Earl of Clancarty Portrait

Earl of Clancarty

Crossbench - Excepted Hereditary

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Division Votes
Thursday 21st October 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]
voted Aye
One of 21 Crossbench Aye votes vs 3 Crossbench No votes
Tally: Ayes - 180 Noes - 130
Speeches
Wednesday 13th October 2021
UK Fashion Industry

My Lords, I welcome the noble Lord to his new post. The fashion industry is hugely valuable culturally and economically, …

Written Answers
Tuesday 3rd August 2021
Eurostar: Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made towards making Eurostar a CITES-designated port.
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Earl of Clancarty has voted in 158 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(30 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(24 debate interactions)
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(14 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(21 debate contributions)
Home Office
(19 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(14 debate contributions)
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View all Earl of Clancarty's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Earl of Clancarty, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Earl of Clancarty has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Earl of Clancarty has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Earl of Clancarty has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Earl of Clancarty has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


74 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 22 February (HL13057), when they expect to announce the first meetings of the committees established under the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement; and what representations the UK has made to the EU to establish these meetings.

The dates of the first meetings of the committees established under the UK - EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement have not yet been agreed with the EU. These bodies, including the Partnership Council, will begin their work formally once the Agreement has been ratified - unless there are essential decisions which cannot be deferred. We look forward to a positive and constructive relationship with the EU, allowing businesses and citizens on both sides of the channel to prosper.

Lord Frost
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to discuss concerns over reciprocal arrangements for touring musicians at the next meeting of the EU–UK Joint Committee.

The arrangements for touring musicians between the UK and the EU relate to the Trade and Cooperation Agreement, and so would not be raised at the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee.

The date of the first meetings of the committees set up under the Trade and Cooperation Agreement will be announced in due course, when we have agreed with the EU.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord True on 21 October (HL Deb, col 1538), whether their offer on mode 4 includes expanding the list of permitted activities to enable musicians' performing and touring activities.

The Government is currently negotiating commitments with EU member states on ‘Mode 4’. A reciprocal agreement based on best precedence would mean that UK citizens will be able to undertake some business activities in EU member states without a work permit, on a short-term basis. The precise details, including range of activities, documentation needed, and the time limit, are under negotiation.

The Government recognises the importance of touring for UK musicians and appreciates the significant contribution of the UK music industry.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that a future agreement with the EU on mode 4 (temporary entry for business purposes) is extended under a free trade agreement to enable touring musicians, their crew, technical staff and entourage to travel between the UK and the EU for short periods of time.

I refer the Noble Lord to the answer given to HL5418 on 22 June 2020.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they are planning to hold, if any, with the EU on mobility issues affecting UK industries undertaking activities in the EU; whether these discussions will incorporate (1) the service sector, and (2) the creative industries; and, if so, what is the timetable for any such discussions.

The UK and EU are committed to supporting all industries on mobility issues, including services sectors and the creative industries.

With respect to the creative industries in particular, the Government has established that some touring activities are possible without needing visas or work permits in at least 17 out of 27 Member States. This includes France, Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark and many more. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport are speaking to their ministerial counterparts in a number of key Member States. They have already spoken to Portugal and Austria, and will shortly speak to other Member States including Spain and Italy. These conversations are covering the reopening of our respective cultural and creative industries post Covid, and the importance of touring.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government to define whether hybrid companies, which offer both services and recruitment services in the EU, would be categorised as agencies or as service companies under the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

Whether the activities of a UK company comprise recruitment agency services or other services (or both) under the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) will depend on the nature of those activities in each specific case, and may vary over time or between different contracts for the same company.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement restricts service provision to a maximum of 12 months.

The UK-EU Trade & Co-operation Agreement (TCA) is based on best precedent set by the EU’s trade deals with Japan and Canada. The TCA ensures that both Parties offer a minimum standard of treatment for business travellers, such as guaranteed lengths of stay of up to 12 months for contractual service suppliers and independent (self-employed) professionals, subject to Member State reservations. This is in line with EU-Japan and CETA precedent, reflects the domestic immigration systems of most of the signatories of the agreement, and is more generous than the typical range of WTO commitments for this category of service suppliers.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their understanding of the term 'agency' as it appears in the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement in the context of the employment of 'contractual service suppliers' under Article SERVIN.4.1: Scope and definitions 5(b); and whether this definition includes recruitment or language services.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) uses the United Nations’ Central Production Classification (CPC) (prov., 1991) to identify individual sectors and sub-sectors. Where the TCA says ‘other than through an agency for placement and supply services of personnel’, it is referring to CPC 872.

CPC 872 includes, but is not limited to, executive search services (87201) (‘services consisting in the search for, selection and referral of executive personnel for employment by others’); placement services of office support personnel and other workers (87202) (‘services consisting in selecting, referring and placing applicants in employment by others on a permanent or temporary basis, except executive search services’); and supply services of office support personnel (87203) (‘services consisting in supplying on a fee or contract basis to the clients, whether on a temporary or long-term basis, office support personnel hired by the supplier, who pays their emoluments’).

Her Majesty’s Government understands the term ‘agency’ to mean a business or organisation providing a particular service on behalf of another business. Her Majesty’s Government understands ‘an agency for placement and supply services of personnel’ to include recruitment services, of the kind described under CPC 872, but not language services. Language services may be better categorised under the subsector ‘translation and interpretation services’ (see Annex 19 (previously Annex SERVIN-4)).

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, under the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, contract brokers are to be treated as service providers in a business-to-business relationship with the contracted services provider, or as recruitment agencies.

Under the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) the classification of the activities carried out by each UK and EU firm will depend on the specific services it provides, which may vary over time or as between different contracts. It would be possible for a single firm to carry out multiple activities at the same or different times (for example, to act both as a contract broker and as a recruitment agency).

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Bounce Back Loan Scheme is a replacement for the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and, if so, whether the latter will be phased out; and what assessment they have made of how many applications they expect to be made to the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, and how many of these they expect to be successful.

The Bounce Back Loan Scheme will operate alongside the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS). Both are temporary schemes supporting small and medium-sized businesses during these unprecedented times.

The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme provides businesses with annual turnover of under £45m with access to working capital of up to £5m. It supports a wide range of business finance products, including term loans, overdrafts, invoice finance and asset finance facilities.

The Bounce Back Loan Scheme supports the smallest SMEs by providing loans from £2,000 up to 25% of the business’ turnover, with a maximum loan size of £50,000. This Scheme launched on 4 May and requires businesses to complete a short, simple, online application form, meaning that applications can be processed rapidly.

A business is not able to take out a Bounce Back Loan Scheme facility if they have been approved for a CBILS facility, and vice versa. However, all accredited lenders who have approved CBILS loans so far will allow customers to refinance their loan into the Bounce Back Loan Scheme where appropriate.

More than 69,000 Bounce Back Loans worth over £2 billion have been approved during the first 24 hours of the scheme.

The Government continues to work with the British Business Bank, HM Treasury and lenders to assess how effectively these schemes are working.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Statement by the Lord Privy Seal on 3 February (HLWS83), whether "short-term business trips to supply services" will apply to (1) the creative industries, and (2) IT services.

We are ending free movement of people. However, we still want to support our businesses in moving their talented people to provide services in both the UK and the EU, as quickly and as easily as possible.

The UK’s creative and digital industries comprise around 20% of the UK’s total exports in services and have grown rapidly in recent years. DCMS has engaged extensively with union bodies, artists and cultural organisations to help understand the needs of the creative and cultural sector, including freelancers who make up a significant proportion of people in these sectors.

As set out in the Political Declaration, both the EU and the UK will aim to provide for visa-free travel for short-term visits, and agree provisions on temporary entry and stay of natural persons, allowing businesses to move their talented employees and provide services.

The scope and detail of this will be subject to negotiations with the EU.

During the Transition period, until the end of 2020, there will be no changes to rules to provide services or work temporarily in the EU and UK Nationals can continue to travel to the EU as now.

4th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they are seeking to negotiate with the EU a visa-waiving treaty for UK workers in the creative industries, resident in the UK, seeking to market their services in the EU.

We are ending free movement of people. However, we still want to support our businesses in moving their talented people to provide services in both the UK and the EU, as quickly and easily as possible.

As set out in the Political Declaration, both the EU and the UK will aim to provide for visa-free travel for short-term visits, and agree provision on temporary entry and stay of natural persons, allowing businesses to move their talented employees and provide services.

The scope and detail of this will be subject to negotiations with the EU.

During the Transition period, until the end of 2020, there will be no changes to rules to provide services or work temporarily in the EU and UK Nationals can continue to travel to the EU as now.

4th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Statement by the Lord Privy Seal on 3 February (HLWS83), whether the "measures to minimise barriers to the cross-border supply of services and investment" will include provisions for the free onward movement of (1) personnel, and (2) equipment, between EU countries.

As set out in the Political Declaration, both the EU and the UK will aim to provide for visa-free travel for short-term visits, and agree provision on temporary entry and stay of natural persons, allowing businesses to move their talented employees and provide services.

The temporary movement of goods and equipment is a priority for cultural, creative and sport sectors - this includes instruments used by touring musicians, objects and collections loaned between museums, and sporting equipment taken to competitive events.

Cultural, creative and sporting organisations from all over the world regularly bring their goods and equipment into the UK on a temporary basis, and UK organisations do the same all over the world too.

Arrangements for moving goods and equipment between the UK and EU will not change before the end of the Transition period in December 2020. During the Transition period, until the end of 2020, there will also be no changes to rules to provide services or work temporarily in the EU and UK Nationals can continue to travel to the EU as now.

The scope and detail of this will be subject to negotiations with the EU.

12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by the Minister of State for Digital and Culture on 29 June (21802) that "some touring activities are possible without needing visas or work permits in at least 17 out of 25 Member States", what assessment they have made of the varying time limits placed on such activities.

We have always acknowledged that the end of freedom of movement would have consequences for touring musicians and performers. Member States are principally responsible for deciding the rules governing what work UK visitors can undertake in the EU, and we have spoken to every Member State.

We have established some touring activities are possible in at least 18 out of 27 Member States without needing visas or work permits. This includes France, Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark and many more.

The length of tour permitted without a visa or permit varies across Member States. For many Member States it is for up to 90 days, which will capture the vast majority of tours.

We are continuing to speak to each Member State to encourage them to ensure their rules and guidance are clear and accessible. And we are now engaging with those Member States that do not have any visa or permit free touring to encourage them to adopt a more flexible approach in line with the UK’s own rules, which allow creative professionals to tour easily here.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether amateur choirs will be treated in the same way as professional choirs in the event of renewed restrictions on singing due to COVID-19.

The government’s Roadmap set out four steps out of lockdown in England.

As of today, there are no limits on the number of people who can sing indoors or outdoors. This includes amateur and professional choirs, and congregational singing.

From Step 4, The government has removed outstanding legal restrictions on social contact and life events, and opened the remaining closed settings.

The Events and Attractions guidance sets out how those organising events can operate at step 4, including in the Performing Arts. The guidance will apply to workplaces and therefore is intended for those who are undertaking activities as part of their work, or who organise events in those venues. Organisers will need to assess whether this guidance is relevant when they plan activities that also involve amateur groups.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of providing a government-backed insurance indemnity package against the risk of cancellation for festivals in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

This Government recognises the importance of the UK’s live events sector and has provided significant financial support including an additional £300M to the Culture Recovery Fund details of which were announced on Friday 25th June.

The DCMS Secretary of State made clear at the DCMS Select Committee in May, the government is aware of the wider concerns around securing indemnity for live events and we continue to assess options to provide further support to the sector within the public health context.

The Secretary of State also underlined that the government’s first priority is to remove remaining barriers (such as social distancing) by reaching Step 4 of the Roadmap. Once that point is reached, if events still cannot go ahead because of a failure of the commercial insurance market, the Government will look at intervening as was done for the TV/Film sectors.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment have they made of providing an indemnity for live music events following the Step 4 lifting of COVID-19 restrictions; and whether they will place the results of any such assessment in the Library of the House.

This Government recognises the importance of the UK’s live events sector and has provided significant financial support to cultural organisations, particularly through the Culture Recovery Fund.

As the Secretary of State made clear at the DCMS Select Committee on Thursday 13th May, the government is aware of the wider concerns around securing indemnity for live events and we continue to assess options to provide further support to the sector within the public health context, engaging with relevant stakeholders as necessary.

We need to be confident that any intervention would lead to an increase in activity, and that insurance represents the last barrier to events reopening. The government’s first priority is to remove remaining barriers (such as social distancing) by reaching Stage 4 of the Roadmap.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish (1) the results, and (2) any arising guidance, from the Events Research Programme.

Research findings from the Events Research Programme’s first phase of pilots will be published on GOV.UK shortly.

The Government has committed to taking a cautious approach to easing restrictions, guided by data instead of dates, to avoid another surge in infections that could put unsustainable pressure on the NHS. The roadmap sets out indicative, “no earlier than” dates for each step which are five weeks apart. Each full step of our roadmap will be informed by the latest available science and data and will be five weeks apart in order to provide time to assess the data, providing one week’s notice to businesses and individuals.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure UK workers have the necessary skills to work in the UK music sector.

This Government understands the importance of ensuring that workers in the music sector have the necessary skills, demonstrated through its commitment to music education. It was made clear in December 2018 that the existing National Plan for Music Education, originally co-published by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and the Department for Education (DfE), would be refreshed. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the refresh of the National Plan is currently on hold, but the Government remains committed to publishing a refresh in due course, to support the next generation of music sector workers.

DCMS is also working closely with the music sector, including UK Music, to put in place programmes to aid music education and skills development. The Music Academic Partnership (MAP), which involves UK educational institutions and UK Music members, sees industry working with academics and educators to give colleges and university students a better chance of finding a job in the music industry. UK Music is also part of the Creative Industries Advisory Group which is working with DfE on developing reforms to the apprenticeship levy.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to establish a transitional support fund for UK musicians intending to tour in the EU.

The Government recognises the world-leading position of the UK performing arts sector and the rich breadth of artistic talent across the UK.

UK performers and artists are of course still able to tour and perform in the EU, and vice versa. However, we understand the concerns about the new arrangements and we are committed to supporting the sectors as they get to grips with the changes to systems and processes.

As the Prime Minister has said, we're working flat out with the industry, including through the DCMS-led working group, on plans to support the creative sectors tour in Europe. Through our bilateral discussions with EU Member States, we have established that in at least 17 out of 27 Member States some touring activities are possible without visas or work-permits. The UK has significantly more generous arrangements for touring professionals than many Member States, and should they be willing to change their rules to match ours we will have those discussions and encourage them to do so.

We are considering a number of options to ensure performers, musicians and artists have the support they need to tour and work in countries across the EU. We have produced new guidance to help artists understand what's required in different countries, and are looking carefully at proposals for a new Export Office that could provide further practical help. We will set out next steps in due course.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to negotiate with the EU to reduce barriers faced by musicians intending to tour EU countries; whether they have produced a timetable for those negotiations; and if so, whether they will place a copy of the timetable in the Library of the House.

The Government recognises the world-leading position of the UK performing arts sector and the rich breadth of artistic talent across the UK.

UK performers and artists are of course still able to tour and perform in the EU, and vice versa. However, we understand the concerns about the new arrangements and we are committed to supporting the sectors as they get to grips with the changes to systems and processes.

As the Prime Minister has said, we're working flat out with the industry, including through the DCMS-led working group, on plans to support the creative sectors tour in Europe. Through our bilateral discussions with EU Member States, we have established that in at least 17 out of 27 Member States some touring activities are possible without visas or work-permits. The UK has significantly more generous arrangements for touring professionals than many Member States, and should they be willing to change their rules to match ours we will have those discussions and encourage them to do so.

We are considering a number of options to ensure performers, musicians and artists have the support they need to tour and work in countries across the EU. We have produced new guidance to help artists understand what's required in different countries, and are looking carefully at proposals for a new Export Office that could provide further practical help. We will set out next steps in due course.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ratify the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage.

The Government values the profound contribution of the UK’s craft workers, artisans and artists to the preservation of our unique intangible heritage. We are exploring the merits of ratifying the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, as a potential addition to the broad range of support measures which already exist for this vital aspect of our nation’s life.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the letter from the Minister of State for Digital and Culture to the Chair of the House of Commons Petitions Committee on 4 March, how the EU’s proposals on visa-free travel for touring professionals and artists was "not consistent with our manifesto commitment to take back control of our borders".

The EU tabled text regarding the paid activities that could be allowed as part of visa-free visits. However, these proposals would not have addressed the creative and cultural sectors’ concerns. The proposals were non-binding, did not include touring but only ‘ad-hoc performances’, did not include technical staff, and did not address work permits.

The EU’s proposals were also part of a wider package, including a visa-waiver for all EU citizens that was not consistent with the manifesto commitment to take back control of our borders. The Trade and Cooperation Agreement allows the UK to determine whether short-term visits from the EU should be subject to visa requirements or not, and ensures that the provision will not apply to future Member States unless the UK agrees to apply these provisions to do so.

The UK’s rules for touring creative professionals are significantly more generous than in many EU Member States. We have said our door is open if the EU is willing to reconsider its position.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had, or plan to have, with the Vice-President of the European Commission for Interinstitutional Relations on reports of concerns UK musicians have about touring within the EU.

In negotiations with the EU, the UK proposed expanding a list of activities for Short Term Business Visitors to cover musicians, artists and their accompanying staff. This would have enabled musicians, artists and support staff to tour and perform in the EU without needing work-permits. We regret that the EU rejected our proposals, but there is scope to return to this issue in the future should the EU change its mind.

UK performers and artists are of course still able to tour and perform in the EU, and vice versa. However, they will be required to check domestic immigration rules for each Member State in which they intend to tour. This is because, while some Member States may allow paid performances without a visa or work permit, others will require musicians, artists and other creative professionals to obtain a visa or work permit, in the same way that they are required for other international artists.

We understand the concerns of the sector regarding the new arrangements and we are committed to supporting them as they get to grips with the changes to systems and processes. The DCMS-led working group on creative and cultural touring, which involves sector representatives and other key government departments, is looking at the issues and options to help the sectors resume touring with ease as soon as it is safe to do so.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by the Minister of State for the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on 19 January (HC Deb, col 773), when they will publish guidance on the criteria that each EU Member State has for allowing UK performers and artists to work there.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement includes a list of 11 activities that can be carried out by short-term business visitors without a work permit, on a reciprocal basis in most Member States, subject to any reservations taken.

During negotiations with the EU, the UK proposed expanding this list of activities for Short Term Business Visitors to cover musicians and their accompanying staff. This would have enabled musicians and other creative professionals to travel and perform in the UK and the EU without needing work-permits. Regrettably, these proposals were rejected by the EU.

Due to the UK’s inclusion on the EU Schengen visa-waiver list, certain activities should be permitted, visa-free, across the whole Schengen Area for up to 90 days in a 180-day period. Member States may require a visa and/or a work permit for what they regard as “paid activity”. Some Member States do allow additional permitted activities, without the need for a visa or work permit, as part of their domestic immigration regimes. Therefore, UK cultural professionals, including musicians, seeking to perform within the EU will be required to check domestic immigration and visitor rules for each Member State in which they intend to perform.

We have published guidance on GOV.UK, signposting to official information provided by EU countries about their business travel routes, which is regularly updated. We are also undertaking an extensive programme of engagement with the sectors to help them understand these new requirements.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether UK musicians require a work permit to undertake unpaid performances in the EU.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement includes a list of 11 activities that can be carried out by short-term business visitors without a work permit, on a reciprocal basis in most Member States, subject to any reservations taken.

During negotiations with the EU, the UK proposed expanding this list of activities for Short Term Business Visitors to cover musicians and their accompanying staff. This would have enabled musicians and other creative professionals to travel and perform in the UK and the EU without needing work-permits. Regrettably, these proposals were rejected by the EU.

Due to the UK’s inclusion on the EU Schengen visa-waiver list, certain activities should be permitted, visa-free, across the whole Schengen Area for up to 90 days in a 180-day period. Member States may require a visa and/or a work permit for what they regard as “paid activity”. Some Member States do allow additional permitted activities, without the need for a visa or work permit, as part of their domestic immigration regimes. Therefore, UK cultural professionals, including musicians, seeking to perform within the EU will be required to check domestic immigration and visitor rules for each Member State in which they intend to perform.

We have published guidance on GOV.UK, signposting to official information provided by EU countries about their business travel routes, which is regularly updated. We are also undertaking an extensive programme of engagement with the sectors to help them understand these new requirements.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether the EU’s definition of Short-Term Business Visitor allows for the selling of services, including by musicians, to the general public during such visits.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement includes a list of 11 activities that can be carried out by short-term business visitors without a work permit, on a reciprocal basis in most Member States, subject to any reservations taken.

During negotiations with the EU, the UK proposed expanding this list of activities for Short Term Business Visitors to cover musicians and their accompanying staff. This would have enabled musicians and other creative professionals to travel and perform in the UK and the EU without needing work-permits. Regrettably, these proposals were rejected by the EU.

Due to the UK’s inclusion on the EU Schengen visa-waiver list, certain activities should be permitted, visa-free, across the whole Schengen Area for up to 90 days in a 180-day period. Member States may require a visa and/or a work permit for what they regard as “paid activity”. Some Member States do allow additional permitted activities, without the need for a visa or work permit, as part of their domestic immigration regimes. Therefore, UK cultural professionals, including musicians, seeking to perform within the EU will be required to check domestic immigration and visitor rules for each Member State in which they intend to perform.

We have published guidance on GOV.UK, signposting to official information provided by EU countries about their business travel routes, which is regularly updated. We are also undertaking an extensive programme of engagement with the sectors to help them understand these new requirements.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Barran on 19 January (HL Deb, col 1085), whether their proposals for enabling musicians to travel and perform in the EU without work permits included musicians being considered Short-Term Business Visitors; and, if so, what assessment they have made of whether this would remove the requirement for work permits.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement includes a list of 11 activities that can be carried out by short-term business visitors without a work permit, on a reciprocal basis in most Member States, subject to any reservations taken.

During negotiations with the EU, the UK proposed expanding this list of activities for Short Term Business Visitors to cover musicians and their accompanying staff. This would have enabled musicians and other creative professionals to travel and perform in the UK and the EU without needing work-permits. Regrettably, these proposals were rejected by the EU.

Due to the UK’s inclusion on the EU Schengen visa-waiver list, certain activities should be permitted, visa-free, across the whole Schengen Area for up to 90 days in a 180-day period. Member States may require a visa and/or a work permit for what they regard as “paid activity”. Some Member States do allow additional permitted activities, without the need for a visa or work permit, as part of their domestic immigration regimes. Therefore, UK cultural professionals, including musicians, seeking to perform within the EU will be required to check domestic immigration and visitor rules for each Member State in which they intend to perform.

We have published guidance on GOV.UK, signposting to official information provided by EU countries about their business travel routes, which is regularly updated. We are also undertaking an extensive programme of engagement with the sectors to help them understand these new requirements.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of precedents for reciprocal arrangements for touring musicians in existing trade agreements, and in the EU–Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement in particular.

Through the Trade and Cooperation Agreement, the UK and the EU agreed to a list of 11 activities that can be carried out by short-term business visitors without the need for a work permit, on a reciprocal basis in most Member States – subject to any reservations taken. This list of permitted activities is based on the best precedent established in the EU’s Free Trade Agreements with Canada and Japan. It includes, among other activities, permissions for after-sales, translation and market research services. The EU–Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement does not include any facilitations for touring musicians.

The UK pushed for the list of permitted activities to be expanded to capture the work done by musicians, artists and entertainers, and their accompanying staff. This was a straightforward solution for our creative industries which would have benefited all sides. Regrettably, the EU rejected these proposals.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Barran on 19 January (HL Deb, col 1085), on what date their proposals for enabling musicians to travel and perform in the EU without work permits was rejected; and what explanation they were given for this rejection.

During negotiations with the EU, the UK repeatedly pushed to capture the work done by musicians, artists and entertainers, and their accompanying staff, through the list of permitted activities for short-term business visitors. This would have allowed musicians and support staff to travel and perform in the UK and the EU more easily, without needing work-permits.

The UK made an offer to the EU which reflected the input of experts from the music sector. This was a straightforward solution for our creative industries which would have benefited all sides.

The EU turned down our proposals on the basis that musicians were providing a service which they viewed as necessitating a work permit and/or visa.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to reports following the meeting between representatives of the music industry and the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on 20 January that they plan to set up a working group to investigate ways to support the music industry following the UK's withdrawal from the EU, what will be the remit of that group; whether any such group will cover other areas of the arts; and who will make up the membership of that group.

DCMS is establishing a working group, including representatives across the creative and cultural sectors and other key government departments, to look at the issues facing those in these sectors when touring in the EU.

The group will work together to provide clarity regarding the steps that need to be taken by practitioners when touring in the EU, and explore what more could be done to help them work as confidently as possible in the EU.

The membership of the group will be announced shortly.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what definition they use of the term 'ad hoc' in relation to visa arrangements for those artists performing an activity on an ad hoc basis between the EU and other countries; and whether that definition would cover artists whilst touring.

In negotiations, the EU tabled a proposal for a permanent visa waiver for short stays covering UK and EU nationals. This drew on bilateral agreements they have with some other third countries, such as Columbia, Peru and the UAE. Accepting a permanent short stay visa waiver for all current and future EU Member States was not, and is not, compatible with our manifesto commitment to take back control of our borders.

This proposal was accompanied by a Joint Declaration intended to direct those Member States who currently require short stay visas for “paid activities” to waive that requirement for “artists performing an activity on an ad-hoc basis”. This offer would not have addressed the creative and cultural industries’ concerns. It did not include touring but only ‘ad hoc’ performances, did not cover accompanying support and technical staff and did not deal with the issue of work permits at all.

On the other hand, our proposals, which were developed with input from the creative and cultural sectors, would have allowed artists to tour in the UK and the EU more easily. The UK proposed to capture the work done by musicians, artists and entertainers, and their accompanying staff, through the list of permitted activities for short-term business visitors under the Mode 4 Chapter of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement. This would have enabled musicians and other creative professionals to travel and perform in the UK and the EU without needing work-permits, for up to 90 days in any 6 month period. Regrettably, these proposals were repeatedly rejected by the EU.

The Government recognises the importance of touring for our world-leading cultural and creative sectors. We are establishing a Working Group, with sector representatives and government departments, with a view to assisting those in the cultural and creative sectors to work as confidently as possible in the EU.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the EU's existing visa waiver agreements with other countries which cover 'artists performing an activity on an ad hoc basis' as a basis for a reciprocal agreement for short-term visas for artists working between the UK and the EU.

In negotiations, the EU tabled a proposal for a permanent visa waiver for short stays covering UK and EU nationals. This drew on bilateral agreements they have with some other third countries, such as Columbia, Peru and the UAE. Accepting a permanent short stay visa waiver for all current and future EU Member States was not, and is not, compatible with our manifesto commitment to take back control of our borders.

This proposal was accompanied by a Joint Declaration intended to direct those Member States who currently require short stay visas for “paid activities” to waive that requirement for “artists performing an activity on an ad-hoc basis”. This offer would not have addressed the creative and cultural industries’ concerns. It did not include touring but only ‘ad hoc’ performances, did not cover accompanying support and technical staff and did not deal with the issue of work permits at all.

On the other hand, our proposals, which were developed with input from the creative and cultural sectors, would have allowed artists to tour in the UK and the EU more easily. The UK proposed to capture the work done by musicians, artists and entertainers, and their accompanying staff, through the list of permitted activities for short-term business visitors under the Mode 4 Chapter of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement. This would have enabled musicians and other creative professionals to travel and perform in the UK and the EU without needing work-permits, for up to 90 days in any 6 month period. Regrettably, these proposals were repeatedly rejected by the EU.

The Government recognises the importance of touring for our world-leading cultural and creative sectors. We are establishing a Working Group, with sector representatives and government departments, with a view to assisting those in the cultural and creative sectors to work as confidently as possible in the EU.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to negotiate a separate standard visa-waiver arrangement with the EU that would include exemptions for artists.

In negotiations, the EU tabled a proposal for a permanent visa waiver for short stays covering UK and EU nationals. This drew on bilateral agreements they have with some other third countries, such as Columbia, Peru and the UAE. Accepting a permanent short stay visa waiver for all current and future EU Member States was not, and is not, compatible with our manifesto commitment to take back control of our borders.

This proposal was accompanied by a Joint Declaration intended to direct those Member States who currently require short stay visas for “paid activities” to waive that requirement for “artists performing an activity on an ad-hoc basis”. This offer would not have addressed the creative and cultural industries’ concerns. It did not include touring but only ‘ad hoc’ performances, did not cover accompanying support and technical staff and did not deal with the issue of work permits at all.

On the other hand, our proposals, which were developed with input from the creative and cultural sectors, would have allowed artists to tour in the UK and the EU more easily. The UK proposed to capture the work done by musicians, artists and entertainers, and their accompanying staff, through the list of permitted activities for short-term business visitors under the Mode 4 Chapter of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement. This would have enabled musicians and other creative professionals to travel and perform in the UK and the EU without needing work-permits, for up to 90 days in any 6 month period. Regrettably, these proposals were repeatedly rejected by the EU.

The Government recognises the importance of touring for our world-leading cultural and creative sectors. We are establishing a Working Group, with sector representatives and government departments, with a view to assisting those in the cultural and creative sectors to work as confidently as possible in the EU.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Barran on 19 January (HL Deb, col 1084) that they "pushed for ambitious arrangements for performers and artists to be able to work across Europe", what were the details of those ambitious arrangements; whether they had proposed a maximum time period allowed for performers and artists to undertake visa-less work in Europe; and if so, what was that time period.

In negotiations, the EU tabled a proposal for a permanent visa waiver for short stays covering UK and EU nationals. This drew on bilateral agreements they have with some other third countries, such as Columbia, Peru and the UAE. Accepting a permanent short stay visa waiver for all current and future EU Member States was not, and is not, compatible with our manifesto commitment to take back control of our borders.

This proposal was accompanied by a Joint Declaration intended to direct those Member States who currently require short stay visas for “paid activities” to waive that requirement for “artists performing an activity on an ad-hoc basis”. This offer would not have addressed the creative and cultural industries’ concerns. It did not include touring but only ‘ad hoc’ performances, did not cover accompanying support and technical staff and did not deal with the issue of work permits at all.

On the other hand, our proposals, which were developed with input from the creative and cultural sectors, would have allowed artists to tour in the UK and the EU more easily. The UK proposed to capture the work done by musicians, artists and entertainers, and their accompanying staff, through the list of permitted activities for short-term business visitors under the Mode 4 Chapter of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement. This would have enabled musicians and other creative professionals to travel and perform in the UK and the EU without needing work-permits, for up to 90 days in any 6 month period. Regrettably, these proposals were repeatedly rejected by the EU.

The Government recognises the importance of touring for our world-leading cultural and creative sectors. We are establishing a Working Group, with sector representatives and government departments, with a view to assisting those in the cultural and creative sectors to work as confidently as possible in the EU.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to update their COVID-19 guidelines to include professional musicians within the list of jobs qualifying for travel exemptions.

At present there are no such exemptions available for musicians coming to the UK.

We continue to work with the cultural and creative sectors to explore all options to support them through this challenging period, including on proposals for exemptions from quarantine. We are continuing to work with the Department for Transport on proposals for an exemption for Performing Arts professionals.

All decisions about exemptions and other measures will need to be considered in light of the wider public health context and the bar for exemptions remains very high.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Barran on 10 September (HL Deb, col 911), what plans they have to seek a Mode IV agreement with the EU to cover musicians and music professionals; and whether any such agreement would enable musicians to travel between the UK and the EU for performing, recording, teaching, or collaborating at short notice and for short periods of time.

Our cultural and creative sectors are one of the UK’s greatest success stories and the music industry is a major contributor to this. The Government recognises the importance of the continued mobility of musicians and music professionals.

As set out in Our approach to the Future Relationship with the EU, the Government is seeking reciprocal mobility arrangements with the EU in a defined number of areas. For example, to allow business professionals to provide certain services, visa-free. This is in line with the arrangements that the UK might want to offer other close trading partners in future, where they support new and deep trade deals.

Although we cannot preempt the outcome of ongoing negotiations, we will continue our close dialogue with the sector to ensure that the Government is kept well informed of the needs of the music sector.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that there is full consultation across the performing arts sector on any Government-commissioned research into managing risks arising from COVID-19 in the performing arts.

It is a priority of my department to work with the arts and cultural sectors to address the challenges of reopening. We are committed to getting the performing arts sector fully back up and running as soon as it is safe to do so. We have published guidance to support the performing arts to engage in activity safely. This guidance was extensively consulted upon and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/performing-arts We continue to work closely with the sector to understand further measures that can be used to help the safety of all who engage in the performing arts.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Barran on 3 June (HL Deb, col 1360), on what basis they consider that a touring visa is not "legally possible".

In my response to The Earl of Clancarty in Parliament on 3 June, I said that a touring visa as he proposed was not “legally possible”.

I am afraid that this could have been phrased more accurately. While a visa of the kind he proposed is not legally impossible, the legal arrangements of the EU make it less negotiable, and each individual EU member state retains the right to caveat the third-party mobility arrangements negotiated at an EU-wide level. We are not asking for a special, bespoke, or unique deal. We are looking for a deal like the free trade agreements the EU has previously struck with other friendly countries such as Canada.

We recognise that music and the performing arts are culturally and economically crucial industries. Through negotiations with the EU on Mobility and Mode IV we are exploring how we can provide greater certainty to these industries in the future through reciprocal provisions based on best precedent.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the financial support being provided to the cultural, creative and media sectors in Germany; what plans they have, if any, to introduce a specific financial support package for the cultural, creative and media sectors in the UK; and what representations they have received in relation to such support.

The Government has noted international responses to support the creative, cultural and media sectors. Direct comparisons are difficult, as the sectors and the measures taken are different in each country. We are considering international examples as we continue to work with arm’s-length bodies, sector representatives, and individual organisations to understand the impact of COVID-19 and what support is needed. DCMS Ministers are in regular touch with creative, cultural and media organisations through regular roundtable sessions, including the Recreation and Leisure Taskforce announced recently to coordinate safe reopening.

Germany has announced a significant package for the self-employed and small businesses. That includes those in the cultural sector, but is not limited to them. Similarly, the UK's support covers all sectors and the creative and cultural industries have benefited from unprecedented support for business and workers to protect them against the current economic emergency including almost £300 billion of guarantees – equivalent to 15% of UK GDP. The cultural, creative and media sectors can access a range of support measures including:

  • A 12-month business rates holiday for all eligible retail, leisure and hospitality businesses in England

  • The retail, hospitality and leisure grant fund (RHLGF)Small business grant funding (SBGF) of £10,000 for all business in receipt of small business rate relief or rural rate relief 8 million jobs have now been furloughed with £11.1 billion claimed so far through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS).

  • 2 million Self-employment Income Support (SEISS) claims have been submitted worth £6.1 billion.

  • Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) has seen 40,564 loans worth £7.25 billion approved so far.

  • The Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CLBILS) has seen 86 approved loans totalling £0.59 billion.

  • Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) has seen 464,393 approved loans so far worth £14.18 billion for small businesses.

  • VAT deferral for up to 12 months

  • The Time To Pay scheme, through which businesses in financial distress, and with outstanding tax liabilities, can receive support with their tax affairs

  • Protection for commercial leaseholders against automatic forfeiture for non-payment until June 30, 2020

  • There were 4.2m people on Universal Credit on 9 April, with 1.5m claims made in the period 13 March 2020 to 9 April 2020.

The Business Support website provides further information about how businesses can access the support that has been made available, who is eligible, when the schemes open and how to apply - https://www.businesssupport.gov.uk/coronavirus-business-support.

Separately, the Arts Council England has made £160 million of emergency funding available specifically for the arts and culture sectors, and the National Lottery Heritage Fund £50 million to heritage and museums organisations, originally with grants of between £3,000 and £50,000 available and now with grants of £50,000 to £250,000.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the proportion of (1) individuals and (2) organisations working in the creative industries who will be eligible for the emergency funding being made available by Arts Council England in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including through the funding being provided to National Portfolio Organisations and Creative People and Places lead organisations.

While the Government has not made a specific assessment of the proportion of professionals working in the creative industries that are eligible, it has worked with the Arts Council to ensure that the application process was as simple as possible and to encourage as many applications as possible.

So long as an applicant has experience of delivering publicly funded work, and fits the Arts Council’s definition of ‘creative practitioner’ (writers, translators, producers, editors, educators, directors and designers in the disciplines and artforms they support, as well as choreographers, composers, visual artists, craft makers and curators), they are eligible.

The Arts Council received a total of 13,684 applications from independent cultural organisations and individual practitioners to the first two elements of their Emergency Response funds.

In detail, this breaks down to 3,391 applications from organisations and 10,293 applications from individuals. The Arts Council will be publishing the details of how they have awarded this funding at the beginning of June, once all the decisions have been made and applicants notified.

The third element of their Emergency Response funds, for National Portfolio Organisations and Creative People and Places lead organisations, closes on 19 May.

All of the Arts Council’s 840 National Portfolio Organisations and 30 Creative People and Places lead organisations were eligible to apply to that fund. The Arts Council will be publishing details of how they’ve awarded this funding at the beginning of July.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that the EU’s funding contribution to the UK’s arts, heritage and creative industries will be fully replaced; and, if so, what funding schemes will enable this.

The Government remains committed to supporting the UK’s thriving cultural and creative economy. We will continue to invest money directly into the UK's cultural and creative sectors, continuing to support and grow their world-class activity on the international stage.

Now we have taken back control of our money, we are able to focus spending on domestic priorities including on our world class arts, heritage and creative industries. Any new spending will be a consideration for the upcoming Comprehensive Spending Review.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement by the Minister for Sport, Media and Creative Industries on 21 January (HC Deb, col 56WH) that the Government welcomes the views "of the industry on movement within Europe", how the music industry can share such views.

The music industry is a major success story for the UK. The government recognises the importance of the continued mobility of talented individuals and groups to support cultural and creative cooperation and the continued growth of the sector.

My department continues to engage on a regular basis with representatives from the music industry at both Ministerial and official level, through bilateral meetings, roundtable discussions, written correspondence, industry events and conferences. This includes the government’s trade advisory committees that help inform international trade policy, and at which the music sector is of course represented.

Furthermore, DCMS has facilitated engagement between the sector and other departments in order to ensure that their views are understood at all levels of government.

We value the contributions made by the sector this far, and welcome their involvement going forward.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement by the Minister for Sport, Media and Creative Industries on 21 January (HC Deb, col 56WH) that “it is essential that free movement is protected for artists post 2020”, how they intend to protect such free movement; and whether such protection will cover freelance workers in other creative and specialist fields.

The UK’s creative industries deliver around 12 per cent of the UK’s total exports in services, and have grown rapidly in recent years. The government is committed to ensuring this growth continues.

DCMS has engaged extensively with union bodies, artists and cultural organisations to help understand the needs of the creative and cultural sector, including freelancers who make up a significant proportion of people in these sectors.

Recognising the depth of the UK-EU relationship, the UK is seeking reciprocal mobility arrangements with the EU in a defined number of areas. For example, to allow business professionals to provide services, or tourists to continue to travel visa-free. This is in line with the arrangements that the UK might want to offer other close trading partners in future, where they support new and deep trade deals. This is subject to wider negotiations with the EU.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Berridge on 7 June (HL Deb, col 1185) that "the Office for Students has just consulted on the request to reprioritise the strategic priorities grant", what are these renewed strategic priorities; and to what level of education it is intended that these strategic priorities will apply.

The Strategic Priorities Grant plays an important role in supporting higher education providers and students to develop the skills and knowledge needed locally, regionally, and nationally to support the economy.

The grant is supplied by the government on an annual basis to support higher education providers’ ongoing teaching and related activities where income from tuition fees alone do not meet the cost of provision.

The government has asked the Office for Students to reform the Strategic Priorities Grant for 2021–22. These reforms apply to higher education funding and include the reallocation of high-cost subject funding towards the provision of high-cost subjects which support the NHS and wider healthcare policy, high-cost science, technology, and engineering subjects, and subjects meeting specific labour market needs, as well as the removal of the London weighting element of the grant.

We have also asked the Office for Students to invest an additional £10 million in our world-leading specialist providers, many of which specialise in arts provision. We want to ensure that our specialist providers receive additional support, and that grant funding is used to support students effectively.

The Office for Students has now publicly consulted on these proposals, and responses from universities, students, and others will be considered before any final decisions on allocations are made.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the (1) gross amount, and (2) the amount per student, which will be paid by the Office for Students to universities for students studying music courses under the CAH25-02-02 code for (a) the 2020–21 academic year, and (b) the 2021–22 academic year, under current proposals.

The Strategic Priorities Grant, formerly referred to as the Teaching Grant, plays an important role in supporting providers and students to develop the skills and knowledge needed locally, regionally, and nationally to support the economy.

We have asked the Office for Students (OfS) to reform the Grant for 2021-22. These reforms include the reallocation of high-cost subject funding towards the provision of high-cost subjects that support the NHS and wider healthcare policy, high-cost science, technology, and engineering subjects, and subjects meeting specific labour market needs.

One of our proposals is for a 50% reduction in the rate of high-cost subject funding, which is one element of the wider Strategic Priorities Grant, for some subjects in order to enable this reprioritisation.

Under current proposals, outlined in the OfS’ consultation on recurrent funding for 2021/22, the high-cost subject funding rate for students on music courses (CAH25-02-02) will be set at £121.50 in 2021/22, down from £243 in 2020/21. This fall is equivalent to a reduction of around 1% in combined funding from a £9,250 tuition fee and OfS funding. Music students will also attract other elements of OfS funding, such as funding for student access and success, which is unrelated to the subject they study.

The OfS’ methodology for calculating funding allocations, which are done at subject price group-level rather than on an individual subject basis, means that the total amount of high-cost subject funding cannot be calculated for individual subjects such as music. However, illustrative modelling performed by the OfS on funding allocations, which accompanied their consultation, calculated that the total amount of funding for C1.2 subjects, which includes performing arts, creative arts, media studies and archaeology, decreased from £36 million in academic year 2020/21 to £19 million in academic year 2021/22. We have asked the OfS to invest an additional £10 million in our world-leading specialist providers. Many of these specialise in arts provision such as the Royal College of Music or the Royal Academy of Music which are both world-leading institutions for music education. We want to ensure that our specialist providers receive additional support, and that grant funding is used to effectively support students.

27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to expand the provision of communications technology and broadband so that children will have access to online music education regardless of their socio-economic background or special educational needs.

The arts form a vital part of children and young people’s education, and access to these important areas should not just be the preserve of the elite. Music is compulsory in all maintained schools from the age of 5 to 14, and academies are also required to provide a broad and balanced curriculum, which Ofsted consider in their inspections.

The department has invested nearly £500 million of funding from 2016-20 in a diverse portfolio of music and arts education programmes, and in January, we announced a further £80 million investment in Music Education Hubs for 2020-21 to ensure all children, whatever their background, have access to a high-quality music education.

The department is committed to the continuation of high-quality education for all pupils during this difficult time and it is supporting schools and parents through a number of initiatives. On 2 July 2020, the department published detailed guidance to support the full opening of schools from the beginning of the autumn term. The guidance made it clear we expect all schools to teach an ambitious and broad curriculum in all subjects from the start of the autumn term – including art and music. Furthermore, detailed guidance on music provision will be published shortly.

Resources may also be found through subject associations and professional bodies, such as BESA’s LendEd website and the EdTech Impact website for example, which include varied resources that teachers already use and rate within the websites. These resources have not been verified by the department’s educational experts, but we are signposting to them because they also cover other areas of the curriculum that are not covered in our list.

The department has announced £4.34 million of funding for the Oak National Academy for the 2020-21 academic year to provide online video lessons covering a variety of subjects, including music. The purpose of this funding is to enable Oak to provide support to schools in developing the ability to switch from classroom teaching to remote provision immediately in case of local lockdowns or self-isolation.

To help children to access education, including music, at home, we have provided laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children who would otherwise not have access and are preparing for examinations in Year 10, and to those receiving support from a social worker, including pre-school children, and care leavers. As of 30 June, over 200,000 laptops and tablets and over 47,000 4G wireless routers had been delivered or dispatched to local authorities and academy trusts.

Where care leavers, children with a social worker at secondary school and children in Year 10, do not have internet connections, we have provided 4G wireless routers to them so that they can learn at home. In partnership with BT, the department has also launched a service to provide children and young people free access to BT Wi-Fi hotspots. 10,000 families are initially able to access the scheme. This offer is currently being piloted and will be rolled out across England in the coming months. We are currently working with BT to expand this offer to allow more children to access the internet through their network of BT Wi-Fi hotspots.

We are also working with the major telecommunications companies to improve internet connectivity for disadvantaged and vulnerable families. For families who rely on a mobile internet connection, mobile network operators are working to provide temporary access to free additional data offering them more flexibility to access the resources that they need the most.

27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to encourage all schools, regardless of management or funding, to maintain their commitment to music education (1) through the COVID-19 recovery and catch-up period, and (2) in the long term.

The arts form a vital part of children and young people’s education, and access to these important areas should not just be the preserve of the elite. Music is compulsory in all maintained schools from the age of 5 to 14, and academies are also required to provide a broad and balanced curriculum, which Ofsted consider in their inspections.

The department has invested nearly £500 million of funding from 2016-20 in a diverse portfolio of music and arts education programmes, and in January, we announced a further £80 million investment in Music Education Hubs for 2020-21 to ensure all children, whatever their background, have access to a high-quality music education.

The department is committed to the continuation of high-quality education for all pupils during this difficult time and it is supporting schools and parents through a number of initiatives. On 2 July 2020, the department published detailed guidance to support the full opening of schools from the beginning of the autumn term. The guidance made it clear we expect all schools to teach an ambitious and broad curriculum in all subjects from the start of the autumn term – including art and music. Furthermore, detailed guidance on music provision will be published shortly.

Resources may also be found through subject associations and professional bodies, such as BESA’s LendEd website and the EdTech Impact website for example, which include varied resources that teachers already use and rate within the websites. These resources have not been verified by the department’s educational experts, but we are signposting to them because they also cover other areas of the curriculum that are not covered in our list.

The department has announced £4.34 million of funding for the Oak National Academy for the 2020-21 academic year to provide online video lessons covering a variety of subjects, including music. The purpose of this funding is to enable Oak to provide support to schools in developing the ability to switch from classroom teaching to remote provision immediately in case of local lockdowns or self-isolation.

To help children to access education, including music, at home, we have provided laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children who would otherwise not have access and are preparing for examinations in Year 10, and to those receiving support from a social worker, including pre-school children, and care leavers. As of 30 June, over 200,000 laptops and tablets and over 47,000 4G wireless routers had been delivered or dispatched to local authorities and academy trusts.

Where care leavers, children with a social worker at secondary school and children in Year 10, do not have internet connections, we have provided 4G wireless routers to them so that they can learn at home. In partnership with BT, the department has also launched a service to provide children and young people free access to BT Wi-Fi hotspots. 10,000 families are initially able to access the scheme. This offer is currently being piloted and will be rolled out across England in the coming months. We are currently working with BT to expand this offer to allow more children to access the internet through their network of BT Wi-Fi hotspots.

We are also working with the major telecommunications companies to improve internet connectivity for disadvantaged and vulnerable families. For families who rely on a mobile internet connection, mobile network operators are working to provide temporary access to free additional data offering them more flexibility to access the resources that they need the most.

27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to further update the list of online education resources for home learning published on 7 April to include arts subjects, such as art and design and music.

The arts form a vital part of children and young people’s education, and access to these important areas should not just be the preserve of the elite. Music is compulsory in all maintained schools from the age of 5 to 14, and academies are also required to provide a broad and balanced curriculum, which Ofsted consider in their inspections.

The department has invested nearly £500 million of funding from 2016-20 in a diverse portfolio of music and arts education programmes, and in January, we announced a further £80 million investment in Music Education Hubs for 2020-21 to ensure all children, whatever their background, have access to a high-quality music education.

The department is committed to the continuation of high-quality education for all pupils during this difficult time and it is supporting schools and parents through a number of initiatives. On 2 July 2020, the department published detailed guidance to support the full opening of schools from the beginning of the autumn term. The guidance made it clear we expect all schools to teach an ambitious and broad curriculum in all subjects from the start of the autumn term – including art and music. Furthermore, detailed guidance on music provision will be published shortly.

Resources may also be found through subject associations and professional bodies, such as BESA’s LendEd website and the EdTech Impact website for example, which include varied resources that teachers already use and rate within the websites. These resources have not been verified by the department’s educational experts, but we are signposting to them because they also cover other areas of the curriculum that are not covered in our list.

The department has announced £4.34 million of funding for the Oak National Academy for the 2020-21 academic year to provide online video lessons covering a variety of subjects, including music. The purpose of this funding is to enable Oak to provide support to schools in developing the ability to switch from classroom teaching to remote provision immediately in case of local lockdowns or self-isolation.

To help children to access education, including music, at home, we have provided laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children who would otherwise not have access and are preparing for examinations in Year 10, and to those receiving support from a social worker, including pre-school children, and care leavers. As of 30 June, over 200,000 laptops and tablets and over 47,000 4G wireless routers had been delivered or dispatched to local authorities and academy trusts.

Where care leavers, children with a social worker at secondary school and children in Year 10, do not have internet connections, we have provided 4G wireless routers to them so that they can learn at home. In partnership with BT, the department has also launched a service to provide children and young people free access to BT Wi-Fi hotspots. 10,000 families are initially able to access the scheme. This offer is currently being piloted and will be rolled out across England in the coming months. We are currently working with BT to expand this offer to allow more children to access the internet through their network of BT Wi-Fi hotspots.

We are also working with the major telecommunications companies to improve internet connectivity for disadvantaged and vulnerable families. For families who rely on a mobile internet connection, mobile network operators are working to provide temporary access to free additional data offering them more flexibility to access the resources that they need the most.

20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made towards making Eurostar a CITES-designated port.

Any specimen covered by CITES controls must be imported or exported through one of the 36 designated land, sea and airports which are all currently operational. The up to date list of the ports is available on the following GOV.UK page: www.gov.uk/guidance/trading-cites-listed-specimens-through-uk-ports-and-airports.

The list of CITES-designated points of entry is kept under review and we are currently working with colleagues in Border Force to determine if it is feasible to designate Eurostar.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Liverpool will be included within the list of ports designated under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.

Liverpool Seaforth port will be designated as a Point of Entry and Exit (PoE) for CITES- listed specimens at the end of the Transition Period.

We will continue to work with port operators, industry and other Government departments such as Border Force, HM Revenue & Customs and Cabinet Office to analyse trade flows and will designate further PoE where this is feasible so as to provide additional routes for traders.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to introduce procedures for the inspection of materials protected under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora when transporting musical instruments between Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1 January 2021.

After the Transition Period, controls implementing the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will apply to the movement of CITES specimens between Great Britain (GB) and Northern Ireland (NI). This is as a result of our international obligations under CITES, and the operation of the Northern Ireland Protocol. Such movement between NI and GB will require CITES documentation, for example import and export permits or a Musical Instrument Certificate. All CITES specimens must be moved through a designated point of entry and exit where documentation must be presented for endorsement by Border Force officials. As a result of the NI Protocol, NI will be treated as part of the EU’s customs territory and the permits and checks usually required under CITES will not be required for movements between NI and EU Member States.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to amend the musical instrument certificate application form FED0172 to remove the obligation to provide the owner’s details; and, if so, what procedure will be required to do so.

We do not have immediate plans to amend the musical instrument certificate (MIC) application form to remove the obligation to provide details of the owner of the instrument. However, we will keep this under review and will be discussing the need for additional guidance on how to apply for a MIC with stakeholders from the sector.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Minister for International Trade on 14 June (13157), whether the new trade deal agreed in principle will enable British musicians and performers to tour for up to 90 days every six months without a permit in Iceland and Liechtenstein.

The agreement secures access to Iceland and Liechtenstein for British service suppliers in all sectors, and to short-term business visitors working in culture and entertainment. This guarantees that British musicians and performers can enter Iceland as visitors to perform for up to 90 days within one calendar year without a permit; and up to eight days within a 90 day period as service providers in Liechtenstein. Liechtenstein does not require British nationals to hold visas under this route.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
18th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to amend the definition of a 'service supplier of the United Kingdom', as set out in Annex 1, Article 1(a) of the Temporary Agreement between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the Swiss Confederation on Services Mobility, in order to enable UK service providers living in the EU to provide services in Switzerland.

The Temporary Agreement between the United Kingdom and Switzerland on Services Mobility (SMA) provides British nationals with crucial certainty to supply services in Switzerland from the United Kingdom. To further support service suppliers, HM Government secured unprecedented access for British nationals to the Swiss Online Notification Procedure, simplifying application processes. Given the temporary nature of the agreement and the strong outcome secured for British services suppliers, HM Government is not planning to renegotiate the SMA at this time. However, the United Kingdom and Switzerland share a joint aim to maintain and develop our close trade relations.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they intend to hold, if any, with the EU concerning the effect of challenges with cabotage on the ability of performing artists based in the UK to conduct tours in the EU.

The EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement has ensured that the vast majority of journeys will continue as they did before the end of the transition period, despite leaving the Single Market and Customs Union.

During negotiations, the UK pressed the EU hard on liberalised access for hauliers carrying equipment for cultural events, but the EU did not agree to our asks.  We have, however, made it clear that our door remains open to discussing these proposals should the EU position change.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether an individual is legally required to remain in quarantine between taking and receiving the results of a COVID-19 test.

If an individual arrives in England from a non-exempt country, territory or region, or has departed from or transited though a non-exempt country, territory or region at any time in the period beginning with the 14th day before the date of their arrival, and they are not exempt, they must self-isolate for 14 days subject to certain limited exceptions when they may leave or be outside their place of self-isolation. The requirement to self-isolate in these circumstances is not dependent upon taking a COVID 19 test or the outcome of a test.

National Health Service guidance states that if someone has the main symptoms of COVID-19, they should get a test as soon as possible. Unless someone is self-isolating after returning from a country, territory or region that is not on the travel corridors list, it is not a legal requirement to remain in self-isolation between taking a test and receiving the result. However, it is advised that they should stay at home and not have visitors until they get the result. It is recommended that they only leave their home to get the test.

14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that (1) local authorities, and (2) local NHS centres, have full access to COVID-19 test data from commercial laboratories.

To provide a more comprehensive response to a number of outstanding Written Questions, this has been answered by an information factsheet Testing – note for House of Lords which is attached, due to the size of the data. A copy has also been placed in the Library.

4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how exempted professionals, including those in IT and engineering, who are UK citizens and resident in the EU should evidence their status on entry to an EU country under the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

The Withdrawal Agreement protects UK nationals and their family members who were lawfully resident in the EU by the end of the transition period, on 31 December 2020. Those in scope of the Withdrawal Agreement and their family members are exempt from the EU's temporary restrictions on non-essential travel due to Covid-19 and have a right to enter, exit and transit to their host Member State. To evidence their status, UK nationals must carry evidence of their residence in the EU, as well as a valid passport, to travel. Boarding should be permitted upon presentation of a residence permit; a certificate of application; a frontier worker permit; or any document that credibly evidences their status under the Withdrawal Agreement. Documents that could be used include proof of an EU address; payslips issued by an EU employer; EU bank account statements; or utility bills evidencing an EU address.

The separate provisions in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on entry and temporary stay for business purposes apply to UK nationals living in the EU, in EU countries other than their Member State of residence or frontier work, in the same way as they do to UK nationals living in the UK. Member State rules vary and business travellers should check, prior to travelling, if they need a visa, work permit or other documentation. If a visa or work permit is needed, business travellers should apply well in advance of any travel. The Travel Advice pages published by the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office provide the most up to date information on travelling to European countries.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the EU about allowing UK citizens to visit EU countries for a continuous visa-free 180-day period from 1 January 2021.

The Government has discussed mobility arrangements across a number of areas as part of negotiations on our future relationship with the EU, and these discussions are ongoing.

The EU has already legislated such that UK nationals will not need a visa when travelling to the Schengen area for short stays of up to 90 days in any 180-day period. This will apply from the end of the transition period to all UK nationals travelling to and within the Schengen area for purposes such as tourism.

This is the standard length of stay that the EU provides to the nationals of eligible third countries that offer visa-free travel access for EU citizens, in line with existing EU legislation.

As things stand, stays beyond the EU's 90/180 day visa-free allocation from 1 January 2021 onwards will be for individual Member States to decide and implement through domestic entry rules and visa arrangements for non-EU citizens. UK nationals will need to discuss the specifics of their situation with the relevant Member State authorities and should be prepared to provide any extra documentation that may be required.

20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they are having with the EU to negotiate an exemption from ATA Carnets and CITES certification for temporary (1) import, and (2) export, between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

HMG published a Command Paper on 21 July setting out a proposed way forward on the Northern Ireland Protocol. This seeks to ensure that businesses and consumers can have normal access to goods from the rest of the UK and sets out a possible approach whereby movements that are purely between GB and NI do not require customs processes.

The Government is not having any discussions with the EU to negotiate an exemption from CITES certification or ATA Carnets for temporary import or export between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. CITES certification is required so as to continue to uphold the UK’s obligations under international agreements. ATA Carnets are not a requirement, they are an optional facilitation which allows goods to be imported temporarily without import duty being paid, and a single document to be used for multiple countries’ customs controls. The UK and approximately 80 countries around the world (including all EU member states) accept ATA Carnets and are signatories to the Customs Convention on the ATA Carnet and the Istanbul Convention on Temporary Admission which govern the use of Carnets.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
29th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what will be the threshold number of (1) musical instruments, and (2) other related equipment, at which the holder will be required to purchase an ATA carnet for temporary export and import.

The current process for ATA Carnets with convention countries outside the EU will apply to relevant imports and exports with the EU at the end of the transition period. This means that from January 2021, ATA Carnets will become one of the options available to both businesses and individuals when temporarily moving goods between the UK and EU countries.

Use of an ATA Carnet is optional and is a commercial decision on whether it is the most cost-effective method in each specific circumstance. There is no specific threshold for the use of an ATA Carnet.

In the UK, ATA Carnets are administered by the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI). Further information on obtaining and using an ATA Carnet can be found by contacting the LCCI.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
29th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there will be a replacement for the social security certificate A1/E101 for self-employed UK citizens working in EEA countries; and, if so, what it will be.

The UK continues to participate in EU social security coordination rules during the transition period, and the self-employed should continue to apply to HMRC for A1/E101 certificates as normal.

Self-employed individuals going to work in the EU, EEA or Switzerland on or after 1 January 2021 who remain subject to UK social security legislation will be entitled to an A1/E101 certificate if they are covered by the Withdrawal Agreement with the EU, the Swiss Citizens’ Rights Agreement or the EEA EFTA Separation Agreement. For those individuals not covered by these agreements, the Government published a mandate on 27 February which sets out its intention to negotiate a future EU-wide agreement on social security coordination, including on which countries’ legislation is applicable.

On 26 October, HMRC published an Agent Update which sets out some of the changes for the self-employed going to work in or coming from the EU, the EEA or Switzerland from 1 January 2021.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what financial support is available for people who are newly self-employed in the 2019-20 tax year, and what consideration they have given to allowing these individuals to access the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

The Government recognises that those who started trading more recently will not have submitted a tax return for the 2018-19 tax year, and it considered alternative approaches. HMRC would not be able to distinguish genuine self-employed individuals who started trading in 2019-20 from fake applications by fraudulent operators and organised criminal gangs seeking to exploit the SEISS.

However, those who entered self-employment after April 2019 may still be eligible for other support. For example, the self-employed can benefit from the Government’s relaxation of the earnings rules (known as the Minimum Income Floor) in Universal Credit.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to extending the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme to those who operate a limited company and take dividends as a source of income.

Income from dividends is a return on investment in the company, rather than wages, and is not eligible for support. Under current reporting mechanisms it is not possible for HM Revenue and Customs to distinguish between dividends derived from an individual’s own company and dividends from other sources, and between dividends in lieu of employment income and as returns from other corporate activity. Expanding the scope would require HMRC to collect and verify new information. This would take longer to deliver and put at risk the other schemes which the Government is committed to delivering as quickly as possible.

However, those who pay themselves a salary through their own company may instead be eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS). The CJRS is available to employers, including personal service companies, and individuals paying themselves a salary through a PAYE scheme are eligible. For clarity, dividends are not covered by the CJRS.

Individuals who are not eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme or the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme may have access to other support which the Government is providing, including the Bounce Back Loans Scheme for small businesses, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, and the deferral of tax payments. More information about the full range of business support measures is available on gov.uk.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by the Minister of State for Digital and Culture on 2 February (145005), with reference to the phrase "permanent short stay visa waiver for all current and future EU Member States", whether the term "permanent" was defined during the negotiations on the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

The EU’s proposal on a visa waiver was set out in their draft agreement, published in March 2020. Article MOBI.4(1) contained commitments on the provision of reciprocal visa free travel for short stays:

“1. The Parties shall provide for reciprocal visa-free travel for citizens of the Union and citizens of the United Kingdom when travelling to the territory of the other party for short stays of a maximum duration as defined in the Parties’ domestic legislation, which shall be at least 90 days in any 180-day period.”

This text is available on the Commission website at:

https://ec.europa.eu/info/publications/draft-text-agreement-new-partnership-united-kingdom_en

The commitment applies to ‘citizens of the Union’ and is not qualified by a date of expiry.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will consider implementing a secure QR code system for proof of settled status for EU citizens resident in the UK.

We continue to welcome feedback on how we can improve our services.

Home Office officials have met with the 3million group to discuss the use of a QR code system and are now considering the feasibility of the suggested approach.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord Frost on 24 June (HL Deb, col 389), what are their reasons for considering that the music industry's proposal for a visa waiver arrangement is not "consistent with our requirement to retain discretion over our own immigration requirements".

UK citizens going to the EU for shorts stays and EU, EEA and Swiss citizens visiting the UK are already visa free. Musicians and performers can already undertake short-term touring without visas and permits in at least 17 Member States.

EU visa waiver agreements are also subject to the provisions of Article 6 (3) of REGULATION (EU) 2018/1806 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL which sets out an individual Member State may still decide to require a visa for short stays for people carrying out a paid activity during their stay.

The EU’s draft text for the TCA included a visa waiver agreement, which would have prohibited the parties from introducing visas on visitors from the other party unless those visitors were carrying out a paid activity (i.e. service supply or performance) during their short-stay visit. In the event they were carrying out a paid activity individual Member States could apply a visa requirement to this category of service suppliers. The ability of the UK to apply visas would have been restricted only to reciprocating by applying a visa requirement to the same category supplier for the individual member state.

The EU’s proposal would also have prevented the UK from introducing or maintaining visit visas on any future EU Member State, not just on existing ones. In effect handing to the European Union the ability to make a country a non-visa national for travel to the UK without the consent or approval of the UK.

The Government is now focusing on bilateral engagement with Member States to encourage them to more closely align with the UK's generous regime.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Permitted Paid Engagement visa will be extended to citizens in the European Economic Area after the end of the transition period.

EEA and Swiss citizens will be able to come to the UK under the Permitted Paid Engagement visitor route in order to undertake certain paid engagements for up to a month.

We expect to treat EEA and Swiss citizens as non-visa nationals, meaning they will be able to enter the UK without the need for a visa in advance of travel if they are intending to visit. This includes the Permitted Paid Engagement visitor route.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the music sector to discuss the requirement, particularly for self-employed musicians, of a flexible and affordable mechanism allowing short-term visa-free work travel.

The UK’s Points-Based Immigration System has been designed with businesses and employers given huge consideration, including the music sector.

The Visitor route includes provision for professional artists entertainers and musicians to undertake paid engagements for up to a month. We expect to treat EEA and Swiss nationals as non-visa nationals, meaning they can undertake these engagements without needing to apply for a visa in advance of travel.

As non-visa nationals, EEA citizens will be in scope for the concession for temporary creative workers looking to remain in the UK for up to three months, without the need to apply for a visa in advance, provided they first secure a certificate of sponsorship. This is a popular and generous concession available only to non-visa nationals working in the creative industries.

We will continue to engage with the creative industries as we review the routes for creatives going forward.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)