Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) helps to drive growth, enrich lives and promote Britain abroad. We protect and promote our cultural and artistic heritage and help businesses and communities to grow by investing in innovation and highlighting Britain as a fantastic place to visit. We help to give the UK a unique advantage on the global stage, striving for economic success.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Labour
Baroness Merron (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)

Scottish National Party
John Nicolson (SNP - Ochil and South Perthshire)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)

Liberal Democrat
Jamie Stone (LDEM - Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross)
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)

Labour
Jo Stevens (LAB - Cardiff Central)
Shadow Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Lord Bassam of Brighton (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) (Sport)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Tracy Brabin Rachael Maskell (LAB - York Central)
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Christian Matheson (LAB - City of Chester)
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Alison McGovern (LAB - Wirral South)
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Chi Onwurah (LAB - Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Alex Sobel (LAB - Leeds North West)
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Ministers of State
Caroline Dinenage (CON - Gosport)
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
John Whittingdale (CON - Maldon)
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
Nigel Huddleston (CON - Mid Worcestershire)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Matt Warman (CON - Boston and Skegness)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Baroness Barran (CON - Life peer)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Scheduled Event
Friday 23rd July 2021
08:00
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee - Private Meeting - Select & Joint Committees
23 Jul 2021, 8 a.m.

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Scheduled Event
Thursday 16th September 2021
09:30
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Oral questions - Main Chamber
16 Sep 2021, 9:30 a.m.
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (including Topical Questions)
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Debates
Thursday 22nd July 2021
Review of the Gambling Act 2005
Adjournment Debate
Select Committee Docs
Friday 23rd July 2021
00:00
Members’ attendance 2019-21
Attendance Statistics
Select Committee Inquiry
Thursday 1st April 2021
Major cultural and sporting events

The inquiry will examine the role of major cultural and sporting events in celebrating the UK’s national identity. Several events …

Written Answers
Friday 23rd July 2021
Sports: Racial Discrimination
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, in the context of racist online abuse received …
Secondary Legislation
Monday 14th June 2021
Gambling (Operating Licence and Single-Machine Permit Fees) (Amendment) Regulations 2021
These Regulations amend the Gambling (Operating Licence and Single-Machine Permit Fees) Regulations 2017 (“the 2017 Regulations”, S.I. 2017/303) made under …
Bills
Wednesday 26th May 2021
Charities Bill [HL] 2021-22
A Bill to amend the Charities Act 2011 and the Universities and College Estates Act 1925; and for connected purposes
Dept. Publications
Friday 23rd July 2021
14:00
UK buyer sought for rare Roman painting
News and Communications

Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Jul. 01
Oral Questions
Jun. 22
Urgent Questions
Jul. 21
Westminster Hall
Jul. 22
Adjournment Debate
View All Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport does not have Bills currently before Parliament


Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament


A Bill to amend the electronic communications code set out in Schedule 3A to the Communications Act 2003; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 15th March 2021 and was enacted into law.


A bill to make provision about the Commonwealth Games that are to be held principally in Birmingham in 2022; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 25th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport - Secondary Legislation

These Regulations amend the Gambling (Operating Licence and Single-Machine Permit Fees) Regulations 2017 (“the 2017 Regulations”, S.I. 2017/303) made under the Gambling Act 2005 (“the Act”).
This Order brings into force on 1st July 2021 variations to the Public Lending Right Scheme 1982 (“the Scheme”) made by the Secretary of State.
View All Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
Petition Open
3,910 Signatures
(196 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
122 Signatures
(89 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
14,137 Signatures
(50 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
2,318 Signatures
(39 in the last 7 days)
Petition Debates Contributed

We want the government to recognise the importance of gyms, health clubs, leisure centres and swimming pools in empowering people to look after their health and stay fit and for them to open first as we come out of lockdown.

We're also calling for government to fund a Work Out to Help Out scheme.

200,570
Petition Closed
29 Mar 2021
closed 3 months, 3 weeks ago

Football is a powerful tool of which allows a range of benefits such as employment, and other important aspects of life. Football can be associated with passion, emotion, excitement and dedication across the community. With Fans attending football games a range of economic benefits are there too.

As we pass the COVID-19 Peak, the Government should: State where the Theatres and Arts fit in the Coronavrius recovery Roadmap, Create a tailor made financial support mechanism for the Arts sector & Clarify how Social Distancing will affect arts spaces like Theatres and Concert Venues.

View All Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


11 Members of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee
Julian Knight Portrait
Julian Knight (Conservative - Solihull)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Chair since 29th January 2020
Giles Watling Portrait
Giles Watling (Conservative - Clacton)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
John Nicolson Portrait
John Nicolson (Scottish National Party - Ochil and South Perthshire)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Damian Hinds Portrait
Damian Hinds (Conservative - East Hampshire)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Damian Green Portrait
Damian Green (Conservative - Ashford)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Julie Elliott Portrait
Julie Elliott (Labour - Sunderland Central)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Clive Efford Portrait
Clive Efford (Labour - Eltham)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Steve Brine Portrait
Steve Brine (Conservative - Winchester)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Kevin Brennan Portrait
Kevin Brennan (Labour - Cardiff West)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Alex Davies-Jones Portrait
Alex Davies-Jones (Labour - Pontypridd)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 11th May 2020
Heather Wheeler Portrait
Heather Wheeler (Conservative - South Derbyshire)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 9th November 2020
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee: Upcoming Events
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee - Private Meeting
23 Jul 2021, 8 a.m.
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50 most recent Written Questions

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Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if Ofcom will assess whether OnlyFans online platform and app is in breach of the Audio-Visual Media regulations.

Ofcom has been the national regulator for the video-sharing platform (VSP) regime since the Audiovisual Media Services Regulations came into force on 1 November 2020. For the first time, these regulations require UK-established VSPs, such as OnlyFans, to comply with new rules around protecting users from harmful content. Throughout the implementation of this novel regulation, Ofcom has been actively engaging with OnlyFans and other VSPs to ensure they understand their regulatory obligations and the steps they may need to take to ensure compliance.

However, if Ofcom were to find a VSP provider in breach of the VSP requirements, it has the ability to investigate using its information gathering powers. Ofcom is also able to take robust enforcement action which can include imposing significant financial penalties and, in the most serious instances, issuing a direction to suspend or restrict a platform provider from providing a service.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, in the context of racist online abuse received by Sir Lewis Hamilton after winning the 2021 British Grand Prix, what steps he is taking with (a) social media companies and (b) sporting bodies and organisations to tackle racist online abuse of sportspeople.

The racist abuse targeted at Sir Lewis Hamilton and other sportspeople is unacceptable. Under the draft Online Safety Bill, services in scope will need to minimise and remove illegal content. Major platforms will also need to address legal but harmful content for adults. The Bill has been published in draft for pre-legislative scrutiny. The process to formally set up the Joint Committee that will scrutinise the draft Bill has begun.

The Government’s sport and physical activity strategy ‘Sporting Future’ sets out a clear ambition to increase diversity, and tackle racism and inequality in sport.

In addition, Sport England, UK Sport and the other home nations’ sports councils recently published the results of a detailed, independent review into tackling racism and racial inequality in sport. Each Council is now developing its own action plans to deliver on commitments relating to people; representation; investment; systems and insight.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what support is available to assist with the upkeep of places of worship to prevent the need for major remedial works.

We recognise the importance of carrying out routine repairs and maintenance in order to reduce the need for major remedial works in places of worship, and the great challenge to raise funding to carry out this work, particularly at the present time. Listed places of worship represent some of the nation's finest heritage, and we support them through the DCMS run Listed Places of Worship Grant Scheme, which makes grants equal to the VAT paid on maintenance and repairs. The scheme will continue to benefit listed places of worship across the country, all of which have provided a much needed space for rest, contemplation and well-being during these difficult times, when they have been able to be open.

Listed places of worship may also benefit from the latest round of Cultural Recovery Funding with the £300 million package announced in June representing the latest and final tranche of funding for the CRF. The National Lottery Heritage Fund is distributing £40m in partnership with Historic England, based on criteria set by DCMS.

There are a number of sources of funding available for places of worship. The National Lottery Heritage Fund supports a broad range of projects that connect people and communities to the national, regional and local heritage of the UK. This includes historic buildings, monuments and the historic environment. This funding can be used for repairs and conservation.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he or any of the Ministers in his Department use personal email addresses to conduct Government business.

Ministers will use a range of digital forms of communication for discussions in line with relevant guidance on information handling and security.

Ministers will have informal conversations from time to time, in person or remotely, and significant content relating to government business from such discussions is passed back to officials.

The Cabinet Office has previously published guidance on how information is held for the purposes of access to information, and how formal decisions are recorded for the official record. Ministers are also given advice on the security of electronic communications.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish their Standing at Football review.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which Premier League clubs are being permitted to introduce rail seating for the new football season; what form this permitted rail seating will take; whether it will be described as "safe standing"; and how many of such seats each club will have.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Sports Ground Safety Authority regarding the form of rail seating required at some football clubs for the new season; and if these (1) will be a permanent solution, and (2) will be defined as safe standing areas.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Sports Ground Safety Authority about the form of rail seating; whether such seating is regarded as a temporary measure; and if so, when further changes by football clubs to adapt seating for the new season will be required.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Sports Ground Safety Authority regarding technical safety differences between requirements for a form of rail seating and the requirement for formal approval of safe standing areas.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to support a defibrillator education programme at all professional sports teams.

First aid skills, including how to administer CPR, are important life skills for everyone. Recent events at UEFA EURO 2020 have demonstrated the immense value of first aid training and access to Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for anyone involved in professional sport.

Sports have a responsibility to make the safety and welfare of players their top priority, including through access to life-saving first aid equipment and relevant training and education. It is for the relevant national governing body or professional league to determine what education programmes may be appropriate for participants and support staff in their sport.

A number of sports do provide relevant education, including football. The Minister for Sport and Tourism welcomed the Premier League’s announcement in June 2021 of their new Defibrillator Fund, which will fund AEDs at thousands of football clubs and facilities across the country. Each grant recipient will be required to have at least one person successfully complete The FA Education’s free online Sudden Cardiac Arrest course.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 26 May 2021 to Question 5194 on Telecommunications: Infrastructure, what estimate he has made of the average rental payment to landowners; and what assessment he has made of the the impact of rental payments on digital connectivity.

It is not possible to provide estimates of the average rental payments to landowners as these are commercial matters.

The price paid for rights to install digital infrastructure is, in the first instance, a matter for negotiation between operators and site providers. But reforms relating to the legislation underpinning these rights were introduced in 2017. Those changes were intended to strike a balance between ensuring individual landowners do not incur losses and making network deployment and maintenance more cost effective. In our view, prices being paid for rights to install communications apparatus prior to 2017 were too high and reflected the increase in demand that had taken place for digital services. With digital communications becoming an increasingly critical part of daily life, changes were made to the valuation regime to address this. The pricing regime now in place is more closely aligned to those for utilities like water, electricity and gas. The recent consultation on further changes to the Code made it clear that the government is not revisiting the valuation regime introduced in 2017.

Responses to the recent consultation are currently being considered. We will carefully consider the impact of our proposals on all stakeholders and will carry out a full assessment of the impacts, in line with the usual processes.

Discussions are regularly held between the department and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on a range of issues including telecoms matters. However, I have not had specific conversations regarding the impact of the changes to rental negotiations on local government finances and the provision of public services.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 26 May 2021 to Question 5194 on Telecommunications: Infrastructure, what assessment he has made of the effect of the proposed changes to the Electronic Communications Code on average rental income for site owners who lease their land to telecommunications companies for infrastructure; and what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on the impact of the changes to rent negotiations on local government finances and the provision of public services.

It is not possible to provide estimates of the average rental payments to landowners as these are commercial matters.

The price paid for rights to install digital infrastructure is, in the first instance, a matter for negotiation between operators and site providers. But reforms relating to the legislation underpinning these rights were introduced in 2017. Those changes were intended to strike a balance between ensuring individual landowners do not incur losses and making network deployment and maintenance more cost effective. In our view, prices being paid for rights to install communications apparatus prior to 2017 were too high and reflected the increase in demand that had taken place for digital services. With digital communications becoming an increasingly critical part of daily life, changes were made to the valuation regime to address this. The pricing regime now in place is more closely aligned to those for utilities like water, electricity and gas. The recent consultation on further changes to the Code made it clear that the government is not revisiting the valuation regime introduced in 2017.

Responses to the recent consultation are currently being considered. We will carefully consider the impact of our proposals on all stakeholders and will carry out a full assessment of the impacts, in line with the usual processes.

Discussions are regularly held between the department and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on a range of issues including telecoms matters. However, I have not had specific conversations regarding the impact of the changes to rental negotiations on local government finances and the provision of public services.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent progress he has made on (a) short term visa and (b) work permit requirements for touring artists and support staff since since the publication on the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

We have always acknowledged that the end of freedom of movement would have consequences for touring musicians and performers. That is why, as the Secretary of State has said, we have moved at pace and with urgency to provide greater clarity about the current position, including working with our friends in EU Member States, to support the creative sectors tour in Europe with ease.

Member States are principally responsible for deciding the rules governing what work UK visitors can undertake in the EU, and we have spoken to every Member State. We have established musicians and performers do not need visas or work permits for short-term tours in at least 19 out of 27 Member States. This includes France, Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark and many more. The length of tour permitted without a visa or permit varies across Member States. For many Member States it is for up to 90 days, which will capture the vast majority of tours.

We are continuing to speak to all Member States to encourage them to ensure their rules and guidance are clear and accessible. And we are now working closely with those Member States that do require visas or work permits for short-term tours to encourage them to adopt a more flexible approach, in line with the UK’s own rules which allow creative professionals to tour here easily. Formal approaches have been made to those Member States, and DCMS ministers will play an active role in discussions.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer on 25 May to Question 3150 on Theatre: EU Countries, what assessment his Department has made of the varying time limits placed on touring activities without needing visas or work permits offered by the 17 EU Member States.

We have always acknowledged that the end of freedom of movement would have consequences for touring musicians and performers. That is why, as the Secretary of State has said, we have moved at pace and with urgency to provide greater clarity about the current position, including working with our friends in EU Member States, to support the creative sectors tour in Europe with ease.

Member States are principally responsible for deciding the rules governing what work UK visitors can undertake in the EU, and we have spoken to every Member State. We have established musicians and performers do not need visas or work permits for short-term tours in at least 19 out of 27 Member States. This includes France, Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark and many more. The length of tour permitted without a visa or permit varies across Member States. For many Member States it is for up to 90 days, which will capture the vast majority of tours.

We are continuing to speak to all Member States to encourage them to ensure their rules and guidance are clear and accessible. And we are now working closely with those Member States that do require visas or work permits for short-term tours to encourage them to adopt a more flexible approach, in line with the UK’s own rules which allow creative professionals to tour here easily. Formal approaches have been made to those Member States, and DCMS ministers will play an active role in discussions.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans he has to work with his counterparts in the EU member states that have more restrictive visa and work permit requirements than those of the UK, to ensure that artists from the UK can continue touring on a reciprocal basis.

We have always acknowledged that the end of freedom of movement would have consequences for touring musicians and performers. That is why, as the Secretary of State has said, we have moved at pace and with urgency to provide greater clarity about the current position, including working with our friends in EU Member States, to support the creative sectors tour in Europe with ease.

Member States are principally responsible for deciding the rules governing what work UK visitors can undertake in the EU, and we have spoken to every Member State. We have established musicians and performers do not need visas or work permits for short-term tours in at least 19 out of 27 Member States. This includes France, Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark and many more. The length of tour permitted without a visa or permit varies across Member States. For many Member States it is for up to 90 days, which will capture the vast majority of tours.

We are continuing to speak to all Member States to encourage them to ensure their rules and guidance are clear and accessible. And we are now working closely with those Member States that do require visas or work permits for short-term tours to encourage them to adopt a more flexible approach, in line with the UK’s own rules which allow creative professionals to tour here easily. Formal approaches have been made to those Member States, and DCMS ministers will play an active role in discussions.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the Government's proposed trade deals with Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein include permit free touring provisions for UK support staff involved in touring activities in the EEA.

The UK’s creative industries are the finest in the world and this Government understands that the cultural and creative sectors rely on the ability to move people across borders quickly, simply, and with minimal cost and administration.

On 8 July, the UK - Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein Free Trade Agreement was signed.

The agreement allows UK touring artists, entertainers and support staff to travel to and work in Norway and Liechtenstein for 90 days in any 180 day period, and Iceland for 90 days in one calendar year without the need for a work permit.

The deal was based on the same UK offer that the EU turned down in negotiations. This shows our proposals were workable and our door remains open if the EU is willing to reconsider its position.

To provide further clarity on the arrangements, UK and EEA states plan to issue a non-binding clarification of entry routes for performers, artists and their support staff.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of OpenRAN (1) as part of their gigabit capable broad rollout, (2) in increasing connectivity to rural communities, and (3) in extending connectivity to rural ‘notspots’.

The Government continues to explore the role of interoperable technologies, such as Open RAN, in the future of our telecommunications networks as part of the 5G Supply Chain Diversification Strategy, published in November last year and here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/5g-supply-chain-diversification-strategy/5g-supply-chain-diversification-strategy . Open RAN is still a nascent technology which promises efficiency and flexibility gains, and the Government is supporting its development as part of the telecoms diversification agenda, including through the £30m Future RAN Competition (FRANC).

The Government is extending connectivity to rural areas - both mobile and full fibre. Project Gigabit recognises Fixed Wireless Access as a potential gigabit-capable technology, which can provide a broadband connection via infrastructure also used for mobile networks. Furthermore, the Shared Rural Network programme will bring 4G coverage to 95% of the UK by 2025 - including total not-spots. We expect Open RAN to play an ever larger role in 5G mobile networks and beyond; these technologies are capable of reaching gigabit speeds and may support the Government's ambition to connect at least 85% of UK premises to gigabit speeds by 2025.

The Government also welcomed the news from Vodafone that it will be supplying large parts of Wales and the South West of England with Open RAN technology, and that deployment will start in rural areas.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the performance of high-speed broadband in rural areas; what steps they are taking to ensure that such services provide the advertised performance; whether they will provide compensation for those who have been advised to replace their old service and install a new one where that service does not meet advertised standards; and what steps they intend to take to support customers experiencing ongoing issues.

Ofcom’s 2020 Connected Nations report shows that 99.4% of UK premises have access to decent broadband speeds (10 Mbps and over), and according to thinkbroadband.com (https://labs.thinkbroadband.com/local/uk) , 97% can get superfast speeds (24 Mbps and over). Ofcom’s 2021 report, UK Home Broadband Performance, which can be found here (https://www.ofcom.org.uk/research-and-data/telecoms-research/broadband-research/broadband-speeds/uk-home-broadband-performance-nov-2020) showed that the average superfast speeds in rural areas was 44.2 Mbps, compared to 48.6 Mbps in urban areas in 2020.

In order to protect consumers, Ofcom has put in place voluntary broadband speeds Codes of Practice with industry, which can be viewed here (https://www.ofcom.org.uk/phones-telecoms-and-internet/information-for-industry/codes-of-practice). Signatories include BT, EE, Plusnet, TalkTalk and Virgin Media. Those signed up to the Code of Practice are committed to having systems which can identify the cause of speed problems, and processes to ensure they are resolved. Furthermore, signatories must provide guaranteed minimum speeds to their customers, and if speeds drop below the promised levels, are required to improve performance within one month. If there is no improvement, consumers have the right to exit their contract without penalty. To ensure effectiveness of the code, Ofcom monitors compliance by the signatories, and where it finds issues, will engage with the provider to deliver prompt resolutions.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made as to whether  Global Marine Group is the only UK-based company that (1) lays, and (2) maintains, communications cables; and what discussions, if any, they have had with the firm about this capability.

Cable laying and operation is a global enterprise which includes UK-based companies. The Government has regular contact with the industry including Global Marine Group. The government understands that the US-owned Global Marine Group is the only UK-based company that can both lay and maintain subsea telecommunications cables.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the statement of the Prime Minister to the Liaison Committee on 7 July 2021, Q79, that one of the key objectives of the Online Safety Bill is to tackle online fraud, what plans he has for the Bill to tackle online fraud other than user-generated content.

Online fraud is in scope of the Online Safety Bill. This means that companies in scope of regulation will need to take action to tackle fraud, where it is facilitated through user-generated content or via search results.

Government is currently working with industry to remove the vulnerabilities that fraudsters exploit, with intelligence agencies to shut down known fraudulent infrastructure, and with law enforcement to identify and bring the most harmful offenders to justice. We are also working to ensure that the public have the advice and support they need.

We are continuing to explore additional legislative and non-legislative solutions to tackle fraud in the round. The Home Office is developing an ambitious Fraud Action Plan, which will be published after the 2021 Spending Review. The Online Advertising Programme, led by DCMS, will also consider further regulation of online advertising to reduce online fraud and we will be consulting on it later this year.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with social media companies on content that may encourage the development of eating disorders; and what steps he is taking to remove content of that nature.

Ministers and officials have regular meetings with a wide range of stakeholders, including social media platforms, on a variety of issues, including eating disorders content. Details of Ministerial meetings are published quarterly on the Gov.uk website.

Under the draft Online Safety Bill, services in scope will need to minimise and remove illegal content, including illegal online abuse. In addition, services which are “likely to be accessed” by children will be required to provide further protections for children from content and activity which is legal but harmful. Major platforms will also need to address legal but harmful content for adults. The government will set out priority categories of legal but harmful material in secondary legislation, for example content which encourages or promotes eating disorders.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he plans to make for the implications of his policies of the debate that took place at the Council of Europe on 21 June 2021 on the potential merits of introducing a right to know mechanism for the preservation of media freedom.

The Government is committed to protecting the freedom of the press and recognises that a vibrant and free press plays an invaluable role in our cultural and democratic life. We want to make sure that this continues, with high journalistic standards working in the public interest. The government set up the National Committee for the Safety of Journalists, and published the National Action Plan for the Safety of Journalists. The plan and the Committee’s aim is to ensure that journalists operating in the UK are as safe as possible, reducing the number of attacks on and threats issued to journalists. In addition, the government recently published an Online Media Literacy Strategy and Action Plan. Matters involving the Council of Europe are the responsibility of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what support his Department is providing to freelancers in the culture sector who are unable to access the Culture Recovery Fund.

The Government recognises the challenge the current pandemic poses to our arts and culture sectors and to the many freelancers working across these industries. As the sector reopens, we continue to keep our cultural recovery policy under constant review.

Freelancers have been supported through the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS). which has so far helped 2.8m self employed. Details on future SEISS support were announced by the Chancellor in his Budget Statement in March, with an extension of the scheme to September 2021. Around 500,000 additional people have been brought into scope who filed a tax return in 2019-20, or were previously ineligible, who now may be able to claim the fourth grant.

However, it is also the case that the Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) had significant indirect benefits for freelancers. In Round 2, organisations were asked to estimate how many FTEs and freelancers were protected by the fund until the end of June. Collectively, applicants reported that 52,000 full time staff and almost 100,000 freelancers would be supported until the end of June. And ALBs were able to complement SEISS with their own interventions i.e. over £51m from ACE to individuals.

Additionally, the third round of the Culture Recovery Fund was announced on 25 June. This third and final round of funding will provide further support as the cultural, heritage and creative sectors reopen at full capacity, underlining the government’s commitment to help them build back better as life returns to normal.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the findings of the Events Research Programme.

Our Phase I events successfully collected a large amount of data on a combination of testing, and non-pharmaceutical interventions (actions that people can take to mitigate the spread of coronavirus) across the nine pilot events.

Findings from the first phase of the Events Research Programme were published on 25 June, and show that:

  • Every event, both indoor and outdoor, carries levels of transmission risk.

  • Large unstructured gatherings indoors where there is significant mixing of people in close proximity typically pose a higher risk.

  • Mitigation options include: communications, crowd and audience management strategies, face coverings, ventilation, testing, restrictions on food and drink, social distancing and capacity caps.

Findings from ERP pilots continue to be shared with the Government for consideration as part of broader policy making. Key findings from Phases II and III will be published in due course.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Prime Minister to the Liaison Committee on 7 July 2021, Q79, that one of the key objectives of the Online Safety Bill is to tackle online fraud, if he will list the key objectives of the Online Safety Bill.

The Online Safety Bill will deliver the government’s manifesto commitment to make the UK the safest place in the world to be online while defending freedom of expression. The Bill’s key objectives are to protect users online and uphold users’ rights online.

With regard to protecting users, the Bill will focus on:

  • tackling criminal content online, including fraud where this is facilitated through user-generated content;

  • protecting children from harmful and inappropriate content; and

  • building trust between users and their online platforms.

To uphold users’ rights online, the legislation will defend freedom of expression and the invaluable role of a free press.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many applicants in the first process for the appointment of Chair of Ofcom had their applications carried forward automatically to the second process.

A second process to appoint a permanent Chair of Ofcom has not yet been launched but announcements will be made in due course. The process will be a fair and open competition, and run in line with the Governance Code for Public appointments and regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will list the members of the interview panel for the first selection process for the Chair of Ofcom.

The first process to appoint the permanent Chair of Ofcom was run in line with the Cabinet Office’s Governance Code for Public Appointments, and regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments. In line with the requirements of the Governance Code, the members of the interview panel were published in March 2021 on the Cabinet Office’s Public Appointments Website. The panel consisted of Susannah Storey (Director General, DCMS), Paul Potts (Senior Independent Panel Member), Melanie Richards and Lord Livingston of Parkhead.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions his Department has had with representatives of the BBC about internal staff appointments at the BBC.

The BBC is operationally and editorially independent from the government, and the government has no role in internal or executive recruitment at the BBC.

Meetings with external organisations and individuals undertaken in a ministerial capacity are published on GOV.UK on a quarterly basis.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions (a) he, (b) his officials and (c) advisors have had with representatives of the BBC about internal staff appointments at the BBC.

The BBC is operationally and editorially independent from the government, and the government has no role in internal or executive recruitment at the BBC.

Meetings with external organisations and individuals undertaken in a ministerial capacity are published on GOV.UK on a quarterly basis.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when his Department will publish its response to the consultation on the Electronic Communications Code 2017, published on 27 January 2021.

The responsibility for the Electronic Communications Code sits with myself as the Minister for Digital Infrastructure. The Minister for Digital and Culture, has not been involved in any of the discussions regarding this issue.

The consultation on changes to the Electronic Communications Code closed on 24 March 2021. It would not be appropriate for me to comment on the possible outcomes of the consultation at this stage, as responses are being considered. However, the consultation response will be published in due course. We will engage with stakeholders after the consultation response has been published to provide further information, and will bring forward legislative proposals before this House as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, which Minister in his Department is responsible for the consultation of the Electronic Communications Code 2017, published on 27 January 2021.

The responsibility for the Electronic Communications Code sits with myself as the Minister for Digital Infrastructure. The Minister for Digital and Culture, has not been involved in any of the discussions regarding this issue.

The consultation on changes to the Electronic Communications Code closed on 24 March 2021. It would not be appropriate for me to comment on the possible outcomes of the consultation at this stage, as responses are being considered. However, the consultation response will be published in due course. We will engage with stakeholders after the consultation response has been published to provide further information, and will bring forward legislative proposals before this House as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the Minister of State for Digital and Culture, the hon. Member for Gosport, has held meetings with stakeholders on the consultation on the Electronic Communications Code 2017, since its publication on 27 January 2021.

The responsibility for the Electronic Communications Code sits with myself as the Minister for Digital Infrastructure. The Minister for Digital and Culture, has not been involved in any of the discussions regarding this issue.

The consultation on changes to the Electronic Communications Code closed on 24 March 2021. It would not be appropriate for me to comment on the possible outcomes of the consultation at this stage, as responses are being considered. However, the consultation response will be published in due course. We will engage with stakeholders after the consultation response has been published to provide further information, and will bring forward legislative proposals before this House as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what additional support he will make available for charities supporting people who are continuing to self-isolate as a result of the rise in covid-19 infection rates.

Government recognises the huge contribution of charities and the voluntary sector in the national effort against coronavirus. It has provided a multi-billion-pound package of support for Britain's charities to continue their vital services, including for those self-isolating.

Charities continue to benefit from the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, and many will have benefited from government grants where they have been required to close non-essential retail. This support is in addition to the £750 million targeted support package which has helped over 13,000 organisations continue to maintain vital services for those most affected by the pandemic.

At this time, government does not have plans to offer additional targeted funding for these sectors, but does continue to monitor sector health closely. The government is committed to working with charity sector representatives to support a strong and resilient sector.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has undertaken research into the incidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy among footballers.

The safety, wellbeing and welfare of everyone taking part in sport is absolutely paramount. National Governing Bodies are responsible for the regulation of their sports and for ensuring that appropriate measures are in place to protect participants from harm, including serious injuries. With that in mind, we expect sports to do all they can to protect their players as a fundamental part of their duty of care.

The Government remains committed to working with sports to build on the positive work on concussion that is already taking place, including the use of research. To that end, the Secretary of State and I hosted two roundtables on concussion in sport earlier this year to understand the issues from the perspectives of players and to push the sports on what more they can be doing, including research.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to tackle racism in sports other than football.

The Government is clear that racism has no place in sport, or society at large. The sport and physical activity strategy ‘Sporting Future: A New Strategy for an Active Nation’ has diversity and inclusion at its heart.

Sport England, UK Sport and the other home nations’ sports councils have recently published the results of a detailed, independent review into tackling racism and racial inequality in sport. Each Council is working to develop their own specific action plans to deliver on the initial commitments relating to people, representation, investment, systems and insight. This will involve working closely with relevant groups or communities to tackle racism in sport.

One area which is important in increasing inclusion in sport is the diversity of the sporting workforce and governance structures.The recently reviewed Code for Sport Governance requires all sporting bodies in receipt of substantial public funding from UK Sport and Sport England to have a detailed and ambitious diversity and inclusion action plan, which we hope will foster positive and lasting change.

The Government will continue to work with our arm’s length and national governing bodies, as well as sector partners such as Sporting Equals, to effectively tackle racism in sport at all levels. However it is ultimately for all individual sports’ national governing bodies, to decide on the specific aims and appropriate initiatives in their organisations, and to evaluate progress with these.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to prevent racism at local football clubs.

The Government is clear that racism has no place in football, sport, or society at large. Our strategy ‘Sporting Future’ is committed to promoting diversity and inclusion in sport and physical activity, including football. We are in regular dialogue with the football authorities across a range of matters, including tackling racism and increasing diversity at all levels from grassroots to elite football.

Following a DCMS-led summit attended by footballing bodies and relevant sector partners,the football authorities introduced multiple measures to tackle discrimination in the game. This included increasing the minimum sanctions for discriminatory behaviour and improving reporting systems at all levels of the game.

We also welcomed the launch of The FA’s ‘Football Leadership Diversity Code’ last year, which is a step in the right direction to ensure English football better represents our modern and diverse society, on and off the pitch. The FA has committed to following this with a version adapted for the National League System and grassroots clubs this year.

Opportunities for participation are crucial too. The Government invests £18m a year into football facilities, through the Football Foundation, to improve access to quality facilities across the country with an additional £75m announced this year as well. Inclusivity forms a part of the assessment criteria for any application for funding from the Foundation, with it being a core value of the organisation.

The Government will continue to liaise closely with the football authorities on their efforts to improve diversity in the sport.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much public funding is available to support antiracism education at local football clubs.

The Government is clear that racism has no place in football, sport, or society at large. Our strategy ‘Sporting Future’ is committed to promoting diversity and inclusion in sport and physical activity, including football. We are in regular dialogue with the football authorities across a range of matters, including tackling racism and increasing diversity at all levels from grassroots to elite football.

Following a DCMS-led summit attended by footballing bodies and relevant sector partners,the football authorities introduced multiple measures to tackle discrimination in the game. This included increasing the minimum sanctions for discriminatory behaviour and improving reporting systems at all levels of the game.

We also welcomed the launch of The FA’s ‘Football Leadership Diversity Code’ last year, which is a step in the right direction to ensure English football better represents our modern and diverse society, on and off the pitch. The FA has committed to following this with a version adapted for the National League System and grassroots clubs this year.

Opportunities for participation are crucial too. The Government invests £18m a year into football facilities, through the Football Foundation, to improve access to quality facilities across the country with an additional £75m announced this year as well. Inclusivity forms a part of the assessment criteria for any application for funding from the Foundation, with it being a core value of the organisation.

The Government will continue to liaise closely with the football authorities on their efforts to improve diversity in the sport.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps is he taking to help promote diversity in junior local football clubs.

The Government is clear that racism has no place in football, sport, or society at large. Our strategy ‘Sporting Future’ is committed to promoting diversity and inclusion in sport and physical activity, including football. We are in regular dialogue with the football authorities across a range of matters, including tackling racism and increasing diversity at all levels from grassroots to elite football.

Following a DCMS-led summit attended by footballing bodies and relevant sector partners,the football authorities introduced multiple measures to tackle discrimination in the game. This included increasing the minimum sanctions for discriminatory behaviour and improving reporting systems at all levels of the game.

We also welcomed the launch of The FA’s ‘Football Leadership Diversity Code’ last year, which is a step in the right direction to ensure English football better represents our modern and diverse society, on and off the pitch. The FA has committed to following this with a version adapted for the National League System and grassroots clubs this year.

Opportunities for participation are crucial too. The Government invests £18m a year into football facilities, through the Football Foundation, to improve access to quality facilities across the country with an additional £75m announced this year as well. Inclusivity forms a part of the assessment criteria for any application for funding from the Foundation, with it being a core value of the organisation.

The Government will continue to liaise closely with the football authorities on their efforts to improve diversity in the sport.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many meetings the (1) Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, and (2) Minister of State for Digital and Culture, have had with representatives from the Local Government Association or local Council representatives, since March 2020.

The Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport met with the Local Government Association this month.

In addition, the Minister of State for Digital and Culture and the Local Government Association were among the attendees for a Museums Working Group in June.

The full list of Ministerial meetings are published on gov.uk on a quarterly basis.



Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to diversify the UK’s technology supply chains away from China.

China is a leading member of the international community and we have a strong and constructive relationship with China in many areas. It has to be part of the solution to any major global problem we face; whether ensuring we do not face another devastating global health crisis, supporting vulnerable countries or addressing climate change. Our approach to China remains clear-eyed and rooted in our values and our interests.

The security and resilience of the UK’s telecoms networks is of paramount importance. That is why the Government undertook the Telecoms Supply Chain Review, a comprehensive review of the supply arrangements for telecoms infrastructure in the UK.

One example of where the government is seeking to diversify its supply chain is in 5G technology. On 2 July the Government published its response to the Diversification Taskforce’s recommendations on solutions and opportunities to diversify the supply market for 5G.

We will progress action across all four areas that the Taskforce focused on. As a part of our ambitious diversification strategy, we will be looking to identify opportunities to diversify component supply chains, both geographically and in terms of the range of suppliers, in order to establish greater resilience against shocks or market disruption.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what data and research he has on the player base of people playing (a) loot boxes, (b) social casinos, (c) twitch gaming and (d) e-sports betting.

We continue to work with the video games industry, other government departments, and relevant regulatory bodies to ensure games are enjoyed safely. We launched a call for evidence in September to understand players’ experiences with loot boxes and to examine evidence of potential harms. This received over 30,000 responses and we have been working to evaluate fully the evidence gathered. The response will be published in the coming months and will set out preferred actions and potential solutions to any issues identified from the evidence.

The government regularly engages with the Gambling Commission and other bodies to discuss emerging trends, including esports betting. Esports betting is regulated with the same protections as any other sports, and operators must abide by the same regulation and license conditions.

Data from the Gambling Commission’s quarterly surveys shows that in the year to December 2020 9% of adults reported they had ever bet on esports with money or items. Further details can be found at: https://www.gamblingcommission.gov.uk/statistics-and-research/publication/taking-a-more-in-depth-look-at-online-gambling#ref-4 The government does not collect statistics on the player base of people opening loot boxes, playing social casino games or accessing twitch gaming streams.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with (a) the Gambling Commission, and (b) gaming operators on the development of Esports Betting.

We continue to work with the video games industry, other government departments, and relevant regulatory bodies to ensure games are enjoyed safely. We launched a call for evidence in September to understand players’ experiences with loot boxes and to examine evidence of potential harms. This received over 30,000 responses and we have been working to evaluate fully the evidence gathered. The response will be published in the coming months and will set out preferred actions and potential solutions to any issues identified from the evidence.

The government regularly engages with the Gambling Commission and other bodies to discuss emerging trends, including esports betting. Esports betting is regulated with the same protections as any other sports, and operators must abide by the same regulation and license conditions.

Data from the Gambling Commission’s quarterly surveys shows that in the year to December 2020 9% of adults reported they had ever bet on esports with money or items. Further details can be found at: https://www.gamblingcommission.gov.uk/statistics-and-research/publication/taking-a-more-in-depth-look-at-online-gambling#ref-4 The government does not collect statistics on the player base of people opening loot boxes, playing social casino games or accessing twitch gaming streams.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made on the potential effect of Esports Betting on gambling-related harm.

We continue to work with the video games industry, other government departments, and relevant regulatory bodies to ensure games are enjoyed safely. We launched a call for evidence in September to understand players’ experiences with loot boxes and to examine evidence of potential harms. This received over 30,000 responses and we have been working to evaluate fully the evidence gathered. The response will be published in the coming months and will set out preferred actions and potential solutions to any issues identified from the evidence.

The government regularly engages with the Gambling Commission and other bodies to discuss emerging trends, including esports betting. Esports betting is regulated with the same protections as any other sports, and operators must abide by the same regulation and license conditions.

Data from the Gambling Commission’s quarterly surveys shows that in the year to December 2020 9% of adults reported they had ever bet on esports with money or items. Further details can be found at: https://www.gamblingcommission.gov.uk/statistics-and-research/publication/taking-a-more-in-depth-look-at-online-gambling#ref-4 The government does not collect statistics on the player base of people opening loot boxes, playing social casino games or accessing twitch gaming streams.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many people were refused entry to the European Championship Final at Wembley on 11 July 2021 for breaking covid-19 quarantine rules.

The Government was clear that anyone suspected of entering the UK with the intention of breaching isolation in order to attend a EURO 2020 match would be denied entry, and that their tickets may be cancelled (if not transferred to someone else). This policy combined with communications to supporters of teams playing in the UK had a significant deterrent effect on those who might otherwise have travelled to the UK for the tournament.

All EURO 2020 matches at Wembley were subject to strict entry requirements. Those seeking to enter were required to provide a negative Lateral Flow test result or (for those from England, Scotland and Wales) proof of full vaccination. Anyone failing to provide these would have been denied entry. The English Football Association was responsible for enforcing these requirements and no data is held on whether any of those denied entry were also deemed to have been breaking border restrictions.

Of the Italian contingent present at the Final, the vast majority were based in the UK (as - other than in the original ballot prior to the pandemic - tickets were not sold to people outside of the Common Travel Area). A small contingent of accredited guests were exempt from the isolation requirement in order to attend the match, but otherwise subject to strict public health restrictions - this included a group of c380 who flew in and out on the day, with no contact with the general public.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to protect (a) children and (b) vulnerable users online before the Online Safety Bill is enacted.

Ahead of Online Safety legislation, the government is taking robust action to ensure that children and vulnerable users are safe online.

Our new regulatory regime for UK-established video sharing platforms requires them to take appropriate measures to protect under-18s from harmful material. Ofcom will be able to take enforcement action against platforms that do not comply.

The Age Appropriate Design Code, which will come into force in September 2021, will provide stronger protections for children’s personal data and guidance to companies on the privacy standards they must adopt on services that children are likely to access and which process their personal data.

On 14th July we published the government’s Media Literacy Strategy, which will educate and empower users with the skills and knowledge they need to keep themselves safe online, with an amplified focus on vulnerable and disabled users.

In June 2021, we published Safety by Design guidance and a One Stop Shop on child online safety. This guidance will ensure that companies are equipped with the knowledge that they need to embed safety into platform design to protect users.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will make it his policy to compensate music (a) festivals and (b) concerts if they have to be cancelled as a result of further covid-19 restrictions.

As the Secretary of State made clear at the DCMS Select Committee in May, the government is aware of the wider concerns around securing indemnity for live events. Protecting public health is of vital importance to the government and we are working closely with the affected sectors and HMT on this issue to assess options to provide further support within the public health context.

Throughout the pandemic, the government’s Plan For Jobs has supported jobs and businesses with over £400 billion of economic support. As part of this package, last year the government announced the unprecedented Culture Recovery Fund - the biggest arts funding package in history. To date, over £1.2 billion has been allocated from the £2 billion Fund, reaching over 5,000 individual organisations and sites.

On 25 June we announced details of the third round of the Culture Recovery Fund and portals for the Emergency Resource Support element of this round are now open. This third and final round of funding will provide further support as the cultural, heritage and creative sectors move towards reopening at full capacity, underlining the government’s commitment to help them build back better as life returns to normal.

As you will be aware, from 19 July, following the success of the vaccine roll-out, outstanding legal restrictions on social contact and life events have been removed and all closed settings can reopen. The government will instead enable people to use personal judgement to manage the risk to themselves and others.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there is legislation which stipulates that TV licences can be paid for only (1) by cheque for the full amount, or (2) Direct Debit for quarterly payments.

The regulations which set the frequency and amount of instalments by which TV licence fees can be paid are the Communications (Television Licensing) Regulations 2004. The Communications (Television Licensing) (Amendment) Regulations 2021 amended instalment amounts for the period beginning 1 April 2021.

The Regulations allow for a range of payment options. For example, the TV Licensing website sets monthly, quarterly and annual payment options for direct debit plans: https://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/pay-for-your-tv-licence/ways-to-pay/direct-debit.

It also sets out that licence fee instalment amounts for a weekly or fortnightly payment licence are set out in an individual payment plan when a customer signs up for a Payment Card: https://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/pay-for-your-tv-licence/ways-to-pay/payment-card.

There is no provision in the Communications (Television Licensing) Regulations 2004 which specifies payments must be made by a certain method. The BBC is responsible for the collection and enforcement of the licence fee, including methods of payment.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what further steps they will take to stop gambling firms from enticing children to bet.

Under the Gambling Act 2005, it is a criminal offence to invite or allow a child to take part in most forms of commercial gambling, and protecting children and other vulnerable persons from being harmed or exploited by gambling is one of the licensing objectives which guide the work of the Gambling Commission. Operators must abide by strict requirements for the protection of children and are subject to sanction by the Commission if they breach these rules.

All gambling advertising, wherever it appears, is subject to strict controls on content and placement. Gambling operators advertising in the UK must abide by the advertising codes issued by the Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP) and the Committees of Advertising Practice (CAP) in which a wide range of provisions are designed to protect children. For example, gambling adverts must not be targeted at children or feature content which appeals particularly to them. CAP and BCAP have also recently consulted on strengthening the codes to reduce potential appeal to children. The Gambling Industry Code for Socially Responsible Advertising requires that operators ensure their logos do not appear on commercial merchandise (such as replica football kit) which is designed for children, and includes a ‘whistle-to-whistle’ ban on gambling adverts during live broadcast sport before 9pm.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 with the publication of a Call for Evidence which closed on 31 March and received approximately 16,000 submissions from a broad range of interested organisations and individuals. We are considering the evidence carefully and intend to publish a White Paper by the end of the year.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) findings, and (2) recommendations, of the Royal Academy of Engineering’s Hamilton Commission report Accelerating Change: Improving Representation of Black People in UK Motorsport, published on 13 July.

The Government is committed to promoting diversity and inclusion in all sport and physical activity, including motor sport. Our strategy ‘Sporting Future’ sets out a clear ambition to increase diversity among sporting organisations and to help the sport sector be more inclusive and welcoming to its spectators, participants and people in its workforce. However it is ultimately for all individual sports’ national governing bodies, to decide on the specific aims and appropriate initiatives in their organisations, and to evaluate progress with these.

We welcome the work of the Royal Academy of Engineering and Sir Lewis Hamilton which is aimed at improving the representation of Black people in UK motor sport. We will continue to work across government and with sector partners to ensure that inequalities people from ethnically diverse backgrounds face in sport, including motorsports, are being tackled effectively.

Sport England, UK Sport and the other home nations’ sports councils have also recently published the results of a detailed, independent review into tackling racism and racial inequality in sport. Following the findings each Council is working to develop their own specific action plans to deliver on their initial commitments relating to people; representation; investment; systems and insight. This will involve working closely with relevant groups or communities to tackle racial inequality in sport, and bring about lasting change.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)