Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb Portrait

Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb

Green Party - Life peer

Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb has no previous appointments


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Division Votes
Tuesday 23rd November 2021
Armed Forces Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 2 Green Party Aye votes vs 0 Green Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 210 Noes - 190
Speeches
Tuesday 7th December 2021
Net-zero Emissions

My Lords, the campaign group Insulate Britain, which has annoyed people so badly, was asking for a national programme to …

Written Answers
Thursday 25th November 2021
Air Pollution and Carbon Emissions
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the additional powers local authorities may require to meet …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 13th January 2020
Clean Air (Human Rights) Bill [HL] 2019-21
A bill to establish the right to breathe clean air; to require the Secretary of State to achieve and maintain …
Tweets
Wednesday 8th December 2021
21:18
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb has voted in 182 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(54 debate interactions)
Baroness Vere of Norbiton (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
(48 debate interactions)
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(37 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(125 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(56 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb


A Bill to make provision about elections to and membership of the House of Lords; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 2nd Reading : House Of Lords
Friday 3rd February 2017

A bill to establish the right to breathe clean air; to require the Secretary of State to achieve and maintain clean air in England and Wales; to involve Public Health England in setting and reviewing pollutants and their limits; to enhance the powers, duties and functions of the Environment Agency, the Committee on Climate Change, local authorities (including port authorities), the Civil Aviation Authority, Highways England, Historic England and Natural England in relation to air pollution; to establish the Citizens’ Commission for Clean Air with powers to institute or intervene in legal proceedings; to require the Secretary of State and the relevant national authorities to apply environmental principles in carrying out their duties under this Act and the clean air enactments; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Monday 13th January 2020
(Read Debate)

First reading took place on 9 September. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords.Second reading - the general debate on all aspects of the Bill - is yet to be scheduled.The 2015/16 session of parliament has ended and this Bill will make no further progress. A bill to make provision for the setting of biodiversity and other targets; to establish aNatural Capital Committee; to require local authorities to maintain local ecologicalnetwork strategies; to identify species threatened with extinction; for access to qualitynatural green space; and to include education about the natural environment in thecurriculum for maintained schools.


Last Event - 1st Reading : House Of Lords
Wednesday 9th September 2015

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to commission a programme of research into the merits of replacing the council tax and non-domestic rates in England with an annual levy on the unimproved value of all land, including transitional arrangements; to report to Parliament within 12 months of completion of the research; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Wednesday 11th June 2014

Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


115 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 13 July (HL1535), whether, as part of the National Audit Office (NAO) investigation into government procurement during the COVID-19 pandemic, any private emails were (1) provided directly, or (2) forwarded as part of official correspondence, to the NAO on the grounds that they contained (a) substantive discussions, or (b) decisions.

The Government fully cooperated with the National Audit Office’s investigation into Government procurement during the pandemic and provided all information requested.

The NAO report sets out the NAO's investigative approach and the evidence drawn on as part of the investigation.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the National Audit Office were given access to the private email accounts of either (1) civil servants, (2) special advisers, or (3) ministers, when carrying out their investigation into government procurement during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Government fully cooperated with the National Audit Office’s investigation into Government procurement during the pandemic and provided all information requested.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 22 February (HL13271), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what consultation, if any, they undertook with (1) independent candidates, (2) smaller political parties, and (3) the Independent Group of the Local Government Association, in the development of the letter dated 22 January from the Minister for the Constitution and Devolution to members of the Parliamentary Parties Panel and the May 2021 polls delivery plan, published on 5 February.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. As outlined in the Written Ministerial Statement of 8 February 2021 (HLWS766), the Government has confirmed that the set of council, mayor and Police and Crime Commissioner elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

On 22 February, the Prime Minister announced the Government’s roadmap out of lockdown and we have since then published guidance on campaigning reflecting the updated COVID restrictions effective from 8 March. In developing this guidance, the Government consulted a number of groups, including the Parliamentary Parties Panel and the Local Government Association; we are committed to ensuring we take into consideration the views of independent candidates as effectively as possible.

From 8 March, individual activists will be able to campaign outdoors in a COVID-secure way. The rules will allow for individual campaigners to deliver leaflets and to engage with electors on their doorsteps - but they should always be socially distanced and not enter inside people’s homes.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 22 February (HL13270), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, further to the letter dated 22 January from the Minister for the Constitution and Devolution to members of the Parliamentary Parties Panel and the May 2021 polls delivery plan, published on 5 February, what steps they have taken to ensure that (1) independent, and (2) smaller political party, candidates are not disproportionately affected by the restrictions on (a) doorstep campaigning, and (b) the delivery of leaflets by individual political party activists.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. As outlined in the Written Ministerial Statement of 8 February 2021 (HLWS766), the Government has confirmed that the set of council, mayor and Police and Crime Commissioner elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

On 22 February, the Prime Minister announced the Government’s roadmap out of lockdown and we have since then published guidance on campaigning reflecting the updated COVID restrictions effective from 8 March. In developing this guidance, the Government consulted a number of groups, including the Parliamentary Parties Panel and the Local Government Association; we are committed to ensuring we take into consideration the views of independent candidates as effectively as possible.

From 8 March, individual activists will be able to campaign outdoors in a COVID-secure way. The rules will allow for individual campaigners to deliver leaflets and to engage with electors on their doorsteps - but they should always be socially distanced and not enter inside people’s homes.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 22 February (HL13269), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, further to the letter dated 22 January from the Minister for the Constitution and Devolution to members of the Parliamentary Parties Panel and the May 2021 polls delivery plan, published on 5 February, what evidence they have to suggest that the delivery of leaflets by individual political party activists carries a greater risk than paid deliveries by (1) the Royal Mail, or (2) other delivery services.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. As outlined in the Written Ministerial Statement of 8 February 2021 (HLWS766), the Government has confirmed that the set of council, mayor and Police and Crime Commissioner elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

On 22 February, the Prime Minister announced the Government’s roadmap out of lockdown and we have since then published guidance on campaigning reflecting the updated COVID restrictions effective from 8 March. In developing this guidance, the Government consulted a number of groups, including the Parliamentary Parties Panel and the Local Government Association; we are committed to ensuring we take into consideration the views of independent candidates as effectively as possible.

From 8 March, individual activists will be able to campaign outdoors in a COVID-secure way. The rules will allow for individual campaigners to deliver leaflets and to engage with electors on their doorsteps - but they should always be socially distanced and not enter inside people’s homes.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultation, if any, they undertook with (1) independent candidates, (2) smaller political parties, and (3) the Independent Group of the Local Government Association, in the development of the letter dated 22 January from the Minister for the Constitution and Devolution to members of the Parliamentary Parties Panel and the May 2021 polls delivery plan, published on 5 February.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. As outlined in my Written Ministerial Statement of 8 February 2021 (HLWS766), the Government has confirmed that the set of council, mayor and Police and Crime Commissioner elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

The Government has published a Delivery Plan for the May elections, setting out how the Government will support local elections teams to deliver effective polls that are covid-secure for voters and staff. The Government has committed to further engage with political parties through the Parliamentary Parties Panel.

In relation to the current national lockdown restrictions and the delivery of leaflets by volunteers, I refer the Noble Lord to the Dear Colleague letter from the Minister for Constitution and Devolution, which I have placed in the Library. The letter reflects the broader guidance and law on the national lockdown, based on advice from the Chief Scientific and Medical Officers.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the letter dated 22 January from the Minister for the Constitution and Devolution to members of the Parliamentary Parties Panel and the May 2021 polls delivery plan, published on 5 February, what steps they have taken to ensure that (1) independent, and (2) smaller political party, candidates are not disproportionately affected by the restrictions on (a) doorstep campaigning, and (b) the delivery of leaflets by individual political party activists.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. As outlined in my Written Ministerial Statement of 8 February 2021 (HLWS766), the Government has confirmed that the set of council, mayor and Police and Crime Commissioner elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

The Government has published a Delivery Plan for the May elections, setting out how the Government will support local elections teams to deliver effective polls that are covid-secure for voters and staff. The Government has committed to further engage with political parties through the Parliamentary Parties Panel.

In relation to the current national lockdown restrictions and the delivery of leaflets by volunteers, I refer the Noble Lord to the Dear Colleague letter from the Minister for Constitution and Devolution, which I have placed in the Library. The letter reflects the broader guidance and law on the national lockdown, based on advice from the Chief Scientific and Medical Officers.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the letter dated 22 January from the Minister for the Constitution and Devolution to members of the Parliamentary Parties Panel and the May 2021 polls delivery plan, published on 5 February, what evidence they have to suggest that the delivery of leaflets by individual political party activists carries a greater risk than paid deliveries by (1) the Royal Mail, or (2) other delivery services.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. As outlined in my Written Ministerial Statement of 8 February 2021 (HLWS766), the Government has confirmed that the set of council, mayor and Police and Crime Commissioner elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

The Government has published a Delivery Plan for the May elections, setting out how the Government will support local elections teams to deliver effective polls that are covid-secure for voters and staff. The Government has committed to further engage with political parties through the Parliamentary Parties Panel.

In relation to the current national lockdown restrictions and the delivery of leaflets by volunteers, I refer the Noble Lord to the Dear Colleague letter from the Minister for Constitution and Devolution, which I have placed in the Library. The letter reflects the broader guidance and law on the national lockdown, based on advice from the Chief Scientific and Medical Officers.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the letter dated 22 January from the Minister for the Constitution and Devolution to members of the Parliamentary Parties Panel and the May 2021 polls delivery plan, published on 5 February, what evidence they have which supports the cessation of (1) doorstep campaigning, and (2) the delivery of leaflets, by individual political party activists.

Democracy should not be cancelled because of covid. As outlined in my Written Ministerial Statement of 8 February 2021 (HLWS766), the Government has confirmed that the set of council, mayor and Police and Crime Commissioner elections scheduled for May will go ahead, and made a firm commitment that the Government will support the sector to deliver them.

The Government has published a Delivery Plan for the May elections, setting out how the Government will support local elections teams to deliver effective polls that are covid-secure for voters and staff. The Government has committed to further engage with political parties through the Parliamentary Parties Panel.

In relation to the current national lockdown restrictions and the delivery of leaflets by volunteers, I refer the Noble Lord to the Dear Colleague letter from the Minister for Constitution and Devolution, which I have placed in the Library. The letter reflects the broader guidance and law on the national lockdown, based on advice from the Chief Scientific and Medical Officers.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
6th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the total number of deaths, from any cause, in the UK in 2020.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Baroness Jones,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking what estimate has been made of the total number of deaths, from any cause, in the UK in 2020 (HL4131).

The table below contains the registered deaths of UK residents in the first 20 weeks of the year. Data has been sourced from the Office for National Statistics, National Records Scotland and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency weekly death publications.

Table 1: Provisional number of deaths registered in the first 20 weeks of 2020, broken down by country[1][2][3][4][5]

UKEnglandWalesScotlandNorthern Ireland
Total deaths registered: week 1-20952,133901,06615,99027,8507,227

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1]Figures are based on deaths registered up to 1 May 2020

[2]Weekly deaths for Scotland are produced by NRS: https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/covid19stats

[3]Weekly deaths for Northern Ireland are produced by NISRA: https://www.nisra.gov.uk/publications/weekly-deaths

[4]England, Wales and Northern Ireland weekly deaths run from Saturday to Friday, Scotland deaths run from Monday to Sunday

[5]Northern Ireland week allocation differs from other countries. For example, week 1 is week ending 10-Jan. This has been adjusted for the purpose of aggregating the data

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the additional powers local authorities may require to meet (1) the net zero target by 2050, and (2) World Health Organisation guidelines on safe levels of air pollution.

Local authorities have a combination of powers in housing, planning, transport, and environmental permitting which allow them to take action to achieve net zero and to improve air quality.

Through the Net Zero Strategy, published on 19 October, the Government set out its commitments to enable local areas to make progress towards net zero. The strategy includes the creation of a new Local Net Zero Forum to improve collaboration net zero policies by convening national and local government senior officials.

The Government is committed to improving air quality, including through reducing a diversity of pollutants that harm both human health and the environment. The Environment Act made improvements on the Local Air Quality Management framework to enable local authorities to take more effective, co-ordinated actions to improve air quality. It will also deliver improvements to public health by ensuring local authorities have more effective powers to tackle emissions from domestic burning.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether their baseline assumption of 160 years for the lifetime of a new nuclear power station, as set out in the Environment Agency guidance on sea level rise, is measured from the expected date of completion of the power station.

The effects of climate change, including sea level rise, are considered and adapted to throughout the lifetime of nuclear power stations from design and construction, through operation and on to decommissioning.

The UK’s robust regulatory framework is designed to accommodate changes in science and expert guidance, whilst ensuring appropriate assessment of the specific operating lifetime of individual stations.

Whilst the National Policy Statement sets out the siting framework and criteria (including flood and coastal erosion risks), all stations will require planning permission and environmental permits from the Environment Agency and safety licensing from the Office for Nuclear Regulation (the ONR) throughout their lifetime. This will require strong evidence from licence holders to demonstrate that the effects of climate change have been thoroughly evaluated and can be managed over the lifetime of stations.

The Environment Agency and the ONR would not allow a site to be built or to operate if they judged that it was not safe to do so.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had, if any, with the EU about leaving the Energy Charter Treaty.

The Government has had no discussions with the EU on leaving the Energy Charter Treaty.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of attempts to reform the Energy Charter Treaty to remove any barriers to phasing out carbon fuels.

The UK supports the process to modernise the Energy Charter Treaty in a way that helps the global clean energy transition, such as the right for States to regulate to reach emissions reduction targets and a stronger focus on climate security issues. We are currently in discussions with Treaty partners over proposals to phase out investment protection for fossil fuels.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that waste incineration contracts do not hinder the delivery of the target to reach net-zero emissions by 2050.

We have already made significant progress towards meeting our net zero target. Between 1990 and 2018, our economy has grown by 75% while emissions have decreased by 43% - faster than any other G7 nation. Since 2000, we have decarbonised our economy faster than any other G20 country. We met our first and second carbon budgets that were established under the Climate Change Act 2008, and we are on track to overachieve on the third. Our forthcoming sector strategies, and wider plans to deliver a green economic recovery following the COVID-19 pandemic, will contain further proposals to put us on track to meeting carbon budgets 4 and 5.

In 2018, waste management accounted for 4.6 per cent (20.7 MtCO2e) of total UK GHG emissions, showing significant achievement of a 69% decrease in emissions between 1990 and 2018. The government is seeking to make the UK a world leader in using resources efficiently and reducing the amount of waste we create as a society. Our Resources and Waste Strategy (2018) sets a clear longer-term policy direction in line with our 25 Year Environment Plan.

The detailed terms of waste incineration contracts are a matter for the contracting parties.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to hold a roundtable meeting with "Party and non-Party stakeholders on pre-2020 implementation and ambition" ahead of COP26, as agreed at COP25.

Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change agreed at COP25 to hold a roundtable among Parties and non-Party stakeholders on pre-2020 implementation and ambition at COP26, which will take place in Glasgow.


The UK government will be involved in preparations as part of its role as incoming President for COP26.

The UK Government is also regularly engaging with Party and non-Party stakeholders, led by the COP26 President, the High Level Champion and the COP26 Envoy.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Office for Nuclear Regulation has a threshold beyond which the construction of new nuclear power stations would be disallowed on a specific section of coastline as a result of Met Office projections for (1) sea levels, or (2) the frequency of storm surges.

The independent Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) considers nuclear site licence applications and related regulatory matters on a case-by-case basis. In order to ensure the impact of climate change and the adequacy of project specific mitigations are fully and properly considered, the ONR does not prescribe thresholds in advance. The regulator requires appropriate safety margins and considers the latest official climate change predictions, prepared with the Meteorological Office and the Environment Agency.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Duncan of Springbank on 5 November 2019 (HL460), how they calculate the greenhouse gas emissions from a tonne of domestic waste being processed in an energy from waste incinerator.

Domestic, or household, waste is currently included within the fuel category “MSW” (Municipal Solid Waste) in the UK Greenhouse Gas Inventory. MSW refers to waste collected by municipalities or other local authorities and includes sources other than domestic waste.

The emissions per tonne of MSW processed in an energy from waste incinerator is calculated using the 2006 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Guidelines. Figures are provided for methane and nitrous oxide along with separate figures for carbon (fossil) emissions from biodegradable MSW and non-biodegradable MSW. The proportions of total MSW that is biodegradable and non-biodegradable is calculated using data from DUKES (the Digest of UK Energy Statistics). These four figures are combined to give total greenhouse gas emissions emitted per tonne of MSW processed in an energy from waste incinerator.

29th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Duncan of Springbank on 5 November 2019 (HL460), what were the equivalent green house gas emissions from incineration in the waste and energy supply sectors in (1) 2017, (2) 2018, and (3) 2019.

In 2017, an estimated 5.2 Mt (million tonnes) of CO2e (carbon dioxide equivalents) were emitted from incineration in the energy supply sector and 0.3 Mt of CO2e were emitted from incineration in the waste sector.

In 2018, an estimated 6.0 Mt of CO2e were emitted from incineration in the energy supply sector and 0.3 of CO2e were emitted from incineration in the waste sector.

Emissions from biogenic waste material are not included in these figures, consistent with domestic and international reporting of greenhouse gas emissions.

We are not currently able to provide equivalent statistics for 2019 as these are not yet available. The Final Statistics for UK Greenhouse Gas Emissions 1990-2019 will be published in February 2021.

29th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Duncan of Springbank on 5 November 2019 (HL460), what were the greenhouse gas emissions produced per tonne of waste processed in an energy from waste incinerator in (1) 2012, and (2) 2018.

There are two categories in the UK Greenhouse Gas Inventory that include waste being processed in an energy from waste incinerator:

  • The incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) in “Power Stations”;
  • The incineration of MSW in “Miscellaneous industrial/commercial combustion”.

In 2012, an estimated 0.4 tonnes of CO2e (carbon dioxide equivalents) were emitted per tonne of waste processed in UK “Power Stations” and 0.8 tonnes of CO2e were emitted per tonne of waste processed in an energy from waste incinerator in UK “Miscellaneous industrial/commercial combustion”.

In 2018, an estimated 0.4 tonnes of CO2e (carbon dioxide equivalents) were emitted per tonne of waste processed in UK “Power Stations” and 0.6 tonnes of CO2e were emitted per tonne of waste processed in an energy from waste incinerator in UK “Miscellaneous industrial/commercial combustion”.

Emissions from biogenic waste material are not included in these figures, consistent with domestic and international reporting of greenhouse gas emissions.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to promote volunteering opportunities in the UK after 31 December for young people from EU countries.

The European Solidarity Corps (ESC) offers volunteering opportunities to young people aged 18-30 from both the UK and the European Union. The UK will continue to participate fully in the current (2018-2020) ESC programme. This means that projects that successfully bid for funding during the current programme will continue to receive EU funding for the full duration of the project, including those where funding runs beyond 31 December 2020 and the end of the transition period. Young people from the UK and EU countries will continue to be able to participate in these projects.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) is considering options for alternatives to EU programmes offering international opportunities to young people. Funding for these opportunities will be subject to the Comprehensive Spending Review.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to improve the (1) reliability, and (2) coverage, of air quality monitoring in the UK.

Defra’s national air quality monitoring networks are made up of 300 sites across the UK and are managed by the Environment Agency. The reliability of the networks is ensured through a process of quality assurance and quality control prescribed in agreements with the monitoring network contractors to continuously improve air quality monitoring reliability and performance. The national air quality monitoring network is subject to continuous review to ensure that it remains fit for purpose and delivers on public expenditure at good value.

The geographical coverage of air quality monitoring is determined by the Air Quality Standards Regulations (2010) that require a set number of monitoring locations within administrative areas dependent on whether the environment is urban, rural or by a roadside and dependent also on population size.

Several adjustments were made in a recent review including increases in monitoring for particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide. Also, as part of the development of new targets for PM2.5 in the Environmental Act, Government is expanding the number of PM2.5 monitoring sites to ensure that compliance with the new targets can be appropriately monitored. A consultation on the new targets and the proposed monitoring arrangements will be issued early in the New Year.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park on 9 November (HL3061), whether the number of spillages from United Utilities treatment plans into (1) Lake Windermere, and (2) Lake Grasmere, are expected to reduce further in (a) 2021, and (b) in subsequent years.

In the last Asset Management Plan (AMP) cycle (2015-2020), United Utilities (UU) delivered a number of schemes in the Lake District to reduce spills into Windermere and other lakes. UU also made improvements to reduce the frequency of storm spills into Lake Windermere from Glebe Road pumping station and into Lake Grasmere from Grasmere Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW). As a result, the number of storm spills from Glebe Road and Grasmere WWTW was reduced significantly in 2020, and these improvements should be maintained in future years.

The Environment Agency is currently looking at the most recent data to determine if further interventions are required.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions the Environment Agency has had with water companies regarding the ending of sewage dumping in the Lake District; and when they expect to meet the target of high quality water in that area, in accordance with the Water Framework Directive.

The Environment Agency (EA) has regular discussions with United Utilities (UU), the water company which covers the North West of England, including the Lake District. The EA is working actively with UU to ensure overflows are properly controlled and to stop environment harm by overflows.

In the last Asset Management Plan (AMP) cycle (2015-2020) UU delivered a number of schemes in the Lake District to reduce nutrient inputs into Windermere and other lakes. UU also made improvements to reduce the frequency of storm spills into Lake Windermere from Glebe Road pumping station and into Lake Grasmere from Grasmere Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW). As a result, the number of storm spills from Glebe Road reduced from 157 in 2018, to 28 in 2020; and at Grasmere WWTW, from 260 in 2018 to 7 in 2020.

The EA required UU to install Event Duration Monitors (EDM) on storm overflows across Cumbria. In the current AMP period (2020-2025) UU must investigate the impact of over 50 storm overflows in Cumbria, which data has shown are spilling frequently, using the Storm Overflow Assessment Framework.

The objective for all waters in the Lake District is to achieve good ecological status. These objectives are set out in the North West river basin management plan. While some waters in the Lake District have improved, some are still below good status. All waters face increasing pressures on the wider water environment including climate change and population growth. To address these challenges, UU and EA are developing the next AMP cycle of improvements (2025 – 2030) to identify investment to improve water quality; as well as developing UU’s drainage and wastewater management plans and delivering the UU’s green recovery programme.

The Environment Bill, which will place future drainage and sewerage management plans on a statutory footing, also legislates for a package of measures to tackle storm overflows, which will help to reduce harm from sewage across all parts of the country, including in the Lake District.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Greenhalgh on 16 July (HL1706), whether the Environment Agency takes any legal account of CO2 emissions when issuing permits; and whether any local authority has "supported the transition to a low carbon future" by requiring carbon capture technology as part of planning permission.

On the UK's exit from the European Union all relevant EU environmental legislation became part of UK law. This includes the Industrial Emissions Directive (IED) which prescribes much of the permitting requirements the Environment Agency delivers through permits issued to installations in England, under the Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2016 (EPR).

The UK no longer participates in the EU Greenhouse Gas Trading System (EU ETS) Directive and has established its own emissions trading scheme. The same framework applies, and the ETS explicitly and directly seeks to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. The Environment Agency is the regulator in England for the ETS and for other climate change regulatory frameworks which may also apply to certain activities, whether they require permits or not. These include Climate Change Agreements and the Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme.

Where an installation's emissions of greenhouse gases are subject to the ETS (which, given the larger scale of IED activities, is likely), the IED prohibits the Environment Agency from setting emission limit values in the environmental permit under EPR. Instead, emissions of greenhouse gases are regulated via the ETS which requires operators to obtain separate ETS permits, to monitor and report all their greenhouse gas emissions and to surrender allowances for every tonne of carbon dioxide, or equivalent, emitted (one allowance is equivalent to one tonne of carbon dioxide).

The Environment Agency seeks to limit direct and indirect emissions of carbon dioxide and many other greenhouse gases via its EPR permitting approaches for all relevant activities, whether subject to IED or not. Examples include requirements on energy efficiency and resource efficiency (including water, energy and waste) by requiring applicants of such activities to scale and assess the impact of their emissions on global warming (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/assess-the-impact-of-air-emissions-on-global-warming and attached to this answer), with the intent of reducing their emissions by selecting the best available techniques and processes to control their emissions.

The National Planning Policy Framework is clear that the planning system should support the transition to a low carbon future, including by supporting renewable and low carbon energy and associated infrastructure. Local Planning Authorities should consider this when considering whether to grant planning permission. Where relevant, this can include considering the appropriateness of carbon capture technologies.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park on 6 October 2020 (HL 8373), (1) whether the "further monitoring" provided an accurate picture of incinerator capacity planned between now and 2025, (2) how that compares with levels of residual waste, and (3)  what impact it will have on national recycling rates.

We are currently assessing planned incinerator capacity against expected future residual waste arisings so we can understand what future incineration capacity may be required following implementation of key commitments in the Resources and Waste Strategy. A further assessment of residual waste treatment capacity needs, updating the details included in the Resources and Waste Strategy, will be published in coming months.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to introduce new standards for home compostable plastics before their 2030 deadline of the roll-out of separate household food waste collection.

The Government's 25 Year Environment Plan sets out our ambition to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste. The Resource and Waste Strategy published in December 2018 focuses on increasing the reuse and recycling of plastics, in line with our ambition to transition to a circular economy in order to tackle plastic pollution.

The Government recognises that innovation into compostable plastics could help reduce the environmental impacts of plastic pollution. However, concerns persist that plastics which are claimed to be biobased, biodegradable, or compostable, if littered or otherwise released into the environment in an uncontrolled way, may not degrade quickly or even at all, and they can only be composted if they meet relevant standards.

The Government published a call for evidence in 2019 to help consider the development of product standards or certification criteria for bio-based, biodegradable, and compostable plastics as well as to better understand their effects on the environment and our current waste system. Strong concerns were raised through the responses regarding the extent to which plastics marketed as biodegradable and compostable actually biodegrade in the open environment, and whether the use of such plastics could even encourage littering if citizens consider them to be in some way environmentally-friendly. Responses also highlighted the need to better understand the environmental impacts and any health implications from using compost containing partially-composted plastics, and we welcome further research on this.

The Government’s response to the call for evidence was published on 8 April 2021 which is in the enclosed document.

The British Standards Institute (BSI) are appointed by Government as the national standards body (NSB) in the UK. As such they are responsible for the development of standards in the UK and the subsequent certification and verification of products.

The European Union's EN 13432 standard has been adopted in the UK by the BSI as BS EN 13432. We have not made an assessment of this standard against the Australian and French standards. BS EN 13432 applies to industrial composting and there is not currently a standard for home composting. However, the BSI are running a project, BS EN 17427 Packaging: Requirements and test scheme for carrier bags suitable for treatment in well-managed home composting installations. Technical specifications and standards are an important step in ensuring that the materials we use behave as we expect and require them to. We will continue to monitor the extent to which these standards do, or do not, address the issues identified through our call for evidence, and will follow with interest any developments.

We recently consulted on measures to increase the consistency in recycling for a core set of materials to be collected from households for recycling and as compostable packaging is not generally collected for recycling, we have not included it as one of the recyclable waste streams named in the legislation. To be added as a waste stream, compostable packing would need to be proven suitable for recycling, including ensuring that end markets exist for the material. Additional investment in the waste industry would be required to support the widespread introduction of biodegradable and compostable plastics and avoid issues of cross-contamination and machine damage.

The evidence base is clearly still developing in relation to these new types of plastic, particularly in terms of their environmental impacts in comparison to alternatives. In accordance with the waste hierarchy, our current preference remains that most plastics are reusable or recyclable. We recognise though that in some applications and specific circumstances biodegradable/compostable plastics may be more suitable.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the need for a UK (1) certification process, (2) verification process, and (3) labelling standards, for plastics labelled as home compostable, now that the UK has left the EU.

The Government's 25 Year Environment Plan sets out our ambition to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste. The Resource and Waste Strategy published in December 2018 focuses on increasing the reuse and recycling of plastics, in line with our ambition to transition to a circular economy in order to tackle plastic pollution.

The Government recognises that innovation into compostable plastics could help reduce the environmental impacts of plastic pollution. However, concerns persist that plastics which are claimed to be biobased, biodegradable, or compostable, if littered or otherwise released into the environment in an uncontrolled way, may not degrade quickly or even at all, and they can only be composted if they meet relevant standards.

The Government published a call for evidence in 2019 to help consider the development of product standards or certification criteria for bio-based, biodegradable, and compostable plastics as well as to better understand their effects on the environment and our current waste system. Strong concerns were raised through the responses regarding the extent to which plastics marketed as biodegradable and compostable actually biodegrade in the open environment, and whether the use of such plastics could even encourage littering if citizens consider them to be in some way environmentally-friendly. Responses also highlighted the need to better understand the environmental impacts and any health implications from using compost containing partially-composted plastics, and we welcome further research on this.

The Government’s response to the call for evidence was published on 8 April 2021 which is in the enclosed document.

The British Standards Institute (BSI) are appointed by Government as the national standards body (NSB) in the UK. As such they are responsible for the development of standards in the UK and the subsequent certification and verification of products.

The European Union's EN 13432 standard has been adopted in the UK by the BSI as BS EN 13432. We have not made an assessment of this standard against the Australian and French standards. BS EN 13432 applies to industrial composting and there is not currently a standard for home composting. However, the BSI are running a project, BS EN 17427 Packaging: Requirements and test scheme for carrier bags suitable for treatment in well-managed home composting installations. Technical specifications and standards are an important step in ensuring that the materials we use behave as we expect and require them to. We will continue to monitor the extent to which these standards do, or do not, address the issues identified through our call for evidence, and will follow with interest any developments.

We recently consulted on measures to increase the consistency in recycling for a core set of materials to be collected from households for recycling and as compostable packaging is not generally collected for recycling, we have not included it as one of the recyclable waste streams named in the legislation. To be added as a waste stream, compostable packing would need to be proven suitable for recycling, including ensuring that end markets exist for the material. Additional investment in the waste industry would be required to support the widespread introduction of biodegradable and compostable plastics and avoid issues of cross-contamination and machine damage.

The evidence base is clearly still developing in relation to these new types of plastic, particularly in terms of their environmental impacts in comparison to alternatives. In accordance with the waste hierarchy, our current preference remains that most plastics are reusable or recyclable. We recognise though that in some applications and specific circumstances biodegradable/compostable plastics may be more suitable.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to ensure items labelled as home compostable do not contain microplastics.

The Government's 25 Year Environment Plan sets out our ambition to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste. The Resource and Waste Strategy published in December 2018 focuses on increasing the reuse and recycling of plastics, in line with our ambition to transition to a circular economy in order to tackle plastic pollution.

The Government recognises that innovation into compostable plastics could help reduce the environmental impacts of plastic pollution. However, concerns persist that plastics which are claimed to be biobased, biodegradable, or compostable, if littered or otherwise released into the environment in an uncontrolled way, may not degrade quickly or even at all, and they can only be composted if they meet relevant standards.

The Government published a call for evidence in 2019 to help consider the development of product standards or certification criteria for bio-based, biodegradable, and compostable plastics as well as to better understand their effects on the environment and our current waste system. Strong concerns were raised through the responses regarding the extent to which plastics marketed as biodegradable and compostable actually biodegrade in the open environment, and whether the use of such plastics could even encourage littering if citizens consider them to be in some way environmentally-friendly. Responses also highlighted the need to better understand the environmental impacts and any health implications from using compost containing partially-composted plastics, and we welcome further research on this.

The Government’s response to the call for evidence was published on 8 April 2021 which is in the enclosed document.

The British Standards Institute (BSI) are appointed by Government as the national standards body (NSB) in the UK. As such they are responsible for the development of standards in the UK and the subsequent certification and verification of products.

The European Union's EN 13432 standard has been adopted in the UK by the BSI as BS EN 13432. We have not made an assessment of this standard against the Australian and French standards. BS EN 13432 applies to industrial composting and there is not currently a standard for home composting. However, the BSI are running a project, BS EN 17427 Packaging: Requirements and test scheme for carrier bags suitable for treatment in well-managed home composting installations. Technical specifications and standards are an important step in ensuring that the materials we use behave as we expect and require them to. We will continue to monitor the extent to which these standards do, or do not, address the issues identified through our call for evidence, and will follow with interest any developments.

We recently consulted on measures to increase the consistency in recycling for a core set of materials to be collected from households for recycling and as compostable packaging is not generally collected for recycling, we have not included it as one of the recyclable waste streams named in the legislation. To be added as a waste stream, compostable packing would need to be proven suitable for recycling, including ensuring that end markets exist for the material. Additional investment in the waste industry would be required to support the widespread introduction of biodegradable and compostable plastics and avoid issues of cross-contamination and machine damage.

The evidence base is clearly still developing in relation to these new types of plastic, particularly in terms of their environmental impacts in comparison to alternatives. In accordance with the waste hierarchy, our current preference remains that most plastics are reusable or recyclable. We recognise though that in some applications and specific circumstances biodegradable/compostable plastics may be more suitable.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of how their plans for post-Brexit standards for compostability and microplastics compare to (1) European Union (EN 13432), (2) Australian (AS 5810), and (3) French (NFT 51-800), standards.

The Government's 25 Year Environment Plan sets out our ambition to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste. The Resource and Waste Strategy published in December 2018 focuses on increasing the reuse and recycling of plastics, in line with our ambition to transition to a circular economy in order to tackle plastic pollution.

The Government recognises that innovation into compostable plastics could help reduce the environmental impacts of plastic pollution. However, concerns persist that plastics which are claimed to be biobased, biodegradable, or compostable, if littered or otherwise released into the environment in an uncontrolled way, may not degrade quickly or even at all, and they can only be composted if they meet relevant standards.

The Government published a call for evidence in 2019 to help consider the development of product standards or certification criteria for bio-based, biodegradable, and compostable plastics as well as to better understand their effects on the environment and our current waste system. Strong concerns were raised through the responses regarding the extent to which plastics marketed as biodegradable and compostable actually biodegrade in the open environment, and whether the use of such plastics could even encourage littering if citizens consider them to be in some way environmentally-friendly. Responses also highlighted the need to better understand the environmental impacts and any health implications from using compost containing partially-composted plastics, and we welcome further research on this.

The Government’s response to the call for evidence was published on 8 April 2021 which is in the enclosed document.

The British Standards Institute (BSI) are appointed by Government as the national standards body (NSB) in the UK. As such they are responsible for the development of standards in the UK and the subsequent certification and verification of products.

The European Union's EN 13432 standard has been adopted in the UK by the BSI as BS EN 13432. We have not made an assessment of this standard against the Australian and French standards. BS EN 13432 applies to industrial composting and there is not currently a standard for home composting. However, the BSI are running a project, BS EN 17427 Packaging: Requirements and test scheme for carrier bags suitable for treatment in well-managed home composting installations. Technical specifications and standards are an important step in ensuring that the materials we use behave as we expect and require them to. We will continue to monitor the extent to which these standards do, or do not, address the issues identified through our call for evidence, and will follow with interest any developments.

We recently consulted on measures to increase the consistency in recycling for a core set of materials to be collected from households for recycling and as compostable packaging is not generally collected for recycling, we have not included it as one of the recyclable waste streams named in the legislation. To be added as a waste stream, compostable packing would need to be proven suitable for recycling, including ensuring that end markets exist for the material. Additional investment in the waste industry would be required to support the widespread introduction of biodegradable and compostable plastics and avoid issues of cross-contamination and machine damage.

The evidence base is clearly still developing in relation to these new types of plastic, particularly in terms of their environmental impacts in comparison to alternatives. In accordance with the waste hierarchy, our current preference remains that most plastics are reusable or recyclable. We recognise though that in some applications and specific circumstances biodegradable/compostable plastics may be more suitable.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration has been given to provisionally establishing the Office for Environmental Protection ahead of the passage of the Environment Bill.

On 1 March we announced that from July, the Office for Environmental Protection, which is to be headquartered in Worcester, will be set up in an interim, non-statutory form, providing independent oversight of the Government's environmental progress and accelerating the foundation of the full body.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish a revised impact assessment on the Environment Bill which takes into account any further powers proposed for (1) the Office for Environmental Protection, and (2) forest risk commodities.

An impact assessment was published when the Environment Bill was introduced. The Government has introduced no further proposed powers for the Office for Environmental Protection in the Bill’s progress. We will publish a full impact assessment specific to the amendments that were tabled to the Bill in November 2020 to introduce due diligence requirements for larger businesses using forest risk commodities in the UK. This impact assessment will outline the expected cost to business of complying with the due diligence requirements, taking into account evidence received through public consultation.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they plan to incorporate predictions by the International Panel on Climate Change of rapid sea level rises into their assessments of (1) coastal erosion, and (2) flooding, to enable planning authorities to request up to date Flood Risk Assessments for new nuclear power stations.

Nuclear new-build facilities are subject to a number of consenting regimes. Firstly, the nationally significant infrastructure project (NSIP) regime under the 2008 Planning Act which considers the initial grant of consent; and secondly the nuclear safety regime under the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) which controls nuclear safety aspects on an ongoing basis throughout the facility’s lifetime.

Proposals for nuclear new-build are NSIPs and are decided by the relevant Secretary of State. Proposals are judged against the relevant national policy statement(s) (NPS). The relevant NPSs make reference to the importance of facilities being resilient and adaptable to climate change. They aim to ensure new facilities are located, constructed, operated and decommissioned with the long-term impacts of climate change in mind.

The Environment Agency provides advice and guidance on this process including on how climate change should be accounted for in relevant flood risk assessments. This was last updated in July 2020 to reflect the latest sea level rise projects (UKCP18). Our advice recommends that flood risk is considered across a range of different climate scenarios, including credible but extreme scenarios (i.e. High++ emissions scenario).

The Environment Agency works closely with the ONR to manage the interaction between the NSIP regime and the nuclear safety regulatory regime. The Environment Agency has produced a number of joint guidance notes with the ONR, to outline their collective approach to flood risk and climate change. These are attached to this answer and can also be found here:

The National Coastal Erosion Map (NCERM) shows erosion projections to 2110 and informs coastal management through Shoreline Management Plans (SMP). This helps manage direct erosion and to manage sediment supplies down the coast which can be relevant for flood risk areas.

All English nuclear power stations have SMP policies of Hold the Line (maintain or upgrade the level of protection provided by defences) for the whole timescale of the hundred year plans. Recent reviews of SMP policies for these stretches of the coast have shown the strategic direction of Hold the Line is deemed fit for the future.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the CO2 emissions limits for energy from waste incinerators; whether they monitor local authorities to ensure that less CO2 from waste is produced each year; and if so, how.

Municipal waste incinerators are regulated by the Environment Agency (EA) in England under environmental permits. Under the permitting process, the EA ensures that the global warming potential of the proposed incinerator will be minimised by the use of Best Available Techniques (BAT - including those set out in the European BAT reference notes) in order to maximise the energy efficiency of the plant and minimise nitrous oxide emissions from its exhaust gas cleaning system. This ensures that the amount of greenhouse gas emitted from the plant per unit of energy generated is minimised.

The EA does not assess (nor place any limits on) the actual amount of CO2 emitted by the plant and municipal waste incinerators are not covered by the European Union’s Emissions Trading System. The amount of CO2 that an incinerator releases is directly proportional to the amount and composition of waste it burns and cannot subsequently be controlled without being captured and stored (carbon capture and storage).

The Government does not monitor CO2 produced from waste at local authority level.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of increasing waste incineration capacity on rates of recycling.

In developing our Resources and Waste Strategy (RWS) the Government considered the amount of residual waste treatment capacity that will be required for England to avoid any negative impact on future recycling ambitions and the major waste reforms we are implementing. The assessment concluded that significant additional residual waste energy recovery capacity such as incineration or advanced conversion technologies – above that already operating or planned to 2020 – would not necessarily be needed to meet an ambition of no more than 10% municipal waste to landfill by 2035, if a 65% recycling rate is achieved by that same year. This assumed that refuse-derived fuel exports remain at 2018 levels. However, if energy recovery continues to provide a better environmental alternative to landfill, more investment to reduce tonnages of municipal waste to landfill further would deliver environmental benefits.

In accordance with the commitment given in the RWS we will continue to monitor residual waste infrastructure capacity.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report by Align, Hydrogeological and Surface Water Risk Assessment for Load Test Piling Location 2, approved in January 2019, and, in particular, its conclusion that there are no historic sources of contamination present at the London Power Tunnels phase 2 construction site, despite it being 500 metres away from a Contaminated Land Special Site.

The Environment Agency (EA) has reviewed the Align Report on Hydrogeological and Surface Water Risk Assessment for Load Test Piling Location 2. This report examines activities associated with HS2 and does not reference the ‘London Power Tunnels phase 2 construction site’, which is a different project south of the river Thames unrelated to HS2.

With respect to the report, the EA is in agreement that there are no historical sources of contamination present at the Load Test Piling Location 2 site. The report does highlight that there are historical sources of contamination present in the wider area of this site, and low-level hydrocarbon contamination was present in groundwater within both the chalk and overlying superficial deposits across the Colne Valley.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure good-quality drinking water sources in the Colne Valley by 2027.

The Government have put in place the Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 2016 which provide the framework for safe drinking water. Within these Regulations is the requirement for water companies to risk assess their supply systems and to keep those risk assessments under review. Risks identified in the risk assessment require mitigation. Any major constructions work within a water company’s area would result in a review of the risk assessment to identify any potential for impact and mitigation put in place to ensure drinking water meets the required standards and is safe for consumers.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what reasons the Environment Agency gave for allowing HS2 Ltd to drill at the Harvil Road site in the Colne Valley.

The Environment Agency (EA) has given permission to High Speed Two (HS2) Ltd to carry out drilling activities at the Harvil Road site under Schedule 33 of the High Speed Rail (London – West Midlands) Act 2017.

The EA reviewed the risks to groundwater quality and quantity by the HS2 Ltd construction activities at the Harvil Road site in the Colne Valley and did not identify any reasons to prohibit drilling activities at the site.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to (1) protect, and (2) enhance, the tranquility of Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Government’s 25 Year Environment Plan has set out our comprehensive and long-term approach to protecting and enhancing the environment in England. The importance of designated landscapes, including Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), is made clear in the plan.

Tranquillity is a key component of AONB purpose. To reflect this it is included in the special qualities of why many of these sites have been designated to be protected as AONBs.

AONBs are some of our most treasured landscapes. Funding for these landscapes has been protected in real terms since 2015. We recognise their value and are committed to help them thrive. The AONBs received over £6.5 million during 19/20 of core grant funding from Defra to deliver their statutory purpose.

The Government is committed to ensuring that noise is managed effectively in order to promote good health and quality of life. We have protections in place to avoid significant adverse noise impacts for example through our planning system, our environmental permitting systems, in vehicle and product standards, and noise abatement legislation.

28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the total value of fees paid to certifiers to grant wood burning stove manufacturers exemptions from the provisions of the Clean Air Act 1993.

Under the Clean Air Act 1993, the Government publishes a list of solid fuel combustion appliances exempted from the prohibition of smoke emissions in smoke control areas.

To add a new appliance to the list, the manufacturer of the appliance must apply to HETAS, the appointed contractor, for approval. They must submit technical and testing documentation evidencing that emissions limits have been met.

The total amount of fees invoiced for by HETAS to manufacturers for this purpose, during the period of April 2019 to 29 of January 2020, was £97,421.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what controls a local authority can impose on a wood burning stove that has been granted an exemption from the provisions of the Clean Air Act 1993

Under Part III of the Clean Air Act 1993 (CAA), it is an offence to emit smoke from a chimney of a building in a Smoke Control Area (SCA) unless burning an authorised fuel or using an exempt appliance. Local authorities are responsible for designation and enforcement of SCAs.

To obtain exemption, appliances such as wood-burning stoves must pass smoke emissions tests. Exemptions are granted on conditions such as requiring users to operate the appliance in accordance with the manufacturers’ instructions and only burn specified fuels. Local authorities can take action in SCAs where they have identified that a user is not complying with these conditions and an offence has occurred.

We recognise that enforcement of SCAs can be challenging. For this reason, we are proposing to amend Part III of the CAA through the Environment Bill to enable quicker, simpler and more proportionate enforcement of SCAs. This includes enabling local authorities in England to issue civil financial penalties for chimney smoke emissions. This will be possible as the regime will shift from being a criminal to a civil regime. This regime change will also remove the statutory defences, including the use of an exempt appliance or an authorised fuel, that currently hinder enforcement. Authorities have no means by which to determine whether the statutory defences apply as they are unable to enter private premises. These changes should make it easier for local authorities to tackle misuse of exempt wood-burning stoves.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many installed wood burning stoves have been granted exemptions from the provisions of the Clean Air Act 1993.

The information requested is not held by Defra. Such information may however be held by local authorities for their individual areas.

The list of exempt appliances under the Clean Air Act 1993 is published on the Defra website at the address below:

https://smokecontrol.defra.gov.uk/appliances.php

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many pollution and smoke complaints it has not been possible to enforce due to the polluter having purchased an exception from the provisions of the Clean Air Act 1993.

The information requested is not held by Defra. Such information may however be held by local authorities for their individual areas.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what projections they have made of future waste arisings broken down by (1) region, and (2) waste authority, in England and Wales.

Waste is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

The Government has produced projections on total waste arisings in England only. These consist of both household municipal and commercial and industrial waste arisings. They are not broken down by region and local authority.

Some analysis has been published in our Resource and Waste Strategy Evidence annex: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/765915/rws-evidence-annex.pdf

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 12 October (HL2847), what area of inalienable land vested in the National Trust following a national appeal for public subscriptions in 1927 would need to be acquired for constructing and operating the A303 Amesbury to Berwick Down dual carriageway and tunnel across the Stonehenge, Avebury and Associated Sites UNESCO World Heritage Site; and what would be (1) the terms, and (2) the costs of such acquisition.

Within the World Heritage Site, there is 41.62 hectares of inalienable land owned by the National Trust that is being acquired; 1.75 hectares subject to outright acquisition and 39.87 hectares subject to subsoil rights acquisition for the A303 Amesbury to Berwick Down scheme. The terms of the acquisition of inalienable National Trust land are the same as for all land interests and rights that are subject to Compulsory Acquisition.

If granted, the Development Consent Order (DCO) gives National Highways Compulsory Acquisition powers to purchase land that is required to build and maintain the scheme, which includes National Trust land declared as inalienable. The National Trust land will be acquired through the General Vesting Declaration (GVD) process, which would vest the required land or rights to National Highways, including subsoil rights to construct and maintain the Tunnel. Where National Highways are taking subsoil rights only, the amenity of the surface land above will remain, including the surface lands inalienability. This applies to 39.87 hectares.

Those rights and interests in land that are extinguished or changed through the above process, such as those belonging to The National Trust, would enable a right to compensation. This compensation would be negotiated and paid following the making of the GVD. A key principle of compensation is that of “equivalence”, meaning that a claimant should be placed in no better or worse position, financially, after the acquisition than they were before the acquisition. Therefore, until a time in which the land has vested through the GVD process and a claim received, it would be inappropriate to prejudice a live negotiation through speculating on potential costs.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many hectares of National Trust land within the Stonehenge, Avebury and Associated Sites UNESCO World Heritage site would need to be (1) acquired, and (2) compulsorily purchased, to enable the construction and operation of the A303 Amesbury to Berwick Down dual carriageway and tunnel, should planning consent be granted by the Secretary of State; what proportion of the land to be acquired has been declared inalienable; and what would be the terms of any (a) acquisition, or (b) compulsory purchase.

The total area of ground that would need to be excavated for the construction of the A303 dual carriageway and Tunnel within the World Heritage site is approximately 8.8 hectares.

The area of Crown land identified within the World Heritage Site to be permanently acquired to enable the construction and operation of the A303 dual carriageway and tunnel is approximately 4,220 square metres. This is the land beneath the existing A303, which is unregistered and (in accordance with the ad medium filum rule) ownership has been attributed to the adjacent parties to the halfway point of the road. The adjacent landowner on the north side of the road is the land parcel that was gifted to the nation by Sir Cecil Chubb.

During inquiries to identify the legal entities with an interest in this land, it was identified that the land gifted by Sir Cecil Chubb is held in the name of the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. As such the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is assumed to hold an interest in the subsoil beneath the A303 up to its half width by virtue of the ad medium filum rule. This is considered to be Crown land. No land gifted by Sir Cecil Chubb is included within the land to be acquired for the Development Consent Order.

Within the World Heritage Site, there is approximately 52.83 hectares of land owned by The National Trust that would need to be acquired or compulsory purchased. Of this 6.3 hectares are subject to outright acquisition, and 46.53 hectares are subject to acquisition at subsoil level for the construction of the bored tunnel with rights above. Of this land, 41.62 hectares has been declared as inalienable, 1.75 hectares subject to outright acquisition, and 39.87 hectares subject to subsoil acquisition.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what area of Crown land would need to be (1) acquired, and (2) compulsorily purchased, within the Stonehenge, Avebury and Associated Sites UNESCO World Heritage site to enable the construction and operation of the A303 Amesbury to Berwick Down dual carriageway and tunnel, should planning consent be granted by the Secretary of State; what proportion of the land to be acquired was gifted to the nation by Sir Cecil Chubb; and what would be the terms of any (a) acquisition, or (b) compulsory purchase.

The total area of ground that would need to be excavated for the construction of the A303 dual carriageway and Tunnel within the World Heritage site is approximately 8.8 hectares.

The area of Crown land identified within the World Heritage Site to be permanently acquired to enable the construction and operation of the A303 dual carriageway and tunnel is approximately 4,220 square metres. This is the land beneath the existing A303, which is unregistered and (in accordance with the ad medium filum rule) ownership has been attributed to the adjacent parties to the halfway point of the road. The adjacent landowner on the north side of the road is the land parcel that was gifted to the nation by Sir Cecil Chubb.

During inquiries to identify the legal entities with an interest in this land, it was identified that the land gifted by Sir Cecil Chubb is held in the name of the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. As such the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is assumed to hold an interest in the subsoil beneath the A303 up to its half width by virtue of the ad medium filum rule. This is considered to be Crown land. No land gifted by Sir Cecil Chubb is included within the land to be acquired for the Development Consent Order.

Within the World Heritage Site, there is approximately 52.83 hectares of land owned by The National Trust that would need to be acquired or compulsory purchased. Of this 6.3 hectares are subject to outright acquisition, and 46.53 hectares are subject to acquisition at subsoil level for the construction of the bored tunnel with rights above. Of this land, 41.62 hectares has been declared as inalienable, 1.75 hectares subject to outright acquisition, and 39.87 hectares subject to subsoil acquisition.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what area of ground would need be excavated within the Stonehenge, Avebury and Associated Sites UNESCO World Heritage site for the construction of the A303 Amesbury to Berwick Down dual carriageway and tunnel, should planning consent be granted by the Secretary of State.

The total area of ground that would need to be excavated for the construction of the A303 dual carriageway and Tunnel within the World Heritage site is approximately 8.8 hectares.

The area of Crown land identified within the World Heritage Site to be permanently acquired to enable the construction and operation of the A303 dual carriageway and tunnel is approximately 4,220 square metres. This is the land beneath the existing A303, which is unregistered and (in accordance with the ad medium filum rule) ownership has been attributed to the adjacent parties to the halfway point of the road. The adjacent landowner on the north side of the road is the land parcel that was gifted to the nation by Sir Cecil Chubb.

During inquiries to identify the legal entities with an interest in this land, it was identified that the land gifted by Sir Cecil Chubb is held in the name of the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. As such the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is assumed to hold an interest in the subsoil beneath the A303 up to its half width by virtue of the ad medium filum rule. This is considered to be Crown land. No land gifted by Sir Cecil Chubb is included within the land to be acquired for the Development Consent Order.

Within the World Heritage Site, there is approximately 52.83 hectares of land owned by The National Trust that would need to be acquired or compulsory purchased. Of this 6.3 hectares are subject to outright acquisition, and 46.53 hectares are subject to acquisition at subsoil level for the construction of the bored tunnel with rights above. Of this land, 41.62 hectares has been declared as inalienable, 1.75 hectares subject to outright acquisition, and 39.87 hectares subject to subsoil acquisition.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to phase out the sale of motorbikes with internal combustion engines.

The Government has no current plans to phase out the sale of internal combustion motorcycles. We are supporting those riders wanting to switch to the growing numbers of zero emission two wheelers and benefit from the lower running costs with a grant of 20% off the up-front purchase price of eligible models, up to a maximum of £1,500.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether local authorities are permitted to use their allocations from the emergency active travel fund to pay for (1) adult cycle training, and (2) Bikeability Level 3 training for secondary school children.

Local Authority allocations from the emergency active travel fund are intended to be spent principally on infrastructure measures, not on cycle training. Funding for cycle training has been made available through the Bikeability programme. We are currently considering expanding the range of training options that can be funded through Bikeability, including adult and family training.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish further information about the creation of a national cycling and walking commissioner and inspectorate, first announced on 9 May.

On 9 May the Government announced a £2 billion package of funding for active travel over the next 5 years. In the summer, the Government will say more about its plans to transform walking and cycling, including plans for a cycling and walking commissioner for England and inspectorate.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to review staff resources dedicated to active travel within the Department for Transport to manage the additional funding for active travel announced in May.

The Government is committed to delivering the aims and ambitions set out in the Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy, which was published in April 2017. The Department for Transport has increased the number of staff working to deliver recent commitments on cycling and walking and will keep this under review.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that the progress of HS2 is regularly reported to Parliament in particular with regard to (1) the expenditure, and (2) the estimated total cost, of that project.

A full-time dedicated HS2 minister has now been appointed, who will provide twice-yearly updates to Parliament on progress, including data on expenditure and estimated costs, allowing proper scrutiny of the project to take place.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 2 March (HL Deb, col 436), whether any future airport expansion will be conditional on all new flight capacity being filled by zero-carbon aeroplanes.

Airport expansion is a core part of boosting our global connectivity and levelling up the UK. It is crucial that vital infrastructure projects, including airport expansion, drive the whole UK economy. This Government supports airport expansion, but we will permit it only within our environmental obligations.

This Government is committed to working with the aviation sector to make sure we deliver on the opportunities available to us, while meeting our environmental commitments, whether that is through modernisation of our airspace, innovation in sustainable fuels or research and technology.

On 27 February the Court of Appeal declared that the Airports National Policy Statement is of no legal effect unless and until the Government carries out a review under the Planning Act 2008. The Court’s judgment is complex and requires careful consideration. We will set out our next steps in due course.

The Government is supportive of airports making best use of their existing runways, subject to the assessment and consideration of their impacts, including consideration of their environmental impacts.

The Government recognises that the fight against climate change is one of the greatest and most pressing challenges facing the modern world. The Government’s net zero target shows the UK’s steadfast commitment to tackling climate change, and we recognise that aviation has a crucial role to play.

The Government is committed to setting a clear ambition for the aviation sector and is carefully considering the advice of the Committee on Climate Change.

We are planning to consult shortly to update the Government’s position on aviation and climate change. It is critical that we consider how aviation can play its part in delivering our net zero ambitions.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to implement the principles set out in the Stockholm Declaration, adopted by the Third Ministerial Global Conference on Road Safety in February; and in particular, changes to speed limits.

The UK supports the aims of the Stockholm Declaration on road safety. The UK is already committed to the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and already adopts a safe system approach to road safety.

We recognise that speed limits play an important part in road safety, and we already encourage local authorities to consider 20 mph where it is appropriate

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of airspace reforms on the tranquillity of Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The airspace issues surrounding National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) were considered in the Department’s airspace and noise project. The outcome of this work was reflected in the Air Navigation Guidance 2017, which the department issued to the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) in October 2017.

The guidance requires the CAA to have regard to the statutory purposes of National Parks and AONB when considering proposals for airspace changes. When airspace changes are being considered, it is important that local circumstances, including community views on specific areas that should be avoided, are taken into account where possible. However, given the finite amount of airspace available, it will not always be possible to avoid overflying National Parks or AONB.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what data they collect about air pollution at, and near to, airports.

The Government has a national air quality monitoring network. In addition to this, local authorities undertake their own monitoring and have an obligation to review and assess local air quality and to take action where they have identified an air quality problem.

Different airports have different obligations for monitoring and reporting air quality, with some reporting requirements necessary by law through planning obligations. Results of this monitoring are shared with stakeholders and are available online.

In the Aviation Strategy, the Government is considering a broad range of national aviation-related air quality initiatives including proposals to improve the monitoring of air pollution around airports.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to reduce air pollution at, and near to, airports.

The management of air pollution at, and near to, airports and any restrictions to ensure compliance with limits are the responsibility of airports and the relevant local authorities.

In the Aviation Strategy, the Government is considering a broad range of national aviation-related air quality initiatives including potential requirements and guidance for airports to produce air quality plans.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the source of their most recent data regarding the flow of groundwater near the HS2 Harvil Road site; and whether this data has been made public.

The source of the most recent groundwater flow data relating to the HS2 Harvil Road site is the ongoing measurement and monitoring of groundwater levels currently being undertaken by HS2 Ltd’s contractors. Measurement and monitoring at this site has been ongoing for 3 years. This data is not yet in the public domain.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their policy on airport expansion.

The Airports National Policy Statement was designated as government policy in June 2018 following a vote in the House of Commons. It sets out that there is a need to increase airport capacity in the South East of England by 2030 by constructing one new runway and that this need is best met by the Northwest runway scheme at Heathrow Airport.

The Northwest runway scheme is to be fully funded and delivered by the private sector. It is for Heathrow to demonstrate that it can meet its environmental obligations, that the project can be financed and built and that the business case is realistic.

Beyond Heathrow, the Government is supportive of airports across the UK making best use of their existing runways as long as they address the economic and environmental impacts and proposed mitigations. As part of the planning process for airport applications it is expected that the relevant planning body will scrutinise whether a scheme is in-line with government policy.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reduce the incidence of road deaths and injuries.

The Government is committed to improving the safety of all road users. The Road Safety Statement – ‘A Lifetime of Road Safety’, published in July last year, describes in some detail the Department’s intention to undertake a set of actions in the coming years aimed at improving road safety. For example, one of those actions is for the Department to establish a rural roads working group to share experience on improving rural road safety and to work together to tackle the key issues.

The effectiveness of these measures will be kept under review.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what rates of (1) deaths, and (2) injuries, are recorded on roads, per capita, broken down by (a) region, (b) speed limit, and (c) mode of transport.

The number and rate per million population of people killed and injured in reported road accidents, by region, road user type, and speed limit in Great Britain in 2018 are shown in the tables attached.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure that all women's prisons have (1) paediatric, and (2) neonatal, emergency equipment; and how they intend to ensure that all healthcare staff are trained in paediatric and neonatal resuscitation.

NHS England and NHS Improvement is responsible for commissioning virtually all healthcare services in prisons in England, including clinical services for pregnant women.

Basic resuscitation equipment only is provided in prisons. NHS England and NHS Improvement has consulted experts in the field of neonatal resuscitation, following which a decision was taken not to provide neonatal resuscitation equipment in prisons due to the highly specialised nature of neonatal resuscitation, which requires specialist training, equipment and immediate access to highly qualified and skilled staff. Should these staff not be available there is a risk that the equipment could be used by untrained staff which risks harming the baby.

All healthcare staff should receive relevant first aid training, including basic adult life support and what to do in emergency situations where specialist neonatal resuscitation is required. This normally includes seeking a rapid response from the local ambulance service who can guide staff through cardiopulmonary resuscitation/rescue breaths and keeping the baby warm until the local ambulance service are in attendance.

While the training of staff employed by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service working in prisons is a matter for that organisation, as the commissioner for NHS services in prisons, NHS England and NHS Improvement seeks evidence that commissioned healthcare providers field competent and appropriately-trained staff to fulfil specific requirements in their contractual obligations.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to reports of transmission of COVID-19 between minks and humans in Denmark, what steps they are taking to reduce the human and animal health risks posed by mink and other fur farming.

Fur farming including mink and other animal fur has been banned in the United Kingdom since 2000.

There are an estimated 120,000 wild mink in Great Britain, that established in the wild following escapes/releases from fur farms in the early twentieth century. As wild mink generally avoids human contact, there is very limited risk of direct contact with mink for the public. Individuals responsible for care of wild or rescued mink are being provided advice by Natural England on practices to reduce infection.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Immigration Health Surcharge exemption will extend to international volunteers from other countries working, or currently applying to work, in (1) Camphill communities, and (2) other health and social care settings, under Tier 5 visa arrangements.

The Department is working to identify those working in the health and care sector, who will be eligible for the reimbursement from 1 October. We will publish further details about how to apply and demonstrate eligibility in the coming months.

20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they intend to measure the success of the NHSX contact tracing application being trialled on the Isle of Wight.

The Isle of Wight phase was intended to improve our understanding of how the different components of our COVID-19 response fit together and how parts of the healthcare system interact with each other. It was also an opportunity to test that the underlying technologies and systems work. Our evaluation of the Isle of Wight phase was designed to provide us with answers on the health behaviours of people who use the app and those who do not, the attitude of individuals to the contact tracing app and their experience of using it, how successfully the app fits in to the wider health service processes, and the app’s influence on wider health-seeking behaviours. The Government Digital Service and Natcen have been procured to survey opinions and attitudes across the Isle of Wight to the app whilst Zuhlke Engineering has been overseeing the technical activities and deliveries.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of personal protective equipment guidance on the spread of COVID-19 in care homes, and in particular guidance for looking after residents who are not in the very vulnerable category and who are not displaying symptoms of COVID-19. [T]

During the current period of sustained transmission of COVID-19, we recommend the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) regardless of whether residents in care homes have symptoms or not.

Working with care sector representative bodies, Public Health England (PHE) published tailored guidance COVID-19 How to work safely in care homes on 17 April, as well as a specialised training video demonstrating the donning and doffing of PPE in care home settings. The PHE guidance also provides tables on when and which PPE to use. A copy of the guidance is attached.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people in the UK they estimate will contract COVID-19 in 2020.

The number of people who contract COVID-19 in 2020 will depend on behavioural factors and future policy. The Government’s five tests will seek to ensure that COVID-19 cases are kept low, whilst enabling the economy to re-open. It is important that people keep alert to control the virus, and in doing so, we will save lives.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of COVID-19 outbreaks in care homes following the release of hospital patients to those care homes.

The safety of residents and staff is a priority. We announced in our Adult Social Care Action Plan, on 15 April 2020, that testing will be provided to all care home residents before they are discharged from hospital into a care home. A copy of the Plan is attached. On 28 April, the Government announced that testing would be expanded in the care sector to include both symptomatic and asymptomatic care home staff and residents. Testing asymptomatic workers and residents will help prevent and control outbreaks.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many care home residents were transferred to hospital with symptoms related to COVID-19 between 3 and 24 April.

The Government does not hold data on the number of residents transferred from care homes to hospitals with symptoms related to COVID-19. We are working closely with local authorities, the care sector and NHS England to understand the impact of COVID-19 on care homes and ensure everyone has access to the right care in the most appropriate setting for their needs.

This is an unprecedented global pandemic and we will continue to work closely with the sector to keep our policies and data under review as the pandemic goes on.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish the scientific advice relating to the decision to allow mass gatherings such as the Cheltenham Festival in March.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies provides scientific and technical advice to inform Government decision-makers during emergencies. The scientific advice on public gatherings was published on the UK Parliament website on 30 March 2020. The Government makes decisions based on the best scientific evidence, along with consideration of the economic, operational, social and policy implications of any interventions that might be introduced.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish the scientific information provided by their scientific advisors relating to COVID-19.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) provides scientific and technical advice to inform Government decision-makers during emergencies. The evidence that informs the SAGE discussions is published on the GOV.UK website. The website is updated on a regular basis with the latest available evidence provided to SAGE.

26th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the attack by Eritrean troops in Adwa in the Tigray region of Ethiopia.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. The Minister will write directly to the Member with a response shortly.
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 12 July (HL1536), what if any access the National Audit Office has to private emails which they regard as amounting to “substantive discussions or decision generated in the course of conducting government business” but which have not been copied to a government email address.

As set out in the answer to HL1536, material amounting to “substantive discussions or decision generated in the course of conducting government business“ should be transferred to the official record and, as such, will be accessible by the NAO in the usual way. In addition, and as set out in Managing Public Money, when the NAO investigates any public sector organisation, it should get full cooperation in provision of papers.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
29th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the National Audit Office have the power to access the private emails of either (1) civil servants, (2) special advisers, or (3) ministers, if these have been used for government business relating directly to their investigations.

Under the National Audit Act 1983, the Comptroller and Auditor General has a right of access to all documents in the custody or under the control of a department that he reasonably requires for carrying out National Audit Office value for money examinations. There is a similar provision in the Government Resources and Accounts Act 2000 in relation to examinations by the Comptroller and Auditor General of a documents relating to a department’s accounts.

The 2013 Cabinet Office Guidance to departments on the use private email is clear that the originator or recipient of a communication should consider whether the information contained in private emails amounts to substantive discussions or decisions generated in the course of conducting government business, and take steps to ensure the relevant information is accessible (e.g. by copying it to a government email address).

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to prioritise companies which support UK environmental and climate targets for financial support administered as part of COVID-19 support programmes.

The Coronavirus is the biggest threat this country has faced in decades. Alongside the focus on supporting the economy, the Government continues to take its environmental responsibilities very seriously.

The Government’s support for business includes paying workers’ wages through the furlough scheme, deferring tax payments, over [£27] billion of government-backed loans and [£18.9] billion of corporate financing through the Bank of England. We will assess the impacts of potential interventions against their contribution to our environmental goals, including our climate change and air quality targets.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the report of the Independent Review of Prevent will provide a breakdown of the number and religious affiliation of individuals and organisations that gave evidence to the Review, including how many were funded by, or affiliated with, the Prevent Strategy.

The Independent Review of Prevent is currently ongoing. The Reviewer, William Shawcross, is independent, so we cannot provide any specific details of his engagement activities to date, nor can we predetermine the findings of the Review. However, he published details of his methodology for the Review on 23 March 2021. His Ways of Working can be found here: Independent Review of Prevent: ways of working -

The Independent Review of Prevent, led by William Shawcross, will gather and analyse a range of information to underpin robust, evidence-based findings and recommendations on the government’s strategy for supporting people vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism.

William Shawcross will submit his report to the Home Secretary on 30 September 2021. His report, with the Government’s response to his recommendations, will be laid in the Houses of Parliament by 31 December 2021.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) individuals identifying as Muslim, and (2) organisations representing Muslims, have engaged in consultations or submitted evidence for the Independent Review of Prevent.

The Independent Review of Prevent is currently ongoing. The Reviewer, William Shawcross, is independent, so we cannot provide any specific details of his engagement activities to date, nor can we predetermine the findings of the Review. However, he published details of his methodology for the Review on 23 March 2021. His Ways of Working can be found here: Independent Review of Prevent: ways of working -

The Independent Review of Prevent, led by William Shawcross, will gather and analyse a range of information to underpin robust, evidence-based findings and recommendations on the government’s strategy for supporting people vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism.

William Shawcross will submit his report to the Home Secretary on 30 September 2021. His report, with the Government’s response to his recommendations, will be laid in the Houses of Parliament by 31 December 2021.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the need to update the College of Policing’s body worn camera guidance (1) to reduce officers’ discretion about its use, and (2) to discourage the practice of turning away from an incident to avoid recording wrongdoing by a fellow officer.

The vast majority of police officers act with integrity at all times and Body Worn Video is a vital tool which helps protect them and the public. The College of Policing has improved its guidance on BWV use with Authorised Professional Practice (APP) guidance published in July 2020. These standards will continue to be periodically updated by the College to keep pace with any issues that arise.

In addition, the Government will consider how to increase the value of BWV in protecting officers and the public.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many organisations and individuals have been identified as engaging in Left, Anarchist, and Single-Issue Terrorism.

The Government does not comment on the specifics of intelligence matters.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the responsibilities are of (1) MI5, and (2) Counter Terrorism Policing, in relation to the surveillance and monitoring of political campaigns and campaigners.

All MI5 activity is conducted in relation to its statutory functions as set out in Section 1 of the Security Service Act 1989.

The Director General MI5 has a statutory responsibility to ensure that MI5 remains apolitical, the government of the day cannot instruct MI5 to perform any task for party political reasons. MI5 only investigates those individuals it considers may be a threat.

Similarly, CT policing’s remit is to protect the UK from terrorism and associated threats such as espionage. Responsibility for public-order policing – including in relation to protest groups and the facilitation of lawful protest – sits with individual forces, supported by the National Police Coordination Centre.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Extinction Rebellion is categorised as a Left, Anarchist and Single-Issue Terrorism organisation.

HMG do not currently categorise Extinction Rebellion as a terrorist organisation.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which (1) political, and (2) campaigning, organisations have been (a) monitored, and (b) infiltrated, by police, or at the direction of police, since 1991.

Part 2 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act provides the police with the power to authorise surveillance and covert human intelligence sources where it is necessary for one of the statutory purposes (i.e. the prevention and detection of crime) and proportionate to what is sought to be achieved. The police are operationally independent of government and the exercise of those powers is therefore a matter for the individual forces concerned.

In 2015 the Home Office established the Undercover Policing Inquiry, to inquire into and report on undercover police operations conducted by English and Welsh police forces in England and Wales since 1968. The Inquiry’s investigations remain ongoing and it will publish a report of its conclusions in due course.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) political, and (2) campaigning, organisations have been (a) monitored, and (b) infiltrated, by police, or at the direction of police, since 1991.

Part 2 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act provides the police with the power to authorise surveillance and covert human intelligence sources where it is necessary for one of the statutory purposes (i.e. the prevention and detection of crime) and proportionate to what is sought to be achieved. The police are operationally independent of government and the exercise of those powers is therefore a matter for the individual forces concerned.

In 2015 the Home Office established the Undercover Policing Inquiry, to inquire into and report on undercover police operations conducted by English and Welsh police forces in England and Wales since 1968. The Inquiry’s investigations remain ongoing and it will publish a report of its conclusions in due course.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what risk assessment has been conducted on the requirement of the Home Office for asylum seekers to report in person.

Immigration Enforcement recommenced face to face reporting in July and August for limited priority cohorts. We have implemented Safe Systems of Working (SSOW) and Risk Assessments in all our Reporting Centres. We have put in place robust social distancing measures, health screening questions as you enter, face masks offered to those without, one-way systems and sanitiser stations throughout our public areas.

We continue to review our current reporting arrangements in line with any new local and national COVID restrictions that are put in place. Before inviting individuals into reporting, case owners will assess cases based on the persons harm they pose to the public, their vulnerability and personal circumstances. We continue to keep in contact with the overall reporting population by telephone to update individuals on the current reporting position.

An SMS text or email/letter is sent to those required to recommence reporting detailing the date and time they should report along with relevant advice on COVID. We have also updated the reporting pages of GOV.UK for those who report and their representatives. This information includes travelling safely on public transport avoiding busy transport hubs, revised opening times to avoid travel at peak times, advice on reporting alone where possible and what to do if those reporting have symptoms or are shielding.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the current Tier 5 Visa arrangements for non-EU citizens to be engaged as volunteers by registered sponsoring organisations for periods of up to a year will be extended to include EU citizens; and if not, what plans they have to put in place alternative arrangements to enable non-EU and EU citizens to volunteer in social care settings in the UK after 31 December.

The current Tier 5 charity visa enables people from outside the EU to come to the UK to undertake unpaid charity work. Migrants on this route are also permitted to undertake a second job in the same sector at the same level as their main job for up to 20 hours per week. These arrangements will be extended to EEA citizens as part of the future points-based migration system.

We very much value the role many who have come to this country play in our healthcare sector, but we will not be introducing a general route for employers to seek cheaper labour from abroad, be those employees or volunteers.

The Migration Advisory Committee is clear that a solution to recruitment issues in social care cannot just be solved via the UK’s immigration system. Employers need to invest in technology, innovation and their existing workforce, focusing on making jobs more attractive for UK workers, not just looking to the migration system.

The Government is supporting the care sector in different ways, including through additional funding and launching a national recruitment campaign.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they use the term "aggravated activism" in government documents relating to policing and public order; and if so, what is their definition of that term.

The Government does not use the terminology of "aggravated activism" in relation to public order.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
27th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what communications have had with (1) the police, and (2) third-sector organisations, about preventative, non-criminal justice approaches to reducing knife crime.

The Government is determined to tackle the scourge of knife crime and other serious violence, which is having a devastating effect on too many victims, families and communities. We are providing the police with the resources and powers they need, including recruiting an extra 20,000 officers over the next three years. Through regular dialogue with the National Police Chiefs’ Council and direct with forces themselves, we will continue to support the police and a wide range of other partners about the challenges they face in tackling serious violence.

The Serious Violence Strategy, published in April 2018, put a new emphasis on prevention and early intervention alongside continuing, robust enforcement. We have also worked with voluntary sector organisations via continuous discussions and visits to support delivery under a number of funding streams. These include the Government’s anti-knife crime Community Fund, where we have supported 175 projects in local communities delivered by voluntary sector agencies to tackle knife crime in the three years since 2017/18. They also include the 40 projects under the £22 million Early Intervention Youth Fund, working with children and young people across England and Wales, which have been delivered by the third sector in some areas and local authorities in others and are supported by Police and Crime Commissioners. In addition, we are providing £200m over the next 10 years through a Youth Endowment Fund to focus on those most at risk of youth violence including those displaying signs such as truancy, aggression and involvement in anti-social behaviour in order to steer them away from becoming serious offenders.

We have also invested £35 million from the £100 million Serious Violence Fund in Violence Reduction Units as a key component of our action to tackle the root causes of serious violence. Violence Reduction Units are non-statutory partnerships which offer leadership and strategic coordination of the local response to serious violence by bringing together police, local government, health and education professionals, community leaders and other key partners to identify the drivers of serious violence and agree a multi-agency response.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to require local authorities in England to take into account (1) the use of carbon capture, utilisation and storage technologies, or (2) the potential for future installation of such technology, when considering whether to grant permission for new energy from waste plants.

The National Planning Policy Framework is clear that the planning system should support the transition to a low carbon future, including by supporting renewable and low carbon energy and associated infrastructure. Local Planning Authorities should consider this when considering whether to grant permission for new energy for waste plants.

In addition to requiring planning permission to build a new energy from waste plant, an environmental permit may be required to operate it. The Environment Agency are the permitting authority in England. Environmental permits contain conditions to protect the environment and human health. Energy from waste permits can set controls a range of factors, for example, by including emissions limits. Carbon capture and utilisation and storage technologies could play a role in this.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have (1) to put a target on their aim to diversify the housebuilding industry, and (2) to collect statistics to monitor delivery against that target.

The Government is committed to diversifying the housebuilding industry. This means enabling a greater variety of firms to contribute to housing supply, providing for a wider range of housing needs and improving productivity, quality and choice. We are providing financial support to help drive greater diversification. The £3 billion Short Term Home Building Fund is available to SME housebuilders, MMC manufacturers and other innovative forms of housing delivery. We have also announced a National Home Building Fund (NHBF), investing £7.1 billion over 4 years, including £2.2 billion of investment to SME firms and innovative housebuilders.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that the Planning Bill directs Local Plans towards promoting sustainable transport to end developers being required to overprovide car parking in areas with good public transport and active travel options.

As set out in the Planning for the Future white paper, our reforms will leave an inheritance of environmental improvement, including that new homes will be built closer to where people want to live and work, to reduce our reliance on carbon-intensive modes of transport.

The White Paper consultation closed in October 2020, and received around 44,000 responses – demonstrating just how important this is to people. We will publish the Government’s response to the consultation, setting out the way forward, ahead of introducing the Planning Bill to Parliament.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to put self and custom-build and community-led housing at the heart of the Planning Bill so that the public can bring forward their own development.

The Government is committed to increasing the number of self and custom build homes and community-led housing in this country, and to establish it as a mainstream option for people to choose to get on the housing ladder or when moving home. The Planning Bill will simplify and modernise the planning system. It will establish a clear set of rules, on questions ranging from where communities want homes to be built to the high design and environmental standards that must be met. Both those looking to self and custom build their own home and SME housebuilders will find this system much easier, less costly and quicker to navigate, with more land available for development and clearer expectations on the types of development permitted.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of potential new build homes that are dependent on the Community Housing Fund.

Until the end of March 2020, when the funding period ended, the Community Housing Fund was delivered outside London by Homes England (and its predecessor, the Homes and Communities Agency). Data provided by Homes England in May indicated that it had received applications for funding from projects anticipating the delivery of a total of 10,780 homes, 4,347 of which from applications that have been approved. The overwhelming majority of the funding requested was in the form of revenue grant to cover pre-development costs. Organisations that are registered as providers of social housing may seek capital funding from the Shared Ownership and Affordable Homes Programme operated outside London by Homes England and, where appropriate, Homes England has been encouraging them to do so.

Within London, the Community Housing Fund is delivered by the Greater London Authority (GLA) with £36 million grant awarded to it by MHCLG. Data provided by the GLA in December indicates a current pipeline of up to 1,387 community-led homes for which funding applications may be made to the GLA.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to devolve powers to (1) the Mayor of London, and (2) elected mayors in England and Wales.

The Government has committed to publishing an English Devolution White Paper as a strategy to unleash the potential of all our regions – covering plans for full devolution across England and levelling up powers of existing mayors.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
8th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what communications they have had with local authorities in England and Wales about (1) the availability, and (2) the funding, of (a) temporary, and (b) emergency, accommodation.

Local authorities have a statutory duty to provide accommodation for households that are homeless and defined as being in priority need, unintentionally homeless and eligible for assistance. They are obliged to secure temporary accommodation for the household in the first instance until suitable long-term accommodation can be secured.

Local authorities provide updates on how many households are living in temporary accommodation to Government via H-CLIC, the new quarterly data return on local authorities’ actions under homelessness legislation. According to that data, in England, the current total number of households in temporary accommodation is 86,130. Of these households, 7,110 were in bed and breakfast accommodation and 22,360 were in nightly paid, privately managed accommodation.

In December 2019 we announced the allocation of £263 million in funding for 2020/21 to local authorities designed to support them to deliver services to tackle homelessness. This is an uplift of £23 million on the previous year. The purpose of this funding is to give local authorities more control and flexibility in managing homelessness pressures and supporting those who at risk of homelessness, including providing them with temporary accommodation.

As housing is a devolved issue, we would advise you to contact the Welsh Government for information about temporary accommodation in Wales.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
8th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the availability of (1) temporary, and (2) emergency, accommodation in England and Wales.

Local authorities have a statutory duty to provide accommodation for households that are homeless and defined as being in priority need, unintentionally homeless and eligible for assistance. They are obliged to secure temporary accommodation for the household in the first instance until suitable long-term accommodation can be secured.

Local authorities provide updates on how many households are living in temporary accommodation to Government via H-CLIC, the new quarterly data return on local authorities’ actions under homelessness legislation. According to that data, in England, the current total number of households in temporary accommodation is 86,130. Of these households, 7,110 were in bed and breakfast accommodation and 22,360 were in nightly paid, privately managed accommodation.

In December 2019 we announced the allocation of £263 million in funding for 2020/21 to local authorities designed to support them to deliver services to tackle homelessness. This is an uplift of £23 million on the previous year. The purpose of this funding is to give local authorities more control and flexibility in managing homelessness pressures and supporting those who at risk of homelessness, including providing them with temporary accommodation.

As housing is a devolved issue, we would advise you to contact the Welsh Government for information about temporary accommodation in Wales.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
8th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what conditions are placed on the disbursement of funds through affordable housing grants from Homes England.

The Government is committed to increasing the supply of social housing and has made £9 billion available through the Affordable Homes Programme to March 2022 to deliver approximately 250,000 new affordable homes in a wide range of tenures, including Social Rent.

Funding is allocated by Homes England (and the GLA in London). Registered providers (such as housing associations and local authorities) are able to bid into the Programme for funding to build Rent to Buy and affordable rented homes; funding for Shared Ownership is also open to private providers. Registered providers can also bid for funding to deliver social rent homes in areas of high affordability pressure.

The conditions guidance for the Affordable Homes Programme is published by the Department as part of its Capital Funding Guide.

The funding guide can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/capital-funding-guide.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to update permitted development rights to facilitate deployment of ground mounted solar arrays which rotate to track the movement of the sun.

To facilitate the take up of renewable energy there is a range of permitted development rights for micro-generation from renewable energy sources. These include stand-alone solar equipment up to 4 metres in height. The rights apply both within the curtilage of residential and non-residential premises and are set out in Part 14 of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) Order 2015, as amended. There are no current plans to alter the permitted development rights for microgeneration renewable energy.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the adequacy of permitted development rights for the deployment of ground mounted solar arrays which rotate to track the movement of the sun.

To facilitate the take up of renewable energy there is a range of permitted development rights for micro-generation from renewable energy sources. These include stand-alone solar equipment up to 4 metres in height. The rights apply both within the curtilage of residential and non-residential premises and are set out in Part 14 of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) Order 2015, as amended. There are no current plans to alter the permitted development rights for microgeneration renewable energy.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of grade 3 prison officers being put in charge of pregnant women's healthcare.

Pregnant women in prison are entitled to the same quality and range of healthcare services as they have access to in the community. Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) published a new policy on pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation from Children up to the Age of Two in Women’s Prisons on 20 September. This delivers a range of improvements to the care of pregnant women in prison. Prisons are in the process of implementing new requirements and are expected to have this in place by 20 March 2022.

Healthcare in women’s prisons, including perinatal services, are commissioned by NHS England & Improvement. The role of HMPPS is to work in partnership with local healthcare providers to secure access to these services. The new policy introduces enhanced Band 3 Pregnancy and Mother and Baby Liaison Officers across the women’s estate. This is an operational prison role designed to enable early identification, contact and signposting to support services, including perinatal healthcare services. It is not a clinical role – provision of clinical services is the responsibility of NHS England and NHS Improvement.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to implement a national policy and pathway for pregnant women in prison.

Pregnant women in prison are entitled to the same quality and range of healthcare services as they have access to in the community. Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) published a new policy on pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation from Children up to the Age of Two in Women’s Prisons on 20 September. This delivers a range of improvements to the care of pregnant women in prison. Prisons are in the process of implementing new requirements and are expected to have this in place by 20 March 2022.

Healthcare in women’s prisons, including perinatal services, are commissioned by NHS England & Improvement. The role of HMPPS is to work in partnership with local healthcare providers to secure access to these services. The new policy introduces enhanced Band 3 Pregnancy and Mother and Baby Liaison Officers across the women’s estate. This is an operational prison role designed to enable early identification, contact and signposting to support services, including perinatal healthcare services. It is not a clinical role – provision of clinical services is the responsibility of NHS England and NHS Improvement.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman Independent investigation into the death of Baby A at HMP Bronzefield on 27 September 2019, published on 22 September, what discussions they have had with the Chief Inspector of Prisons.

The events that took place at HMP/YOI Bronzefield were unquestionably tragic, and significant improvements have since been put in place both at the prison and across the entire female estate.

The Ministry of Justice, Sodexo (the private providers who are contracted to run HMP Bronzefield) and health providers have accepted the recommendations made by the Prison and Probation Ombudsman in their thorough report and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) will continue to work closely with providers to ensure pregnant women in Bronzefield receive the best possible care. The on-site HMPPS Controller will oversee implementation of the recommendations in line with the agreed Action Plan and timelines, working collaboratively with NHSE and service providers.

A project team is coordinating the implementation of the recommendations and to take forward wider learning across all women’s prisons.

In July 2019 a fundamental review of policy relating to pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation from children up to the age of two in women’s prisons commenced, which concluded in July 2020, and HMIP were part of the consultation group. As a result of the review, a new policy has been published and learning from these tragic events has been incorporated into the new policy where appropriate.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to update Parliament on the progress of implementing the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman recommendations for change at HMP Bronzefield, published on 22 September.

The events that took place at HMP/YOI Bronzefield were unquestionably tragic, and significant improvements have since been put in place both at the prison and across the entire female estate.

The Ministry of Justice, Sodexo (the private providers who are contracted to run HMP Bronzefield) and health providers have accepted the recommendations made by the Prison and Probation Ombudsman in their thorough report and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) will continue to work closely with providers to ensure pregnant women in Bronzefield receive the best possible care. The on-site HMPPS Controller will oversee implementation of the recommendations in line with the agreed Action Plan and timelines, working collaboratively with NHSE and service providers.

A project team is coordinating the implementation of the recommendations and to take forward wider learning across all women’s prisons.

In July 2019 a fundamental review of policy relating to pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation from children up to the age of two in women’s prisons commenced, which concluded in July 2020, and HMIP were part of the consultation group. As a result of the review, a new policy has been published and learning from these tragic events has been incorporated into the new policy where appropriate.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that all the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman recommendations for change at HMP Bronzefield, published on 22 September, will be implemented in a timely fashion.

The events that took place at HMP/YOI Bronzefield were unquestionably tragic, and significant improvements have since been put in place both at the prison and across the entire female estate.

The Ministry of Justice, Sodexo (the private providers who are contracted to run HMP Bronzefield) and health providers have accepted the recommendations made by the Prison and Probation Ombudsman in their thorough report and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) will continue to work closely with providers to ensure pregnant women in Bronzefield receive the best possible care. The on-site HMPPS Controller will oversee implementation of the recommendations in line with the agreed Action Plan and timelines, working collaboratively with NHSE and service providers.

A project team is coordinating the implementation of the recommendations and to take forward wider learning across all women’s prisons.

In July 2019 a fundamental review of policy relating to pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation from children up to the age of two in women’s prisons commenced, which concluded in July 2020, and HMIP were part of the consultation group. As a result of the review, a new policy has been published and learning from these tragic events has been incorporated into the new policy where appropriate.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) women, and (2) trans men, were known to be pregnant in East Sutton Park Prison for the first two quarters of 2020.

We do not hold this pregnancy data for the requested time period or format. This data would need to be collected by individual prisons at a disproportionate cost.

As part of our fundamental review of policy relating to pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation from children up to two in prison, we committed to providing national pregnancy data in the future. The ‘HMPPS Annual Digest, April 2020 to March 2021’ was published on 29 July 2021 and this contains the latest published figures relating to pregnant prisoners. This data is, however, provided as a national snapshot. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmpps-annual-digest-april-2020-to-march-2021

Further information on the review, including our findings and resulting reforms regarding data collection, can be found in our summary report published in July 2020:

Review of operational policy on pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation (publishing.service.gov.uk)

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) women, and (2) trans men, were known to be pregnant in Drake Hall Prison for the first two quarters of 2020.

We do not hold this pregnancy data for the requested time period or format. This data would need to be collected by individual prisons at a disproportionate cost.

As part of our fundamental review of policy relating to pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation from children up to two in prison, we committed to providing national pregnancy data in the future. The ‘HMPPS Annual Digest, April 2020 to March 2021’ was published on 29 July 2021 and this contains the latest published figures relating to pregnant prisoners. This data is, however, provided as a national snapshot. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmpps-annual-digest-april-2020-to-march-2021

Further information on the review, including our findings and resulting reforms regarding data collection, can be found in our summary report published in July 2020:

Review of operational policy on pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation (publishing.service.gov.uk)

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) women, and (2) trans men, were known to be pregnant in New Hall Prison for the first two quarters of 2020.

We do not hold this pregnancy data for the requested time period or format. This data would need to be collected by individual prisons at a disproportionate cost.

As part of our fundamental review of policy relating to pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation from children up to two in prison, we committed to providing national pregnancy data in the future. The ‘HMPPS Annual Digest, April 2020 to March 2021’ was published on 29 July 2021 and this contains the latest published figures relating to pregnant prisoners. This data is, however, provided as a national snapshot. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmpps-annual-digest-april-2020-to-march-2021

Further information on the review, including our findings and resulting reforms regarding data collection, can be found in our summary report published in July 2020:

Review of operational policy on pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation (publishing.service.gov.uk)

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)