Baroness Hayman of Ullock Portrait

Baroness Hayman of Ullock

Labour - Workington

Became Member: 9th September 2020

Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)

(since July 2024)

Opposition Whip (Lords)
21st Oct 2020 - 5th Jul 2024
Shadow Spokesperson (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Oct 2020 - 5th Jul 2024
Shadow Spokesperson (Levelling Up, Housing, Communities and Local Government)
4th Dec 2021 - 26th Oct 2023
Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Feb 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow Minister (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) (Flooding and Coastal Communities)
10th Oct 2016 - 9th Feb 2017
Opposition Whip (Commons)
18th Sep 2015 - 10th Oct 2016
Justice Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 26th Oct 2015


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Baroness Hayman of Ullock has voted in 484 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Benyon (Conservative)
(150 debate interactions)
Baroness Scott of Bybrook (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
(100 debate interactions)
Lord Douglas-Miller (Conservative)
(43 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(129 debate contributions)
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Legislation Debates
Levelling-up and Regeneration Act 2023
(59,461 words contributed)
Elections Act 2022
(26,371 words contributed)
Environment Act 2021
(25,350 words contributed)
Procurement Act 2023
(16,272 words contributed)
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View all Baroness Hayman of Ullock's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Hayman of Ullock, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


1 Bill introduced by Baroness Hayman of Ullock


A Bill to amend the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985 and the Commonhold and Leasehold Reform Act 2002 to limit the right of landlords to recover legal costs in excess of a prescribed scale; to make Tribunal judgments binding on all leaseholders and to require landlords to account to all leaseholders; and for connected purposes

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Thursday 8th September 2022

Baroness Hayman of Ullock has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 50 Written Questions

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Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
24th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the differences in pay for male and female workers in the climate and natural environment sectors; and whether they have any plans to address the gender pay gap in these sectors.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

5th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what discussions they are having with representatives from the metals recycling industry about the importance of the free and fair trade of scrap steel.

The UK has an abundant supply of scrap. Officials are in regular contact with metals recycling sector representatives on a range of issues, including trade. We are paying close attention to how the scrap market is responding to new domestic opportunities on high quality scrap for electric arc furnaces.

The Government supports free and fair trade and takes the control of waste exports and our international obligations very seriously. The export of scrap is subject to strict controls and exporters are required to ensure that the waste they ship is managed in an environmentally sound manner throughout shipment and recycling.

18th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the likely impact of the UK’s accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership on (1) domestic food producers, and (2) the animal welfare practices associated with imported food products.

The Impact Assessment for the UK's accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) was published on 17th July 2022 and outlines sectoral impacts. The Government has negotiated a balanced agreement, with significant opportunities for UK agri-food businesses and which also has strong protections for the UK's sensitive agricultural products.

18th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what engagement they undertook with representatives of domestic food producers prior to taking the decision to accede to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The government has ensured that UK food producers have been able to express their views on the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific partnership (CPTPP) through frequent engagement with the agricultural sector.

We have regularly spoken to representatives of domestic food producers, including the Food and Drink Association, National Farmers' Union, the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board, the Agricultural Industries Confederation and the British Poultry Council.

The Department has also hosted roundtable events specifically for agricultural stakeholders, further giving them a forum to provide perspectives on CPTPP.

Agricultural stakeholders were also able to contribute to the consultation exercise on CPTPP, which received almost 150,000 responses. The Government's response to that consultation was published in June 2021 at the outset of negotiations.

28th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of claims that Drax Power Station is burning wood from rare forests in Canada; and whether such behaviour is consistent with the terms of the environmental subsidies provided to it.

The Government only supports sustainable biomass and generators only receive subsidies for biomass that complies with strict sustainability criteria. We take reports of non-compliance very seriously and regularly engage with our regulator, Ofgem, to ensure that our strict sustainability criteria are being adhered to.

8th May 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to support research into sustainable materials, including those limiting emissions along entire material and product lifecycles.

The Government are committed to supporting the research and development of sustainable materials, notably where it enhances our commitments to net zero. The Government set up the Henry Royce Institute in 2015, the UK’s centre for advanced materials research with an initial £235m in investment provided by HMG. In 2022 an additional £95 million was provided to the Royce Institute.

The cross-government Innovation Accelerator Programme through InnovateUK has funded a two-year pilot for a Centre of Expertise in Advanced Materials and Sustainability (CEAMS), part of wider programme that will see £100 million invested across 26 transformative R&D projects.

The UK government through UKRI has awarded the Foundation Industries Sustainability Consortium £19.5 million to run the Economic Material Innovation for Sustainable and Efficient use of Resources (EconoMISER) programme. The funding provides the UK’s Foundation Industries, who contribute 10% of the total CO2 emitted by UK homes and businesses, with the essential tools needed to decarbonise.

1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether breathable nature-based insulation is more appropriate for insulating older homes in the existing housing stock than synthetic products.

The Government has not made an assessment of the circumstances in which nature-based insulation products would deliver better outcomes in older homes. The Government remains committed to ensuring that all insulation products sold on the UK market are safe and perform to the required standard.

1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of using breathable nature-based insulation on the comfort, health and well-being of occupants.

The Government has not made an assessment of the potential for nature-based insulation products to contribute to the decarbonisation of the built environment, the 2050 Net Zero Carbon target, or the impact on the residents of homes in which these products are use. The Government has also made no assessment of the benefits of showing consumers the potential relationship between individual products and energy savings.

To improve energy and heat efficiency in buildings usually requires a number of interventions, including improving insulation. Therefore, the focus of Government programmes that deliver this, such as the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund, is on developing approaches to whole house retrofit, rather than on identifying the contribution individual products can make.

1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made, if any, of showing potential consumers the relationship between energy savings and operational carbon versus stored biogenic carbon of insulation materials.

The Government has not made an assessment of the potential for nature-based insulation products to contribute to the decarbonisation of the built environment, the 2050 Net Zero Carbon target, or the impact on the residents of homes in which these products are use. The Government has also made no assessment of the benefits of showing consumers the potential relationship between individual products and energy savings.

To improve energy and heat efficiency in buildings usually requires a number of interventions, including improving insulation. Therefore, the focus of Government programmes that deliver this, such as the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund, is on developing approaches to whole house retrofit, rather than on identifying the contribution individual products can make.

1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of proposals for a mechanism to inform consumers (1) how much embodied carbon an insulation product contains, and (2) whether, and if so how much, it stores biogenic carbon, through Environmental Product Declarations at the specifier level.

The Government has not made an assessment of the potential for nature-based insulation products to contribute to the decarbonisation of the built environment, the 2050 Net Zero Carbon target, or the impact on the residents of homes in which these products are use. The Government has also made no assessment of the benefits of showing consumers the potential relationship between individual products and energy savings.

To improve energy and heat efficiency in buildings usually requires a number of interventions, including improving insulation. Therefore, the focus of Government programmes that deliver this, such as the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund, is on developing approaches to whole house retrofit, rather than on identifying the contribution individual products can make.

1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the potential for carbon storing nature-based insulation products to decarbonise the built environment, and (2) the impact such products could have on reaching the 2050 Net Zero target.

The Government has not made an assessment of the potential for nature-based insulation products to contribute to the decarbonisation of the built environment, the 2050 Net Zero Carbon target, or the impact on the residents of homes in which these products are use. The Government has also made no assessment of the benefits of showing consumers the potential relationship between individual products and energy savings.

To improve energy and heat efficiency in buildings usually requires a number of interventions, including improving insulation. Therefore, the focus of Government programmes that deliver this, such as the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund, is on developing approaches to whole house retrofit, rather than on identifying the contribution individual products can make.

27th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the 2050 Net Zero target, whether they have assessed the amount of (1) energy required for, and (2) the global warming potential of, the manufacture of insulation materials.

The Government has not undertaken as assessment of the amount of energy required for the manufacture of insulation products, or the impact this may have on global warming. The Government remains committed to ensuring that all insulation products sold on the UK market are safe and perform to the required standard.

27th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the 2050 Net Zero target, whether they have assessed the levels of embodied carbon contained in (1) synthetic, and (2) nature-based, insulation materials.

The Government has not undertaken such an assessment. The Government continues to take forward work to mitigate carbon emissions through measuring and reducing the embodied and operational carbon of the buildings and infrastructure it funds, and within the construction supply chain.

26th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) quantity, and (2) mix, of insulation that will be needed for typical homes to enable the UK to hit its 2050 Net Zero target in respect of the built environment.

The Government has not made a public assessment of the quantity and mix of insulation required to reach Net Zero. There are multiple pathways to achieving Net Zero, all with varying degrees of insulation installed. In pathways where less insulation is installed, more heat demand must be met by low carbon heat. The optimal mix will depend on a number of factors, such as the cost of low carbon heating technologies, and the ability for the electricity grid to meet peak heat demand.

26th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) existing UK manufacturing capacity, and (2) associated supply chains, in relation to the capacity required to insulate the entirety of the UK’s building stock in time to meet the 2050 Net Zero target.

Government recognises the need for a skilled, competent and robust supply chain to deliver the improvements to buildings necessary to meet our net zero targets. We are continuing to work with the industry to support training in key skills shortage areas and new routes of entry to increase capacity.

The Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) published research in 2021, ‘Building Skills for Net Zero’, that used the Climate Change Committee’s data to define a skills route map for the UK construction industry. This identifies the roles and expertise teams need to meet the requirements for the UK, Wales and Scotland and can be found here: https://www.citb.co.uk/about-citb/construction-industry-research-reports/search-our-construction-industry-research-reports/building-skills-for-net-zero/

26th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the quantity of insulation material needed to insulate the entirety of the UK’s building stock in time to meet the 2050 Net Zero target.

The English Housing Survey provides estimates[1] of the extent of different insulation measures in the English housing stock. These estimates suggest that 6.3m solid walls remain uninsulated, 5.4m cavity walls remain uninsulated, and 3.2m lofts have less than 100mm of insulation (this figure excludes homes that do not have a loft – for example, homes with a loft conversion). Only 1.9m homes currently have floor insulation.

It should be noted, particularly for higher cost measures like solid wall insulation, that not all these untreated properties need to be improved, as some of these improvements would not be considered cost effective, practical or affordable on an individual property basis. Energy efficiency is a matter for the devolved administrations, who will have equivalent estimates for their countries.

[1]https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/898342/Energy_Chapter_2_Figures_and_Annex_Tables.xlsx, tabs: AT2.10, AT 2.11, and AT2.12

27th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government over what period was the £71 million funding invested in research by the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research; how much of this funding has been spent on administrative costs; and how much of this funding has been spent on projects where refinement of the use of animals in research was the primary focus.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. I will correspond directly with the noble Baroness.

8th May 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the scale of e-waste; and what steps they are taking to address this.

Defra is committed to delivering a more sustainable future for the UK and world. Supporting this it recently announced the world’s first United Nations-backed International Centre of Excellence on Sustainable Resource Management in the Circular Economy. In partnership with national and international partners the centre will deliver environmentally sustainable primary extraction of Critical Minerals and map the flow of these critical and priority minerals across their complete life cycle, from extraction to reuse, recovery to disposal.

Defra also published a consultation and a call for evidence on reforms to the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Regulations 2013 with a view to improving levels of collection for re-use and recycling, improving treatment standards and critical mineral recovery from WEEE and wider measures in support of the circular economy. The consultation and call for evidence closed on 7 March. Defra is currently analysing the responses and will publish a summary of responses in due course.

The current regulations require producers to finance the collection and proper treatment of WEEE which has stimulated investment in WEEE treatment infrastructure.

Under the Producer Responsibility Obligations (Packaging Waste) Regulations 2007 obligated producers are required to obtain Packaging Waste Recycling Notes (PRNs), as evidence that a certain tonnage of packaging waste that has been recycled. The sale of PRNs generates millions of pounds of revenue a year for reprocessors and exporters of packaging waste (circa £490m in 2022), which should be re-invested to support development of the necessary recycling and reprocessing infrastructure.

8th May 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to improve data collection, mapping, and tracking of critical minerals and other material streams within electrical and electronic equipment.

Defra has recently announced the world’s first United Nations-backed International Centre of Excellence on Sustainable Resource Management in the Circular Economy. In partnership with national and international partners the centre will deliver environmentally sustainable primary extraction of Critical Minerals and map the flow of these critical and priority minerals across there complete life cycle, from extraction to reuse, recovery to disposal. In addition, Defra also published a consultation and call for evidence on reforms to the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Regulations 2013. This sought evidence in support of future policy measures intended to improve treatment standards and critical mineral recovery from WEEE. Defra is currently analysing and will publish a summary in due course.

8th May 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to invest in infrastructure to support the re-use, repair and re-manufacturing of e-waste products according to the waste hierarchy.

The Waste Prevention Programme for England: Maximising Resources, Minimising Waste (copy attached) commits the Government to prioritise measures to support the waste hierarchy in relation to electrical equipment. This includes consideration of ways to provide consumers and businesses with information on the environmental performance of electrical and electronic products, focussing on material resource efficiency aspects such as durability, reparability and recyclability. The Government has also introduced new eco-design requirements for a range of industrial appliances, white goods, electronic displays and lighting products, to increase their reparability. We have also published a consultation and call for evidence on potential reforms to the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Regulations 2013. The review includes measures to ensure more WEEE is properly collected for reuse and recycling, considers new metrics to evaluate the performance of the WEEE system and wider proposals that would support the circular economy. We are currently analysing the responses to this consultation and call for evidence and will publish a summary in due course.

18th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the adequacy of border control posts ahead of the introduction of the common user charge on 30 April; and what assessment they have made of the likely impact of the common user charge on the UK’s environmental horticulture industry.

Defra is confident that existing and new BCP infrastructure will have sufficient capacity and capability to handle the volume of expected checks outlined in the Border Target Operating Model (BTOM), with robust, dynamic, and effective operational measures ready to call upon if needed.

Defra will continue to work with existing BCP operators to ensure they are prepared, and the Government has built new infrastructure at critical locations.

Operators have not expressed concerns regarding under-capacity, we are therefore not anticipating queues but will continue working closely with operators to address any concerns they may have.

The common user charge for BCP operating costs applies only to UK government-run BCPs. Commercial operators will independently set BCP charges for their own facilities.

The impact of the Common User Charge (CUC) on businesses of all sizes will be kept under monthly and quarterly reviews, with rates reviewed and updated annually.

Full details of the CUC can be found on GOV.UK.

18th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to extending the place of destination (PoD) scheme to allow inspection of horticulture imports at a registered PoD until border control posts are fully functional for the purpose of plant and tree imports.

Defra is confident that existing and new Border Control Posts infrastructure will have sufficient capacity and capability to handle the volume of expected checks outlined in the Border Target Operating Model, with robust, dynamic, and effective operational measures ready to call upon if needed.

Looking ahead, we are piloting an ambitious programme of trusted trader assurance schemes for sanitary and phytosanitary goods. The pilots will explore how businesses can provide assurance through data, technology and trusted relationships and take increased responsibility for controls.

17th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many marine mammals were caught by vessels fishing in UK waters in 2023.

Marine mammal bycatch is required to be reported under the Marine Mammal Protection Act. According to the Marine Management Organisation six marine mammals were reported by fishing vessels as bycatch injury or mortality in 2023.

There are various sources for marine mammal bycatch data in the UK.

The UK Bycatch Monitoring Programme provides bycatch estimates for the UK; however, these have not yet been produced for 2023.

The UK Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme diagnosed 16 cases of bycaught marine mammals in 2023 (covering England, Wales and Northern Ireland and which all occurred in England).

In Scotland, the Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme reports on incidents of marine mammal bycatch in Scottish waters.

13th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that the UK’s accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (1) does not weaken domestic pesticide standards in terms of active substance approvals or maximum residue levels, and (2) does not undermine the precautionary principle with regards to pesticides.

The UK has not lowered its standards in order to accede to CPTPP. All food and drink products imported into the UK, irrespective of the purpose for which they will be used, must comply with our import requirements and regulatory standards for food safety. This includes pesticide active substance approvals and maximum residue levels (MRLs).

The UK Government supports the precautionary principle. This is expressly a part of our plant protection product regime and is also incorporated into the Environment Act through the Environmental Principles that the Government must consider when making new policy.

13th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have any plans to introduce a phase-out of pesticides in public, urban spaces under local authority control, as has been done in countries such as Luxembourg.

It is for each Local Authority to decide the best way of delivering effective and cost-effective weed control in its operations without harming people or the environment. There is a legal requirement to minimise the use of pesticides in areas used by the public.

Further, it is vital that everyone who uses pesticides professionally is appropriately trained and utilises the highest standards of practice possible to protect the public and the environment from the risks associated with pesticide use.

This includes fully engaging with effective Integrated Pest Management (IPM). We are working with stakeholders in the sector to ensure pesticide users fully utilise IPM and reduce their reliance on chemical pesticides and increase their standards.

13th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the adequacy of funding to local authorities to implement the simpler recycling reforms that were announced in October 2023.

Financial burdens introduced through new statutory duties on local authorities will be assessed in accordance with the new burdens doctrine and reasonable net costs will be covered by the Government in line with the new burdens doctrine. We have brought forward up to £295 million in capital funding to roll out weekly food waste collections across England. This will cover the cost of additional bins and vehicles. Defra developed the funding formula in collaboration with the Waste and Resources Action Programme and underwent an extensive assurance process with local authority networks. Requests by local authorities to reconsider funding allocations, based on new evidence, are currently being considered. We are still calculating resource funding allocations.

Extended Producer Responsibility payments will be provided to local authorities for the costs of collecting and managing household packaging waste through efficient and effective services. This includes the collection of additional packaging materials for recycling such as plastic films and flexibles. Initial estimates are that local authorities in the UK will collectively receive payments in the region of £1.2 billion per annum for managing household packaging waste. Payments modelling is currently underway to refine this estimate ready for packaging Extended Producer Responsibility implementation.

13th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of requiring weekly food waste collections on rural councils.

Financial burdens introduced through new statutory duties on local authorities will be assessed in accordance with the new burdens doctrine and reasonable net costs will be covered by the government in line with the new burdens doctrine. We have brought forward up to £295 million in capital funding to roll out weekly food waste collections across England. This will cover the cost of additional bins and vehicles. Defra developed the funding formula in collaboration with the Waste and Resources Action Programme. The formula took into account rurality and underwent an extensive assurance process with local authority networks. We are still calculating resource funding allocations.

13th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of recycling reforms on local authority finances.

We published an impact assessment alongside the 2021 consultation on Consistency in recycling England, which can be found attached to this answer. The final impact assessment is due to be published in line with the laying of the secondary legislation for Simpler Recycling.

6th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish the chemicals strategy.

The Government is committed to protecting human health and the environment and we will set out our priorities for addressing risks from chemicals in due course.

6th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what is their timetable for consulting on activity regulations under the Animals (Low-Welfare Activities Abroad) Act 2023.

The Animals (Low-Welfare Activities Abroad) Act 2023 provides a framework for the introduction of future bans on the advertising and offering for sale, in England and Northern Ireland, of low-welfare animal activities abroad.

Future decisions on which specific animal activities will fall in scope of the advertising ban will be evidence-based and subject to Parliamentary scrutiny. Sufficient, compelling evidence will be required to demonstrate why any specific advertising ban is needed.

This Government continues to make animal welfare a priority and we are currently exploring a number of options to ensure progress as soon as is practicable.

6th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to expand the types of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) regulated under environmental permitting, and whether they will consider tightening the limits on the amount of PFAS that can be in effluent.

The Environment Agency is developing options to increase the number of PFAS that are controlled through environmental permits issued under the Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2016. This is focused on those with the strongest evidence of harm, such as PFAS listed under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants, and may include new statutory and non-statutory standards for water quality which can be used to set permit limits for discharges to rivers.

More widely, the Government is working with the Environment Agency to assess levels of PFAS occurring in the environment, their sources, and potential risks to inform policy and regulatory approaches. Action has already been taken to ban or highly restrict specific PFAS both domestically and internationally, including perfluoro-octane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) as well as perfluorohexanesulphonic acid (PFHxS), a persistent organic pollutant, the use and production of which was prohibited in 2023.

In the Environmental Improvement Plan 2023, the Government also committed to consult on improvements to the regulatory framework for industrial emissions to better reflect our environmental priorities. This will include assessing whether any changes are required to ensure that industrial emissions of persistent chemicals such as PFAS are effectively controlled.

5th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the metals recycling industry regarding the impact of introducing a fixed-rate deposit return scheme on the recycling rates of aluminium.

DEFRA engage stakeholders across industry, including material manufacturers and the metals sector.

Regarding the issue of deposit levels, the deposit return scheme will have a central body to manage its operation; this role is to be undertaken by a new industry not-for-profit body, the Deposit Management Organisation (DMO). The DMO will be responsible for setting the deposit level within parameters set out in the regulations. The DMO will be required to consult all those with an interest in the scheme in setting the deposit level(s). The DMO will have the ability to set either a fixed rate or variable rate deposit (which could vary by drinks container size, format or material type).

28th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the reply by Lord Douglas-Miller on 22 February (HL Deb col 701), what assessment they have made of the merits of returning peatland sites to fully functioning bog habitat, including by limiting burning regimes.

In 2021, peatlands emitted 2% of UK net greenhouse gas emissions. When in a restored state, peatlands accumulate and store carbon, making them a vital tool in climate regulation and achieving the Government’s Net Zero goals. Full restoration of peatland habitats delivers on each of our natural capital objectives - locking up carbon, restoring biodiversity, preserving heritage sites, minimising wildfire hazards, and improving water regulation and quality. This Government is committed to restoring these precious environments.

There are a variety of restoration methods used to restore our peat. We seek to minimise the use of burning as a tool for restoration and therefore only permit burning in specific circumstances when it is being conducted in the right place and for the right reasons. Our Heather and Grass etc Burning (England) Regulations 2021 limit the instances when burning is permitted, and data from the Moorland Change Map suggests a decline in burning on moorlands since the introduction of the Regulations.

28th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether payments to farmers in England to rewet upland peat are sufficient (1) to offset management costs and provide income to the farmers, and (2) to ensure levels of restoration activity that are consistent with short-term and long-term targets.

Payment rates are based on the income forgone and costs to the farmer. In January, we announced that we were increasing the payment rate for rewetting moorland peat in Countryside Stewardship from £25 to £181 per hectare. This significant increase will ensure appropriate payment to farmers as well as incentivising rewetting of vitally important peatland.

The Nature for Climate Peatland Grant scheme has provided £35 million of funding to financially commit us to restoring approximately 27,000 hectares of peatland. This scheme is funding a significant proportion of our short-term target of restoring 35,000 hectares by 2025.

The Government’s Environmental Land Management schemes will help us meet our longer-term target to restore 280,000 hectares of peatland by 2050. In particular, the Landscape Recovery scheme will provide successful projects with funding to support large-scale peatland restoration. Payments made to land managers under Landscape Recovery projects will be benchmarked against rates paid for similar activities under existing Government schemes, such as Countryside Stewardship, to ensure payments to farmers are appropriate.

27th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure high recycling rates under the Simpler Recycling policy; and how such rates will be assessed to give consumers confidence.

Simpler Recycling will aim to make recycling clearer and more consistent across England. All household and non-household premises (such as businesses, schools and hospitals) across England will be able to recycle the same materials in the following core groups: metal; glass; plastic; paper and card; food waste; garden waste (household only). Furthermore, packaging producers will be required to label packaging as ‘Recycle’ or ‘Do Not Recycle’ adopting a single label format which incorporates the Recycle Now symbol.

27th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have assessed the effectiveness of introducing statutory guidance on Simpler Recycling which mandates the sorting of materials in order to be recycled by Material Recovery Facilities.

We recently consulted on the content of the statutory guidance for Simpler Recycling. We will publish our final statutory guidance once the regulations relating to Simpler Recycling have been made.

27th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have assessed the impact of mandating the sorting of co-mingled materials collected from households on increasing recycling rates under the Simpler Recycling policy.

As part of Simpler Recycling, we have consulted on the provision of an exemption to allow local authorities and waste collectors in England to co-collect two or more dry recyclable waste streams in the same container, and to co-collect food and garden waste together in one container, without the need for written assessment. This consultation is now closed and we are analysing the responses and feedback from stakeholders gathered through this process. We will communicate the outcome of the consultation in due course. Furthermore, we will publish our Final Impact Assessment for Simpler Recycling alongside secondary legislation in 2024 which will contain modelled impacts of the Simpler Recycling on recycling rates.

14th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what materials their proposed deposit return scheme in England, Wales and Northern Ireland will include; and whether they intend to add further materials after the scheme is operational.

The position on materials in scope in the Deposit Return Scheme for drink containers (DRS) was first published in March 2022 in the consultation response on an Extended Producer Responsibility for packaging; and reiterated in January 2023 in the DRS consultation response.

14th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what recent discussions they have had with packaging manufacturers regarding the scope of their proposed deposit return scheme in England, Wales and Northern Ireland; and whether they intend to revise the scope of that scheme following any such discussions.

Conversations with packaging manufacturers on scope of materials in the deposit return scheme have been consistent with the position that was outlined in the Government’s consultation response in January 2023 (see attached).

14th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to introduce safeguards to ensure that, under their Border Target Operating Model, there can be no interference with consignments which enter the UK via the Port of Dover prior to inspections being carried out at the Sevington inland border facility.

Goods selected for inspection will not be legally cleared for sale or use within the UK until they have attended and been cleared at the BCP. Where the BCP has concerns, either due to non-attendance or evidence of non-compliance, there are existing provisions, including requiring return or destruction of the goods, or for the goods to be referred for inland controls by the local authority.

Any vehicles suspected to be carrying illegal imports (e.g. those for which customs declarations and pre-notification have not been made or suspected to have been made in bad faith) will continue to be stopped and dealt with by Border Force at the point of entry to the UK, not sent to Sevington.

14th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how much meat has been seized at the UK border by officials in each of the last six months; and whether they expect to completely eradicate the import of illicit produce under their Border Target Operating Model.

The data we have relates to seizures of “products of animal origin, contaminated goods and packaging” (not necessarily just meat) reported to Defra by English PHAs only. Any seizures made by other officials or seizures not reported to Defra are not included here. The data below relates to all EU and Rest of World imports.

Year

Number of seizures of products of animal origin reported to Defra by English Port Health Authorities

Total weight (kilogrammes)

2022 (w/c 22 October 2022-w/c 31 December 2022 inclusive)

42

4,123

2023 (w/c 7 January 2023 to 30 December 2023 inclusive)

622

53,879

2024 (w/c 6 January 2024 to w/c 27 January 2024 inclusive)

45

7,572

Total

709

65,574

There are rules for bringing food or animal products into Great Britain (GB) for personal use, depending on the country that the traveller is coming from. There are restrictions on meat, dairy and other products.

African swine fever (ASF) cases in Europe in 2022 represented new “jumps” in disease distribution towards the United Kingdom. While we consider that the overall risk of entry of ASF virus into the UK from all combined pathways remains at medium, the particular pathway of human-mediated transport of non-commercial, infected products from the EU is considered to be high risk. The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) conducts outbreak risk assessments on ASF in the EU, published here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/african-swine-fever-in-pigs-and-boars-in-europe and attached to this answer.

As a result, we announced controls restricting the movement of pork and pork products into GB to help safeguard Britain's pigs. Travellers are no longer allowed to bring pork or pork products weighing over two kilograms into GB, unless they are produced to the EU’s commercial standards. The controls, which came into force in September 2022, strengthen the standards for bringing pork and pork products into GB from the EU and EFTA states. This measure helps limit possibly infected pig meat being brought into GB through various means, such as in passengers’ luggage or in vehicles.

7th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the Common User Charge on (1) groupage and mixed loads entering the UK, and (2) small and medium-sized businesses.

Defra is committed to designing and delivering a charging policy which keeps costs down and minimises impact across all businesses. Through the ‘Charging arrangement at government-run border control posts’ consultation with industry in July 2023, the Government sought feedback on the impacts of the Common User Charge proposals on businesses of all sizes and operating models. It has taken on board all feedback and considered all possible options and timescales to ensure it can implement a charging system that will deliver best value for all traders, and one which meets government’s cost recovery objectives in as transparent and fair way as possible. We expect to publish the Government Response to the consultation shortly which will confirm the final policy and rates.

7th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the Common User Charge on UK food price inflation; and whether they intend to publish the modelling behind this.

Defra has analysed the responses to the 'Charging arrangements at Government-run border control posts' consultation and has carefully assessed the potential impacts on food imports. This will ensure we implement a charging system that will deliver best value for traders, and one which meets government’s cost recovery objectives in as transparent and fair way as possible. We expect to publish the Government Response to the consultation shortly which will confirm the final policy and rates.

7th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government when they will publish their response to the consultation on the Common User Charge, which ran from 12 June 2023 to 9 July 2023; and at what level the charge will be set.

Defra has analysed the responses to the 'Charging arrangements at government-run border control posts' consultation which ran from 12 June to 9 July 2023. We have taken on board all feedback and considered all possible options and timescales to ensure we can implement a charging system that will deliver best value for traders, and one which meets Government’s cost recovery objectives in as transparent and fair way as possible. We expect to publish the Government Response to the consultation shortly which will confirm the final policy and rates.

1st Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what analysis has been carried out of the impact of proposals to extend Permitted Development Rights in National Parks and other Protected Landscapes for the conversion of barns and other rural buildings to residential use, including analysis of whether this would conflict with the statutory purposes to conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the area.

The Government has consulted on proposals to extend permitted development rights to support housing delivery and the agricultural sector. This includes proposals to extend permitted development rights to allow farmers to convert agricultural buildings like barns to houses in national parks and other protected landscapes. We are currently analysing responses to this consultation, which closed on 25 September 2023. This includes consideration of whether this PDR extension would conflict with the statutory purposes of protected landscapes.

National Parks and National Landscapes represent our shared heritage and support our nation’s health and wellbeing. They are also crucial to delivering our commitments to tackle climate change and restore nature. To support them in this role we introduced measures in the Levelling Up and Regeneration Act 2023 placing a stronger requirement on partners to deliver on the statutory purposes of these areas.

17th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Douglas-Miller on 3 January (HL1212), what was the nature of the “learning” undertaken by and shared within the Environment Agency following its response to the pollution incident at Cunsey Beck, Windermere.

There was informative and useful advice in the Scottish Environment Protection Agency report. The specific improvements that the Environment Agency in Cumbria and Lancashire have looked to put in place when dealing with significant pollution incidents are:

  1. To consider and gather all potential witness information even in the event of no immediate polluter being identified.
  2. To ensure full consideration is applied to Environment Agency ecologist deployment and deliver best available practice in sampling.
  3. Where dead fish are present during an incident, logging more detail on specific locations and taking samples.
  4. During more significant investigations, ensure geographic representation of river locations where actions/observations/samples are made or taken.

The above is in addition to an increased focus on the Environment Agency’s response to incidents affecting water quality. In March 2023, the Environment Agency launched a Regulatory Plan which sets out key actions for Windermere, placing regulation at the heart of its work to improve the water environment. These actions include monitoring trends and pollution hotspots, targeting efforts on reducing pollution sources and reviewing findings on a regular basis.

The Environment Agency is also leading the Love Windermere partnership, a long-term initiative which brings together organisations committed to developing a science-based plan for the environmental protection of this iconic lake.

17th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Douglas-Miller on 3 January (HL1212), how many times in each of the past five years the Environment Agency has (1) undertaken an internal review, or (2) asked the Scottish Environment Protection Agency to carry out an external review, of a response to a specific pollution incident.

The Environment Agency proactively undertakes internal reviews of incidents to identify what went well so that good practice can be shared. It will also review what did not go well so that lessons are identified, and performance can be improved. All the most serious incidents are reviewed and all less serious incidents where significant operational impact has been identified. There are approximately 100 serious incidents each year. The table below shows the number of incidents each year which have undergone a routine internal review.

Internal Review

2019

267

2020

270

2021

323

2022

204

2023

180

The Environment Agency asked SEPA to carry out a review of an incident near Windermere that occurred in June 2022. They have no records of any other referrals.

14th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have plans (1) to bring forward their proposed ban on the sale of all peat-containing products, or (2) revise the list of items exempted from the ban until 2030.

In August 2022 we announced that we would ban the sale of peat for use in amateur gardening; we remain committed to this and plan to legislate as soon as parliamentary time allows. It remains our policy that we intend to legislate to restrict, and ultimately ban, the sale of peat and peat containing products. Our proposals, announced in March this year, include technical exemptions up to 2030. We are continuing to hold discussions with the horticulture sector on possible technical exemptions for the continued use of peat in the professional sector up to 2030, and for conservation purposes thereafter.