Cabinet Office

We support the Prime Minister and ensure the effective running of government. We are also the corporate headquarters for government, in partnership with HM Treasury, and we take the lead in certain critical policy areas.



Secretary of State

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union

 Portrait

Dominic Raab
Deputy Prime Minister

 Portrait

Andrew Griffith
Parliamentary Secretary (Minister for Policy and Head of the Prime Minister’s Policy Unit)

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Liberal Democrat
Lord Wallace of Saltaire (LDEM - Life peer)
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)
Alistair Carmichael (LDEM - Orkney and Shetland)
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)

Plaid Cymru
Hywel Williams (PC - Arfon)
Shadow PC Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)

Labour
Baroness Smith of Basildon (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Cabinet Office, Constitutional and Devolved issues)
Baroness Smith of Basildon (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)

Scottish National Party
Stewart Hosie (SNP - Dundee East)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)

Democratic Unionist Party
Gregory Campbell (DUP - East Londonderry)
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Angela Rayner (LAB - Ashton-under-Lyne)
Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
Baroness Chapman of Darlington (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office
Rachel Hopkins (LAB - Luton South)
Shadow Minister (Cabinet Office)

Scottish National Party
Brendan O'Hara (SNP - Argyll and Bute)
Shadow SNP Deputy Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)

Labour
Conor McGinn (LAB - St Helens North)
Shadow Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
Fleur Anderson (LAB - Putney)
Shadow Minister (Cabinet Office)
Ministers of State
Nigel Adams (CON - Selby and Ainsty)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
Steve Barclay (CON - North East Cambridgeshire)
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
Michael Ellis (CON - Northampton North)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
Lord True (CON - Life peer)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
Oliver Dowden (CON - Hertsmere)
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
Heather Wheeler (CON - South Derbyshire)
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
Alok Sharma (CON - Reading West)
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
Scheduled Event
Wednesday 25th May 2022
Cabinet Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Procurement Bill – second reading
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Scheduled Event
Thursday 26th May 2022
Cabinet Office
Addresses to the Crown - Main Chamber
Platinum Jubilee of Her Majesty the Queen
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Scheduled Event
Thursday 9th June 2022
09:30
Cabinet Office
Oral questions - Main Chamber
9 Jun 2022, 9:30 a.m.
Cabinet Office (including Topical Questions)
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Scheduled Event
Thursday 14th July 2022
09:30
Cabinet Office
Oral questions - Main Chamber
14 Jul 2022, 9:30 a.m.
Cabinet Office (including Topical Questions)
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View calendar

Cabinet Office Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Apr. 20
Oral Questions
Jun. 29
Urgent Questions
May. 12
Written Statements
Apr. 19
Westminster Hall
Feb. 02
Adjournment Debate
View All Cabinet Office Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Introduced: 11th May 2022

A Bill to make provision about procurement

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Wednesday 11th May 2022
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading (Lords)
Wednesday 25th May 2022

Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament

Introduced: 12th May 2021

A Bill to make provision about the dissolution and calling of Parliament, including provision for the repeal of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 24th March 2022 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 30th December 2020

A Bill to Implement, and make other provision in connection with, the Trade and Cooperation Agreement; to make further provision in connection with the United Kingdom’s future relationship with the EU and its member States; to make related provision about passenger name record data, customs and privileges and immunities; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 30th December 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 19th May 2020

A Bill to make provision about reports of the Boundary Commissions under the Parliamentary Constituencies Act 1986; to make provision about the number of parliamentary constituencies and other rules for the distribution of seats; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 14th December 2020 and was enacted into law.

Cabinet Office - Secondary Legislation

These Regulations make amendments to various United Kingdom and Scottish public procurement regulations for the purpose of implementing the Free Trade Agreement between Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway and the United Kingdom (“EEA EFTA Agreement”). This includes consequential amendments.
View All Cabinet Office Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
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Petitions with most signatures
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7,161 Signatures
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(12 in the last 7 days)
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2,709 Signatures
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2,395 Signatures
(9 in the last 7 days)
Petition Debates Contributed

The individual must remain sovereign over their own body, discrimination against those who cannot or will not be vaccinated against COVID is incompatible with a free democracy. The Government must take firm action to prevent 'vaccination passports' and discriminatory 'no jab, no job' policies.

We would like the UK Govt to negotiate a free cultural work permit that gives us visa free travel throughout the 27 EU states for music touring professionals, bands, musicians, artists, TV and sports celebrities that tour the EU to perform shows and events & Carnet exception for touring equipment.

Isolation essential to the Government’s strategy for fighting coronavirus, and UK citizens must remain healthy and exercise whilst keeping adequate distance between people. The Government should allow golf courses to open so families or individuals can play golf in order to exercise safely.

View All Cabinet Office Petitions

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

11th May 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination and (d) bullying scores by ethnicity of civil servants’ responses to the (i) 2020 and (ii) 2021 Civil Service People Surveys.

The Cabinet Office publishes results from the Civil Service People Survey on GOV.UK. In addition to the overall results, demographic breakdowns are published.

The demographic scores for the 2020 Civil Service People Survey were published on 31 March. This publication included scores for (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination, and (d) bullying by ethnicity, disability status, gender and sexual orientation of civil servants’ responses.

Publication of the demographic scores of the 2021 Civil Service People Survey is scheduled for 30 June 2022 on GOV.UK. This will also include scores for (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination, and (d) bullying by ethnicity, disability status, gender and sexual orientation of civil servants’ responses.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
11th May 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination and (d) bullying scores by disability status of civil servants’ responses to the (i) 2020 and (ii) 2021 Civil Service People Surveys.

The Cabinet Office publishes results from the Civil Service People Survey on GOV.UK. In addition to the overall results, demographic breakdowns are published.

The demographic scores for the 2020 Civil Service People Survey were published on 31 March. This publication included scores for (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination, and (d) bullying by ethnicity, disability status, gender and sexual orientation of civil servants’ responses.

Publication of the demographic scores of the 2021 Civil Service People Survey is scheduled for 30 June 2022 on GOV.UK. This will also include scores for (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination, and (d) bullying by ethnicity, disability status, gender and sexual orientation of civil servants’ responses.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
11th May 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination and (d) bullying scores of civil servants’ responses by gender to the (i) 2020 and (ii) 2021 Civil Service People Surveys.

The Cabinet Office publishes results from the Civil Service People Survey on GOV.UK. In addition to the overall results, demographic breakdowns are published.

The demographic scores for the 2020 Civil Service People Survey were published on 31 March. This publication included scores for (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination, and (d) bullying by ethnicity, disability status, gender and sexual orientation of civil servants’ responses.

Publication of the demographic scores of the 2021 Civil Service People Survey is scheduled for 30 June 2022 on GOV.UK. This will also include scores for (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination, and (d) bullying by ethnicity, disability status, gender and sexual orientation of civil servants’ responses.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
11th May 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination and (d) bullying scores of civil servants’ responses by sexual orientation to the (i) 2020 and (ii) 2021 Civil Service People Surveys.

The Cabinet Office publishes results from the Civil Service People Survey on GOV.UK. In addition to the overall results, demographic breakdowns are published.

The demographic scores for the 2020 Civil Service People Survey were published on 31 March. This publication included scores for (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination, and (d) bullying by ethnicity, disability status, gender and sexual orientation of civil servants’ responses.

Publication of the demographic scores of the 2021 Civil Service People Survey is scheduled for 30 June 2022 on GOV.UK. This will also include scores for (a) engagement, (b) inclusion, (c) discrimination, and (d) bullying by ethnicity, disability status, gender and sexual orientation of civil servants’ responses.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
10th May 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the financial impact on UK Security Vetting applicants of waiting periods for security clearance.

No assessment has been made of the financial impact on applicants to UK Security Vetting of waiting periods for security clearance.

The purpose of National Security Vetting is to help safeguard National Security. Waiting periods for security clearance are driven by the time required to gather information from a range of sources on an applicant and the subsequent analysis of this information. Waiting times therefore vary accordingly.

Advice is provided to applicants that this process can take some time to complete. I am unable to comment further on the financial impact that this essential security control may have.

Work is ongoing within Cabinet Office to modernise and improve the effectiveness of vetting overall, in line with the Government’s wider modernisation agenda and to keep pace with the threats faced by the UK today. The modernisation aims to improve the end to end user experience for the applicant and sponsoring department and improve the speed of applications.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
10th May 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what total cost to the public purse was of vehicles ordered on Downing Street's travel account for mini-cabs in each month of (a) 2019-20, (b) 2020-21 and (c) 2021-22.

This information is not centrally held in the form requested, and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
10th May 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the background work is expected to commence to establish the Commission on Covid Commemoration; and when he plans to publish a detailed timetable for setting up the Commission on Covid Commemoration.

As the Prime Minister previously announced, the Government will set out the Commission membership and terms of reference in due course.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
10th May 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reasons the annual report from Lord Geidt, the Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests has been delayed and when it will be published.

The Independent Adviser publishes a report annually. The previous report was published at the end of May 2021.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
22nd Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) civil servants, (2) special advisers, and (3) contractors, were employed in the Cabinet Office in (a) 2001, (b) 2011, and (c) 2021.

The number of (1) civil servants, (2) special advisors, and (3) contractors, were employed in the Cabinet Office in (a) 2001, (b) 2011, and (c) 2021 is set out in the table below.

Figures for contractors in 2001 and 2011 were not held centrally during those years and are therefore unavailable.

In 2011, the role and remit of the Cabinet Office was largely to act in support of the Prime Minister and the operation of Government. Since then, the role of the Cabinet Office in managing the Civil Service has grown significantly to include centralisation of a number of functions including Human Resources, Commercial, Digital, Communications, and Security.

The Cabinet Office also supports the Government in its response to national events, such as – in recent years – EU Exit, COVID-19, and COP26.

Headcount

2001

2011

2021

Civil Servants

1,890

1,641

1807 - Secretariats and Policy 8,437 - Corporate Centre for Government, Inquiries, Equalities Hub, COP 26 and COVID Taskforce

Special Advisors

25

43

58

Contractors

N/A

N/A

429

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many FTE staff are working on processing the security checks required for airport staff to begin employment.

I am unable to confirm staffing levels in United Kingdom Security Vetting (UKSV) for security reasons but can confirm that there are measures in place to fast track applications submitted from the aviation sector. UKSV works closely with customer groups and authorities to understand their forecasted demand for the provision of vetting services. In turn this allows for an appropriate resourcing forecast.

I am also unable to reveal the number of National Security Vetting (NSV) checks in progress as this is likely to prejudice national security. It would also impact the protective measures employed in safeguarding Her Majesty’s Government (HMG). However, I am able to report that security checks are being processed in a timely manner and that there are no delays.

In line with the practice followed by successive administrations, the Government does not otherwise comment on security matters.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average time taken is to process the government security checks required for a single employee of airport staff to begin employment.

I am unable to confirm staffing levels in United Kingdom Security Vetting (UKSV) for security reasons but can confirm that there are measures in place to fast track applications submitted from the aviation sector. UKSV works closely with customer groups and authorities to understand their forecasted demand for the provision of vetting services. In turn this allows for an appropriate resourcing forecast.

I am also unable to reveal the number of National Security Vetting (NSV) checks in progress as this is likely to prejudice national security. It would also impact the protective measures employed in safeguarding Her Majesty’s Government (HMG). However, I am able to report that security checks are being processed in a timely manner and that there are no delays.

In line with the practice followed by successive administrations, the Government does not otherwise comment on security matters.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
27th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the amount of time it takes to process security clearance for new airport staff; what is the average amount of time taken for this process; and how this average compares to that of April 2019.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference the report published by Collateral Global entitled Understanding Definitions and Reporting of Deaths Attributed to COVID-19 in the UK, if he will take steps to require establishments to regularly verify a subset of deaths using autopsies with full medical documentation in any potential future pandemic.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the hon. Member’s Parliamentary Question of 14 April is attached.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department is enrolled on any trusted flagger programmes with social media companies.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport lead on social media companies and related trusted flagger programmes. Therefore, the Cabinet Office does not hold any information on this subject.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
25th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 4 April (HL6397), how many non-disclosure agreements have involved payments of £100,000 or more over the last five years.

Under the Cabinet Office issued guidance on the use of confidentiality clauses in the Civil Service, there are certain circumstances where departments are obliged to seek Cabinet Office Ministerial approval before using such clauses in a settlement agreement. This includes where the case has a proposed payment of £100,000 or more.

Data held by the Cabinet Office shows there has been one case over the last five years where Cabinet Office Ministerial approval was granted for use of a confidentiality clause to be used in connection with a settlement agreement with a proposed payment of £100,000 or more.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many pharmacists, as defined by the ONS occupation code 2213, pharmaceutical technicians as defined by ONS code 3217, and pharmacy and other dispensing assistants as defined by ONS occupation code 7114, died during the covid-19 pandemic in England in the period 1 March 2020 to 31 March 2022.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the hon. Member’s Parliamentary Question of 25 April is attached.



Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
26th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking, if any, to encourage civil servants to return to work in the office.

Following the lifting of COVID-19 restrictions, civil servants have been increasingly returning to the office.

The Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government Efficiency has written to departments to underline the importance of workplace attendance and request that they review their existing guidance on the minimum number of days staff work in the office to ensure we are making efficient use of the government estate.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
6th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in respect of the principal offices of each government department located in central London, (1) what temperature the offices are heated to during working hours in winter, and (2) what assessment they have made of the advantages and disadvantages of reducing that temperature by 2°C.

The government must meet the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, which place a legal obligation on employers to provide a 'reasonable' temperature in the workplace. The current operational temperatures in open plan offices vary across government.

We are following, and closely monitoring, industry and HSE guidance in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of reducing the operational temperature setpoint by 2°C.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Minister of the Cabinet Office, how many people in the UK were employed in the semi-processed food industries at the end of the financial years (a) 2020-21 and (b) 2021-22.

It has not proved possible to respond to the Rt hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Minister of the Cabinet Office, what the total gross value added to the UK economy was from semi-processed food industries during the financial year (a) 2020-21 and (b) 2021-22.

It has not proved possible to respond to the Rt hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people in the UK were employed in agriculture, forestry and fishing industries at the end of the financial year (a) 2020-21 and (b) 2021-22.

It has not proved possible to respond to the Rt hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the total gross value added to the UK economy was from agriculture, forestry and fishing industries during the financial year (a) 2020-21 and (b) 2021-22.

It has not proved possible to respond to the Rt hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
26th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to provide a list of those individual benefits set out in the Benefits of Brexit paper, published on 31 January, which do not apply to Northern Ireland because of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what is the total cost to the public purse of the (a) travel, (b) accommodation and (c) printing costs of the Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government Efficiency’s visits to civil service offices across the country in the last (i) 7, (ii) 14, (iii) 21 and (iv) 28 days.

Since being appointed, the Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government Efficiency has visited Glass Wharf, Bristol, on Friday 22 April. Travel was provided by the Government Car Service. No accommodation costs were incurred. Costs for printing in support of the visit were not outside that usually provided.

The Minister also regularly attends government offices within London for meetings as part of his duties. Travel is usually provided by the Government Car Service and printing costs did not materially differ from those usually incurred.

Jacob Rees-Mogg
Minister of State (Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government efficiency)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions he has had with his counterparts in the Scottish Government on his Department’s review into retained EU law in the UK.

The Government remains committed to engaging with devolved governments on the reviews into retained EU law, including engaging at Ministerial level.

To date, there have been regular official level discussions with the devolved administrations. We will continue to engage at an official level in areas of interest.

Jacob Rees-Mogg
Minister of State (Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government efficiency)
20th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister of the Cabinet Office, whether the National Infrastructure and Construction Pipeline has a target for the use of UK steel.

The National Infrastructure and Construction Pipeline reports on forecast and projected infrastructure investment across the public and private sectors, and includes projections regarding skills demand. The Pipeline does not include targets for any sector, including UK steel.

This government is committed to creating the right conditions in the UK for a competitive and sustainable steel industry. It publishes a separate Steel Procurement Pipeline setting out the UK government steel requirements over the next 10 years, together with data on how departments are complying with steel procurement guidance. This enables UK steel manufacturers to better plan and bid for government contracts.

Jacob Rees-Mogg
Minister of State (Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government efficiency)
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he has instructed No. 10 staff to preserve evidence for the inquiry into the Government's handling of the covid-19 outbreak.

All departments are aware that the Covid inquiry will bring with it substantial obligations to provide relevant records, information and data, and that preparation for the inquiry includes the need to ensure that no material of potential relevance to the inquiry is destroyed. The Cabinet Office raised this to the attention of all departments across Whitehall in June 2021 and again in February 2022.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
22nd Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 24 June 2019 (HL16339), whether they continue to be the custodians, through the Government Property Agency, of the Royal Naval Division War Memorial.

The Government Property Agency (GPA) remains the Custodian of the Royal Naval Division War Memorial following transfer of the freehold.

Renovation works to the Memorial were put on hold during a major refurbishment of London, Old Admiralty Building which was only completed in 2021.

The Government Property Agency is working with Heritage England to assess the works required to develop a suitable plan. We expect the works to be concluded at the earliest opportunity once we have received feedback from the Heritage survey, until this has been concluded the GPA is unable to give a timescale for completion.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 24 June 2019 (HL16339), whether the renovations due to be completed in 2019 have been carried out; whether there have been any further renovations since; and, if not, whether the Government Property Agency will conduct a survey to start renovations as soon as possible.

The Government Property Agency (GPA) remains the Custodian of the Royal Naval Division War Memorial following transfer of the freehold.

Renovation works to the Memorial were put on hold during a major refurbishment of London, Old Admiralty Building which was only completed in 2021.

The Government Property Agency is working with Heritage England to assess the works required to develop a suitable plan. We expect the works to be concluded at the earliest opportunity once we have received feedback from the Heritage survey, until this has been concluded the GPA is unable to give a timescale for completion.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, how long the fountain of the Royal Naval Division War Memorial has not been functional; and when they expect the necessary repairs to have been completed.

The Government Property Agency (GPA) remains the Custodian of the Royal Naval Division War Memorial following transfer of the freehold.

Renovation works to the Memorial were put on hold during a major refurbishment of London, Old Admiralty Building which was only completed in 2021.

The Government Property Agency is working with Heritage England to assess the works required to develop a suitable plan. We expect the works to be concluded at the earliest opportunity once we have received feedback from the Heritage survey, until this has been concluded the GPA is unable to give a timescale for completion.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Prime Minister is planning to visit Rwanda; and if so, when.

Our new migration and economic development partnership is a world first, which will tackle head-on the imbalance between illegal and legal migration routes. It will ensure that those who are in genuine need of protection will be safe and secure in a host country recognised globally for its record on welcoming and integrating migrants. And it will disrupt the business model of organised crime gangs and deter migrants from putting their lives at risk.

As has been the practice under successive Administrations, for security reasons, future engagements by the Prime Minister are announced as and when appropriate.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if the Efficiency and Value for Money Committee will publish the minutes of its meetings.

The Domestic & Economic (Efficiency and Value for Money) Committee is a Cabinet Committee.

It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.



Jacob Rees-Mogg
Minister of State (Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government efficiency)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, who will appoint members to the Efficiency and Value for Money Committee.

The Domestic & Economic (Efficiency and Value for Money) Committee is a Cabinet Committee.

Membership of Cabinet Committees is decided by the Prime Minister. GOV.UK is updated regularly with the list of Cabinet Committees, their terms of reference, and membership.

Jacob Rees-Mogg
Minister of State (Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government efficiency)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the selection criteria are for membership of the Efficiency and Value for Money Committee.

The Domestic & Economic (Efficiency and Value for Money) Committee is a Cabinet Committee.

Membership of Cabinet Committees is decided by the Prime Minister. GOV.UK is updated regularly with the list of Cabinet Committees, their terms of reference, and membership.

Jacob Rees-Mogg
Minister of State (Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government efficiency)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 said they had been eligible for free school meals during their school years.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022, describe their ethnicity as (a) White, (b) Black, (c) Asian and (d) Mixed Race.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all government Departments at the end of March 2022, described themselves as coming from a lower socio-economic background.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022, started their civil service career as members of the Civil Service Fast Stream.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 were aged (a) below 35 years old, (b) 35-44 years old, (c) 45-54 years old, (d) 55-64 years old and (e) in 2010 or later.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 started their civil service career (a) before 1980, (b) between 1980-89, (c) between 1990-1999, (d) between 2000-2009 and (e) in 2010 or later.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 (a) do not have a university degree or (b) did not obtain their first degree at (i) Oxford or Cambridge University, (ii) a non-Oxbridge Russell Group university, (iii) a non-Russell Group UK university and (iv) a non-UK university.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 said they had attended (a) state-funded non-selective secondary school, (b) a state-funded secondary school selective on the basis of academic, faith or other grounds and (c) an independent secondary school.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 said that at the time they were aged 18, they did not have a parent with formal educational qualifications.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 said that at the time they were aged 18 they had at least one parent who had obtained (a) a university degree or (b) qualifications below degree level as their highest educational qualification.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022, said that at the time they were aged 14, they had at least one parent working in (a) a higher managerial, administrative or professional occupation, (b) an intermediate occupation or (c) a routine or manual occupation.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
20th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022, described their gender as (a) male and (b) female.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office when he plans to respond to the letter dated 14 April 2022 from the hon. Member for Ashton-under-Lyne.

The advice of Independent Adviser on Ministers’ Interests has now been published and is available on GOV.UK. This sets out the Independent Adviser’s judgement that the requirements of the Ministerial Code have been adhered to by the Chancellor, and that he has been assiduous in meeting his obligations. The Prime Minister has accepted this advice and considers the matter closed. I have replied to the Rt Hon Member’s letter in that light.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent assessment has been made of the (a) effectiveness of the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO), (b) quality of PHSO customer service and (c) PHSO responsiveness to enquiries from hon. Members.

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman is a crown servant that reports directly to Parliament. The Ombudsman is not accountable to the government for its performance and sets its own standards for how it delivers its objectives. Further to this, the Honourable Member may wish to write to the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee that acts as the scrutiny body for the Ombu

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment his Department has made of the impact of recent civil service pay freezes on employee recruitment and retention.

Recruitment and retention data covering the period of the public sector pay pause is not currently held. In 2020/21, Civil Service turnover (includes all moves out of the Civil Service) was 5.9%.

In light of the pay pause, which was necessary in order to help protect public sector jobs and protect investment in public services, the Government ensured that the lowest paid across all of the public sector were protected. Anyone below a full time equivalent salary of £24,000 received an uplift of £250 or the new National Living Wage rate, whichever was greater. This was c.128,000 civil servants around the time the pay pause was announced in November 2020.

As the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced on October 27th 2021, the temporary public sector pay pause will be lifted. Pay awards will be made to public sector workers over the next three years as we return to a normal pay-setting process. It is for departments to monitor and consider their recruitment and retention challenges when determining future pay awards.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip