Conor McGinn Portrait

Conor McGinn

Labour - St Helens North

Shadow Minister (Home Office)

(since April 2020)

Deputy national campaign co-ordinator

(since June 2021)
Regulatory Reform
2nd Mar 2020 - 20th May 2021
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 6th Jul 2020
Consolidation, &c., Bills (Joint Committee)
9th Mar 2020 - 6th Jul 2020
Consolidation Bills (Joint Committee)
9th Mar 2020 - 6th Jul 2020
Opposition Whip (Commons)
27th Jan 2020 - 10th Apr 2020
Foreign Affairs Committee
19th Mar 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Consolidation Bills (Joint Committee)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Regulatory Reform
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Consolidation, &c., Bills (Joint Committee)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Opposition Whip (Commons)
18th Sep 2015 - 9th Oct 2016
Defence Sub-Committee
8th Sep 2015 - 26th Oct 2015
Defence Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 26th Oct 2015


Department Event
Wednesday 8th September 2021
09:25
Home Office
Fourth Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
8 Sep 2021, 9:25 a.m.
The draft Alcohol Licensing (Coronavirus) (Regulatory Easements) (Amendment) Regulations 2021
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Monday 18th October 2021
14:30
Home Office
Oral questions - Main Chamber
18 Oct 2021, 2:30 p.m.
Home Office (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Investing in Children and Young People
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 193 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 224 Noes - 0
Speeches
Tuesday 13th July 2021
Prevention and Suppression of Terrorism

May I start by paying tribute to the right hon. Member for Old Bexley and Sidcup (James Brokenshire), who has …

Written Answers
Friday 16th July 2021
Sanctions: Syria
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking against people in the UK …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 28th January 2020
Racial Justice Sunday 2020: Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities
That this House welcomes the Catholic Church’s focus on Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities for Racial Justice Sunday on 9 …
Bills
Tuesday 11th October 2016
Unlawful Killing (Recovery of Remains) Bill 2016-17
A Bill to establish a presumption against eligibility for parole in cases where a person, convicted of unlawfully killing another …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 26th July 2021
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: Betting and Gaming Council
Address of donor: 1st Floor, 90 Chancery Lane, London WC2A 1EU
Amount of …
EDM signed
Monday 19th April 2021
Public Health
That the Health Protection (Coronavirus, International Travel) (England) (Amendment) (No. 7) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 150), dated 12 February …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 22nd April 2020
Public Advocate (No. 2) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to establish a public advocate to provide advice to, and act as data controller for, representatives of the …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Conor McGinn has voted in 249 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Conor McGinn Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Chris Philp (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
(31 debate interactions)
Kevin Foster (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(89 debate contributions)
Attorney General
(5 debate contributions)
Northern Ireland Office
(4 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Conor McGinn's debates

St Helens North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest St Helens North signature proportion
Petition Debates Contributed

Illegal immigrants are entering the UK in many different ways, including small boats from France which are not stopped by either French or British forces.


Latest EDMs signed by Conor McGinn

19th April 2021
Conor McGinn signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 19th April 2021

Public Health

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That the Health Protection (Coronavirus, International Travel) (England) (Amendment) (No. 7) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 150), dated 12 February 2021, a copy of which was laid before this House on 12 February 2021, be revoked.
10 signatures
(Most recent: 19 Apr 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Green Party: 1
9th March 2021
Conor McGinn signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 9th March 2021

Public Health

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Health Protection (Coronavirus, International Travel) (England) (Amendment) (No. 7) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 150), dated 12 February 2021, a copy of which was laid before this House on 12 February 2021, be annulled.
10 signatures
(Most recent: 23 Mar 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Green Party: 1
View All Conor McGinn's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Conor McGinn, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Conor McGinn has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Conor McGinn has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Conor McGinn


Parallel Parliament Note:

The substantive text of this bill was included within the Government’s Northern Ireland (Executive Formation) Act which received Royal Assent during the 2017-2019 Parliament.

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for the marriage of same sex couples in Northern Ireland; to make provision in the law of Northern Ireland for the conversion of civil partnerships to marriages and for the review of civil partnership; to make provision for the legal recognition of the marriage of armed forces personnel overseas and of other marriages solemnised outside Northern Ireland; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 28th March 2018
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

A Bill to establish a presumption against eligibility for parole in cases where a person, convicted of unlawfully killing another person, has not provided relevant knowledge in their possession for the purposes of facilitating the location and recovery of the remains of the victim; to create a separate offence of withholding such information; to make provision about the available sentences for such an offence; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 11th October 2016
(Read Debate)

172 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the £1.9 billion allocated by the Government to the National Cyber Security Strategy 2016-2021, how that funding has been (a) spent and (b) allocated in each year since the inception of that strategy.

The National Cyber Security Strategy 2016-2021, supported by a £1.9 billion investment, is delivering transformational change, building new capabilities and intervening to protect the UK from cyber attacks.

For national security reasons we are unable to provide details of the National Cyber Security Programme budget, but we have made significant progress, as the Strategy explains, some of the ambitions go beyond its five year timescale. This is why the Spending Review provided further funding for the NCSP in 2021-22 and why we will be setting out a new long-term strategy for cyber security this year. The National Cyber Security Strategy 2016 - 2021 Progress Report 2020 sets out further detail on the progress we have made since 2016 and the impact our interventions are having.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Government is on course to reach the objectives set out in the National Cyber Security Strategy 2016-21.

The National Cyber Security Strategy 2016-2021, supported by a £1.9 billion investment, is delivering transformational change, building new capabilities and intervening to protect the UK from cyber attacks.

For national security reasons we are unable to provide details of the National Cyber Security Programme budget, but we have made significant progress, as the Strategy explains, some of the ambitions go beyond its five year timescale. This is why the Spending Review provided further funding for the NCSP in 2021-22 and why we will be setting out a new long-term strategy for cyber security this year. The National Cyber Security Strategy 2016 - 2021 Progress Report 2020 sets out further detail on the progress we have made since 2016 and the impact our interventions are having.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much funding his Department has provided to each veterans' organisation based in (a) St Helens and (b) Merseyside in each of the last five years.

Further to the answer given on 28 April 2020 to PQ 37764 and to PQ 96068 on 28 September, the charitable and voluntary sector plays an important role in the support available to veterans and the wider Armed Forces Community. The Government provides a range of financial support to the sector including through regular grants to the Armed Forces Covenant Fund Trust, which this year received £20m to distribute. A further £6m was provided to nearly 100 charities through the COVID-19 Impact Fund. This includes both funding for local projects and for organisations who operate nationally, including in the North West. The Government does not hold centrally a complete breakdown of the funding charities and organisations which support veterans in St Helens and Merseyside have received.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether it is Government policy that Cabinet ministers use the NHS covid-19 app, including contact tracing.

We encourage everyone to download and use the NHS COVID-19 app.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the list of responsibilities and roles undertaken by the National Security Adviser.

The National Security Adviser is the principal adviser to the Prime Minister and Cabinet on national security strategy, policy, capability and civil contingencies.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many of the working-age population in (a) St Helens, (b) Liverpool City Region and (c) the North West do not qualify for Statutory Sick Pay.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with (a) publicans, (b) breweries and (c) associated trade bodies on the effect of the Government's decision not to permit pubs to sell takeaway alcohol in sealed containers during the covid-19 lockdown announced in January 2021.

I regularly meet with a wide range of representatives from the hospitality sector to understand the impact of COVID-19 on businesses and jobs.

Over the course of the pandemic, the Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support to businesses, including those in the hospitality sector, which we keep under review.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the financial viability of dog kennels, catteries and other animal boarding facilities.

The Government understands the considerable difficulties faced by UK businesses due to the coronavirus pandemic. Animal boarding facilities have not been required to close at any point during the pandemic, as there remains a requirement to care for the pets of people hospitalised from Coronavirus and for key workers, and vulnerable people who may not be able to care for their pets. Wee have advised pet owners[1] that they may leave their home to access animal boarding services. This should be by appointment only, and only if the boarding service does not offer a collection or drop-off service.

The Government has put in place a range of business support measures since March 2020. These include loans, small business grants through local authorities, mortgage holidays and VAT deferral. These measures have been updated in line with local and national restrictions. In November, at the beginning of the second national lockdown, Government made available £1.1bn in discretionary funding allocated to each local authority to support businesses via the Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG). This was topped up with a further £500m in January 2021.

Local authorities have significant discretion in the businesses they support and the amount of grant funding per business based on local priorities.

Given the new national restrictions, other amendments now include:

  • extending the coronavirus job retention scheme to support the wage costs of employers until end of April 2021.
  • Increasing the overall level of the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme grant to 80% of trading profits covering November to January for all parts of the UK.
  • Extending the Bounce Back Loan Scheme application deadline to the end of March 2021, to further support eligible firms who need it during this ongoing period of difficulty.

We would always encourage businesses that have been unable to access support, or who are unsure about what support is available, to contact their nearest Business Growth Hub for advice. The Government has established a network of 38 of these hubs, one in each Local Enterprise Partnership area in England. Businesses of all sizes are able to access free, tailored guidance from expert advisers who make up the Hub teams. All contact details are online www.lepnetwork.net/local-growth-hub-contacts/.

The free Business Support Helpline offers advice to businesses across England (FREEPHONE 0800 998 1098) provides with free, impartial business support.

Firms based in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales can access business support through their devolved Governments.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-for-people-with-animals

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the announcement of a one-off grant for businesses in the retail, hospitality and leisure businesses on 5 January 2021, if he will advise local authorities to include wholesale distribution businesses in the eligibility criteria.

Officials are working closely with local authorities to deliver the one-off grant for businesses, announced by the Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer on the 5th January.

Through the Closed Businesses Lockdown Payment Grant, all rate-paying businesses mandated to close may eligible for a grants of up to £9,000. This is alongside the Local Covid Restrictions Grant (Closed) Addendum for 5 January onwards scheme, which provides grants of up to £4,500 per six-week period of closure.

For those businesses not mandated to close but who have had their trade adversely affected by the national and localised Covid-19 Restrictions, the Chancellor announced a further top up of £500 million to the exiting £1.1bn in Additional Restrictions Grant Fund. Local authorities have discretion to use this funding to support businesses in the way they see fit in their local area.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his (a) policy and (b) strategy is on (i) the use of nuclear power and (ii) its future role in the UK.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister published his Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution on 18th November, in which he affirmed the Government’s objective to advance nuclear as a clean energy source. This includes large scale nuclear and developing the next generation of small and advanced reactors. The Ten Point Plan highlights the key role of nuclear in delivering deep decarbonisation of our electricity system alongside renewables and other technologies. One of the key targets is the publication of the Energy White Paper, in which further information will be provided.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of job losses in the retail sector during the covid-19 outbreak an on regional inequalities.

The Government recognises the impact that the coronavirus is having on retailers and businesses as a whole, which is why we have delivered one of the most generous and comprehensive packages of support globally.. Retailers are benefitting from the removal of business rates for 12 months and have been able to access grants through the Small Business Grant Fund or the Retail, Hospitality, and Leisure Grant Fund.

Retailers have been able to benefit from The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, and an extension on the moratorium on commercial landlords’ right to forfeiture for the non-payment of rent to 31 December 2020.

Additionally the Job Retention Bonus will encourage businesses, including retailers, to keep on furloughed workers, helping to protect jobs and our economic recovery.

We have announced a new Plan for Jobs – making available up to £30 billion with a clear goal to create, protect, and support jobs. This includes a new £2 billion Kickstart Scheme creating hundreds of thousands of new, fully subsidised jobs for young people across the country and £1.6 billion investment in scaling up employment support schemes, training, and apprenticeships to help people looking for a job.

We are ramping up and bringing forward investment, creating jobs in every part of the UK. At the Budget, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced £88 billion of capital funding for this year. In the New Deal package, we announced our plans to accelerate a further £5 billion of additional investment projects.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to (a) support and (b) promote the sport of pigeon racing.

Pigeon Racing is not listed under Sport England's list of recognised sports, which can be viewed here. DEFRA have issued full guidance here on gatherings concerning Columbiformes here.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department is providing specific (a) guidance and (b) support to UK-based mountain professionals to help them navigate the new systems of visa and work permits in EU member states.

The Government has published an End of Transition Period guidance page for the tourism sector to help them navigate the new systems. The Business Secretary also wrote to all tourism businesses in November 2020.

My Department continues to engage with stakeholders in the tourism sector to hear their priorities for the UK’s future relationship with the EU. Officials are currently engaging with the tourism trade bodies, including the British Association of International Mountain Leaders (BAIML) to gather feedback on priority regulators and qualifications for the tourism sector.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what his Department's policy is on enabling UK creative workers to travel to the EU for touring and entertainment purposes.

The UK and EU have unilaterally decided not to impose visas on short-stay visitors. For short stays of up to 90 days in any 180-day period, UK nationals will not need a visa when travelling to and within the Schengen Area to undertake a limited range of activities, such as tourism, or attending business meetings, or cultural and sports events. However, Member States can require a visa for what they regard as “paid activity”.

Therefore, UK cultural professionals, including musicians, seeking to tour within the EU will be required to check domestic immigration and visitor rules for each Member State in which they intend to tour. Although some Member States may allow touring without a visa or work permit, others will require musicians and other creative professionals to obtain a visa or work permit, in the same way that they are required for other international artists.

We recognise that this means there will be some additional processes for those in cultural and creative industries working across the EU. However this does not mean our sectors will not be able to work in the EU nor that our position has changed on being as welcoming as ever to talented EU artists and musicians wishing to perform in the UK.

We are delivering an extensive programme of engagement with the industry to assess impacts and support these sectors in understanding new requirements. The Secretary of State had a very productive discussion with representatives from across the creative and cultural sectors on the issue on Wednesday 20th January. We have also published guidance online, signposting to official information provided by EU countries about their business travel routes, which is regularly updated.

We will also look at whether we can work with our partners in EU Member States to find ways to make life easier for those working in the creative industries in our respective countries.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of trends in the level of activity of hostile states in relation to spreading disinformation and conspiracy theories on covid-19.

The Government takes the issue of disinformation very seriously. During the Covid-19 pandemic, it continues to be vitally important that the public has accurate information about the virus, and DCMS is leading work across Government to tackle disinformation.

That is why we stood up the Counter Disinformation Unit up on 5 March to bring together cross-Government monitoring and analysis capabilities. The Unit’s primary function is to provide a comprehensive picture of the extent, scope and impact of disinformation and misinformation regarding Covid-19 and to work with partners to ensure appropriate action is taken.

Whilst disinformation can come from a range of sources, we know that certain states routinely use disinformation as a foreign policy tool. The UK, along with our G7 and Nato partners, is working hard to protect our democracies against disinformation as we work together to tackle the shared threat of Covid-19

We continue to monitor for any disinformation campaigns and any related conspiracy theories so that we can respond to them quickly and effectively. We are focused on addressing disinformation by any actor, whether state or non-state.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the casino industry on its offer to withdraw the sale of alcohol to avoid closure in the tiered system of covid-19 alert levels.

Officials from the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport are in regular contact with the Betting and Gaming Council and individual casino operators to discuss the impact of coronavirus restrictions on their businesses. Discussions are ongoing and have included consideration of potential measures to reduce risk, such as the withdrawal of alcohol sales, that may help local leaders and government in their assessment of venues that can safely remain open.

The Chancellor announced on 9 October that the government’s Job Support Scheme (JSS) would be expanded to protect jobs and support businesses required to close their doors as a result of coronavirus restrictions. Under the scheme, the Government will pay two thirds of employees’ salaries. Grants under the Local Restrictions Support Grant scheme, also increased to up to £3,000 per month for businesses required to close in local lockdowns.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish the advice he has received from Public Health England on live sports and covid-19 in relation to (a) participation and (b) spectators.

Sports and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health, and are a vital weapon against coronavirus. That’s why we made sure that people could exercise at least once a day even during the height of lockdown - and why we opened up grassroots sport and leisure facilities as soon as it was safe to do so. However, we have always made clear that we will adopt a phased approach to reopening based on scientific and medical advice, with the primary goal of protecting public health. Public Health England agreed our approach to the phased return of recreational sport.

Organised outdoor team sport, outdoor and indoor exercise classes and outdoor licensed physical activity are still exempt from the rule of 6, and can happen in any number. Social interaction before and after playing any sport should be limited and only be in groups up to six.

In terms of spectators, we recognise the news that stadia won’t be reopening from 1 October will be disappointing to many fans and sports, particularly after all the work on test events and preparations. However we have to take difficult decisions that give us the best chance of containing the virus this winter.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to help non-profit community clubs manage the safe return of live entertainment, following the resumption from 15 August 2020 of socially-distanced indoor performances in England.

On 9 July we published guidance for people who work in performing arts, including arts organisations, venue operators and participants which will help people understand how they can work and take part in the performing arts safely, and keep their audiences safe.

Following the Prime Minister’s announcement on 9 September, our guidance was updated to require that people must not meet socially in groups of more than 6. This will apply indoors and outdoors.

Venues such as theatres, concert halls and other entertainment venues that are already able to host larger numbers, and are Covid secure in line with the relevant guidance, will continue to be able to do so. As part of these changes venues and organisers will need to ensure that the gatherings limit of 6 is not exceeded and that groups are kept separate from one another to ensure they do not mix and do not exceed the new legal limits. Venues and organisers will also have a clear duty to ensure their premises are COVID-19 Secure.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions his Department has had with the Committee of Registered Clubs Associations and its affiliates on managing the safe return of live entertainment during the covid-19 outbreak.

Ministers and officials have regular meetings and discussions with a wide range of stakeholders on a variety of issues.

We have worked closely with stakeholders through both the Visitor Economy and Events & Entertainment Working Groups to develop Covid-19 Secure reopening guidance for providers of live entertainment. We continue to meet with sector representatives to discuss the specific issues impacting the full return of live entertainment.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what guidance his Department has issued on the implications for (a) brass bands, (b) choirs and (c) other amateur music groups of the Government’s latest covid-19 restrictions.

As of 14 September non-professional performing arts activity, including choirs, orchestras or drama groups can continue to rehearse or perform together where this is planned activity in line with the performing arts guidance and if they can do so in a way that ensures that there is no interaction between groups of more than six at any time. If an amateur group is not able to ensure that no mingling takes place between these sub-groups of no more than six (including when arriving at or leaving activity or in any breaks or socialising) then such non-professional activity should not take place.

We will continue to work with the Performing Arts sector to understand how the new regulations affect those engaging in activity. We have always been clear that the easing of restrictions depends on the prevalence of COVID-19.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has had discussions with BT Group on preventing compulsory redundancies at BT Technology; and if he will make a statement.

My department regularly engages with BT about a range of topics, including their UK workforce, at both official and ministerial level.

The Government is committed to boosting job creation in the UK. On 8 July, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced the Government’s Plan for Jobs which makes up to £30 billion available, with a clear goal to create, protect, and support jobs.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what (a) financial and (b) other support his Department has provided to the greyhound racing sector as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

Greyhound racing, as part of the leisure industry, is eligible to access the help announced by the Chancellor on 17 March. This set out a business rates holiday for businesses in the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors, irrespective of rateable value, so that all eligible businesses will pay no business rates for 12 months. On 18 March, MHCLG published guidance for local authorities on the application of the relief.

In addition, the government has announced the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, through which all UK employers will be able to access support to continue paying part of their employees’ salary for those employees that would otherwise have been laid off during this crisis. Furthermore, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme provides loans of up to £5 million for SMEs through the British Business Bank, backed by an 80% government guarantee.


Officials continue to be in regular communication with the Greyhound Board of Great Britain to understand the needs of the sector during this time and ensure they are aware of central government guidance as we work towards the resumption of greyhound racing.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish his Department’s list of identified online harms and the groups at risk from each of them.

The Government published the initial response to the Online Harms White Paper consultation on 12 February 2020. This confirmed that the Government is developing legislation on online harms to establish a new duty of care on online companies towards their users, overseen by an independent regulator. Companies will be expected to ensure higher levels of protection for children than for the typical adult user.

The White Paper provided an indicative list of online harms that in-scope companies would be expected to address. That list was not exhaustive or fixed. Online harms legislation will need to be sufficiently flexible, so that it is responsive to emerging technologies and forms of harmful content and behaviour, while at the same time providing sufficient certainty to companies. The White Paper also excluded some types of harm from scope, including harm to companies and harm arising from a breach of data protection legislation or cyber-security. Further information on the duty of care and harm to be addressed will be provided in the Full Government Response to the White Paper consultation.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to tackle educational disadvantage amongst white working class boys in (a) St Helens, (b) Merseyside and (c) England.

Educational achievement is at the heart of our commitment to ensure no young person is left behind because of the place or circumstances of their birth. Most pupils now attend Good or Outstanding schools. As of March 2020, 86% of schools are Good or Outstanding compared to just 68% in 2010.

We are aware that pupils of all backgrounds have been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak and we are providing schools with the resources and tools to address lost education so that all pupils can catch up. Our £1 billion COVID-19 catch-up package is providing additional funding so that schools can support pupils who have been negatively affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. As part of this, the £650 million universal Catch-Up Premium is enabling all schools to identify and prioritise support for pupils to address their needs. This complements the National Tutoring Programme which is targeting £350 million to accelerate the academic progress of disadvantaged pupils by making high quality tutors available to schools in all regions at a greatly reduced rate.

Recognising that disadvantaged children may not have access to the resources they need to learn remotely, we have invested more than £195 million to support access to remote education and online social care. As part of this, we are making more than 340,000 laptops and tablets available this term to support disadvantaged children in Years 3 to 11 whose face-to-face education may be disrupted. This supplements more than 220,000 laptops and tablets and 50,000 4G wireless routers which were delivered during the summer term.

English schools continue to receive the pupil premium, worth £2.4 billion again this financial year, to enable them to arrange extra personalised support for disadvantaged pupils of all abilities. This year, schools in St Helens are sharing £9.7 million provided through this grant, with schools in the five local authorities in Merseyside sharing £82.4 million.

We founded the Education Endowment Foundation in 2011 to research and disseminate the most effective ways to improve disadvantaged pupil progress. So far, it has conducted 190 trials in 13,000 English schools leading to the publication of a comprehensive range of internationally recognised effective practice. The research shows schools effectively implementing the best evidence-based approaches can make a difference to every pupil’s future.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the Social Mobility Commission's strategy is for improving social mobility for white working class boys.

The Social Mobility Commission is an Arm’s Length Body, whose statutory responsibility is to monitor social mobility in the United Kingdom and promote social mobility in England. They carry out this responsibility by appraising action on social mobility via their annual monitoring report laid in Parliament, making recommendations to the government and conducting other evidence-based research reports they publish throughout the year. The Social Mobility Commission also carry out important work with frontline delivery partners to help drive change, and put evidence on best practice into action alongside employers, local regional leaders, social mobility charities, and reaching out to young people through digital channels.

The Social Mobility Commission’s work has a key focus on understanding the drivers of poor outcomes for individuals from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds, as part of an overarching strategy to understand the drivers of poor social mobility through high-quality research.

The Social Mobility Commission also recently contributed to the Education Select Committee inquiry on ‘Left Behind White Pupils from Disadvantaged Backgrounds’. Their written evidence can be found here: https://committees.parliament.uk/writtenevidence/12557/default.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what resources his Department has made available to secondary schools in (a) St Helens North constituency, (b) the North West and (c) England to enable more trainee teachers to be accommodated on work placement positions during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has been working to support schools throughout England to host trainee teachers on placements during the COVID-19 outbreak. We have relaxed the criteria for the delivery of Initial Teacher Training (ITT) in the 2020/21 academic year to support schools to host trainees in the current operating environment, for example, by suspending the expectation that trainees train to teach in at least two schools. The criteria is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-initial-teacher-training-itt/coronavirus-covid-19-initial-teacher-training-itt.

We have also suggested roles that trainee teachers can undertake in schools in 2020/21 in the Department’s guidance on the full opening of schools, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools#school-workforce.

For the 2019/20 cohort, we have made funding available for course extensions to enable schools to host trainees for an additional period of time as they work towards qualification.

These measures are intended to support schools throughout England, including secondary schools in St Helens North constituency and the North West, and are set out here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-initial-teacher-training-itt/coronavirus-covid-19-initial-teacher-training-itt#trainees-not-recommended-for-qts-in-2019-to-2020.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to (a) support PGCE candidates and others on teacher training programmes in the event that they cannot secure work placement positions due to the ongoing covid-19 outbreak and (b) promote alternative arrangements for those trainee teachers.

The Department has been working closely with initial teacher training (ITT) institutions to support trainees, including postgraduates, to secure training placements in schools this academic year. We have encouraged schools to host trainees, confirmed that trainees are critical?workers, and relaxed the criteria for the delivery of ITT in the 2020/21 academic year. The Department has supported the ITT sector to share innovative approaches to delivering school placements. Further information about the relaxations of the ITT criteria this academic year can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-initial-teacher-training-itt

The Department is continuing to work with the sector to identify what further support may be needed to secure and deliver ITT school placements this academic year, including alternative arrangements for trainees whose placements are disrupted for a reason relating to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to (a) financially support apprentices who cannot finish their programme as a result of the effect of covid-19 restrictions on normal assessment procedures and (b) introduce alternative arrangements for those apprentices.

Apprenticeships are more important now than ever in helping businesses to recruit the right people and develop the skills they need to recover and grow following the COVID-19 outbreak. Ensuring apprentices can continue to progress and achieve their apprenticeships during the disruption caused by COVID-19 continues to be a priority.

We have introduced a range of flexibilities in the delivery of training and apprenticeship assessment to support apprentices and their employers to ensure they can continue with and complete their apprenticeships. These include encouraging the remote delivery of training, introducing flexibilities to end-point assessments, and allowing furloughed apprentices to continue their apprenticeships and end-point assessments. We continue to monitor closely the availability of assessments and to address any identified barriers to participation and assessment.

Where apprentices are made redundant, we have taken steps to support these individuals and ensure more can continue and complete their apprenticeship. The department introduced a redundancy support service for apprentices which provides clear, accessible advice and guidance to individuals on the impact of redundancy, their options and next steps. As part of this service we also launched a vacancy sharing scheme to help redundant apprentices find new apprenticeship opportunities with employers. Over 1000 employers have signed up to the service to offer opportunities to redundant apprentices, including Bupa Dental and Taylor Wimpey.

We have amended legislation so that all apprentices who have less than 6 months of their apprenticeship remaining or have completed 75% of their apprenticeship at the point of redundancy can be funded to complete their apprenticeship. This change will mean more apprentices can complete their apprenticeship, maximising the value of public and employer investment in their training and putting them in a stronger position to secure new employment.

To help support employers to offer new apprenticeships, including to those that have been made redundant, employers are now able to claim £2,000 for every new apprentice they hire under the age of 25, and £1,500 for those 25 and over, until 31 January 2021.

Gillian Keegan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to tackle the effect of digital exclusion on the levels of educational attainment among children from Gypsy, Roma and Traveller backgrounds during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has met with Gypsy, Roma and Traveller (GRT) stakeholders to discuss the issues faced by children and young people during the COVID-19 outbreak. Their input has been shared with teams working on vulnerable children, exclusions and remote education to help inform policy decisions. The Department recognises that GRT children are a particularly vulnerable group at this time.

Laptops and tablets have been ordered for vulnerable and disadvantaged children and young people who do not have access to one and are preparing for exams in Year 10, receiving support from a social worker or are a care leaver. Where care leavers, children with a social worker at secondary school and disadvantaged children in Year 10 do not have internet connections, we will be providing 4G wireless routers.

Schools and families are also able to access support from the BBC, which is broadcasting lessons on television, and may choose to draw on the many educational resources offers made by publishers across the country.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of take-up for free school meals vouchers was for eligible pupils in (a) St Helens (b) Merseyside and (c) the North West in the latest period for which data is available.

Throughout this period of partial school closures, we are asking schools to support children who are eligible for benefits-related free school meals by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. However, we recognise that providing meals and food parcels is not a practical option for all schools. That is why, on 31 March we launched a national voucher scheme, with costs covered by the Department for Education.

Schools are best placed to make decisions about the most appropriate arrangements for eligible pupils. This can include food parcel arrangements, provision through the national voucher scheme or alternative voucher arrangements.

As of Tuesday 12 May, Edenred has reported that over £70 million worth of voucher codes have been redeemed into supermarket eGift cards by schools and families through the national voucher scheme. Edenred has also reported that over 16,500 schools had placed orders for the scheme as of Tuesday 28 April. We do not collect data on the scheme at pupil level.

These are rapidly developing circumstances. We will continue to keep the situation under review and to keep Parliament updated accordingly.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of school pupils are in receipt of free school meals in (a) St Helens, (b) Liverpool City Region and (c) the North West.

Information on the number of pupils and schools in local authorities and regions, including free school meal eligibility, is published in the annual Schools, pupils and their characteristics statistical release. The most recent figures, for January 2019, are available at the link below. Table 4c shows breakdowns for different school phases and types by local authority and region.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2019.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to raise awareness of road safety among children in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools.

Primary and secondary schools are able to cover teaching about road safety as part of their duty to provide a broad and balanced curriculum, and many do so through their Personal, Social, Health and Economic education (PSHE) provision. Schools can draw on resources available from many organisations, including the THINK! Campaign developed by the Department for Transport, available here: https://www.think.gov.uk.

During the stakeholder engagement process about the curriculum content for Relationships Education and Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and about the future status of PSHE, the Department for Education engaged with 90 organisations and other government departments, including the Department for Transport.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
10th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to (a) reduce the level of social stigma in relation to mental health and (b) promote awareness of mental health issues among young people.

The Department is making teaching about mental health part of compulsory health education in all state-funded schools in England from September 2020. The statutory guidance sets out that pupils will be taught about the importance of good physical and mental health including the steps pupils can take to protect and support their own health and mental wellbeing. The content will also cover understanding emotions; identifying where someone is experiencing signs of poor mental health; simple self-care; and how and when to seek support. The statutory guidance can be found at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/relationships-education-relationships-and-sex-education-rse-and-health-education.

The Department is also working with the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families to pilot setting up peer support approaches in schools and colleges that allow young people to play an active part of creating a mentally healthy and supportive environment. The findings from the programme’s external evaluation will be shared nationally, to help more schools to develop or improve their own mental health peer support programmes.

To support school staff, the Department has set up Expert Advisory Group on teacher and leader wellbeing which has a remit to advise the Department on what it can do to help schools and colleges promote good wellbeing, including tackling stigma around mental health.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of online veterinary services during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS), the regulatory body of the veterinary profession, has temporarily permitted the remote prescribing of medicines as part of allowing practices to operate safely and effectively during the pandemic. This is subject to ongoing review by the RCVS.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of covid-19 restrictions on access to veterinary services.

The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) has published surveys about the impact of the restrictions. These show there was an initial impact on veterinary practices. They have, however, since been able to adapt and are now able to work nearer to full capacity. Changes include the introduction of procedures to protect the safety of staff and customers.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the withdrawal of Capital Grant funding for contaminated land remediation in 2017 on the development of (a) brownfield and (b) greenbelt sites.

No assessment has been made of the effect of the withdrawal of Capital Grant funding in 2017 for contaminated land remediation on brownfield and greenbelt sites.

It is the responsibility of local authorities to identify and prioritise contaminated land remediation where there is an unacceptable risk to health and the environment, as under Part 2A of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. This includes brownfield and greenbelt sites where there is an unacceptable risk from the current land use.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with the Home Secretary on tackling the shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers in the UK workforce.

The Secretary of State has engaged with the Home Secretary specifically on this issue. We have broadened the eligibility of Skilled Worker visas to include jobs skilled and lowered the salary threshold. Modelling by the Migration Advisory Committee suggest the new, lower thresholds strike a reasonable balance between controlling immigration and business access to labour. The Committee found the job of HGV driver does not meet this threshold, so it is not eligible to be added to the Shortage Occupation List or to be sponsored for a Skilled Worker visa.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to promote the (a) recruitment and (b) training of heavy goods vehicle drivers.

We are supporting apprenticeships, including to train lorry drivers. A revised standard will be available from 1 August 2021 attracting £7,000 in apprenticeship levy funding. There is also an incentive payment of £3,000 available for new apprentices of any age with an employment start date of 1 April 2021 to 30 September 2021.

The Department for Work and Pensions is developing a scheme to train jobseekers in HGV driving. The Flexible Support Fund is available to help the unemployed or those in receipt of Universal Credit renew their Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC).

The Department has provided a grant for the non-profit initiative Road to Logistics to train military service leavers, ex-offenders and the long term unemployed to move into jobs in the logistics sector, including lorry driving.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding he has made available to increase capacity at heavy goods vehicle testing centres to compensate for driving test slots lost during the covid-19 outbreak.

Driver testing has restarted and the DVSA is conducting around 3,000 vocational tests per week. DVSA is increasing the number of tests available through extended operating hours and ensuring all staff who can conduct a driving test are doing so.

DVSA continue to work with the driver training industry to understand demand, respond to geographical peaks and identify issues in booking tests. DVSA has recruited 300 new car examiners which will ease the demand on examiners who are able to conduct vocational tests. They are also looking at other options for increasing vocational resource.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much funding his Department has allocated to (a) young drivers’ awareness programmes and (b) safety campaigns in each year since 2010.

Road awareness education and safety campaigns are crucial to improving safety for all road user groups. Between 2010 and 2017, our campaigns targeted a wider audience of road users, including young drivers.

Since 2017 Departmental spend has been primarily focused on young driver road safety campaigns. In order to have the greatest impact, THINK! Campaign activity focuses on those at greatest risk: male drivers aged 17-24.

To that end, since 2010, the Department has invested £47.9 million into awareness programmes and safety campaigns.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to improve road safety awareness among (a) young and (b) all drivers.

The Department’s THINK! campaigns play a vital role in reducing deaths and serious injuries on the road by changing the attitudes and behaviours that can lead to casualties.

2019 Reported Road Casualties show an 11% decrease in fatalities among 17-24 year olds and a 7% decrease in people of all ages killed in accidents involving a young car driver, compared with the previous year. This decrease comes during a period when THINK! activity has focused on changing risky attitudes and behaviours among this demographic.

The Department also encourages road safety awareness for all road user groups, as outlined in our 2019 Road Safety Statement: A Lifetime of Road Safety. Road safety education begins at school age, with our THINK! Team delivering educational resources for children aged 3-16 years old.

We have also funded educational support for older drivers in recognition that knowledge, experience and skills develop and deteriorate based on age and experience.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on airports in (a) the North West and (b) other regions.

The aviation sector is important to the UK economy and the government recognises the challenging times facing the sector as a result of COVID-19. The Government continues to work closely with airports to support them to ensure there is sufficient capacity to protect global travel routes, to continue repatriation and freight, and to maintain vital connectivity.

The aviation sector will be able to draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor. We have been clear that if individual companies find themselves in trouble as a result of coronavirus and have exhausted the measures already available to them, then we are prepared to enter discussions with individual companies seeking bespoke support as a last resort. However, any intervention would need to represent value for money for taxpayers.

6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to his July 2019 policy paper entitled Road Safety Statement: a lifetime of road safety, whether it is his policy to review the research on road safety performance (a) indicators and (b) targets.

The Department has commissioned research on road safety performance indicators and targets to establish if there is any evidence to support their effectiveness in road safety improvements.? The research report is due later this year.

6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Road safety statement 2019: a lifetime of road safety, published in July 2019, what progress his Department has made on the review on roads policing.

Good progress is being made on the review on roads policing, including on the inspection of roads policing and a Call for Evidence to run alongside that inspection.

Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary Fire and Rescue Services (HMICFRS) have completed their thematic review of roads policing in seven police forces and will be issuing a publicly available report in due course.

The Department will be publishing the Call for Evidence shortly.

Consideration will then be given to the responses and we would expect to produce the final report on roads policing once all the evidence has been considered.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to help local authorities take effective enforcement action against taxis and private hire vehicles licensed in different boroughs.

We are aware of a number of authorities that use their existing powers to require the drivers they licence to cooperate with requests from authorised compliance and enforcement officers in other areas.

Authorities are able to co-authorise compliance and enforcement officers, extending their powers to take action against all licensees licensed by authorities in the agreement.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his Department's timescale is for responding to the Taxi and private hire vehicle licensing: protecting users consultation published on 12 February 2019.

We will shortly be issuing Statutory Taxi and Private Hire Standards to licensing authorities on protecting passengers.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the effect on the level of road traffic-related casualties of introducing 20mph speed limits in built-up environments.

In November 2018, the Department published its comprehensive three-year study of the effect of 20mph limits.

The report is available online at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/20-mph-speed-limits-on-roads

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to increase the number of 20mph limit zones in built-up environments.

The Department believes that local traffic authorities are best placed to set local speed limits based on local needs and priorities.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
16th Nov 2020
To ask the hon. Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, what the Church of England’s policy is on non-English language inscriptions on headstones in its graveyards.

There are legal proceedings currently underway on this matter and due to the House of Commons Sub Judice Resolution the Church Commissioners are unable to provide an answer at this time.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
16th Nov 2020
To ask the hon. Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, what the Church of England’s policy is on the use of the Irish language (a) in its services and (b) as inscriptions or engravings on (i) headstones or (ii) other objects on Church property.

There are legal proceedings currently underway on this matter and due to the House of Commons Sub Judice Resolution the Church Commissioners are unable to provide an answer at this time.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what (a) guidance and (b) support her Department is providing to gateway organisations to assist them in helping small and medium-sized businesses make effective use of the Kickstart scheme.

Guidance for Kickstart gateways and small employers has been provided through the Kickstart site and related gov.uk pages. Material is also available online to help employers advertise that they are active participants of Kickstart.

There has been active engagement with public, private and voluntary sector organisations to encourage their participation as Kickstart gateways and over 400 have stepped forward indicating their interest in the role. Their details have been published on gov.uk.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to raise awareness among small and medium-sized businesses in St Helens North constituency of the different local and national gateway organisations helping to facilitate Kickstart scheme access.

The department has published a list of organisations willing to act as gateway organisations, nationally and by region, to better allow small and medium-sized employers to find a Kickstart gateway. This list is available, online, through the gov.uk pages.

Officials have held a number of discussions with representatives from the Liverpool Local Enterprise Partnership, which represents businesses in the St Helens area. And local JobCentre Plus staff are also meeting with employers and organisations in their area. This engagement will promote and encourage participation in the Kickstart Scheme.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what funding his Department invested through the National Institute for Health Research into research on Tourette’s syndrome in each year since 2010.

Since 2010, £3.3 million has been invested into research on Tourette’s syndrome through the National Institute for Health Research.

The following table shows spending on research on Tourette’s syndrome in each financial year since 2010.

Year

Research spend

2010/11

£0

2011/12

£149,296

2012/13

£281,996

2013/14

£356,558

2014/15

£204,102

2015/16

£197,677

2016/17

£134,129

2017/18

£313,302

2018/19

£612,658

2019/20

£669,635

2020/21

£362,080

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of Health Education England’s clinical psychology intake has opted to undertake a specialist placement focusing on Tourette’s syndrome in each of the last five years.

This information is not held centrally.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to invest in specialist Tourette’s syndrome services and care across (a) St Helens Clinical Commissioning Group area, (b) the North West region and (c) England.

The majority of services for people with Tourette’s syndrome are commissioned locally by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), through local community paediatric services or child and adolescent mental health services, with the pathways varying across the country. These services will be appropriate for the majority of children and young people with Tourette’s syndrome.

For those requiring specialist support, there are specialised tertiary services across the country with focused multidisciplinary teams assessing and supporting children with tics, Tourette’s syndrome and motor stereotypies and their families. The potential commissioning of a local tertiary service for tics and Tourette’s is under review by CCGs across the North West and NHS England and NHS Improvement.

NHS St Helens CCG has tasked its local providers to review the needs of children and young people from St Helens who have been discharged from Alder Hey Children’s Hospital’s Tourette’s service in the preceding six months and has temporarily invested £30,000 to support this.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of patients waiting for (a) routine and (b) urgent dental care across the St Helens Clinical Commissioning Group area.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have confirmed that within the St Helens Clinical Commissioning Group area, there are no patients on a waiting list for urgent treatment. No estimate has been made of the number of patients waiting for routine appointments as this is managed at individual practice level.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what additional support he has allocated to the dental sector to increase capacity for (a) routine patient appointments and (b) urgent care during the covid-19 outbreak.

During the pandemic over 600 urgent treatment centres have been opened to support the delivery of urgent care. National Health Service dentists have been asked to maximise safe throughput to meet as many prioritised needs as possible, focussing first on urgent care and vulnerable groups, followed by overdue routine care. This has been underpinned by the requirement for dental providers to deliver 60% of contracted units of dental activity and 80% of units of orthodontic activity for the first six months of 2021/22 in order to receive full payment of their NHS contract value.

Guidance has also been issued by NHS England on the use of flexible commissioning to target restricted dental capacity to those patient groups that most need support.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking in conjunction with NHS Hospital Trusts to ensure that young people are able to safely have a companion present for key cancer appointments and treatments during the covid-19 outbreak.

We understand the need for young people to be accompanied by their parents and caregivers at appointments and recommend that patients be accompanied where appropriate and necessary. The current guidance, published on 13 October 2020, allows visiting in outpatient and diagnostic settings in a COVID-19 secure way.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many heart (a) operations and (b) procedures were performed in each year since 2010 across the St Helens Clinical Commissioning Group area.

The number of heart operations and procedures recorded for patients in the St Helens Clinical Commissioning Group for in each year from 2010-11 to 2019-20 is shown in the following table:

Year

Operations

Procedures

2010-11

1,125

1,476

2011-12

1,153

1,657

2012-13

1,153

1,593

2013-14

1,060

1,480

2014-15

1,107

1,532

2015-16

1,185

1,612

2016-17

1,503

1,982

2017-18

1,290

1,747

2018-19

1,199

1,646

2019-20

1,207

1,592

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what additional financial support he is providing to the NHS to tackle the adverse effects of the covid-19 outbreak on the (a) detection and (b) treatment of heart and circulatory conditions.

The recently announced Spending Review included funding of £1 billion for all health conditions to address backlogs, tackle long waiting lists and facilitating up to one million extra checks, scans and additional operations.

The NHS Long Term Plan also includes work to raise awareness of the symptoms of heart failure and to ensure early and rapid access to diagnostic tests and treatment. This remains a priority for NHS England and NHS Improvement during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the time period required to clear the backlog of cases of (a) heart surgery and (b) other procedures delated or postponed during the covid-19 outbreak.

NHS England has advised it is too early to make an estimate of the time required to clear the backlog of cases.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of mass covid-19 testing in Liverpool; and if he will publish the data that supports that assessment.

The Government published the ‘Liverpool COVID-19 community testing pilot: interim evaluation report summary’ which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/liverpool-covid-19-community-testing-pilot-interim-evaluation-report-summary/liverpool-covid-19-community-testing-pilot-interim-evaluation-report-summary

The report evaluates the data on the biological, behavioural and systems aspects of the pilot and its early public health impacts. A final assessment and a more detailed report on the effectiveness of mass testing and the data to support will follow later in 2021.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to increase the (a) quantity and (b) quality of online support for teenagers who self-harm during the covid-19 outbreak.

National Health Service mental health services have remained open for business throughout the pandemic. Our community, talking therapies and children and young people’s services have deployed innovative digital tool to connect with people and provide ongoing support. For those with severe needs or in crisis, all NHS mental health providers have established 24 hours a day, seven days a week mental health crisis lines.

We have invested more than £10 million in supporting national and local mental health charities, including CALM and Samaritans, to continue their vital work in supporting people across the country.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding has been allocated from the public purse to support self-harm prevention services in (a) St Helens and (b) England in each year since 2015.

The date is not held in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of funding for hospices; and if he will make a statement.

There are 184 hospices in England almost all of which are majority funded from charitable and philanthropic donations and are therefore independent organisations. Most hospices also receive some statutory funding, mainly from clinical commissioning groups for providing local services.

The Department recognises that the hospice sector has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, and that subsequent social distancing measures have affected some aspects of community fundraising. We regularly assess the effect of the COVID-19 outbreak on the hospice sector, and through NHS England and NHS Improvement are in discussions with stakeholders in the sector about the challenges they face. A range of steps have been taken to support hospices.

We have made up to £200 million available to the sector for additional capacity between April and July, and we continue to work closely with hospices to support their essential work.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been treated by the NHS for pressure ulcers in each year since 2010.

We do not hold the information in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to provide funding for research into (a) new treatments and (b) preventative strategies for pressure ulcers.

The Department’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including pressure ulcers. Applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the importance of the topic to patients and health and care services, value for money and scientific quality. Information on individual projects funded by the NIHR can be found at the following link:

https://www.journalslibrary.nihr.ac.uk/programmes/

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of pressure ulcers treated by the NHS since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

We do not hold the information in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the public health guidance underpinning the decision to close (a) leisure centres and gyms, (b) casinos and betting shops and (c) pubs and bars in the Liverpool City Region in response to the imposition of the tier 3 local covid alert level.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) provides advice to the Department and considered the risks of transmission through different routes and environments, including leisure centres, gyms, casinos and betting shops. SAGE’s paper is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/933225/S0824_SARS-CoV-2_Transmission_routes_and_environments.pdf

A national impact assessment on the potential effect of COVID-19 restrictions on transmission across the country, including in the Liverpool City region, is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/925856/S0770_NPIs_table__pivot_.pdf

The Government also published scientific evidence regarding transmission risk in the hospitality sector, particularly pubs and bars, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/transmission-risk-in-the-hospitality-sector/transmission-risk-in-the-hospitality-sector

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the annual cost to the NHS of treating pressure ulcers in each year since 2010.

We do not hold the information in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what role the (a) Liverpool City Region Combined Authority, (b) Merseyside Resilience Forum and (c) individual local authorities play in determining the (i) local covid-19 alert tiering arrangements and (ii) implementation of those arrangements.

We worked with all appropriate local leaders and representative groups to agree the right decision for the area based on the best available science, along with the consideration of the economic, operational, social and policy implications.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what role the (a) Liverpool City Region Combine Authority, (b) Merseyside Resilience Forum, (c) St Helens Council and (d) St Helens CCG play in public health policy and practice.

Liverpool City Region Combined Authority does not have any specific public health functions, but it has a range of responsibilities which it can act on and interact with people’s health including relating to transport, housing and employment. Local resilience fora bring together multi-agency partnerships from local public services including the emergency services and the National Health Service to plan and prepare for localised incidents and emergencies. Upper tier local authorities, including St Helens Council, have a statutory duty to take steps to improve the health of their population and also play a vital role in protecting health locally. Clinical commissioning groups commission most of the hospital and community NHS services in the local area for which they are responsible.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the structure is for making locally-agreed decisions on covid-19 tiering arrangements between the Government and (a) regional mayors, (b) combined authorities, (c) individual local authorities, (d) local resilience forums and (e) local hon. Members.

The COVID-19 Contain framework sets out how NHS Test and Trace and the Joint Biosecurity Centre will work with local authorities, Public Health England and the public to contain and manage local COVID-19 outbreaks. This framework will support local decision-makers by clarifying their responsibilities and empowering them to take preventative action and make strong decisions locally, supported by mechanisms that safeguard key national assets and interests.

While COVID-19 presents an unprecedented challenge, well-established local and national arrangements for public health and emergency planning are being used as the basis of this enhanced response. The decision-making model follows the tried and tested approach to civil emergencies, based on the concept of subsidiarity, which is where decisions should be taken at the lowest appropriate level, with co-ordination at the highest necessary level.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the status is of the School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme.

The School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme will resume in September when all children will return to school. As before, all children in Key Stage 1 in state-funded primary schools will receive a free piece of fruit or vegetable every school day.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the evidential basis is for banning the sale and production of menthol cigarettes in the UK.

The Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016 (TRPR), introduced a ban on flavoured cigarettes and hand rolling tobacco. The only exception was for menthol cigarettes where a four-year extension was allowed for the ban to come into force. This expired on 20 May 2020.

The published impact assessment of the TRPR, along with backed up by the international evidence base, states that menthol cigarettes act as a gateway into smoking, have particular appeal amongst young people, and that there is a misconception that they are healthier to smoke.

The introduction of the ban will save lives. Stopping smoking now will bring immediate benefits to health, including for those with an existing smoking-related disease.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish a list of covid-19 symptom tracker online apps that have been approved by his Department; and what guidance his Department has published on downloading Government approved apps.

The National Health Service has an existing approach to assessing apps for their clinical efficacy, data security and cyber security using the Digital Assessment Questionnaire which is available at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/services/nhs-apps-library/guidance-for-health-app-developers-commissioners-and-assessors/how-we-assess-health-apps-and-digital-tools#preview-the-questions

Apps can also be assessed against the NHS Digital Health Technology Standard that was introduced in February 2020. This is available at the following link:

https://www.nhsx.nhs.uk/media/documents/NHS_Digital_Health_Technology_Standard_draft.pdf

To date, three COVID-19 symptom tracker apps have been assessed using these approaches. More information is available about how we assess apps and other digital health technologies at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/blog/transformation-blog/2020/how-we-are-assessing-covid-19-apps

NHSX, together with jHub, are working with the providers of third party COVID-19 symptom tracking apps and will publish details of those that meet our standards on the NHSX website in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, what plans he has to postpone the reorganisation of (a) clinical commissioning groups and (b) the NHS.

It is for NHS England to approve the mergers of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). There are a number of CCGs merging on 1 April 2020, and plans to do so are well advanced. NHS England have, so far, not indicated an intention to pause these mergers.

The Government also remains committed to considering legislative changes to support the NHS implement the Long Term Plan and will bring forward proposals in due course.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people with a respiratory disease diagnosis live in (a) St Helens, (b) Liverpool City Region and (c) the North West.

Data on the total number of people with a respiratory disease diagnosis are not available. The Quality Outcomes Framework collects data on the number of patients recorded on general practice registers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) or asthma.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many acute beds there are in each NHS hospital trust in the North West.

This information is not available in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on the financial viability of career progression for ambulance service staff of the changes to unsocial hours payments as part of the 2018 NHS Pay Deal.

The National Health Service trade unions agreed as part of the three-year deal that new ambulance staff would be paid unsocial hours in the same way as everyone else under the Agenda for Change contract. This is so ambulance staff have the same arrangements as, for example, nurses and midwives.

We do not anticipate an impact on retention. Existing ambulance staff were given the choice to remain on their historic unsocial hours arrangements if they did not want to move to the new arrangements in place for all other staff. The latest data available does not show any reduction in unsocial hours pay for ambulance staff.

Under Section 2 of the NHS Terms and Conditions of Service, a percentage enhancement is paid on top of hours worked in unsocial hours periods, such as nights and weekends. These are the arrangements that apply to new ambulance staff and those that choose to switch to them, and mean the more unsocial hours that are worked, the higher the pay.

In 2016 a new job profile for paramedics was agreed with ambulance trade unions, allowing them to develop in to a higher pay band. Newly qualified paramedics can progress in to the higher band after two years if they meet the learning outcomes. Paramedics can be ‘fast-tracked’ if they can meet all the competencies in less than two years.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the effect on retention rates of ambulance service staff of the changes to unsocial hours payments as part of the 2018 NHS Pay Deal.

The National Health Service trade unions agreed as part of the three-year deal that new ambulance staff would be paid unsocial hours in the same way as everyone else under the Agenda for Change contract. This is so ambulance staff have the same arrangements as, for example, nurses and midwives.

We do not anticipate an impact on retention. Existing ambulance staff were given the choice to remain on their historic unsocial hours arrangements if they did not want to move to the new arrangements in place for all other staff. The latest data available does not show any reduction in unsocial hours pay for ambulance staff.

Under Section 2 of the NHS Terms and Conditions of Service, a percentage enhancement is paid on top of hours worked in unsocial hours periods, such as nights and weekends. These are the arrangements that apply to new ambulance staff and those that choose to switch to them, and mean the more unsocial hours that are worked, the higher the pay.

In 2016 a new job profile for paramedics was agreed with ambulance trade unions, allowing them to develop in to a higher pay band. Newly qualified paramedics can progress in to the higher band after two years if they meet the learning outcomes. Paramedics can be ‘fast-tracked’ if they can meet all the competencies in less than two years.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to financially support ambulance service staff who work a large number of unsocial hours per month in response to changes to unsocial hours payments as part of the 2018 NHS Pay Deal.

The National Health Service trade unions agreed as part of the three-year deal that new ambulance staff would be paid unsocial hours in the same way as everyone else under the Agenda for Change contract. This is so ambulance staff have the same arrangements as, for example, nurses and midwives.

We do not anticipate an impact on retention. Existing ambulance staff were given the choice to remain on their historic unsocial hours arrangements if they did not want to move to the new arrangements in place for all other staff. The latest data available does not show any reduction in unsocial hours pay for ambulance staff.

Under Section 2 of the NHS Terms and Conditions of Service, a percentage enhancement is paid on top of hours worked in unsocial hours periods, such as nights and weekends. These are the arrangements that apply to new ambulance staff and those that choose to switch to them, and mean the more unsocial hours that are worked, the higher the pay.

In 2016 a new job profile for paramedics was agreed with ambulance trade unions, allowing them to develop in to a higher pay band. Newly qualified paramedics can progress in to the higher band after two years if they meet the learning outcomes. Paramedics can be ‘fast-tracked’ if they can meet all the competencies in less than two years.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to reduce barriers to career progression for ambulance service staff within NHS England.

The National Health Service trade unions agreed as part of the three-year deal that new ambulance staff would be paid unsocial hours in the same way as everyone else under the Agenda for Change contract. This is so ambulance staff have the same arrangements as, for example, nurses and midwives.

We do not anticipate an impact on retention. Existing ambulance staff were given the choice to remain on their historic unsocial hours arrangements if they did not want to move to the new arrangements in place for all other staff. The latest data available does not show any reduction in unsocial hours pay for ambulance staff.

Under Section 2 of the NHS Terms and Conditions of Service, a percentage enhancement is paid on top of hours worked in unsocial hours periods, such as nights and weekends. These are the arrangements that apply to new ambulance staff and those that choose to switch to them, and mean the more unsocial hours that are worked, the higher the pay.

In 2016 a new job profile for paramedics was agreed with ambulance trade unions, allowing them to develop in to a higher pay band. Newly qualified paramedics can progress in to the higher band after two years if they meet the learning outcomes. Paramedics can be ‘fast-tracked’ if they can meet all the competencies in less than two years.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's announcement on 18 December 2019 that funding will be allocated to the provision of grants to nursing students from September 2020, whether that funding will include compensation for students that were not eligible for an NHS bursary as a result of the removal of the NHS bursary scheme in 2017.

The maintenance grants announced on 18 December 2019 are available to new and continuing students from September 2020. Students who started courses in the 2017/18 academic year and will have completed their studies will not receive backdated payments.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of (a) mental health services and (b) mental health assessment in Young Offender Institutions; and if he will make a statement.

The Department has not made a formal assessment of the adequacy of mental health services or mental health assessment in Young Offender Institutions.

Children and Young People in Young Offender Institutions should have access to the same range and quality of health services, including mental health services, as the general public receives from the National Health Service.

Since April 2013, NHS England (now NHS England and NHS Improvement) has commissioned health services for all children and young people in Young Offender Institutions in England.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have a number of systems in place to enable it to assess the adequacy of healthcare provision. These include quarterly contract management meetings, Children and Young People Indicators of Performance returns, quality assurance visits, a quality surveillance process, and intelligence arising from Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons, Ofsted and Care Quality Commission reports. In addition, NHS England and NHS Improvement work in partnership with the relevant colleagues from Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service Youth Custody Service, Ministry of Justice, Department for Education and Public Health England in responding to any concerns.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effect on the mental health of children in young offender institutions of being placed in solitary confinement for prolonged periods of time.

We have made no formal assessment. The Youth Custody Service is reviewing the current model of separation of children and young people in young offender institutions.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking as part of the NHS Long Term Plan to improve children’s mental health services in St Helens North constituency; and if he will make a statement.

The NHS Long Term Plan commits to at least an additional 345,000 children and young people aged 0-25 being able to access support via National Health Service-funded mental health services and school or college-based mental health support teams by 2023/24.

St Helens Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has advised that it is taking a borough-wide approach for children and young people’s mental health. As part of this, the CCG will fund a number of projects including:

- commissioning Kooth - an online provider that supplies advice, guidance, general support and online counselling for children and young people aged 11-25 years. This will go live in March 2020;

- extending the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies programme into additional schools in the borough; and

- a one-year pilot to enhance the crisis response service provision for children and young people with autism and/or learning disabilities.

In addition, the CCG has agreed to take part in the national Link programme, which brings together professionals from education and health in workshops to create closer working to help address the mental health needs of children and young people in the borough.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding has been allocated from the public purse to children’s mental health services in (a) St Helens and (b) nationally in each of the last 10 years.

This information is not held centrally.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent representations he has made to his counterpart in the Government of India on its treatment of religious minorities.

We engage with India on the full range of human rights matters, working with Union and State Governments, and with non-Governmental organisations (NGOs), to build capacity and share expertise to promote human rights for all. The Minister of State for South Asia and the Commonwealth, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon, has raised our concerns about the impact of recent legislative and judicial measures on minorities with Indian Government Ministers.

The British High Commission in New Delhi and our network of Deputy High Commissions across India also regularly meet religious representatives and run projects promoting minority rights. For example, over the last three years, we have worked with local NGOs to bring together young people of diverse faith backgrounds to work together on social action projects in their local communities and promote a culture of inter faith tolerance.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th May 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent assessment she has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on gypsy, roma and traveller communities.

It is important to continue to develop our understanding of how this new virus affects different communities, and to use the insights gained from the latest available data and research. This is why we have asked Public Health England to review COVID-19 outcomes among different groups, and to explore potential reasons for disparities.

We have also asked all local authorities to consider how best to support communities, especially those potentially at risk such as Gypsy, Roma and Traveller citizens, who may need specific support, including access to basic services such as water, sanitation and waste disposal.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what the status is of the Government’s Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy, announced in February 2020 and led by Alex Ellis; and what the timetable is for its publication.

Following the Chancellor's announcement that the Comprehensive Spending Review is being delayed, the Integrated Review has been paused given the pressing need to focus on COVID-19. We will return to the Integrated Review when appropriate to do so, ensuring that we engage with all relevant stakeholders, including civil society.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many employees in (a) St Helens Borough Council, (b) St Helens CCG, (c) St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, (d) Merseytravel, (e) Merseyside Police and (f) Liverpool City Region Combined Authority are paid more than (i) £80,000, (ii) £100,000, (iii) £150,000, (iv) £200,000 and (v) £250,000 per annum.

The information cannot be provided in the form requested due to taxpayer confidentiality and the low numbers of recipients in the bands requested, which could be identifiable.

However, HMRC in collaboration with the ONS publish Employment and Earnings statistics that show that fewer than 5% of UK employees each month are paid more than an annual equivalent income of £80,000 and less than 1% of employees are paid more than an annual equivalent income of £150,0001.

1 https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/earningsandworkinghours/bulletins/earningsandemploymentfrompayasyouearnrealtimeinformationuk/november2020 (Figure 5)

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the financial effect of the restrictions on hospitality businesses in the covid-19 tier system on the wholesale sector in (a) St Helens North constituency and (b) Liverpool City Region during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has provided unprecedented levels of support for workers and businesses to protect, as much as possible, against the current economic emergency. Food and drink wholesalers have been eligible for a number of these support schemes, with the most relevant likely to include:

  • The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help keep millions of people in employment;
  • £10,000 cash grants for all business properties in receipt of Small Business Rates Relief and Rural Rates Relief;
  • The Bounce Back Loan Scheme for small businesses to borrow between £2,000 and £50,000, with no interest payments or fees for the first 12 months.

Food and drink wholesalers have also benefited from the Eat Out to Help Out Scheme which provided over 100 million half price meals during August and helped to protect the livelihoods of the 1.8 million people working in the hospitality sector.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the economic effect of the tier-3 local covid restrictions on (a) the Liverpool City Region and (b) the six individual boroughs in that combined authority, in the event that those restrictions last (i) 28, (ii) 56, (iii) 112 and (iv) 224 days.

The UK, along with many other countries around the world, has experienced a severe recession caused by coronavirus, and no major economy has avoided a dramatic fall in GDP. In response to those restrictions, the government took action to protect jobs and livelihoods and support businesses through the deepest global recession in decades.

Since they were classed as Very High Alert, the government has also recently provided local authorities in Liverpool City Region with £44m to support businesses and public health. The government had already provided businesses in the Liverpool City Region with £1.3bn in direct support through grants and loans, and local authorities with £136m of additional support to address Covid-related pressures.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on unemployment of the ending of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme in (a) St Helens North, (b) Liverpool City Region and (c) the North West.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) has supported 13,200 employments in St Helens North, 64,900 employments in the local authority of Liverpool and 1,035,600 employments in the North West region of England.

Many of these employments will have already returned to work. In the North West region of England, as of 31 July, the number of employments furloughed had fallen to 453,700.

The Government is adapting its response to the changing context, evolving as restrictions have changed. Today the Government has published its Winter Economy Plan, a targeted package of measures to support jobs and business through the winter months. As part of that Plan, the Job Support Scheme will support viable businesses who are facing lower demand due to COVID-19 to keep their employees in work and attached to the workforce. This is in addition to the targeted Plan for Jobs, which includes a Job Retention Bonus to encourage firms to keep on furloughed workers, providing £1.2 billion to significantly expand and enhance work search support, as well as additional support to people to build the skills they need to get into work, and the new £2 billion Kickstart Scheme, creating hundreds of thousands of new, fully subsidised jobs for young people.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on unemployment among 16-24-year olds of ending the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme in (a) St Helens North, (b) Liverpool City Region and (c) the North West.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) has supported the employment of nearly 1.89 million 16-24-year olds across the whole of the UK.

Many of these employees will have already returned to work. Across the whole of the UK and all ages, the number of employments furloughed has decreased from a peak of 8.9 million on 8 May to about 4.8 million on 31 July.

The Government is adapting its response to the changing context, and today the Government has published its Winter Economy Plan, a targeted package of measures to support jobs and business through the winter months. As part of that Plan, the Job Support Scheme will support viable businesses who are facing lower demand due to COVID-19 to keep their employees in work and attached to the workforce. This is in addition to the targeted Plan for Jobs, which includes a Job Retention Bonus to encourage firms to keep on furloughed workers, £1.2 billion to expand and enhance work search support, additional support to people to build the skills they need to get into work, and the new £2 billion Kickstart Scheme, creating hundreds of thousands of new, fully subsidised jobs for young people.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of people in (a) St Helens North constituency, (b) the North West and c) the UK for whom cash is their primary payment method.

The Government recognises that cash remains important for many individuals and businesses across the UK. That is why, at the March 2020 Budget, the Chancellor announced that the Government will bring forward legislation to protect access to cash for those who need it.

The Government is engaging with the financial regulators, including through the Joint Authorities Cash Strategy Group, to monitor the impact of COVID-19 on the UK’s cash infrastructure and ensure that those who rely on cash to transact can continue to do so in the long-term. The Financial Conduct Authority and Payment Systems Regulators are developing a comprehensive picture of cash access infrastructure across the UK in relation to social economic factors that reflect consumer needs, building upon their mapping work carried out during the COVID-19 crisis.

LINK, the UK’s main ATM network, publishes the annual total of free-to-use ATMs across the UK since 1998 online. As of 2019, there were 45,000 free-to-use ATMs in the UK; although this is less than the peak number in 2017, this remains 13% higher than a decade ago. LINK’s Monthly ATM Footprint Report also publishes information monthly on the break down by constituency.

During the COVID-19 outbreak, financial services firms have announced a range of measures to support vulnerable customers. We are working with the Financial Conduct Authority to ensure there is continued support for these people. For example, many firms have methods for trusted third parties to access cash. Anyone with questions should contact their banking service provider.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the number of free-to-use ATMs in (a) St Helens North constituency, (b) the North West and (c) the UK in each year since 2010.

The Government recognises that cash remains important for many individuals and businesses across the UK. That is why, at the March 2020 Budget, the Chancellor announced that the Government will bring forward legislation to protect access to cash for those who need it.

The Government is engaging with the financial regulators, including through the Joint Authorities Cash Strategy Group, to monitor the impact of COVID-19 on the UK’s cash infrastructure and ensure that those who rely on cash to transact can continue to do so in the long-term. The Financial Conduct Authority and Payment Systems Regulators are developing a comprehensive picture of cash access infrastructure across the UK in relation to social economic factors that reflect consumer needs, building upon their mapping work carried out during the COVID-19 crisis.

LINK, the UK’s main ATM network, publishes the annual total of free-to-use ATMs across the UK since 1998 online. As of 2019, there were 45,000 free-to-use ATMs in the UK; although this is less than the peak number in 2017, this remains 13% higher than a decade ago. LINK’s Monthly ATM Footprint Report also publishes information monthly on the break down by constituency.

During the COVID-19 outbreak, financial services firms have announced a range of measures to support vulnerable customers. We are working with the Financial Conduct Authority to ensure there is continued support for these people. For example, many firms have methods for trusted third parties to access cash. Anyone with questions should contact their banking service provider.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to promote adequate access to alternative payment methods during the covid-19 outbreak for people whose primary payment method is cash.

The Government recognises that cash remains important for many individuals and businesses across the UK. That is why, at the March 2020 Budget, the Chancellor announced that the Government will bring forward legislation to protect access to cash for those who need it.

The Government is engaging with the financial regulators, including through the Joint Authorities Cash Strategy Group, to monitor the impact of COVID-19 on the UK’s cash infrastructure and ensure that those who rely on cash to transact can continue to do so in the long-term. The Financial Conduct Authority and Payment Systems Regulators are developing a comprehensive picture of cash access infrastructure across the UK in relation to social economic factors that reflect consumer needs, building upon their mapping work carried out during the COVID-19 crisis.

LINK, the UK’s main ATM network, publishes the annual total of free-to-use ATMs across the UK since 1998 online. As of 2019, there were 45,000 free-to-use ATMs in the UK; although this is less than the peak number in 2017, this remains 13% higher than a decade ago. LINK’s Monthly ATM Footprint Report also publishes information monthly on the break down by constituency.

During the COVID-19 outbreak, financial services firms have announced a range of measures to support vulnerable customers. We are working with the Financial Conduct Authority to ensure there is continued support for these people. For example, many firms have methods for trusted third parties to access cash. Anyone with questions should contact their banking service provider.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, what recent estimate he has made of the number of women whose average income calculation has been reduced by maternity leave taken in the previous three tax years.

Eligibility for the SEISS and the size of the grant paid out is based on information provided to HMRC on self-assessment returns. Self-assessment returns do not include information on breaks in trade, such as the dates or the reasons. HMRC do not know why an individual’s profits may have dropped from self-assessment returns. As a result, a precise estimate relating to the impact of maternity leave is not available. However, the SEISS grant is calculated based on average profits between 2016/17 and 2018/19. This mitigates any periods of reduced earnings which all self-employed individuals may experience.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to provide financial assistance to employees who were working before 19 March 2020, but are exempt from the furlough scheme due to a real-time information submission after this date by their employer.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is open to any individual who was on an employer’s PAYE payroll on or before 19 March 2020 and for whom HMRC received an RTI submission notifying payment in respect of that employee on or before the 19 March 2020. Those not eligible for the scheme may be eligible for other support Government is providing, including a package of temporary welfare measures and up to three months’ mortgage payment holidays for those struggling with their mortgage payments.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many and what proportion of businesses in (a) St Helens, (b) Liverpool City Region and (c) the North West have a rateable value of less than £51,000.

As of 31 March 2019:

(a) For the St Helens billing authority, there were 4,704 non-domestic properties. 4,267 (91%) of these had a Rateable Value of less than £51,000;

(b) For the Liverpool City Region (combining the billing authorities of Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral) there were 47,676 non-domestic properties. 43,541 (91%) of these had a Rateable Value of less than £51,000;

(c) For the North West region, there were 273,784 non-domestic properties. 251,829 (92%) of these had a Rateable Value of less than £51,000.

The Valuation Office Agency publishes statistics on the stock of properties at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/non-domestic-rating-stock-of-properties-including-business-floorspace-2019. The next update to these statistics is planned for July 2020.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of business rates on the ability of registered childcare providers to remain financially viable in England.

The Government appreciates that business rates can represent a high fixed cost for small businesses. Childcare providers may be eligible for Small Business Rates Relief, where the smallest businesses pay no business rates at all. All childcare providers will benefit from the change from RPI to CPI indexation of business rates.

The Government will be conducting a fundamental review of business rates.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to (a) raise public awareness of and (b) encourage young people to access monies held in their name in Child Trust Fund accounts.

HMRC is working closely with Child Trust Fund providers and the wider industry to assist those who have difficulty in locating a misplaced Child Trust Fund account.

HMRC:

  • has improved the National Insurance Notification (NINO) letter, which is sent out prior to a child’s 16th birthday, to raise awareness of the Child Trust Fund scheme;
  • has worked with a charity, The Share Foundation, to develop a process whereby the charity can link children with their account; and
  • is developing a simplified system for account tracing which will assist those with a limited digital footprint.

In addition, while CTF providers are already required to send regular statements to the contact for the account, regulations were laid on 15 January which will require them to send a statement in the year the child reaches 17 in anticipation of the maturity of the account.

If a child, or their parent, does not know which provider is managing the child’s account, HMRC provides a tracing service, which can be accessed at: www.gov.uk/child-trust-funds

As accounts do not begin to mature until September 2020, no accounts are currently unclaimed, and the total value of unclaimed funds is zero.

The regulations laid on 15 January ensure that any CTF account not claimed by the account holder when they turn 18 will retain its tax-free status until it is claimed. These regulations also provide that funds in a mature CTF may be transferred to an ISA without counting towards the individual’s annual ISA subscription limit.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate he has made of the total number of unclaimed Child Trust Fund accounts in (a) St Helens North constituency and (b) the UK.

HMRC is working closely with Child Trust Fund providers and the wider industry to assist those who have difficulty in locating a misplaced Child Trust Fund account.

HMRC:

  • has improved the National Insurance Notification (NINO) letter, which is sent out prior to a child’s 16th birthday, to raise awareness of the Child Trust Fund scheme;
  • has worked with a charity, The Share Foundation, to develop a process whereby the charity can link children with their account; and
  • is developing a simplified system for account tracing which will assist those with a limited digital footprint.

In addition, while CTF providers are already required to send regular statements to the contact for the account, regulations were laid on 15 January which will require them to send a statement in the year the child reaches 17 in anticipation of the maturity of the account.

If a child, or their parent, does not know which provider is managing the child’s account, HMRC provides a tracing service, which can be accessed at: www.gov.uk/child-trust-funds

As accounts do not begin to mature until September 2020, no accounts are currently unclaimed, and the total value of unclaimed funds is zero.

The regulations laid on 15 January ensure that any CTF account not claimed by the account holder when they turn 18 will retain its tax-free status until it is claimed. These regulations also provide that funds in a mature CTF may be transferred to an ISA without counting towards the individual’s annual ISA subscription limit.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate he has made of the total value of unclaimed funds currently residing in Child Trust Fund accounts.

HMRC is working closely with Child Trust Fund providers and the wider industry to assist those who have difficulty in locating a misplaced Child Trust Fund account.

HMRC:

  • has improved the National Insurance Notification (NINO) letter, which is sent out prior to a child’s 16th birthday, to raise awareness of the Child Trust Fund scheme;
  • has worked with a charity, The Share Foundation, to develop a process whereby the charity can link children with their account; and
  • is developing a simplified system for account tracing which will assist those with a limited digital footprint.

In addition, while CTF providers are already required to send regular statements to the contact for the account, regulations were laid on 15 January which will require them to send a statement in the year the child reaches 17 in anticipation of the maturity of the account.

If a child, or their parent, does not know which provider is managing the child’s account, HMRC provides a tracing service, which can be accessed at: www.gov.uk/child-trust-funds

As accounts do not begin to mature until September 2020, no accounts are currently unclaimed, and the total value of unclaimed funds is zero.

The regulations laid on 15 January ensure that any CTF account not claimed by the account holder when they turn 18 will retain its tax-free status until it is claimed. These regulations also provide that funds in a mature CTF may be transferred to an ISA without counting towards the individual’s annual ISA subscription limit.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking against people in the UK with links to criminal activity by the Syrian regime.

Whilst it would not be appropriate to comment on individual cases, where there is evidence of criminal activity in support of the Syrian regime, the Home Office, Police, Crown Prosecution Service and any relevant body will consider it and act on it as appropriate.

We are clear, the conflict in Syria poses serious risks to UK interests, including the stability of the wider region, migration, and counter-terrorism. We therefore remain vigilant to those seeking to perpetuate the conflict or profit from it.

The UK has imposed sanctions on the Assad regime to end the violent repression of civilians in Syria, and to increase pressure for a political solution. UK sanctions send a clear message to the regime and its supporters, we will not stand by whilst the regime continues to commit serious human rights abuses. Sanctions will be used to hold them to account, and to stop those targeted from entering the UK, channelling money through UK banks, and profiting from our economy.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the impact of the reduction to the Official Development Assistance budget on the UK’s security; and if she will publish that assessment.

The Foreign Secretary is the Secretary of State with overall responsibility for the UK ODA budget and assessing the impact of any reductions.

Regarding the Home Office ODA budget allocation, the Home Office’s non-discretionary ODA in–donor spend on refugees and asylum seekers in the UK will not be changed, in alignment with our legal obligations.

Between our ODA and CSSF allocations we have maintained the vast majority of our other ODA funded activity. Much of our work overseas seeks to support host country law enforcement agencies to develop their capabilities in preventing the spread of illicit commodities and illegal movement of people. The Home Office also has overseas law enforcement work which is funded from core non-ODA budgets. Some of our ODA funded activity was planned to stop at the end of FY 20/21 as part of conventional multi-year programme planning. In some cases the activity overseas has been scaled back.

The interventions the Home Office are making with our ODA budget are crucial to addressing developing countries needs to become more open societies, strengthen public intuitions and facilitating economic development. This is in turn will support the UK’s ability to counter serious and organised crime and illegal migration in the future.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the security costs associated with hosting the G7 summit in Cornwall; and which Government Department is responsible for meeting those costs.

The Cabinet Office G7 Presidency Taskforce hold a central budget for the UK presidency year. The Government will meet the additional costs incurred by Devon and Cornwall police for the G7 Leaders’ Summit which is subject to a Home Office assurance process.

The full policing costs for major events are not known until after the event, due to the responsive nature of the work.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to (a) reduce incidences and (b) raise awareness of delivery text scams.

Fraudsters are sophisticated and will exploit any vulnerabilities they can, especially as more of us find ourselves at home and online.

We are working hard to tackle fraud. As part of the 2020 Spending Review, the Government committed a further £63m to the Home Office to tackle economic crime, including fraud. This is in addition to the funding the Home Office commits each year to the National Economic Crime Centre in the NCA, and police forces, including over £15m each year to the City of London Police as the national lead force for fraud.

The Dedicated Card and Payment Crime Unit (DCPCU), a specialist unit which was set up last year in collaboration with City of London Police, the Metropolitan Police and UK Finance, recently made 8 arrests as part of an investigation in Royal Mail text scams (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-57226704).

However, we recognise there is still more to do, and are working closely with DCMS, the telecommunication industry, regulators and consumer groups to tackle fraud and close those vulnerabilities (e.g., like the ability to ‘spoof’ the number of a legitimate organisation) criminals too easily exploit in order to protect the public.

We are also raising awareness among the public to help them protect themselves.

Royal Mail has issued guidance on how to spot fake emails and communications and what to do if you have received one. More information can be found on the Royal Mail’s website: https://www.royalmail.com/help/scam-examples.

Action Fraud issued an alert on delivery scams on 23 December last year (found here: https://www.actionfraudalert.co.uk/da/357020/Scam%20warning%20-%20Fake%20DPD%20emails%20and%20texts.html).

We continue to encourage the public to forward suspicious text messages to 7726 (which is free of charge) and anyone who has been a targeted by a scam to report it. Action Fraud is the national reporting service for all victims of fraud and cybercrime and can be contacted by phone on 0300 123 2040 or through their website: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many reported instances of fraud committed by fake travel operators there were in each year since 2010.

The Home Office collects quarterly data on the number of reports of fraud made to Action Fraud and that have been recorded as criminal offences by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB). This data is published as official statistics by the Office for National Statistics on a quarterly basis and is available from June 2015 to December 2020 in table A5 below:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables.

It is not possible to distinguish how many reports of fraud committed by fake travel operators were recorded as these could fall under the various fraud types, such as ‘Time share and holiday fraud’, ‘Ticket fraud’ and ‘Other fraud’ depending on the circumstances.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of people who have fallen victim to scammers purporting to be part of the delivery or courier industry since March 2020.

The Home Office collects data on the number of fraud offences recorded by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) but cases relating to delivery or courier fraud are not separately identifiable.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the status is of her Department's public consultation on Protect Duty, announced on 24 February 2020; and what the timescale is for that consultation.

The Home Office remains committed to developing a Protect Duty to further improve security at publicly accessible locations. We will launch a public consultation for the duty by the end of February.

This launch had been paused due to the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on many of the organisations we would hope to respond.

We know public venues and spaces vary; across sectors, size, geographies and nature of their operations. Whilst circumstances vary between different sectors and organisations, we know many have been dealing with an increased workload during COVID-19.

We will progress with an 18-week consultation period (instead of the usual 12) to take us into the summer, when we hope that the impacts of COVID-19 will lessen and businesses should be in a better position to engage with the consultation.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 14 December 2020 to Question 126066, for what reason her Department does not collect information on the number of people re-arrested after being previously released on terrorism-related charges.

National security is a Government priority and we take police activity to disrupt individuals suspected of terrorism-related activity seriously.

The Home Office publishes quarterly national statistics on the use of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent relevant legislation in Great Britain. This includes information on arrests, charges and convictions for terrorism-related offences. The most recent publication up to the quarter ending September 2020 was published on 10 December on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000-quarterly-update-to-september-2020.

The quarterly publications establish transparency by ensuring that data is publicly available on the use of police powers in a consistently categorised way. As with all crime statistics published by the Home Office, data providers are not required to routinely provide further detail on an individual’s previous arrest and charge history, as to do so would place a disproportionate burden on the organisations responsible, particularly the National Counter-Terrorism Police Operations Centre. As with all Official Statistics, we continually review outputs taking account of user needs.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on work permits for creative workers since 24 December 2020.

The Home Office and Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport hold regular bilateral discussions on a range of policy issues at official and Ministerial level.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her Department's policy is on the use of Mode IV exemptions for mobility.

It is common for free trade agreements to include Mode IV commitments on the temporary entry of businesspersons. These commitments do not exempt such persons from immigration control.

It is Home Office policy to ensure any such commitments are delivered through its domestic immigration requirements, in particular through the Intra-Company Transfer, Tier 5 International Agreement Worker and Visitor categories of the Immigration Rules.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what mechanisms and structures have been agreed between the EU and the UK on future security co-operation.

The safety and security of our citizens is the Government’s top priority.

The Trade Co-operation Agreement (TCA) was signed by the EU and the UK on 30 December. The agreement delivers a comprehensive package of capabilities that ensures we can work with counterparts across Europe to tackle serious crime and terrorism – protecting the public and bringing criminals to justice.

This includes: streamlined extradition arrangements which prevent disproportionate extradition requests and long periods of pre-trial detention; effective operational co-operation with Europol and Eurojust that reflects the scale of our contribution to these agencies; fast and effective exchange of national DNA, fingerprint and vehicle registration data via the Prüm system; fast and effective arrangements for exchanging criminal records data via shared technical infrastructure; the continued transfer of Passenger Name Record (PNR) data from the EU; and arrangements that will simplify and speed up cooperation with EU Member States on mutual legal assistance and asset freezing and confiscation. The agreement also provides an additional basis for bilateral law enforcement cooperation to continue between the UK and EU Member States. This includes information sharing in response to requests, as well as on a spontaneous basis, such as information on wanted and missing persons and objects.

Further detail on the Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice co-operation elements of the TCA are available on GOV.UK.

The UK is, and will continue to be, a global leader on security and one of the safest countries in the world.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the Common Travel Area.

The Government is committed to maintaining the Common Travel Area arrangements and has done so throughout the pandemic. There continue to be no routine immigration controls on journeys from within the CTA to the UK, with no immigration controls whatsoever on the land border.

Those arriving in England from within the CTA will only be required to provide locator details and self-isolate in certain circumstances. These requirements apply to all nationalities, including British and Irish nationals.

The Government has also announced passengers arriving from all international destinations will be required to present a negative COVID-19 test result before entering England. However, people travelling to England from within the Common Travel Area will be exempt.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been re-arrested after being released on terrorism-related charges in each year since 2020; and what proportion that number is of the total number of people arrested on terrorism-related charges in each of those years.

The Home Office collects data from the National Counter Terrorism Policing Operations Centre on how many people have been arrested and charged with terrorism-related offences in Great Britain. These data are published quarterly in ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 statistics’, which are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Information on how many of these are re-arrests after being released on terrorism-related charges is not collected by the Home Office.

7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people convicted of terrorism-related charges have been released in each year since 2010.

The Home Office collects data from Her Majesty’s Prison & Probation Service and the Scottish Prisons Service on the number of terrorist prisoners released in Great Britain.

These data are published quarterly in ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 statistics’, which are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

16th Nov 2020
To ask the hon. Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the appeals process against consistory court decisions to the Provincial Court of the Archbishop.

It is possible to appeal the decision of a consistory court to the provincial court of the Archbishop, with the permission of the consistory court or of the appeal court, provided that the appeal does not relate to a question of doctrine, ritual or ceremonial. The Provincial Courts of Canterbury and York are known by the names ‘The Court of Arches’ and ‘The Chancery Court of York’.

As in a temporal court the test for whether to grant permission to appeal is the same, i.e whether the appeal has a real prospect of success or there is some other compelling reason why the appeal should be heard.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 22 July 2019 to Question 277618 on Hezbollah, whether it remains her policy to not collect data on the number of Hezbollah members or supporters in the UK.

The Government takes proscription offences seriously. However, investigations into the activities of proscribed organisations or individuals who may be members or supporters of proscribed organisations are an operational matter for the police and intelligence agencies. It would not be appropriate to publish data on intelligence related matters.

The Government publishes quarterly national statistics on the use of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent relevant legislation in Great Britain. This includes information on arrests, charges and convictions for proscription offences. The most recent publication up to year ending June 2020, was published on 17 September on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000-quarterly-update-to-june-2020.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what provision there is for mutual aid between counter terrorism policing and the National Crime Agency.

CT policing and the NCA have a well-established relationship and along with other operational partners, collaborate closely to tackle a range national security threats and safeguard the country. This cooperation includes sharing resources, intelligence, specialist capabilities and facilities as well as providing operational support or undertaking joint operations.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the status is of the Proscription Review Group; and when that Group last met.

The Proscription Review Group (PRG), a cross–Government group supporting the Home Secretary in her decision making on proscription issues, remains active. The Government does not comment on intelligence matters and it would not be appropriate to comment on the timing of PRG meetings.

We keep the keep the list of proscribed organisations under regular review. This year, in February and July respectively, we have proscribed the right-wing terrorist groups Sonnenkrieg Division and Feuerkrieg Division.

17th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the announcement of 30 March 2020 on £500,000 funding for victims of terrorism, how many applications she has received to date; how much of that funding has been distributed; how many (a) organisations and (b) people have received such funding; and how much each of those organisations and individuals have received.

Unfortunately, given that this grant competition is still in progress, we are unable to provide the requested information at this time. Any award announcement will be published on Contracts Finder: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much her Department has spent on counter-terrorism programmes in each year since 2010.

Overall net spending for the Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism is published annually in the Home Office Annual Report and Accounts. This information is broken down by administration, programme and capital expenditure.

This information can be found via the following links:

FY 2018-19 - pages 99-100

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/807126/6.5571_HO_Annual_Report_201920_WEB.PDF

FY 2017-18 – pages 91-92

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/727179/6_4360_HO_Annual_report_WEB.PDF

FY 2016-17 – pages 82-83

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/627853/ho_annual_report_and_accounts_2016_2017.pdf

FY 2015-16 – pages 101-102

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/539638/HO_AR_16_gov.pdf

FY 2014-15 – pages 93-94

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/441282/HO-AR15_web.pdf

FY 2013-14 – pages 81-82

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/321446/ARA_web_enabled_18_June.pdf

FY 2012-13 – pages 116-117

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/210660/Annual_Report_and_Accounts_FINAL_updated_logo.pdf

FY 2011-12 – pages 120-121

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/143619/annual-report-2011-12.pdf

FY 2010-11 – pages 39-40

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/120048/annual-report-201011.pdf

8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to review the effectiveness of the Computer Misuse Act 1990.

The Home Office keeps the Computer Misuse Act (CMA) under regular re-view. The Home Office have been engaged in ongoing discussions with relvant partners in law enforcement, government and private sector to ensure that the legislation continues to remain effective.

8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the status of Sir Craig Mackey's serious and organised crime review is; and if she will commit to publishing the findings and recommendations of that review.

  • The independent SOC review has been led by Sir Craig Mackey QPM, former deputy commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, with support from stakeholders and advisors from law enforcement and national security. The review’s recommendations cover the status, roles and responsibilities of the NCA, regional organised crime units, and other national agencies pursuing serious criminality, along with local police forces in England and Wales, to ensure they have the right governance, support and legal powers to deliver on their missions.
  • Sir Craig Mackey delivered his final report to the Home Secretary and the Minister for Security at the end of February. We are now considering the review’s final recommendations
  • The Government will consider how the review’s recommendations can support the implementation of the Serious and Organised Crime Strategy, published in November 2018, which sets out measures to build the UK’s defences against this type of crime, track down the most dangerous and determined criminals and bring them to justice.

We will provide details of the key findings of in due course.

18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been covered by the VIP and Royal protection scheme; and what the cost of that scheme has been to public purse in each year since 2010.

It is our long-standing policy not to provide detailed information on the security arrangements for protected individuals. To do so could compromise the integrity of those arrangements and affect the security of the individuals concerned.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to Questions 38010 and 38011 tabled by the hon. Member for St Helens North on 20 April 2020.

The responses for UIN 38010 was given on 14th May 2020 and UIN 38011 was given on 18th May 2020.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the operation of the Common Travel Area.

Both the UK and Irish Governments are committed to maintaining the Common Travel Area (CTA) arrangements. As such, there are no routine immigration controls on journeys from within the CTA to the UK, with no immigration controls whatsoever on the Northern Ireland – Ireland land border.

We continue to work closely with the Republic of Ireland and the Crown Dependencies on our response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Recognising the unique nature of the Common Travel Area, as well as the position of Northern Ireland, there are no plans to introduce the recently announced measures at the UK border on journeys from within the Common Travel Area, including on the land border with Ireland.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to tackle covid-19- related cyber crime through false online fundraising and donation portals.

However, the Home Office remains vigilant to the ongoing risks that COVID-19 poses in terms of being used as a ‘hook’ to commit cybercrime and fraud, including through false online fund raising and donations.

The Home Office is working closely with law enforcement, private sector partners, and the third sector, to both warn businesses and the public about COVID-19 related frauds and scams and provide advice and guidance that sets out how they can protect themselves.n parallel, the Home Office is also working closely with the Charity Commission for England and Wales, who have recently issued a safety alert to charities themselves to minimise the risk of them becoming a victim of such frauds and cyber-attacks.

The Home Office is also working with the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) to monitor fraudulent websites that are using COVID-19 related themes. In recent weeks this has led to the removal of more than 2,000 online scams related to coronavirus, including those that are fraudulently purporting to enable charitable donations.

20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what additional resources she has allocated to keeping children and young people safe from online sexual abuse and exploitation following the introduction of the Government’s instructions to stay at home during the covid-19 outbreak.

n 2019, the Government significantly increased resources to the National Crime Agency leading to a near doubling of the CEOP Command’s online investigative capability. In September 2019, the Home Office announced an additional £30m funding for tackling child sexual abuse in 2020/21 to ensure offenders are no longer able to hide in the shadows preying on our society’s most vulnerable.

We are working with Law Enforcement, the UK Intelligence Community, safeguarding partners and the third sector to assess the threat and ensure they have the resources they need to tackle offending and provide the greatest protection for vulnerable children during COVID-19. The NCA and UK policing continue to relentlessly fight the online child sexual abuse threat; in the last seven weeks the NCA has developed and disseminated 2,600 online child sexual abuse (CSA) packages for police forces to investigate.

As part of this the Government has made £1.6 million available immediately for the NSPCC to expand and promote its national helpline for adults. Expanding the NSPCC Helpline will mean many more adults know how and where to raise concerns and seek advice or support about the safety and wellbeing of any children they are concerned about. The Home Office will further distribute £7.8 million in emergency support for charities helping vulnerable children who have been impacted by the coronavirus outbreak.

We are further working across government and agencies to ensure that teachers, parents and carers have access to the support they need to help keep children safe online. As part of this the NCA has stepped up its messaging on staying safe online through their #OnlineSafetyAtHome campaign and their ThinkUKnow resources. The Department for Education has published interim safeguarding guidance for schools and colleges encouraging them to disseminate advice on online safety and we have published guidance for parents and carers on gov.uk. We have also worked with our Five Country partners to galvanise industry action; in response, key industry partners have developed a campaign targeting parents, carers and children with information and advice on staying safe online.

20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish her Department’s list of identified online harms and the groups at risk from each of them.

I take the problem of online harms very seriously and am clear that while companies have taken some positive steps, more needs to be done to tackle online harms.

The Government committed to introducing new online harms legislation in the Queen's speech on 19th December. The legislation will build on proposals in last year’s Online Harms White Paper and will establish a new duty of care on companies towards their users, overseen by an independent regulator.

The White Paper did provide an indicative list of harms. However, that list was neither exhaustive nor fixed. Online harms legislation will need to be sufficiently flexible, so that it is responsive to emerging forms of harmful content and behaviour as well as new technologies, while at the same time providing sufficient certainty to companies.

We are working with stakeholders to ensure that legislation and the process for defining harms in scope of legislation meets the dual needs of flexibility and certainty. Further information on this will be provided in the full government response to the White Paper consultation.

20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on levels of (a) serious and organised crime, (b) cyber crime and (c) economic crime.

The Covid-19 pandemic is already affecting how criminal networks operate across the globe. The UK and other countries’ response to the pandemic has reduced some organised criminal activities. We are aware that some criminals are adapting their focus to seek out new opportunities to commit crime.

The Home Office and its operational partners will continue to monitor and respond to the threats of serious and organised crime, cyber crime and economic crime during the COVID-19 pandemic including from criminals who seek to profit from the pandemic

20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what roles (a) her Department and (b) the Government have in the review of the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy.

Her Majesty’s Government (HMG) will be taking a leading role in negotiating the UN review of its Global Counter Terrorism Strategy.

The review is currently scheduled to take place in June and July 2020 but may be delayed due to COVID-19. When it does occur we will work through the UK Mission to the United Nations in New York to achieve international consensus on the UN’s approach to Counter Terrorism. The Home Office will work together with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to coordinate input to the review from across HMG, to ensure that all departmental interests are reflected in the UK’s position.

1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of food served in military barracks to armed forces personnel in self-isolation.

The quality of food provision for Service personnel (SP), whether in isolation or non-isolation, is monitored and assured constantly by the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) and Front-Line Commands. No separate assessment is thus made on the standard of food served to SP in isolation. The standards of food quality are set out in Joint Services Publication 456, Defence Food Quality Standards.

DIO and its Industry Partners have produced guidance on feeding in isolation and are sharing best practice across the regions including undertaking additional assurance checks in collaboration with onsite teams at the point of delivery.

7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 September 2020 to Question 78846 on Armed Forces: Coronavirus, what progress he has made on making an assessment of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on levels of recruitment to the (a) regular and (b) reserve armed forces.

The position remains unchanged from the answer I gave on 1 September 2020 to Question 78846 to the hon. Member for Portsmouth South (Mr Morgan).

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on levels of recruitment to the (a) regular and (b) reserve armed forces.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 1 September 2020 to Question 78846 to the hon. Member for Portsmouth South (Mr Morgan).

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, (a) how many and (b) which local authorities have (i) submitted bids for funding and (ii) have had bids for funding accepted under the Community Champions scheme.

65 areas were invited to submit an Expression of Interests to the Community Champions programme. 60 applied, of which all 60 were awarded funding.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will publish the full criteria used to invite local authorities to apply for inclusion in the Community Champions scheme.

On 25 January £23.75 million funding was confirmed and allocated to 60 councils and two voluntary groups in England. The funding was to expand work to support those most at risk from COVID-19 and to boost vaccine take up through the Community Champions scheme. This was part of over £7.9 billion government funding provided to councils to help them support their communities during the pandemic. The scheme was specifically targeted at areas where challenges may be greatest due to the local combination of disproportionately impacted groups.

The list of local authorities who were invited to take part in the scheme drew upon a wide range of data sources, including DHSC/PHE long-term data on COVID-19 incidence; data on social integration; and evidence on the prevalence and specific support needs of disabled people in an area.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will issue guidance to local authorities on (a) administering scrutiny and monitoring requirements, (b) responding to freedom of information requests and (c) conducting non-essential business during the covid-19 outbreak.

The local authority remote meetings regulations made under section 78 of the Coronavirus Act 2020 have enabled local authorities to continue to conduct essential business whilst protecting the health and safety of their members, officers and the public. All local authority meetings in England are in scope of the regulations. There is no barrier to Overview and Scrutiny meetings being held remotely. It is down to the local authority to decide what is appropriate in their specific circumstances.

With regards to responding to freedom of information requests and conducting non-essential business local authority staff are subject to the current “work from home” directive in national Covid-19 guidance and local authority offices are subject to the same workplace safety Covid-19 guidance as any other employer.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will publish the latest public health guidance on covid-19 and (a) communal worship and (b) private worship in churches, synagogues, mosques and temples in England.

Our approach has always been guided by scientific and medical advice and we have listened carefully to the views of the scientific community, in particular the information from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) and its sub-groups. The number of Covid-19 cases is growing at an exponential rate so we have needed to act to limit our interaction with others.

This has sadly meant that we have had to make the difficult decision to close our places of worship for communal worship as we need to minimise social contact wherever we can for this short period of time.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, for what reason he called in the planning application for the Parkside development in Newton-le-Willows; and if he will publish the documentation his Department holds in relation to that decision.

This planning application (P/2018/0048/OUP) for the construction of up to 92,900 m2 of employment floorspace (Use Class B8 with ancillary B1(a)) and associated servicing and infrastructure on the site of former Parkside Colliery in Newton-le-Willows, was called-in by the Secretary of State on 21 May 2020. The reasons for the call in are as set out in the letter, and I am now arranging for a copy to be sent to the Honourable Member for St Helens North. It would not be appropriate for me to add anything.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he has plans to waive obligations on local authorities to reply to freedom of information requests as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

During the current pandemic, we recognise that resources may be unavailable to deal with FOI Requests. Although statutory deadlines will not be extended, the Regulator, the Information Commissioner, has stated that organisations will not be penalised during this extraordinary period.

6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the proposed reduction in business rates for pubs will include clubs in local communities.

The Department published guidance to help local authorities implement the business rates pubs discount. The guidance set out the eligibility criteria for the £1000 discount for pubs with a rateable value of less than £100,000. The guidance also set out the Government’s policy intention that to be eligible premises should; be open to the general public, allow free entry other than when occasional entertainment is provided, allow drinking without requiring food to be consumed; and permit drinks to be purchased at a bar.

The guidance can be found at:https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/business-rates-pubs-discount-2020-to-2021-local-authority-guidance

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to increase the number of Probation Service user contact centres in (a) Liverpool City Region, (b) the North West and (c) England.

Public Protection remains the number one priority in the probation system. With this in mind we continue to manage our high risk and complex cases face to face, as far as possible. Last summer, the Probation Roadmap to Recovery was published, which has since been revised to align with the Prime Minister’s National Roadmap. It sets out the aims for delivery in the coming weeks and months and outlines when we will lift national pauses, rather than mandate when services will be re-introduced.

A four-year estates strategy will see £131m of funding allocated to the refurbishment of existing sites and creation of 65 new sites across England and Wales. As part of the Probation Reform Programme 191 sites which are currently used by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) will be transferred to the National Probation Service.

As part of the Probation Reform Programme, the estates strategy for Liverpool City region and the North West has been reviewed. The probation contact centre in St Helens closed in March 2021 as a result of the Probation Reform Programme estates strategy review. Staff and supervised individuals subsequently moved to Probation contact centres in Knowsley and Prescot. Changes to the estate have not affected the existing partnerships arrangements that are in place between the National Probation Service and key stakeholders/partners in St Helens. Currently there are no plans to increase the number of Probation contact centres in the region, however, we continue to source local premises for specific needs as required.

Funding for the Probation regions for 2021/22 is yet to be finalised. Given the changes to the nature and scope of Probation Service provision since 2010 it is not possible to provide meaningful figures covering the period requested without incurring disproportionate costs.

Data on the number of service users from 2014 to 2019 is provided on the attached table. It is not possible to provide probation caseload figures for the Liverpool City region specifically prior to 2014 as this would involve re-extracting data which would now be incomplete due to deletions in line with Data Protection Act rules applied on the recording system at the time; the cost of undertaking this exercise would therefore be disproportionate.

The number of offenders supervised by each National Probation Service region, division and CRC is regularly published as part of the Offender Management Quarterly series of statistics and can be found via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what funding his Department has allocated to maintain probation services for each National Probation Service region from April 2021 onwards.

Public Protection remains the number one priority in the probation system. With this in mind we continue to manage our high risk and complex cases face to face, as far as possible. Last summer, the Probation Roadmap to Recovery was published, which has since been revised to align with the Prime Minister’s National Roadmap. It sets out the aims for delivery in the coming weeks and months and outlines when we will lift national pauses, rather than mandate when services will be re-introduced.

A four-year estates strategy will see £131m of funding allocated to the refurbishment of existing sites and creation of 65 new sites across England and Wales. As part of the Probation Reform Programme 191 sites which are currently used by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) will be transferred to the National Probation Service.

As part of the Probation Reform Programme, the estates strategy for Liverpool City region and the North West has been reviewed. The probation contact centre in St Helens closed in March 2021 as a result of the Probation Reform Programme estates strategy review. Staff and supervised individuals subsequently moved to Probation contact centres in Knowsley and Prescot. Changes to the estate have not affected the existing partnerships arrangements that are in place between the National Probation Service and key stakeholders/partners in St Helens. Currently there are no plans to increase the number of Probation contact centres in the region, however, we continue to source local premises for specific needs as required.

Funding for the Probation regions for 2021/22 is yet to be finalised. Given the changes to the nature and scope of Probation Service provision since 2010 it is not possible to provide meaningful figures covering the period requested without incurring disproportionate costs.

Data on the number of service users from 2014 to 2019 is provided on the attached table. It is not possible to provide probation caseload figures for the Liverpool City region specifically prior to 2014 as this would involve re-extracting data which would now be incomplete due to deletions in line with Data Protection Act rules applied on the recording system at the time; the cost of undertaking this exercise would therefore be disproportionate.

The number of offenders supervised by each National Probation Service region, division and CRC is regularly published as part of the Offender Management Quarterly series of statistics and can be found via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much funding his Department has allocated to maintain probation services in (a) Liverpool City Region and (b) the North West in each year since 2010.

Public Protection remains the number one priority in the probation system. With this in mind we continue to manage our high risk and complex cases face to face, as far as possible. Last summer, the Probation Roadmap to Recovery was published, which has since been revised to align with the Prime Minister’s National Roadmap. It sets out the aims for delivery in the coming weeks and months and outlines when we will lift national pauses, rather than mandate when services will be re-introduced.

A four-year estates strategy will see £131m of funding allocated to the refurbishment of existing sites and creation of 65 new sites across England and Wales. As part of the Probation Reform Programme 191 sites which are currently used by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) will be transferred to the National Probation Service.

As part of the Probation Reform Programme, the estates strategy for Liverpool City region and the North West has been reviewed. The probation contact centre in St Helens closed in March 2021 as a result of the Probation Reform Programme estates strategy review. Staff and supervised individuals subsequently moved to Probation contact centres in Knowsley and Prescot. Changes to the estate have not affected the existing partnerships arrangements that are in place between the National Probation Service and key stakeholders/partners in St Helens. Currently there are no plans to increase the number of Probation contact centres in the region, however, we continue to source local premises for specific needs as required.

Funding for the Probation regions for 2021/22 is yet to be finalised. Given the changes to the nature and scope of Probation Service provision since 2010 it is not possible to provide meaningful figures covering the period requested without incurring disproportionate costs.

Data on the number of service users from 2014 to 2019 is provided on the attached table. It is not possible to provide probation caseload figures for the Liverpool City region specifically prior to 2014 as this would involve re-extracting data which would now be incomplete due to deletions in line with Data Protection Act rules applied on the recording system at the time; the cost of undertaking this exercise would therefore be disproportionate.

The number of offenders supervised by each National Probation Service region, division and CRC is regularly published as part of the Offender Management Quarterly series of statistics and can be found via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many service users of the National Probation Service there have been in (a) Liverpool City Region and (b) the North West in each year since 2010.

Public Protection remains the number one priority in the probation system. With this in mind we continue to manage our high risk and complex cases face to face, as far as possible. Last summer, the Probation Roadmap to Recovery was published, which has since been revised to align with the Prime Minister’s National Roadmap. It sets out the aims for delivery in the coming weeks and months and outlines when we will lift national pauses, rather than mandate when services will be re-introduced.

A four-year estates strategy will see £131m of funding allocated to the refurbishment of existing sites and creation of 65 new sites across England and Wales. As part of the Probation Reform Programme 191 sites which are currently used by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) will be transferred to the National Probation Service.

As part of the Probation Reform Programme, the estates strategy for Liverpool City region and the North West has been reviewed. The probation contact centre in St Helens closed in March 2021 as a result of the Probation Reform Programme estates strategy review. Staff and supervised individuals subsequently moved to Probation contact centres in Knowsley and Prescot. Changes to the estate have not affected the existing partnerships arrangements that are in place between the National Probation Service and key stakeholders/partners in St Helens. Currently there are no plans to increase the number of Probation contact centres in the region, however, we continue to source local premises for specific needs as required.

Funding for the Probation regions for 2021/22 is yet to be finalised. Given the changes to the nature and scope of Probation Service provision since 2010 it is not possible to provide meaningful figures covering the period requested without incurring disproportionate costs.

Data on the number of service users from 2014 to 2019 is provided on the attached table. It is not possible to provide probation caseload figures for the Liverpool City region specifically prior to 2014 as this would involve re-extracting data which would now be incomplete due to deletions in line with Data Protection Act rules applied on the recording system at the time; the cost of undertaking this exercise would therefore be disproportionate.

The number of offenders supervised by each National Probation Service region, division and CRC is regularly published as part of the Offender Management Quarterly series of statistics and can be found via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has for the provision of services under the National Probation Service in the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens.

Public Protection remains the number one priority in the probation system. With this in mind we continue to manage our high risk and complex cases face to face, as far as possible. Last summer, the Probation Roadmap to Recovery was published, which has since been revised to align with the Prime Minister’s National Roadmap. It sets out the aims for delivery in the coming weeks and months and outlines when we will lift national pauses, rather than mandate when services will be re-introduced.

A four-year estates strategy will see £131m of funding allocated to the refurbishment of existing sites and creation of 65 new sites across England and Wales. As part of the Probation Reform Programme 191 sites which are currently used by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) will be transferred to the National Probation Service.

As part of the Probation Reform Programme, the estates strategy for Liverpool City region and the North West has been reviewed. The probation contact centre in St Helens closed in March 2021 as a result of the Probation Reform Programme estates strategy review. Staff and supervised individuals subsequently moved to Probation contact centres in Knowsley and Prescot. Changes to the estate have not affected the existing partnerships arrangements that are in place between the National Probation Service and key stakeholders/partners in St Helens. Currently there are no plans to increase the number of Probation contact centres in the region, however, we continue to source local premises for specific needs as required.

Funding for the Probation regions for 2021/22 is yet to be finalised. Given the changes to the nature and scope of Probation Service provision since 2010 it is not possible to provide meaningful figures covering the period requested without incurring disproportionate costs.

Data on the number of service users from 2014 to 2019 is provided on the attached table. It is not possible to provide probation caseload figures for the Liverpool City region specifically prior to 2014 as this would involve re-extracting data which would now be incomplete due to deletions in line with Data Protection Act rules applied on the recording system at the time; the cost of undertaking this exercise would therefore be disproportionate.

The number of offenders supervised by each National Probation Service region, division and CRC is regularly published as part of the Offender Management Quarterly series of statistics and can be found via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has allocated additional funding available to preventative services to help reduce incidences of self-harm in prisons during the covid-19 outbreak; and whether his Department provides specific support to women in prisons at risk of self harm.

We are under no illusions about the impact of the measures which were put in place to protect lives during the Covid-19 pandemic and we have made prisoners’ wellbeing our priority. We have produced a range of products to support governors in devising and implementing local safety and welfare plans designed to mitigate risks and promote wellbeing. We have developed new guidance for staff on understanding and supporting someone who is self-harming. We have enabled continued family contact through more than 1,600 secure mobile phones and secure video calls. We continue to work closely with the Samaritans who are providing support for Listeners – selected prisoners trained to provide emotional support to their fellow prisoners and who continue to offer their phone service for emotional support.

We are delivering more in-cell activity and are continuing to improve our offer to support prison residents during this period. For example, distraction packs, supplementary food packs and additional educational materials have been provided, as well as £5 PIN credit per prisoner per week.

We recognise that the level of self-harm in the women’s estate is too high and are determined to reduce this. A Women’s Self-Harm Task Force was set up in April 2020 in response to our increasing concerns about the level of self-harm in the Women’s estate. We know that many of the drivers (risks and triggers) and protective factors linked to women’s risk of self-harm in prisons have been impacted by Covid-19 and the restricted regimes that have been put in place to control the spread of infection.

The Task Force has led work to introduce a number of specific interventions to counteract the impact of Covid-19 on self-harm in the Women’s estate. This work has seen the introduction of bespoke well-being checks, increased credit to enable phone calls and increased access to Purple Visits (video calls with family and friends).

We have prioritised the roll out of the revised version of the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork (ACCT) multi-disciplinary case management system used in prisons to support people at risk of suicide and self-harm. We will also be implementing the Offender Management in Custody model in the female estate in April. This will provide each woman in the female estate with a dedicated key worker who will be able to better support them and identify concerns at an early stage so that women can receive the right support at the right time.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions has he had with the Chancellor of Exchequer on the adequacy of current levels of financial support for the prevention of women’s self-harm in prisons.

We recognise that the level of self-harm in the women’s estate is too high and are determined to reduce this. A Women’s Self-Harm Task Force was set up in April 2020 in response to our increasing concerns about the level of self-harm in the Women’s estate. We know that many of the drivers (risks and triggers) and protective factors linked to women’s risk of self-harm in prisons have been impacted by Covid-19 and the restricted regimes that have been put in place to control the spread of infection.

The Task Force has led work to introduce a number of specific interventions to counteract the impact of Covid-19 on self-harm in the Women’s estate. This work has seen the introduction of bespoke well-being checks, increased credit to enable phone calls and increased access to Purple Visits (video calls with family and friends).

We have prioritised the roll out of the revised version of the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork (ACCT) multi-disciplinary case management system used in prisons to support people at risk of suicide and self-harm. We will also be implementing the Offender Management in Custody model in the female estate in April. This will provide each woman in the female estate with a dedicated key worker who will be able to better support them and identify concerns at an early stage so that women can receive the right support at the right time.

We have also produced a range of products to support Governors in devising and implementing local safety and welfare plans designed to mitigate risks and promote wellbeing. We have developed new guidance for staff on understanding and supporting someone who is self-harming. We continue to make the Samaritans phone service available and are working with the Samaritans to ensure that the Listener peer support scheme continues to function effectively wherever possible.

There has been further investment to support the wellbeing of women offenders in custody, including investment into increased phone credit for women and bespoke well-being checks. Further work has also been done to increase the number of video calls that prisoners have with family and friends.

Crucially, we have also invested £5m in alternatives to prison, including new women’s centres which help people address issues such as alcohol or drug addiction which leads them to crime.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of people imprisoned for terror-related offences in each year since 2010 held a previous terror-related conviction and have been re-admitted to prison for subsequent terror-related convictions.

Between January 2013 and December 2020, 7 individuals convicted of a terrorist offence (who have been convicted under the Terrorism Act 2000 and 2006) have been released from prison and then convicted of a further terrorist offence (under the Terrorism Act 2000 and 2006) in England and Wales. Unfortunately, we will be unable to break down this figure further as it may reveal sensitive personal data.

Prior to 2013, release data on Terrorism Act offenders was held at a local and regional level by relevant law enforcement partners, but not recorded centrally by the Ministry of Justice, meaning we are unable to provide data before 2013. Recidivism rates for Scotland and Northern Ireland are not held by the Ministry of Justice as prisons are a devolved matter.

From the year ending June 2014 to year ending June 2020 the number of terrorist prisoners released from prison custody was 387 in Great Britain. This number includes historical terrorism cases which pre-date the introduction of the Terrorist Acts (2000 & 2006) and where an individual was imprisoned pre-2001 following a terrorist investigation, acts of terrorism, or for membership of a proscribed organisation.

We use a range of rehabilitation approaches to manage terrorists before and after they are released from custody and use a robust multi-agency approach to monitor extremists released into the community. Our new legislation means terrorists now face tougher sentences, will stay in prison for longer and be subject to appropriately strict licence conditions on release.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people released on licence with a terror-related conviction have been recalled to prison after breaching their licence conditions in each year since 2010; and what proportion of these were recalled specifically for engaging in subsequent terror-related activity for each year.

The numbers of offenders with a terror-related conviction who have been released on licence and subsequently recalled to prison is set out in the table below. The table also sets out how many of those individuals were recalled in connection with engaging in a terror-related activity.

Year

Number of offenders on licence for a terror-related conviction recalled to prison

Number of offenders recalled specifically for engaging in subsequent terror-related activity

2010

5

0

2011

5

1

2012

3

0

2013

6

1

2014

7

0

2015

3

0

2016

8

1

2017

4

0

2018

4

2

2019

10

2

2020 (to end of June)

10

0

These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, in addition to Government’s guidance on work practices and social distancing, whether he has issued specific additional advice to bailiffs and debt collectors on undertaking their work during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has published Covid-secure guidance for those using the taking control of goods procedure. The guidance is titled Working safely during COVID-19: enforcement agents (bailiffs) and is available on Gov.uk. It is kept under review to ensure it continues to reflect the latest public health advice.

In addition to this, the Ministry of Justice has advised that the enforcement trade associations inform their members that they should not enter residential properties in England and Wales for the purpose of enforcement by taking control of goods at this time. This advice is kept under review.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking in relation to the work of the enforcement agency industry to protect people facing financial difficulties as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government’s guidance titled Working safely during COVID-19: enforcement agents (bailiffs) reiterates that enforcement agents should follow the guidance on vulnerability set out in the National Standards for Taking Control of Goods and ensure they act in accordance with all relevant legislation. This includes signposting individuals to debt advice organisations where appropriate and giving them an adequate opportunity to get assistance and advice.

The guidance also makes clear that enforcement agents should take into account impacts of Covid-19 when considering if an individual should be deemed vulnerable, including whether an individual is or has been symptomatic, self-isolating or shielding.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people convicted of terrorism-related charges have been released before the end date of their sentence in each year since 2010.

In England and Wales since 2010, no terrorist offender has been released from management by HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) before the end of their sentence. As per Criminal Justice Act 2003, prisoners will serve half of their sentence in custody before being subject to strict probation supervision in the second half – which has happened in most cases. During this time terrorist offenders are subject to strict licence conditions, which can result in recall to custody if they are breached.

Regarding those terrorist offenders who have moved from prison custody to management in the community, the table below provides the data available to the department, from 2013 – 2019. This data was not collected before 2013:

Table 1: Number of TACT convicted prisoners released on conditional licence, from January 1st 2013 to December 31st 2019.*

Year

No. of Conditional Releases

2013

22

2014

11

2015

16

2016

14

2017

30

2018

34

2019

22

The Terrorist Offenders (Restriction of Early Release) Act, which came into force on 26 February, now means that the early release of terrorist offenders serving relevant sentences, will now be subject to Parole Board decisions. The Act changes the release arrangements for terrorist offenders serving determinate sentences, moving the earliest point of release, subject to a Parole Board decision from half-way to two thirds of the custodial term.

*Data sources and quality

The above figures relate to TACT Convicted prisoners only, for this reason the numbers do not match the statistics published under the Home Office Statistical Bulletin. The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to improve security standards in prisons to prevent the smuggling of illicit substances for inmates.

We are taking decisive action to improve security to: stop illicit items being smuggled in by prisoners, staff and visitors; to strengthen staff resilience to corruption; and to target organised criminals and staff who exploit prisons as a lucrative illicit market. This package of measures is being funded through the £100m investment to tackle crime from behind bars announced by the Prime Minister last summer.

Enhanced gate security will be deployed to the most challenging prisons in the estate. Cutting-edge x-ray body scanners will target prisoners smuggling illicit items into prisons. We recently announced the first 16 sites to receive this equipment and further installations will follow this year.

Whilst the vast majority of our staff are honest and hardworking, we are also investing new resource to step up our counter corruption capability and strengthen (in scale and reach) intelligence-led operations and investigations with law enforcement partners against those that present the greatest threat of harm to prison security and the community.

We will also equip sites with new technology and staff to enhance staff and visitor searching at the gate. We have already announced the first 7 sites for this provision.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to reduce rates of (a) self-harming and (b) suicide in prisons; and if he will make a statement.

Far too many prisoners are self-harming or taking their own life and we know that relationships between staff and prisoners plays an important role in tackling this. We have therefore invested in the recruitment of over 4,500 more prison officers since 2016, an increase which has helped us to roll out the key worker scheme. Key workers provide a consistent individual prison officer with whom prisoners can establish a relationship, build trust and receive encouragement.

We have delivered improved Introduction to Self-Harm and Suicide training to over 25,000 new and existing staff, and we are investing an extra £2.75 billion to modernise prisons, combat drug use and improve the environment in which offenders live.

We are continuing our partnership with the Samaritans, awarding a grant of £500k each year for the three years to 2021. This supports the excellent Listeners scheme, through which selected prisoners are trained to provide emotional support to their fellow prisoners.

Finally, we have also sought to revise and update the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork (ACCT) care planning process designed to manage prisoners at risk of self-harm. Changes to ACCT were piloted between February and June 2019 and, following a full evaluation of the pilot, a revised version will be rolled out across the estate later in the year.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the number of inmates developing drug problems.

Initiatives including Offender Management in custody are developing and supporting rehabilitative cultures in prison, so that individuals will be supported and, if necessary referred to substance misuse services, including if their circumstances change whilst in custody.

Last year we published The National Prison Drug Strategy which has three strands: restricting supply, reducing demand and ensuring prisoners are encouraged to engage in meaningful activity and treatment interventions.

Illicit substances pose huge challenges in our prisons which is why we are investing £100million in airport-style security - including x-ray body scanners - to stop them getting in. This is part of our £2.75billion investment to make jails safer for offenders and staff, while working closely with healthcare providers to ensure prisoners have the support they need to live drug-free upon release.

Consequently, ensuring that the prison environment provides opportunities to engage in purposeful activity and commit to positive change is key to providing hope for the future and encouraging prisoners to turn away from drugs

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the full decision of the Parole Board in relation to the case of Ian Simms.

I entirely understand the distress and concern felt by Marie McCourt and her family at the Parole Board’s decision to release Ian Simms, who has steadfastly refused to say what he did with Helen’s body. My heartfelt sympathies remain with the McCourt family.

The independent Parole Board has published the summary of Ian Simms release. It is uncommon for the Board to publish the decisions in full as each decision contains sensitive, personal and other confidential information. Instead, the Board produces a comprehensive summary for victims and may also publish the summary publicly.

The Secretary of State applied to the Parole Board for the release decision to be reconsidered but that was unsuccessful. The Board’s decision on the reconsideration application has also been published on its website.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)