as inadequate in January 2019 and (c) since the monitoring visit by Ofsted on 14 January 2020.

Over the course of 2018, the Director of Children’s Services and the Assistant Director for Hull City Council met with the regional lead for Yorkshire and the Humber on several occasions to discuss support. During this time, Hull City Council was in receipt of support from North Yorkshire County Council as a Partner in Practice (PiP), funded by the Department for Education. In February 2019, Hull City Council had also paid for support from another PiP, Essex County Council.

In May 2019, the Department issued an improvement notice and appointed an improvement adviser, Paul Moffat, to support and challenge Hull City Council’s improvement journey in line with established policy set out in the ‘Putting Children First’ guidance, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/putting-children-first-our-vision-for-childrens-social-care.

Mr Moffat was previously the Chief Executive of Doncaster Children’s Services Trust. He has a strong background in improving children’s services, taking Doncaster’s Children’s Services Trust’s Ofsted rating from ‘Inadequate’ to ‘Good’ in three years. The Department also funded North Yorkshire County Council and Essex County Council in 2019 to provide support to Hull City Council on a number of areas.

Since the monitoring visit in January 2020, Mr Moffat has continued to work closely with Hull City Council.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken in response to the outcome of the SEND local area inspection of Kingston upon Hull City Council by the CQC and Ofsted that took place in October 2019.

The joint Ofsted and Care Quality Commission special educational needs and disabilities local area revisit to Kingston upon Hull in October 2019, published on 23 December 2019, found that sufficient improvement had been made in two out of the four significant weaknesses identified in the October 2017 inspection.

The Department for Education is clear that progress with addressing the remaining weaknesses must be accelerated. The Department requested leaders of local areas to submit an updated action plan setting out how they will achieve this.

This action plan must be co-produced with partners. It should state how the local area will report on progress and impact, as well as how partners, including families, will be kept fully aware and informed of progress.

The Department will review the plan with partners, including NHS England, as part of our assessment of the most appropriate actions that will bring about the required improvement in services.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what role his Department had in the appointment of the interim director of children’s services at Kingston upon Hull City Council.

Hull City Council took the decision to remove the Director of Children’s Services (DCS) from her post after the Ofsted monitoring visit in January 2020. It was also the Council’s decision to appoint a new leadership team. The Department had no role in the appointment of the interim DCS.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the outcomes of the SEND local area inspection and inspection of children’s social care services at Kingston upon Hull City Council, whether his Department has provided (a) staff and (b) financial support to that local authority to improve children’s services.

The government is providing local authorities with an additional £1 billion for adult and children’s social care in every year of this Parliament.

The Department for Education has not provided any funding directly to the local authority to improve Children’s Social Care. Prior to the May 2019 Ofsted inspection report, the regional lead for Yorkshire and the Humber met with Hull City Council on several occasions to discuss support. During this time, Hull City Council was in receipt of support from North Yorkshire County Council as a Partner in Practice (PiP), funded by the Department. In February 2019, Hull City Council also paid for support from another PiP, Essex County Council.

In May 2019, the Department issued an improvement notice and appointed an improvement adviser, Paul Moffat, to support and challenge Hull City Council’s improvement journey in line with established policy set out in the ‘Putting Children First’ guidance, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/putting-children-first-our-vision-for-childrens-social-care.

Mr Moffat was previously the Chief Executive of Doncaster Children’s Services Trust. He has a strong background in improving children’s services, taking Doncaster’s Children’s Services Trust’s Ofsted rating from ‘Inadequate’ to ‘Good’ in three years. The Department also funded North Yorkshire County Council and Essex County Council to provide support to Hull City Council on a number of areas, equating to an investment of approximately £80,000 in 2019-20.

The joint Ofsted and CQC special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) local area revisit to Kingston upon Hull in October 2019, published on 23 December 2019, found that sufficient improvement had been made in two out of the four significant weaknesses identified in the October 2017 inspection. In 2018-19, the Department provided Kingston upon Hull with a SEND implementation grant of £140,968 to support the implementation of the SEND reforms. The Department has also funded training and resources from delivery partners, including Whole School SEND, Contact and the Council for Disabled Children, and a dedicated SEND adviser to provide support and challenge to the local area to improve their SEND services.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND local area inspection of Hull City Council by the CQC and Ofsted that took place in October 2019 and Ofsted's inspection of children’s social care services in Kingston upon Hull City Council published in May 2019, if he will make an assessment of the capacity of that local authority to improve the (a) SEND and (b) child protection services it provides.

In the ‘Putting Children First’ guidance, the department is clear that where failure occurs in children’s social care services we expect most councils to improve with support and challenge from experts, especially when failure is not persistent or systemic. It also highlights that we will review councils’ progress towards improvement. Where insufficient progress has been made, we have the right to appoint a commissioner to review whether services should remain in council control. The guidance is available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/putting-children-first-our-vision-for-childrens-social-care.

An Ofsted monitoring visit, published in February 2020, found that progress to improve children’s social care services in Hull has not been good enough to date. The department is aware the council has made changes to the leadership of its social care services and is considering the next steps in our intervention in Hull.

The joint Ofsted and Care Quality Commission SEND local area revisit to Kingston-upon-Hull in October 2019, published on 23 December 2019, found that sufficient improvement had been made in two out of the four significant weaknesses identified in the October 2017 inspection.

The department is clear that progress with addressing the remaining weaknesses must be accelerated, and has requested local area leaders submit an updated action plan setting out how they will achieve this. This action plan must be co-produced with partners and outline how the local area will report on progress and impact, as well as how partners, including families, will be kept fully aware and informed of progress.

The department will review the plan with partners, including NHS England, as part of our assessment of the most appropriate actions that will bring about the required improvement in services. We are working with the newly appointed leadership team at the City Council to establish a joint approach to driving improvement across both services.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to appoint a Commissioner to oversee children’s services provision in Hull.

In the ‘Putting Children First’ guidance, the department is clear that where failure occurs in children’s social care services we expect most councils to improve with support and challenge from experts, especially when failure is not persistent or systemic. It also highlights that we will review councils’ progress towards improvement. Where insufficient progress has been made, we have the right to appoint a commissioner to review whether services should remain in council control. The guidance is available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/putting-children-first-our-vision-for-childrens-social-care.

An Ofsted monitoring visit, published in February 2020, found that progress to improve children’s social care services in Hull has not been good enough to date. The department is aware the council has made changes to the leadership of its social care services and is considering the next steps in our intervention in Hull.

The joint Ofsted and Care Quality Commission SEND local area revisit to Kingston-upon-Hull in October 2019, published on 23 December 2019, found that sufficient improvement had been made in two out of the four significant weaknesses identified in the October 2017 inspection.

The department is clear that progress with addressing the remaining weaknesses must be accelerated, and has requested local area leaders submit an updated action plan setting out how they will achieve this. This action plan must be co-produced with partners and outline how the local area will report on progress and impact, as well as how partners, including families, will be kept fully aware and informed of progress.

The department will review the plan with partners, including NHS England, as part of our assessment of the most appropriate actions that will bring about the required improvement in services. We are working with the newly appointed leadership team at the City Council to establish a joint approach to driving improvement across both services.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the effect on children in Hull of the findings of Ofsted's inspection of children’s social care services in Kingston upon Hull City Council published in May 2019.

Ofsted found children’s social care services in Hull to be inadequate in May 2019. Subsequently, a monitoring visit by Ofsted in January 2020 showed that services for children, young people and families in Hull were still in need of improvement.

Following the original inadequate judgement and in line with the department’s intervention policy set out in ‘Putting Children First’, we appointed an improvement adviser, Paul Moffatt. Paul Moffat reports regularly to ministers on progress in Hull and led a Department for Education review of progress in December 2019.

‘Putting Children First’ is available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/putting-children-first-our-vision-for-childrens-social-care.

28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the effect on the level of take-up of free school meals of linking that take-up to provision of the pupil premium.

We allocate pupil premium funding every year that a child is claiming a free school meal and for the following 6 years should they cease claiming free school meals, recognising the importance of continuing the additional investment for those that have experienced economic disadvantage.

Evidence proves economic deprivation is strongly consistently linked to under-achievement at school. Pupil eligibility for free school meals in the last 6 years (known as “Ever6 FSM”) remains the best available proxy measure of economic deprivation at individual pupil level.

We want to make sure as many eligible pupils as possible are claiming their free school meals, and to make it as simple as possible for schools and local authorities to determine eligibility. To support this, we provide an Eligibility Checking System to make the checking process as quick and straightforward as possible for schools and local authorities. We have also developed a model registration form to help schools encourage parents to sign up for free school meals, and we provide guidance to Jobcentre Plus advisers so that they can make Universal Credit recipients aware that they may also be entitled to wider benefits, including free school meals.

We will continue to look at what the most effective schools do and highlight and disseminate best practice. We are prepared to consider any further steps we can take to improve the take-up of free school meals.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to introduce dedicated capital expansion and maintenance funds for sixth form providers in England.

Our ambition is to level up the skills of the entire nation and ensure that post-16 education providers are in a great shape to deliver this. The department is considering how best to achieve this ambition and will announce details of any future capital funding in due course. This will build on the significant uplift in recurrent funding for 16-19 education which we are putting in place for the next academic year, 2020-21.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she plans to introduce new regulations to (a) monitor and (b) mitigate the presence of microplastics in the UK.

No assessment has been made. We are commissioning a research project called the ‘Emissions of intentionally added microplastics’ which will investigate the risks of intentionally added microplastics. It will advise on the most effective measures to address risks and help identify wider evidence gaps that need to be addressed to support a more strategic approach to managing intentionally added microplastics.

The Government has, however, taken a targeted approach to tackling microplastic pollution. We’ve already banned microbeads in rinse-off personal care products and we continue to tackle upstream sources of secondary microplastics that leak into the environment, by banning and restricting commonly littered plastic items – including single use plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds and through our upcoming bans on single use plastic plates, cutlery, balloon sticks and expanded and extruded polystyrene food and drinks containers. We recently announced in the Plan for Water that we will change the law to ban the sale of wet wipes containing plastic subject to public consultation, which will be launched in Autumn 2023.

The UK Government is also proud to have supported the proposal by Rwanda and Peru that led to the ambitious resolution to start negotiating an international legally binding treaty to end plastic pollution, agreed at the United Nations Environment Assembly in March 2022. The process to negotiate a new agreement is now underway, and the UK has taken an ambitious stance, including calling for specific provisions in the agreement to address microplastic pollution.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of (a) monitoring and (b) mitigating the presence of microplastics within the UK.

No assessment has been made. We are commissioning a research project called the ‘Emissions of intentionally added microplastics’ which will investigate the risks of intentionally added microplastics. It will advise on the most effective measures to address risks and help identify wider evidence gaps that need to be addressed to support a more strategic approach to managing intentionally added microplastics.

The Government has, however, taken a targeted approach to tackling microplastic pollution. We’ve already banned microbeads in rinse-off personal care products and we continue to tackle upstream sources of secondary microplastics that leak into the environment, by banning and restricting commonly littered plastic items – including single use plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds and through our upcoming bans on single use plastic plates, cutlery, balloon sticks and expanded and extruded polystyrene food and drinks containers. We recently announced in the Plan for Water that we will change the law to ban the sale of wet wipes containing plastic subject to public consultation, which will be launched in Autumn 2023.

The UK Government is also proud to have supported the proposal by Rwanda and Peru that led to the ambitious resolution to start negotiating an international legally binding treaty to end plastic pollution, agreed at the United Nations Environment Assembly in March 2022. The process to negotiate a new agreement is now underway, and the UK has taken an ambitious stance, including calling for specific provisions in the agreement to address microplastic pollution.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the potential impact of microplastic contaminants on public health.

The potential impact of microplastic materials on human health has been assessed in 2021 by the UK Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment (COT) who published an overarching statement on potential risks from exposure to microplastics.

The COT concluded that it is not yet possible to perform a complete assessment for the potential risks to human health from exposure to micro and nanoplastics via the oral and inhalation routes". The COT made a number of recommendations for further research including understanding the risk of exposure from the oral and inhalational routes. UKHSA has work ongoing in this area in small projects in collaboration with Imperial College. These projects, while limited, are assisting the understanding of the potential risks from exposure to micro and nano plastics from inhalational and oral exposure.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of microplastics in the air within (a) houses, (b) large cities, (c) hospitals and (d) health care environments.

The Environment Agency undertakes a range of ambient air quality monitoring on behalf of Defra including particulate matter monitoring. Particulate matter is a complex pollutant that could include some proportion of microplastics but this is not routinely assessed. Near real time data on particulate matter levels, as well as other pollutants, are made available on UK Air website.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate she has made of the prominence of microplastic contaminants in human tissue samples.

The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) is aware of a several published research papers that report finding microplastic particles in human tissues such as a lung and diseased liver. These studies are small but do indicate the potential of small numbers of microplastic particles to enter some human tissues. UKHSA is not directly involved with this work and is not currently assessing the prevalence of microplastic particles in human tissues, but does have some research work ongoing with Imperial College London to look at the factors that contribute to the uptake of microplastic particles into tissues.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime's report, entitled Wildlife and Forest Crime Analytic Toolkit Report: United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, published in August 2021, which states that raptors are being persecuted by organised crime groups, if the Government will (a) recognise raptor persecution as serious and organised crime and (b) allocate additional resources to help tackle raptor persecution.

We welcome this report and the fact that it recognises the UK's global leadership in fighting wildlife and forestry crime. We invited the UN to undertake this analysis and we are proud to be the first G7 country to request this assessment. While raptor persecution is not linked to organised crime groups, this government takes it very seriously and Defra has this year more than doubled its funding of the National Wildlife Crime Unit (NWCU) from £165,000 per year to over £1.2 million over the next three years to target wildlife crime priorities including the illegal killing of birds of prey.

The report does, however, link the illegal trade of raptors to organised crime. This government recognises illegal wildlife trade (IWT) as a serious crime, which is sometimes carried out by organised criminal groups, and advocates that approach worldwide. From August 2021 the Home Office has provided additional funding for the NWCU to tackle money laundering related to IWT, aligning directly to G7 commitments to intensify the combating of illicit finance from IWT. This is intended to be a three-year project.

We will carefully consider all of the UN report's recommendations to help us build on the positive progress we have made in tackling wildlife crime. The UK is already committed to protecting endangered animals and plants from poaching and illegal trade to benefit wildlife, local communities, the economy and protect global security. We are investing over £46m between 2014 and 2022 to counter international illegal trade by reducing demand, strengthening enforcement, ensuring effective legal frameworks and developing sustainable livelihoods.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to (a) set targets for the reduction of plastic pollution, (b) publish a strategy and annual reports on plastic pollution reduction and (c) establish an advisory committee on plastic pollution.

The Environment Bill requires the Government to set at least one long-term, legally binding target in four of the highest priority areas for environmental improvement, including Resource Efficiency and Waste Reduction. These targets will be set following a robust, evidence-led process that includes seeking independent expert advice, a role for stakeholders and the public, and approval from Parliament. We prefer to set a wider Resources and Waste target to ensure a holistic approach to all materials, not just plastics, to ensure we achieve the best environmental outcome.

As to a strategy, annual reports and an advisory committee on plastic pollution reduction, the Government's 25 Year Environment Plan sets out our ambition to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste by 2042. In December 2018 we published the Resources and Waste Strategy, which sets out how we want to achieve this and move towards a circular economy, effectively providing a strategy for plastic pollution reduction. The Environment Bill will enable us to significantly change the way that we manage our waste and take forward a number of the proposals from the Resources and Waste Strategy. The Bill contains powers to create extended producer responsibility schemes; introduce deposit return schemes; establish greater consistency in the recycling system; better control the export of plastic waste; and give us the power to set new charges for other single-use plastic items. All these measures will effectively contribute to reducing plastic pollution.

The Government are currently consulting on policy proposals for extended producer responsibility for packaging, a deposit return scheme and more consistency in recycling collections.

We also support the UK Plastics Pact (UKPP), which produces an annual report on the progress to plastic waste reduction targets in 2025. The Pact is a collaborative initiative of over 120 business members, representing retail, manufacturing, hospitality, the plastic supply sector, plastic recycling and resource management.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Mar 2021
What steps he is taking to secure long-term funding for nature-based flooding solutions.

This Government sees nature-based solutions playing an increasing role in our effort to reduce flood risk, alongside traditional flood defences, in our £5.2 billion capital flood defence programme as well as through the £200 million innovation programme. These will run for the next six years. In addition, the Government’s ongoing investment in the environment, such as the Nature for Climate Fund and our environmental land management schemes, will also support natural flood management measures.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the £63 million of local welfare assistance to be used by local authorities announced by the Prime Minister on 10 June 2020, how much of the £63 million (a) is new money and (b) has previously been announced and on what dates.

All of the £63 million is additional funding, sitting alongside the £6.5 billion of extra support the Government is providing through the benefits system to ensure the most vulnerable in our society are protected throughout this crisis.

We are currently finalising the amounts to be allocated to different local authorities.

The funding is not ring-fenced for children on free school meals. The Government has recently announced a further £120 million of funding to continue free school meals for children during the school holidays.

This funding is a one-off boost to local authorities in recognition that some people in our communities are facing sudden and severe financial difficulties.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the £63 million of local welfare assistance to be used by local authorities announced by the Prime Minister on 10 June 2020, what amount has been allocated to Hull City Council.

All of the £63 million is additional funding, sitting alongside the £6.5 billion of extra support the Government is providing through the benefits system to ensure the most vulnerable in our society are protected throughout this crisis.

We are currently finalising the amounts to be allocated to different local authorities.

The funding is not ring-fenced for children on free school meals. The Government has recently announced a further £120 million of funding to continue free school meals for children during the school holidays.

This funding is a one-off boost to local authorities in recognition that some people in our communities are facing sudden and severe financial difficulties.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the £63 million of local welfare assistance to be used by local authorities announced by the Prime Minister on 10 June 2020, whether this funding is ring-fenced for children on free school meals during the school holidays.

All of the £63 million is additional funding, sitting alongside the £6.5 billion of extra support the Government is providing through the benefits system to ensure the most vulnerable in our society are protected throughout this crisis.

We are currently finalising the amounts to be allocated to different local authorities.

The funding is not ring-fenced for children on free school meals. The Government has recently announced a further £120 million of funding to continue free school meals for children during the school holidays.

This funding is a one-off boost to local authorities in recognition that some people in our communities are facing sudden and severe financial difficulties.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the £63 million of local welfare assistance to be used by local authorities announced at Prime Minister’s Questions on 10 June 2020, whether he plans to make the same level of additional funding in each of the next five years.

All of the £63 million is additional funding, sitting alongside the £6.5 billion of extra support the Government is providing through the benefits system to ensure the most vulnerable in our society are protected throughout this crisis.

We are currently finalising the amounts to be allocated to different local authorities.

The funding is not ring-fenced for children on free school meals. The Government has recently announced a further £120 million of funding to continue free school meals for children during the school holidays.

This funding is a one-off boost to local authorities in recognition that some people in our communities are facing sudden and severe financial difficulties.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to protect people on universal credit who live in flood risk areas and who may be unable to afford flood insurance premiums.

Flood Re, launched in 2016, is a joint initiative between Government and industry designed to improve the availability and affordability of flood insurance for households at high risk of flooding.

Flood Re allows insurance companies to pass on the flood risk element of household insurance policies to them for a below market rate set premium. Premiums charged by Flood Re to insurers are based on the Council Tax band of the property. This means that people on universal credit who live in flood risk areas will benefit from Flood Re. From May 2019, 99% of households with prior flood claims can now receive quotes from 5 or more insurers due to Flood Re. Four out of five householders with a prior flood claim saw price reductions of over 50%.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to protect people living in rented accommodation in flood-risk areas who cannot afford flood insurance premiums.

Flood Re, launched in 2016, is a joint initiative between Government and industry designed to improve the availability and affordability of flood insurance for households at high risk of flooding. Flood Re allows insurance companies to pass on the flood risk element of household insurance policies to them for a below market-rate set premium.

For renters, insurers can ask Flood Re to cover the flood risk part of a contents insurance policy, as long as the property meets certain criteria, including: being used for private; residential purposes; having a domestic Council Tax band A to H; being a single residential unit or building comprising two or three units; being insured on an individual basis; and being built before 01/01/2009.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office plans to maintain the expertise of staff relating to (a) development projects, (b) climate change emergencies and (b) other key policy issues of her Department after the merger of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office with her Department.

Merging the departments will bring together the best of what we do in aid and diplomacy, and create new opportunities for staff. The ambition, vision and expertise of DFID and FCO staff will be at the heart of the new department – taking forward the work of UK aid, which will remain central to our mission.

We will continue to look at how our aid budget can be spent most effectively in our national interest, including through the Integrated Review – which will inform the priorities of the new Department.

17th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what monitoring will be putin place after the merger of her Department with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to ensure that the 0.7% of UK GDP pledged for overseas development aid is used for that purpose and not for security and diplomatic aims.

Our commitment to spending 0.7 percent of our national income on aid is enshrined in law and the UK continues to abide by the OECD DAC rules for aid. All UK official development assistance (ODA) must meet OECD DAC criteria, and have the promotion of the economic development and welfare of developing countries as its primary purpose. We will continue to look at how this money can be spent most effectively, taking into account our national interest, including through the Integrated Review – which will inform the priorities of the new Department.

8th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she is taking to ensure that workers’ rights are maintained in all UK trade agreements.

The Government shares the public’s high regard for workers' rights and the Prime Minister has been clear that there will be no reduction in UK protections in signing up to new Free Trade Agreements.

The agreements secured with both Australia and New Zealand demonstrate our resolve to maintain workers’ rights, and our commitment to maintain high standards.

The Government has also committed to maintaining these standards in various public mandates, that set out our approach to trade negotiations.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
8th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she has taken to protect domestic food standards when negotiating free trade agreements.

We have not and will not compromise on our high food safety through our trade negotiations. These decisions are made independently of free trade agreements (FTAs).

The independent Trade and Agriculture Commission considers whether our FTAs affect the United Kingdom’s statutory protections in relation to animal or plant life or health, animal welfare, and the environment - and recently concluded that the United Kingdom-Australia FTA does not.

8th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent steps she has taken to increase the proportion of UK trade through free trade agreements.

We have secured trade agreements with 70 countries plus the EU, partners that accounted for £808bn of UK bilateral trade in 2021.

The Department for International Trade can report significant progress this year. We have signed a free trade agreement (FTA) with New Zealand and a Digital Economy Agreement with Singapore. We have completed three rounds of FTA negotiations with India and one round with Canada. We have completed a Call for Input on an enhanced FTA with Israel, and launched FTA negotiations with Mexico, Switzerland and Greenland. We are preparing to launch FTA negotiations with the Gulf Cooperation Council.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answers of 21 June 2021 to Question 16807 on Trade Agreements: Australia and to Question 16808 on Livestock: Australia, what assessment she has made of whether Australian farmers would be allowed to export chickens reared using barren battery cages to the UK; and if she will make a statement.

The Department for International Trade has always been clear that the deal with Australia will not compromise the UK’s high standards. This agreement does not create new permissions for imports from Australia. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

The Government has secured a comprehensive partnership to work with Australia, including internationally, to progress animal welfare in partnership with Australia. The Government has also agreed a non-regression clause on animal welfare - a first in a Free Trade Agreement. This commitment means that neither country can lower their animal welfare standards to undercut the other.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of the legality of (a) barren battery cages, (b) sow stalls, (c) hormone-fed beef, (d) hot branding and (e) mulesing in Australia on (i) food and (ii) farming standards in the UK.

The Department for International Trade has always been clear that this deal will not compromise the UK’s high standards. Imports will still have to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

This deal will also not unfairly undercut UK farmers. The Government has agreed a ground-breaking non-regression clause on animal welfare, which means that neither country can lower their animal welfare standards to undercut the other. The Government has also agreed a general safeguard mechanism which will provide a safety net for industry if they face serious injury from increased imports as a direct consequence of the Free Trade Agreement.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he plans to publish the response to the Supporting Recycled Carbon Fuels through the Renewable Transport Fuels Obligation consultation.

The Department has carefully analysed responses to the consultation “Supporting Recycled Carbon Fuels through the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation” and will be publishing the Government response as soon as possible.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has provided recent guidance to public transport providers in Kingston Upon Hull North constituency on (a) accessibility and (b) permissions for passengers using electric mobility scooters.

In 2022 the Department issued Guidance to support licensing authorities with the implementation of updated laws improving disabled people’s access to taxis and private hire vehicles (PHVs).

The Department also consulted on updated best practice guidance for taxi and PHV licensing authorities, including recommendations on providing a more inclusive service, and the substantive guidance document will be published later in 2023. Both documents are relevant to public transport authorities and providers across England, including those in Kingston Upon Hull North.

Rules on the carriage of mobility scooters vary by transport mode, and advice is provided in mode-specific guidance documents. There have been no recent major changes to such guidance for buses, taxis/PHVs or rail services.

22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make it his policy to issue indefinite disabled person’s parking badge entitlements to people with progressive conditions such as Parkinson’s.

Applications to the Blue Badge scheme are not dependent upon condition but are based on the need of the applicant to park closer to their destination. Local authorities are responsible for administering the scheme locally and all local authority administrators have the discretion to add a ‘not for reassessment’ marker to individual Blue Badge records, including for applicants with Parkinson's.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
13th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with petrol retailers on wholesale fuel costs for car users.

Fuel prices are regularly discussed across government. The Department for Transport (DfT), and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) engage the motoring sector through the Motorists’ Forum on the cost of living and fuel costs.

Both Departments continue to review the findings and recommendations of the Competition and Market Authority (CMA), following the publication of their urgent review on fuel retail market competition and the initial findings of their subsequent in-depth fuel market study. DfT and BEIS will continue to work with the CMA and representatives of the fuel industry on this issue to ensure motorists are paying a fair price at the pump.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
13th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the zero-emission bus regional areas scheme in decarbonising the bus fleet.

The Zero Emission Bus Regional Area scheme (ZEBRA) is supporting local authorities to drive decarbonisation of their bus fleets. So far, the Government has awarded £270 million to 17 local transport authorities which will support up to 1,278 zero emission buses (ZEBs). These will remove polluting diesel buses from the road.

To inform the assessment of ZEBRA bids, my department required local authorities to complete a tool that calculates the costs and benefits of each bid, including the amount of carbon savings. This information helped target funding to ensure the decarbonisation of the bus fleet in an effective way. Furthermore, we have designed a monitoring and evaluation project for the scheme. This will provide data on the effectiveness of the scheme and the extent to which it delivers its aims and objectives. It will also improve the evidence base on the performance of ZEBs, to support full decarbonisation of the bus fleet.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
13th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the new train timetable on reliability of rail operators.

The December 2022 timetable was designed to improve performance, particularly through some of the busiest parts of the network.

Since it was introduced, the network has faced considerable challenges, with poor weather (snow, ice, wind and heavy rain), sustained industrial action and a wide-ranging programme of engineering works. The full impact of the timetable on service performance will only become clearer when network disruption stabilises, towards the end of January.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
13th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with TransPennine Express on its recent operational performance.

The Department, which manages TransPennine Express’s contract in partnership with Transport for the North through the Rail North Partnership, is in regular dialogue with the operator to stabilise the current service provision (which has been affected by high levels of absence, a lack of rest day working and overtime, and industrial action) and then return services to a fuller and reliable timetable.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
13th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of trends in the number of cancelled planned rail services effecting journeys to and from Hull in 2022.

The Department, which manages TransPennine Express’s contract in partnership with Transport for the North through the Rail North Partnership, is in regular dialogue with the operator to stabilise the current service provision (which has been affected by high levels of absence, a lack of rest day working and overtime, and industrial action) and then return services to a fuller and reliable timetable.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
13th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of trends in the level of bus services in England since 2019.

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in significant reductions to bus service levels and passenger numbers. To mitigate the impacts of the pandemic the Government has provided nearly £2 billion in emergency and recovery funding to bus operators and local transport authorities to keep vital bus services running. As a result of this support, bus services in England in 2020/21 ran at over 80% of pre-COVID levels, even though patronage and commercial fare revenue dropped significantly.

The Government is taking proactive steps to help increase patronage by providing £60 million to help bus operators cap single fares at £2 on services in England outside London from 1 January to 31 March 2023. Over 130 operators covering more than 4,600 routes are participating in the scheme, which will help increase patronage on buses and help millions save on their regular travel costs.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to increase the use of electric transport in Kingston upon Hull.

Overall, the Government has invested over £2 billion to support the transition to zero emission vehicles. This funding has largely gone to reduce barriers to adoption, including offsetting higher upfront costs, and to accelerate the rollout of chargepoint infrastructure.

In Kingston upon Hull, 411 charging devices have been installed to date through the Department’s Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme, and 184 sockets through its Workplace Charging Scheme.

Under the Department’s On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS) grant, funding is available to all UK local authorities to provide public chargepoints for their residents without access to private parking. The Department encourages Hull City Council to make use of the scheme and apply for funding.

6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to take steps to improve bus services in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

Hull City Council have been allocated funding totalling £416,388, to strengthen their in-house capacity to help deliver their Bus Service Improvement Plan (BSIP). They will be able to access practical assistance under the planned new Bus Centre of Excellence. The BSIP covers Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

Hull City Council has been recently allocated emergency and recovery funding of around £130,000, to help the bus sector mitigate the impacts of the pandemic, in addition to almost £135,000 annually, to support socially necessary bus services.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he plans to take to improve train services in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

In its December 2022 timetable TransPennine Express introduced direct services from Hull to Liverpool through Manchester, allowing for direct ‘coast to coast’ services and re-establishing a historic rail link between the two port cities.

We will take an adaptive approach to investment when considering any future projects as part of the Northern Powerhouse Rail programme – looking at how well current projects are going, and at how demand and economic growth recover.

In the meantime, we are investing in the station and associated facilities - the Hull gateline project is ongoing, aimed at specific areas of concern around ticketless travel and anti–social behaviour, and TPE is installing a new train-cleaning facility to improve performance and asset availability.

As well as the above, Hull Trains is an open access operator currently running up to 94 direct services from Hull and the Humber to London every week, providing improved connectivity for communities throughout the region.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department is taking steps to support the local authority to reduce traffic congestion in Kingston upon Hull.

The causes of congestion can be systemic, for example increasing population and urbanisation, or more localised, for example network pinch points, inadequate public transport or road works. Measures to combat congestion can be aimed at increasing capacity and / or decreasing demand.

Local traffic authorities have a statutory duty under the Traffic Management Act 2004 to manage their networks with the aim of ‘securing the expeditious movement of traffic’. The Department for Transport helps local authorities in achieving this by supporting sustainable alternative modes and providing design and other guidance as well as investment in infrastructure and innovative, data-led solutions.

The Government has already made record amounts of funding available to local authorities for investment in active travel schemes since the start of the pandemic. The second statutory Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy, published in July 2022, reiterated the Government’s commitment to this important agenda and set out the funding that is projected to be spent on it from 2020/21 to 2024/25.

The National Bus Strategy asked that all English Local Transport Authorities outside London publish Bus Service Improvement Plans, setting out local visions for the step-change in bus services that is needed, driven by what passengers and would-be passengers want. We have awarded over £1 billion to deliver service improvements, bus priority and ambitious fares initiatives.

The Government continues to invest in new technologies and the use of data to better manage road networks and provide accurate data about events such as congestion, to road users. For example, the department has invested several million pounds in creating ‘Street Manager’, a data platform which helps highway authorities and utility companies to plan and co-ordinate their road works.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
17th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 10 March 2022 to Question 135447 on Transport for the North: Staff, what assessment his Department has made of potential staffing level changes following changes to Transport for the North's budget.

As per my answer on the 10 March, Transport for the North’s (TfN) core funding for financial year 2022-23 totals £6.5m, a rise of £500,000 on the previous year. This financial settlement will enable TfN to effectively deliver its statutory functions.

As a devolved body, it is for TfN to set its business plan and associated staffing plans. It is not for the Government to comment on the business planning of a devolved body.

For staff affected by TfN’s move to Northern Powerhouse Rail co-sponsor, the Department have commenced discussions on the TUPE process. As such, I am not able to comment further at this time.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 10 March 2022 to Question 135448, what the numerical financial difference will be as a result of the funding previously provided to TfN to contract Network Rail and other stakeholders now flowing directly through the Department.

In financial year 2021-22, Transport for the North (TfN) was allocated £25m for Network Rail’s continued development of Northern Powerhouse Rail.

As we move to the new delivery model, Network Rail will now be funded through the Department’s Rail Network Enhancement Pipeline funding processes.

The forecast for Network Rail for development work in financial year 2022-23 is £25m.

As per my answer on 10 March, this funding is separate to TfN’s core funding which totals £6.5m for financial year 2022-23, a rise of £500,000 on the previous year. This financial settlement will enable TfN to effectively deliver its statutory functions in the coming financial year.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many jobs have been identified as being at risk of redundancy at Transport for the North as a result of reductions in budget.

Transport for the North’s (TfN) core funding for financial year 2022-23 totals £6.5m, a rise of £500k on the previous year. This is made up of a base grant of £6.1m and an additional £400k to cover TfN’s new Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR) role.

The Department has provided TfN with a financial settlement that will enable it to effectively deliver its statutory functions. As a devolved body, it is for TfN to set its business plan and associated staffing plans. It is not for the Government to comment on business planning of a devolved body.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion has been reduced from Transport for the North's budget.

Transport for the North’s (TfN) core funding for financial year 2022-23 totals £6.5m, a rise of £500k on the previous year. This is made up of a base grant of £6.1m and an additional £400k to cover TfN’s new Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR) role.

In the next financial year, Transport for the North will transition from NPRco-client to co-sponsor. As such, the funding previously provided to TfN to contract Network Rail and other stakeholders will now directly flow through the Department.

The Department will also continue to support the Rail North Partnership in the coming financial year and will inform TfN once the level of funding is finalised.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the workforce headcount at Transport for the North was in (a) 2020, (b) 2021 and (c) 2022; and what the projected headcount is for the end of 2022.

The Department provides Transport for the North (TfN) with a financial settlement commensurate with the delivery of its statutory functions. As a devolved body, it is for TfN to set its business plan and associated staffing plans.

Following confirmation of their core grant allocation, Transport for the North are undertaking business planning procedures for the forthcoming financial year. It is not for the Government to comment on business planning of a devolved body.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the number of cyclist deaths per annum.

This Government is committed to increasing walking and cycling and making our roads safer for vulnerable road users including cyclists and pedestrians. The Government is investing £2bn of funding for cycling and walking over this Parliament to deliver the commitments outlined in the Prime Minister’s Gear Change Cycling and walking plan. These include providing hundreds of miles of new safe and fully segregated cycle routes as well as policy changes to improve safety for people cycling such as updating the Highway Code.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of trends in the number of deaths on the roads of under 16 year olds in (a) England and (b) the Humberside region.

The number of under 16 years old deaths in reported road accidents in England and Humberside police force between 2010 and 2020 can be found in the table below.

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Humberside

0

1

2

2

2

1

1

1

2

1

2

England

47

47

55

38

46

45

56

43

42

36

33

STATS19

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to restrict noise pollution created by modified exhaust pipes on (a) cars and (b) motorbikes.

The Government takes the impact of traffic noise on health, wellbeing and the natural environment seriously. Vehicles are required to meet strict noise limits before being placed on the market and police have powers to act if they suspect an exhaust has been modified to increase noise.

On 2nd August the Department published research into enforcement against excessive noise pollution from vehicles using acoustic cameras. Preliminary indications are that the technology has the potential to identify excessively noisy vehicles, however, there are still difficulties in measuring noise in uncontrolled environments. Further research is being commissioned to address these challenges.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that Ryanair passengers are provided with refunds in the event of flight cancellations.

Government have published advice for claiming a cancelled flight refund in the Passenger COVID-19 Charter which sets out rights, responsibilities and reasonable expectations when booking and travelling during the pandemic.

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) reviewed airlines’ compliance on refunds last summer and worked collaboratively to improve their performance on consumer obligations. The majority of airlines now pay refunds within 7 days. The CAA regulates the compliance of airlines with aviation consumer law.

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) is currently investigating whether Ryanair has broken consumer law by failing to offer refunds to customers they could not legally take during lockdown in the UK. The government is not able to comment on this case as it is on-going.

Ryanair are also a member of Aviation ADR, an Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) body, who can assist consumers to resolve disputes with the airline, including for cancelled flights.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the treatment by Ryanair in respect of refunds of passengers who have had their flights cancelled as a result of the covid-19 pandemic.

Government have published advice for claiming a cancelled flight refund in the Passenger COVID-19 Charter which sets out rights, responsibilities and reasonable expectations when booking and travelling during the pandemic.

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) reviewed airlines’ compliance on refunds last summer and worked collaboratively to improve their performance on consumer obligations. The majority of airlines now pay refunds within 7 days. The CAA regulates the compliance of airlines with aviation consumer law.

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) is currently investigating whether Ryanair has broken consumer law by failing to offer refunds to customers they could not legally take during lockdown in the UK. The government is not able to comment on this case as it is on-going.

Ryanair are also a member of Aviation ADR, an Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) body, who can assist consumers to resolve disputes with the airline, including for cancelled flights.

25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he made underpinning the decision to allow flights from India to land at UK airports after India was put on the covid-19 red list.

Since direct flight bans were first introduced in November 2020, England has introduced one of the world’s most stringent systems for testing and quarantining for arrivals from high-risk countries.

Alongside the requirements to take a pre-departure test and complete the Passenger Locator Form, most people who are allowed to enter England from a country on the red list will be required to quarantine for 10 days in a government-approved managed quarantine hotel with Covid-19 tests on days 2 and 8.

Direct flight bans were not introduced for countries added to the ‘Red List’ on 9 and 23 April, which had regular scheduled services to England (Pakistan, Bangladesh and India), on a trial basis. Passengers on direct flights were still subject to measures such as quarantine in a government-approved managed quarantine hotel.

We continually assess the data to understand the efficacy of measures such as managed hotel quarantine, entry bans and testing to ensure public health is protected.

20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 April 2021 to Question 174771 on Railways: North of England, how many meetings the Minister of State, the hon. Member for Pendle has had on the Northern Powerhouse Rail programme since his appointment to that role.

As minister for Northern Powerhouse Rail, I attend regular meetings on this topic. Details of meetings with external organisations are routinely published on the GOV.UK website.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 April 2021 to Question 174768 on Hull Paragon Station: Domestic Visits, whether the Minister of State, the hon. Member for Pendle has made any visits to Hull Paragon Station since February 2020.

I have not made any visits to Hull Paragon Station. I look forward to visiting many stations when circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 April 2021 to Question 174770 on Passengers: North of England, if he will publish a list of stakeholders the Minister of State, the Hon. Member for Pendle has met since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

I have met with a large number of stakeholders since the start of covid-19 outbreak. The details of many of these can be found in the published Ministerial transparency returns on the GOV.UK website.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 April 2021 to Question 175761 on Department for Transport: Rail Delivery Group, if he will publish the minutes of meetings with representatives from the Rail Delivery Group.

While minutes of meetings are not published, to enable Ministers and stakeholders to have space to have free and open exchange of views about developing policy, you can find information on the meetings between Ministers and representatives from the Rail Delivery Group on in the transparency returns on Gov.UK.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 April 2021 to Question 174765 on Ministers: Department for Transport, if he will publish minutes for the MPs surgery held by the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, on 24 March 2021.

The MP surgery held on 24 March 2021 was a follow-up to the parliamentary report published on 23 March 2021. All MPs who were interested were able to attend. While minutes of meetings are not published, to enable Ministers and stakeholders space to have full and frank discussions about developments on the project, I presented on the report and took questions from MPs in attendance.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 April 2021 to Question 175755 on Transport for the North: Finance, whether that decision has any effect on the Government's allocation of funding to the Northern Powerhouse Rail programme.

The decision to reallocate costs from Transport for the North’s core budget to their Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR) budget bears no relation to the Government’s overall allocation of funding to the NPR programme.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 April 2021 to Question 175754 on Rolling Stock: Diesel Engines, what estimate his Department has made of the Government funding required to phase out diesel-only trains by 2040.

High-level estimates of the cost of decarbonising the railway made by Network Rail and the rail industry will inform the government's approach to rail decarbonisation, which will be set out in the Department’s forthcoming Transport Decarbonisation Plan. The costs of individual schemes will be assessed separately to ensure value for money and affordability.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 April 2021 to Question 175754 on Rolling Stock: Diesel Engines, how much funding the Government has allocated to deliver its commitment of a net-zero transport system by 2050.

Our forthcoming Transport Decarbonisation Plan (TDP) will set out the scale and pace of rail decarbonisation necessary to deliver a net zero transport system by 2050. Decisions on funding for decarbonisation schemes and subsequent allocations will be made in the usual way to ensure that they are value for money and affordable.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 14 April 2021 to Question 175757 on Transport for the North, what the dates were of those meetings held between the Minister of State of his Department and representatives of Transport for the North.

Departmental transparency returns will include the dates of ministerial meetings with Transport for the North (TfN) representatives. Ministerial colleagues and I frequently meet with northern stakeholders, including TfN Board members, on a range of matters.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 25 March 2021 to Question 172921 on Transport for the North: Finance, what assessment his Department made of the future spending plans and outgoing costs of Transport for the North as part of the decision to reduce its core funding allocation in response to Transport for the North having high reserves.

The decision to adjust Transport for the North’s core funding grant for 2020/21 and 2021/22 was based on an assessment of the funding required for them to effectively undertake their statutory functions.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 April 2021 to Question 174767 on Railways: North of England, whether the Minister of State, the hon. Member for Pendle, has made any journeys on the TransPennine train from Manchester to Hull since February 2020.

I have not made any journeys on the TransPennine train from Manchester to Hull in my Ministerial capacity. I look forward to making many train journeys when restrictions ease.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State in his Department plans to visit station operators at Darlington Station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans the Minister of State in his Department has to visit station operators at Leeds Railway Station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if the Minister of State in his Department will visit operators at Liverpool Lime Street Station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State in his Department has plans to visit and meet with TransPennine Express operators at Hull Station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of recent toilet improvements made at Hull Paragon Station.

The Department advised that the toilets are suitable for a transport interchange but due to their location, they are frequently used by other members of the public as well as passengers. The toilets have also become a target for vandalism and anti-social behaviour. Whilst TransPennine Express, which manages the station, covers the cost of repairs and has provided additional cleaning to meet the extra demand, this means that customers have reduced access to the facility whilst the toilets are being cleaned or repaired.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish minutes of meetings between the Minister of State in his Department and representatives of Transport for the North in each of the last 12 months.

There has been regular engagement between ministers and Transport for the North over the last year. No formal minutes of these meetings were recorded to allow for a free and open exchange of views on key issues. However, issues raised by stakeholders are followed up and, where necessary, further meetings are held with officials.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of diesel rolling stock on the environment.

Rail is a comparatively green mode of transport, but the Government is working to further reduce emissions and reduce the impact of air and noise pollution.

Diesel freight and passenger trains in Great Britain created 1,788 kilotonnes of CO2e last year (April 2019-April 2020). The Government will reduce these emissions through our ambition to phase out diesel-only trains by 2040 and deliver a net-zero transport system by 2050.

The Department is working to gain a more comprehensive understanding of air pollution in stations by funding a new £4.5 million air quality monitoring network. This will be rolled out over the next three years, with air quality monitors installed in around 100 stations across England and Wales from summer 2021. Once established, the network will help to identify priority locations where air quality improvement measures are most needed.

Noise from the railway can have an impact on the lives of the people who live along its routes, and the industry is working to minimise the impact of noise from the railway on its neighbours and on passengers. The Department supports periodic strategic noise mapping to identify the most sensitive areas on and around the rail network that are exposed to railway noise. We assess the sensitive areas as described in the Noise Action Plan: Railways - this plan is updated every 5 years and was last updated in 2019.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State in his Department plans to visit station operators at Cleethorpes Railway Station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State in his Department plans to visit station operators at Scarborough Railway Station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State in his Department plans to visit station operators at Manchester Victoria Station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State in his Department plans to visit station operators at Sheffield Train Station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State in his Department plans to visit station operators at Manchester Piccadilly Train Station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State in his Department plans to visit station operators at Newcastle Station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish minutes of meetings between the Minister of State in his Department and hon. Members representing constituencies in the North of England in each of the last 12 months.

I meet with MPs on a regular basis. Most recently, I held a MP surgery that all MPs were invited to on the 24th March. I am happy to engage with any MPs who request a meeting.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, on what dates the Minister of State in his Department held discussions with hon. Members representing constituencies in the North of England in the last 12 months.

I meet with MPs on a regular basis. Most recently, I held a MP surgery that all MPs were invited to on the 24th March. I am happy to engage with any MPs who request a meeting.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister of State for Transport of 17 March 2021, Official Report, column 448, what his Department's definition is of a (a) budget reduction and (b) budget adjustment.

On this occasion, the terms ‘reduction’ and ‘adjustment’ were used interchangeably to refer to the change in Transport for the North’s core funding allocation for 2020/21 and 2021/22.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister of State for Transport of 17 March 2021, Official Report, column 448, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of Transport for the North's ability to charge £2.5 million of the costs that previously came from its core budget to the Northern Powerhouse Rail programme on improvements to the North’s rail network.

This decision has no impact on the Government’s ambitions to significantly improve the North’s rail network.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish minutes of meetings between the Minister of State in his Department and representatives of HS2 operators in each of the last 12 months.

The Department publishes information about ministerial meetings, including dates, who the meeting is with, and the purpose of the meeting. While minutes of meetings are not published, to enable Ministers and officials space to have full and frank discussions about developing policy, we are openly reporting progress on the project to Parliament twice-yearly. Our latest report can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/hs2-6-monthly-report-to-parliament-march-2021

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish the (a) dates and (b) minutes of meetings between the Minister of State in his Department and representatives of National Rail in each of the last 12 months.

National Rail is a trading name licensed for use by the Rail Delivery Group used to promote passenger railway services. In line with their roles and portfolios, both Ministers of State have met with the Rail Delivery Group and their representatives when appropriate over the past year.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department will publish in full the Ministerial diary of the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, for the week commencing 13 February 2020.

I was appointed as Minister of State for Transport on Thursday 13th February. I had no meetings with external organisations that week. I had introductory meetings with Officials within the Department.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department will publish a list of meetings the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has had with hon. Members representing constituencies in the North of England since his appointment.

I meet with MPs on a regular basis. Most recently, I held a MP surgery that all MPs were invited to on the 24th March. I am happy to engage with any MPs who request a meeting.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will list the Transport for the North board meetings attended by the Minister of State for Transport.

Neither of the Ministers of State for Transport have attended any Transport for the North Board meetings. The Department is represented at these meetings by Officials within the Department.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department will publish in full the Ministerial diary of the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, for each week since the week commencing 17 February 2020.

As part of my role as Minister of State for Transport, I regularly meet with departmental officials and external stakeholders. My meetings with many external organisations are routinely published on the GOV.UK website as part of transparency returns.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has visited Liverpool Lime Street railway station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has visited Newcastle Central railway station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has visited Leeds railway station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has visited Sheffield train station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has visited Darlington train station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has visited Manchester Piccadilly train station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has visited Hull Paragon station.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has travelled on the TransPennine train from Manchester to Hull.

Ministers very much look forward to visiting a range of stations and locations in due course once circumstances allow.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will provide the dates of meetings the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has had with hon. Members representing constituencies in the north of England since his taking up that post.

I meet with MPs on a regular basis. Most recently, I held a MP surgery that all MPs were invited to on the 24th March. I am happy to engage with any MPs who request a meeting.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will provide the minutes of the meetings the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has had with hon. Members representing constituencies in the north of England, since his taking up that post.

I meet with MPs on a regular basis. Most recently, I held a MP surgery that all MPs were invited to on the 24th March. I am happy to engage with any MPs who request a meeting.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what meetings the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has had with passenger groups based in the North of England since his appointment.

Ministers hold meetings with a wide range of stakeholders including operators and passenger groups. During the pandemic these meetings have been held virtually. I am the Minister responsible for HS2, Northern Powerhouse Rail, Transpennine route upgrade, and skills. Chris Heaton-Harris MP is Minister of State and has responsibility for rail, Williams Review, Beeching, Crossrail 2, East West Rail, cycling and walking, accessibility and corporate.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what meetings the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has had with passenger groups representing disabled people based in the North of England since his appointment.

Ministers hold meetings with a wide range of stakeholders including operators and passenger groups. During the pandemic these meetings have been held virtually. I am the Minister responsible for HS2, Northern Powerhouse Rail, Transpennine route upgrade, and skills. Chris Heaton-Harris MP is Minister of State and has responsibility for rail, Williams Review, Beeching, Crossrail 2, East West Rail, cycling and walking, accessibility and corporate.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department will publish the minutes of all meetings the Minister of State for Transport, the hon. Member for Pendle, has attended on the Northern Powerhouse Rail programme.

As part of my responsibilities as the Minister of State I have many meetings regarding the Northern Powerhouse Rail programme.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the oral contribution by the Minister of State for Transport, Official Report, column 448 and with reference to his statement that the 40 per cent reduction in Transport for the North’s core funding will not take place until the next financial year, whether Transport for the North has been allocated £10 million in financial year 2020-21.

I refer the Right Honourable Member to my oral contribution to the House, Official Report, column 447; Transport for the North received a core funding settlement from the Department of £7 million for the current financial year (2020/21) and £6 million for the next (2021/22).

I also refer the hon Member to the answer I gave on 22 March 2021, to Question UIN 170563 https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2021-03-17/170563/.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister of State for Transport of 17 March 2021, Official Report, column 447 on Transport for the North: Funding, whether the £9.5 million referred to in that debate was earmarked expenditure.

Transport for the North (TfN) project that, had they received £10 million in core grant this financial year, their reserves would have risen to £9.5 million at the end of this financial year. It is for Transport for the North to manage their core funding allocation within the parameters set out in the Grant Funding Agreement between the Department and TfN, and therefore questions on the makeup of their projected reserves should be directed to TfN rather than the Department.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister of State for Transport of 17 March 2021, Official Report, column 447 on Transport for the North: Funding, what funding made up the £9.5 million in reserves.

Transport for the North (TfN) project that, had they received £10 million in core grant this financial year, their reserves would have risen to £9.5 million at the end of this financial year. It is for Transport for the North to manage their core funding allocation within the parameters set out in the Grant Funding Agreement between the Department and TfN, and therefore questions on the makeup of their projected reserves should be directed to TfN rather than the Department.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister of State for Transport of 17 March 2021, Official Report, column 448 on Transport for the North: Funding, whether Transport for the North was required to pay back the unspent £126 million to his Department.

TfN was allocated up to £150m at the 2015 Spending Review to support its Integrated and Smart Travel programme, with this multi-year funding allocation expiring at the end of the current financial year. Following the approval of business cases TfN utilised around £24m to enable the roll-out of smart ticketing across the north in addition to incurring development, business-case and other project costs of around £10 million but were unable to produce a business case for their ambitious multi modal project which was acceptable to all transport operators in the North.

As the £150m funding was not allocated as a lump sum, there is no need for TfN to pay back the balance.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister of State for Transport of 17 March 2021, Official Report, column 448 on Transport for the North: Funding, how the £150 million was made available to Transport for the North.

TfN was allocated up to £150m at the 2015 Spending Review to support its Integrated and Smart Travel programme, with this multi-year funding allocation expiring at the end of the current financial year. Following the approval of business cases TfN utilised around £24m to enable the roll-out of smart ticketing across the north in addition to incurring development, business-case and other project costs of around £10 million but were unable to produce a business case for their ambitious multi modal project which was acceptable to all transport operators in the North.

As the £150m funding was not allocated as a lump sum, there is no need for TfN to pay back the balance.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister of State of 17 March 2021, Official Report, column 447, that Transport for the North’s budget was adjusted to ensure it did not build up unnecessarily large reserves, what his estimate is of an acceptable reserve.

As I stated in the House during the adjournment debate on this subject on 17 March 2021, the Department for Transport and Transport for the North have an agreed minimum reserve level of £2 million.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of whether Transport for the North’s reserves were earmarked for anything.

Transport for the North is required to operate a reserves strategy, to enable the organisation to operate with a degree of flexibility, whilst also guarding against unexpected costs or cash flow fluctuations. It is for Transport for the North to manage their funding allocation, and reserves strategy, accordingly.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister of State of 17 March 2021, Official Report, column 447, that Transport for the North underspent its core grant, in which areas of that budget there was an underspend.

Transport for the North is allocated a core funding grant to enable them to carry out their statutory functions. It is a decision for Transport for the North Board as to how that grant is spent, subject to the conditions set out in the Grant Funding Agreement between the Department for Transport and Transport for the North.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister of State of 17 March 2021, Official Report, column 447, that Transport for North’s budget was adjusted to ensure it did not build up unnecessarily large reserves, what Transport for North’s reserves were projected to be in 2020-21.

As I stated in the House on 17 March during the adjournment debate on this matter, Transport for the North’s reserves were projected to rise to £9.5m in 2020-21, had their core funding grant not been adjusted.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether plans for a contactless ticketing scheme in the North of England have been cancelled as stated in a letter from the Department of Transport to Transport for the North, dated 4 January 2021.

Due to a forecast underspend and a significant build-up of reserves due to displaced activity in 2020/21, the core grant that Transport for the North (TfN) receives from the Department was set at £7 million for 2020/21 and £6 million for 2021/22. Furthermore, the Department has agreed to TfN charging £2.5 million of costs, previously from its core budget, to the Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR) programme for 2021/22. As I stated in the House in the adjournment debate on this subject of 17 March, “Taking into account all the funding streams available to Transport for the North, its budget has not been reduced by 40%.”

In the 2015 spending review, Transport for the North was allocated up to £150 million to support its integrated and smart travel programme. It has utilised only £24 million in the past five years to enable the roll-out of smart ticketing throughout the north. Additionally, it incurred development, business-case and other project costs of around £10 million but was unable to produce a business case for its ambitious multi-modal projects that was acceptable to all transport operators in the north. The multi-year funding for Transport for the North’s integrated and smart travel programme was always due to expire at the end of this financial year. We are considering how best to deliver more effectively the roll-out of smart ticketing to improve passenger services throughout the region.

The launch of the National Bus Strategy on 15 March 2021 outlined our ambition to see seamless, integrated ticketing between operators and to extend this across all types of transport and all regions of the country, including the North. We will work with transport technology providers, app developers, bus operators and LTAs to ensure that any technology to support this is developed strategically, and money is not wasted on different technology solutions for different places. As rail ticketing and fares systems are updated we will also consider opportunities for facilitating integrated electronic ticketing with buses.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the core budget of Transport for the North has been reduced from £10 million to £6 million for the financial year 2021-22 as stated in a letter from the Department for Transport to Transport for the North dated 4 January 2021.

Due to a forecast underspend and a significant build-up of reserves due to displaced activity in 2020/21, the core grant that Transport for the North (TfN) receives from the Department was set at £7 million for 2020/21 and £6 million for 2021/22. Furthermore, the Department has agreed to TfN charging £2.5 million of costs, previously from its core budget, to the Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR) programme for 2021/22. As I stated in the House in the adjournment debate on this subject of 17 March, “Taking into account all the funding streams available to Transport for the North, its budget has not been reduced by 40%.”

In the 2015 spending review, Transport for the North was allocated up to £150 million to support its integrated and smart travel programme. It has utilised only £24 million in the past five years to enable the roll-out of smart ticketing throughout the north. Additionally, it incurred development, business-case and other project costs of around £10 million but was unable to produce a business case for its ambitious multi-modal projects that was acceptable to all transport operators in the north. The multi-year funding for Transport for the North’s integrated and smart travel programme was always due to expire at the end of this financial year. We are considering how best to deliver more effectively the roll-out of smart ticketing to improve passenger services throughout the region.

The launch of the National Bus Strategy on 15 March 2021 outlined our ambition to see seamless, integrated ticketing between operators and to extend this across all types of transport and all regions of the country, including the North. We will work with transport technology providers, app developers, bus operators and LTAs to ensure that any technology to support this is developed strategically, and money is not wasted on different technology solutions for different places. As rail ticketing and fares systems are updated we will also consider opportunities for facilitating integrated electronic ticketing with buses.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding his Department has provided to Transport for the North in each of the last three years.

TfN have received £10m in core funding for the previous two financial years. In December 2020, TfN’s core budget for this financial year (20/21) was reduced to £7 million, in part due to TfN’s underspend this financial year and the maintenance of large reserves.

TfN have had access to £104 million of the £147m Northern Powerhouse Rail budget since FY18/19, broken down as follows: 2018/19 - £15 million; 2019/20 - £30 million; 2020/21 - £59 million.

TfN was allocated up to £150m at the 2015 Spending Review to support its Integrated and Smart Travel programme, with this multi-year funding allocation expiring at the end of the current financial year. TfN utilised around £24 million in the past five years to enable the roll-out of smart ticketing across the North.

Finally, TfN receive a grant from the Department for Transport as a contribution to funding the Rail North Partnership team which manages the Northern and TransPennine Express franchises on behalf of the Department for Transport and Transport for the North. For the last three years these amounts are 2018/19 - £388k, 2019/20 - £582k, 2020/21 - £680k.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of trends in the level of funding for Transport for the North.

In the next financial year, TfN will have access to over £70m of funding, the majority of which will enable further development of Northern Powerhouse Rail. To date, over £100m has been spent on Northern Powerhouse Rail development. TfN’s most recent core funding settlement is an appropriate settlement that enables the organisation to continue to deliver its statutory functions of developing a transport strategy for the region. The Rail North Partnership Grant that TfN receives from the Department will also continue unchanged in the next financial year. TfN was allocated up to £150m at the 2015 Spending Review to support its Integrated and Smart Travel programme, with this multi-year funding allocation expiring at the end of the current financial year. TfN utilised around £24m in the past five years to enable the roll-out of smart ticketing across the North and we are now considering how best to deliver more effectively the rollout of smart ticketing to improve passenger services across the region.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent representations he has received on changes in the level of funding for Transport for the North.

The Secretary of State has received correspondence on Transport for the North’s (TfN) recent funding settlement from a range of individuals and organisations. Aside from representations made by TfN Board members themselves, this correspondence includes from MPs, councillors, Combined Authority Mayors and the TUC. This is in addition to ongoing dialogue between TfN and Departmental officials.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 7 October 2020 to Question 98677 on Taxis: Protective Clothing, which organisation is responsible for ensuring that operators carry out those risk assessments; and what the penalty is in the event that operators do not complete those risk assessments to an adequate standard.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is the enforcing authority responsible for ensuring taxi operators carry out risk assessments covering work activities away from the taxi office. The duty to carry out assessments is a legal requirement and if not completed, HSE can take enforcement action to require operators to comply. This includes the option of issuing an Improvement Notice which stipulates what is required in a given timeframe. Non-compliance with an Improvement Notice is an offence and carries potential financial penalties and / or imprisonment.

The HSE takes a proportionate approach to enforcement in line with their publicly available enforcement policy statement.

2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to Answer of 1 October 2020 to Question 96010 on Taxis: Protective Clothing, whether it is (a) his Department's or (b) another organisation's responsibility to ensure operators are carrying out adequate covid-19 risk assessments.

It is the operator's responsibility to follow Government Safer Transport Guidance for operators. This includes the recommendation to conduct risk assessments to ensure suitable protective measures are in place for both transport workers and passengers.

28th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 25 September 2020 to Question 93554, what the scientific basis is for his Department's decision not to enforce mandatory face coverings for taxi and private hire drivers.

The Department for Transport’s guidance for transport operators (Coronavirus (COVID-19): safer transport guidance for operators) advises that the risks of coronavirus should be identified through operator's conducting risk assessments. These inform decisions and measures to be put in place to protect both transport workers and customers. We continually review guidance for safer transport in line with scientific advice.

Evidence tells us that the most effective measures are social distancing, rigorous hand hygiene, not touching one’s face and good ventilation of fresh air. It is up to the operator to use their risk assessments to determine if face coverings are a practical and safe protective measure based upon specific job roles.

22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 September 2020 to Question 90961 on Cars: Hire Services, and the Prime Minister's statement on covid-19 measures on 22 September 2020, whether it is now mandatory for private hire and taxi drivers to wear face coverings at all times when working.

Face coverings are now mandatory for customers using taxi and private hire vehicle services, unless they are exempt from wearing one. Face coverings are not mandatory for drivers.

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, in relation to the Government's covid-19 guidance on private hire cars, for what reason the wearing of face coverings is not mandatory in those vehicles; what the medical evidence is to support that decision; and what plans he has to review that decision.

The Government has published safer transport guidance on the safe provision of transport services during the coronavirus pandemic. The guidance to passengers says that passengers should wear a face covering when using taxis or private hire vehicles. Taxi drivers are able to refuse carriage to passengers where it is reasonable to do so, and private hire vehicle operators can make wearing a face covering a condition of hiring. We are aware of private hire vehicle operators that are doing this and requiring the driver they work with to do the same. We continually review guidance for safer transport in line with scientific advice.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what (a) financial and (b) non financial resources his Department has allocated to (a) Humber Ports and (b) other UK ports to prepare for the end of the transition period.

As part of the Port Infrastructure Resilience and Connectivity (PIRC) fund in 2019, the ports of Hull and Immingham successfully bid to receive £1.4m between them to support preparations for leaving the European Union. The total amount of funding to successful applicants through this fund was £10m, with a maximum of £1m to any single port.

As part of preparations for the end of the Transition Period on 31 December 2020, on 12 July the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster announced funding of up to £705m for new infrastructure, jobs and technology at the border. This includes up to £470m to build port and inland infrastructure needed for new customs procedures and controls. Further details of how ports can apply to access this funding will be provided in due course.

6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what was the average waiting time for a Work Capability Assessment in Kingston upon Hull North constituency in the latest period for which data is available.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Universal Credit decisions were subject to an appeal by the claimant in 2022 in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

From 01 January 2022 to 30 September 2022, there were 30 Universal Credit appeals lodged by claimants in the Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

Notes:

  • All volumes have been rounded to the nearest 10;
  • Appeals data taken from the DWP UC computer system’s management information. This appeal data may differ from that held by His Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service for various reasons such as delays in data recording and other methodological differences in collating and preparing statistics;
  • Appeals data up to 30 September 2022 is in line with the latest published statistics on appeals. Claimants who have received benefit decisions more recently may not yet have had time to complete the claimant journey and progress to appeal;
  • The Parliamentary Constituency geography relates to the origin of the claim (i.e. derived from claimant’s postcode) rather than the location of where a tribunal is held;
  • These figures are produced using internal MI, are not quality assured to Official Statistics standards, and may be subject to revision.
Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to improve the take-up of Pension Credit in Kingston upon Hull North constituency.

Pension Credit provides vital financial support to pensioners on a low income. In Kingston upon Hull North some 2,400 pensioners already receive Pension Credit, but we want all those who are eligible to claim it. That’s why the Department launched a £1.2m nationwide communications campaign in April to raise awareness of Pension Credit and increase take-up. The campaign included a whole range of activities including:

  • advertising in regional and national newspapers, and on national and local broadcast radio;
  • promotion of Pension Credit on social media, via internet search engines and sponsored advertising on targeted websites that pensioners, their friends and family are likely to visit;
  • information screens in Post Offices and GP surgeries across GB;
  • advertising on the sides of buses, interior bus panels and digital street displays; and
  • leaflets and posters in Jobcentres, as well as digital versions which could be used by stakeholders and partners across local communities; and
  • a second Pension Credit awareness media ‘day of action’ in June working in close collaboration with broadcasters, newspapers and other partners such as Age UK, Independent Age and the private sector to reach out to pensioners to promote Pension Credit through their channels

Last month we undertook a further burst of communications activity, including press and radio advertising and social media to highlight to pensioners that if they applied for Pension Credit by 18 December, it would not be too late to qualify for a £324 Cost of Living Payment – subject to Pension Credit backdating rules.

On 7 December, around 40 MPs attended a Pension Credit event at Portcullis House which I hosted. I was pleased to hear about the work that a number of MPs are already doing to help their constituents make a claim and also that others pledged to help promote Pension Credit.

In the coming weeks, DWP will write to over 11 million pensioners to notify them of the up-rating of their State Pensions. As with last year, a leaflet accompanying the notification includes information promoting Pension Credit. This has been updated to include a more prominent ‘call to action’ using the Pension Credit campaign messaging to encourage eligible pensioners to make a claim.

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to help pensioners in Kingston upon Hull North constituency access (a) information about their eligibility for Pension Credit and (b) Pension Credit.

Pension Credit provides vital financial support to pensioners on a low income. In Kingston upon Hull North some 2,400 pensioners already receive Pension Credit, but we want all those who are eligible to claim it. That’s why the Department launched a £1.2m nationwide communications campaign in April to raise awareness of Pension Credit and increase take-up. The campaign included a whole range of activities including:

  • advertising in regional and national newspapers, and on national and local broadcast radio;
  • promotion of Pension Credit on social media, via internet search engines and sponsored advertising on targeted websites that pensioners, their friends and family are likely to visit;
  • information screens in Post Offices and GP surgeries across GB;
  • advertising on the sides of buses, interior bus panels and digital street displays; and
  • leaflets and posters in Jobcentres, as well as digital versions which could be used by stakeholders and partners across local communities; and
  • a second Pension Credit awareness media ‘day of action’ in June working in close collaboration with broadcasters, newspapers and other partners such as Age UK, Independent Age and the private sector to reach out to pensioners to promote Pension Credit through their channels

Last month we undertook a further burst of communications activity, including press and radio advertising and social media to highlight to pensioners that if they applied for Pension Credit by 18 December, it would not be too late to qualify for a £324 Cost of Living Payment – subject to Pension Credit backdating rules.

On 7 December, around 40 MPs attended a Pension Credit event at Portcullis House which I hosted. I was pleased to hear about the work that a number of MPs are already doing to help their constituents make a claim and also that others pledged to help promote Pension Credit.

In the coming weeks, DWP will write to over 11 million pensioners to notify them of the up-rating of their State Pensions. As with last year, a leaflet accompanying the notification includes information promoting Pension Credit. This has been updated to include a more prominent ‘call to action’ using the Pension Credit campaign messaging to encourage eligible pensioners to make a claim.

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to help support low income private renters with the cost of living.

The Government announced over £37bn of cost of living support earlier this year which includes an extension to the Household Support Fund backed by £421m, running from 1 October 2022 to 31 March 2023. This is in addition to the energy bill support announced in September.

In the private rented sector, Local Housing Allowance (LHA) determines the maximum financial support available for renters. LHA rates are not intended to cover all rents in all areas. In April 2020 Local Housing Allowance (LHA) rates were increased to the 30th percentile of local rents. This significant investment of nearly £1 billion provided 1.5 million claimants with an average £600 more housing support in 2020/21 than they would otherwise have received.

LHA rates have been maintained at their increased levels since then, so that everyone who benefitted from the increase will continue to do so.

For those who require additional support with housing costs, Discretionary Housing Payments (DHP) are available. Since 2011 we have provided almost £1.5 billion in DHPs to local authorities.

The government understands the pressures people are facing with the cost of living and has taken further decisive action to support people with their energy bills. The Energy Price Guarantee is supporting millions of households with rising energy costs, and the Chancellor made clear it will continue to do so from now until April next year. This is in addition to the over £37bn of cost of living support announced earlier this year which includes the £400 non-repayable discount to eligible households provided through the Energy Bills Support Scheme. Also included is an extension to the Household Support Fund backed by £421m, running from 1 October 2022 to 31 March 2023.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
14th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans her Department has to improve child maintenance services for parents attempting to access unpaid maintenance payments from parents on with high income.

The Child Maintenance Service (CMS) already has strong enforcement powers in place to recover unpaid child maintenance, including powers to deduct directly from earnings and from a wide range of bank accounts, seizing goods and forcing the sale of a property.

The CMS can also pursue sanctions against those parents who are unwilling to meet their responsibilities such as disqualification from driving, confiscating a UK Passport or commitment to prison. Curfew powers are currently being consulted on which will help ensure CMS can use the right lever to obtain compliance.

Child Maintenance payments are considered a high priority and paying parents are encouraged to prioritise these against other outgoings.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of Gypsy, Roma and Travellers are living in (a) relative and (b) absolute poverty.

It is not possible to produce a robust estimate of Gypsy, Roma, and Travellers' poverty rates due to the small sample size.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans she has in place to reduce the use of foodbanks.

Foodbanks are independent, charitable organisations and the Department for Work and Pensions does not have any role in their operation. There is no consistent and accurate measure of foodbank usage at a constituency or national level.

We understand the data limitations in this area, and therefore from April 2021 we introduced a set of questions into the Family Resources Survey (FRS) to measure and track foodbank usage. The first results of these questions are due to be published in March 2023 subject to usual quality assurance.

Our commitment to include questions in the Family Resources Survey show how seriously we take this issue; the data is vital to ensure we understand the full picture.

We understand the pressures people are facing with the cost of living and have taken action to support families. That is why the government is providing over £15bn in further support, targeted particularly on those with the greatest need. This package is in addition to the over £22bn announced previously, with government support for the cost of living now totaling over £37bn this year.

From October 2022, Government is providing an additional £500 million to help households with the cost of essentials, bringing the total funding for this support to £1.5 billion. In England £421m will be used to further extend the Household Support Fund (October 2022 – March 2023). Devolved administrations will receive £79 million through the Barnett formula.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department took to ensure effective application and distribution of funding under the Household Support Fund to different local authorities.

We recognise that some people require extra support over the winter, through the final stages of recovery, which is why vulnerable households across the country are able to access the Household Support Fund, which provides £421 million to help vulnerable people in England.

Each Local Authority in England was allocated a share of the £421m based on population weighted by the index of multiple deprivation. Kingston upon Hull was allocated £3,038,293.68. Kingston upon Hull used a portion of their funding to establish a Household Support Scheme which ran applications until 17 December. We understand that the rest of their funding was used towards other initiatives, including food vouchers for vulnerable families over Christmas, February half term and the forthcoming Easter holidays.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to information from Hull City Council that the application period for the Household Support Fund went live on 23 November 2021 and closed on 17 December 2021 as a result of the number of applicants exceeding the available funding, what assessment her Department made of the amount of funding required to support that scheme.

We recognise that some people require extra support over the winter, through the final stages of recovery, which is why vulnerable households across the country are able to access the Household Support Fund, which provides £421 million to help vulnerable people in England.

Each Local Authority in England was allocated a share of the £421m based on population weighted by the index of multiple deprivation. Kingston upon Hull was allocated £3,038,293.68. Kingston upon Hull used a portion of their funding to establish a Household Support Scheme which ran applications until 17 December. We understand that the rest of their funding was used towards other initiatives, including food vouchers for vulnerable families over Christmas, February half term and the forthcoming Easter holidays.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much funding has been made available for the Household Support Fund (a) nationally and (b) in Kingston upon Hull.