Baroness Jenkin of Kennington Portrait

Baroness Jenkin of Kennington

Conservative - Life peer

Select Committee on Charities
25th May 2016 - 26th Mar 2017
Equality Act 2010 and Disability Committee
11th Jun 2015 - 15th Mar 2016
Refreshment Committee (Lords)
20th Jun 2012 - 30th Mar 2015


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 28th June 2022
Pharmacy (Responsible Pharmacists, Superintendent Pharmacists etc.) Order 2022
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 109 Conservative No votes vs 1 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 193 Noes - 119
Speeches
Tuesday 15th March 2022
Housing for Older People
My Lords, a couple of years ago, the noble Baroness, Lady Greengross, and I were on the Intergenerational Fairness and …
Written Answers
Thursday 10th February 2022
Gender Recognition
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps the Home Office is taking to close safeguarding loopholes where a name is …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Baroness Jenkin of Kennington has voted in 338 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

16 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Jenkin of Kennington voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 15 Conservative Aye votes vs 19 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 75 Noes - 35
View All Baroness Jenkin of Kennington Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(7 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(7 debate interactions)
Lord Kamall (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(14 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(4 debate contributions)
Home Office
(4 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Baroness Jenkin of Kennington's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Jenkin of Kennington, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Baroness Jenkin of Kennington has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Baroness Jenkin of Kennington has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Baroness Jenkin of Kennington has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Jenkin of Kennington has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


22 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
16th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the projected budget for the Safe To Be Me: a Global Equality Conference to be held in London on 27–28 June 2022; and how many staff are expected to work on it.

The Government looks forward to hosting Safe to Be Me: A Global Equality Conference which will bring together government representatives, businesses, civil society and international parliamentarians on 29 June - 1 July 2022 to address important issues around the safety of LGBT+ people at home and abroad. The Conference will explore four key themes: making progress towards legislative reform that advances equality and legal protections for LGBT+ people globally, including decriminalisation; tackling violence and discrimination; improving access to public services; and working with businesses to strengthen the economic case for LGBT+ inclusion. This will be the UK’s first global LGBT+ Conference, and we will work closely with Lord Herbert of South Downs as Chair of the Conference, and in his role as Prime Minister’s Special Envoy on LGBT+ rights to ensure this event is ambitious.

The overall budget allocated to the delivery of the Conference is still being finalised. As of December 2021, there are 8.25 FTE staff within the international LGBT+ team in the Cabinet Office who are working on the Conference with oversight from a Deputy Director. Additionally, the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office currently has 8.25 FTE staff within the international LGBT+ rights team whose work includes the Conference, as well as substantial oversight from the relevant Director General. We expect resourcing to increase in the run up to the Conference.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidance they have issued for decisions about prosecuting individuals in relation to female genital mutilation offences.

The CPS has legal guidance for all prosecutors dealing with potential cases involving female genital mutilation, which it keeps under review. This guidance has recently been revised to reflect the practical challenges in these cases and to provide clarification on piercing and cosmetic surgery. This was done in consultation with key stakeholders and published in autumn 2019.

12th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the outturn spending from the public purse on the Prime Ministerial residence in Downing Street in each financial year since 1997 for which records are held.

The Downing Street complex is a working building, as well as containing two Ministerial residences. As has always been the case, refurbishments and maintenance are made periodically. The Government is legally required to maintain the Downing Street buildings to the high standards appropriate to its Grade 1 and 2 listed status in consultation with Historic England. The listed status, as well as security and other relevant factors, significantly add to the cost of maintenance and repairs, compared to normal properties.

Across successive governments, Prime Ministers have received an annual allowance of up to £30,000 a year from the public purse to contribute towards the costs associated with maintaining and furnishing of the residency within the Downing Street estate.

Such works contribute to assets owned and held by the nation for use by Ministers, including for example for hosting official guests.

Figures for outturn spending from that allowance on the No 11 flat (the residence of the Prime Minister since 1997) are as follows.

To assist public scrutiny, they are presented in cash terms at the time of the payments, and in real terms (equivalent costs today).

Year

Cash outturn

Real terms*

1997-98

£16,471

£25,299

1998-99

£48,336

£73,040

1999-00

£32,189

£48,425

2000-01

£37,501

£55,406

2001-02

£32,945

£47,973

2002-03

£32,707

£46,587

2003-04

£21,094

£29,414

2004-05

£14,012

£18,996

2005-06

£35,293

£46,617

2006-07

£14,832

£19,050

2007-08

£28,150

£35,164

2008-09

£27,083

£32,939

2009-10

£29,389

£35,181

2010-11

£30,000

£35,267

2011-12

£13,335

£15,442

2012-13

£0

£0

2013-14

£20,490

£22,840

2014-15

£0

£0

2015-16

£29,106

£31,744

2016-17

£19,400

£20,647

2017-18

£0

£0

2018-19

£6,134

£6,270

2019-20

£0

£0


*Using HMT figures for GDP deflator for 2019-20.

Note: The annual allowance may be combined or spread to support works across financial years.

Figures exclude essential works to make good the premises prior to occupation.

No works took place in 2019-20 partly due to the general election and the covid pandemic.

Audited figures of spending from the allowance for the 2020-21 financial year are not yet available; works have taken place by long-standing Downing Street contractors on painting, sanding and floorboards. Any costs of wider refurbishment in this year have been met by the Prime Minister personally.

The Government has been considering the merits of whether works on parts or all of the Downing Street estate could be funded by a trust; this could mirror long-standing arrangements in place for Chequers (a private trust) or for Dorneywood (a charitable trust), reducing the need for subsidy from the public purse. Such matters are legally complex and policy development is ongoing. The Government engaged with the Leader of the Opposition’s Office on the proposals in July.

Matters concerning works on the Downing Street estate, including the residences, will be covered in the Cabinet Office’s forthcoming annual report and audited accounts.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
11th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of instances of taking children into care under safeguarding law in relation to female genital mutilation (FGM) (1) before, during and after a prosecution for FGM, irrespective of the outcome of the investigation and prosecution, and (2) in cases when family members are willing and able to take responsibility for them.

This information is not held centrally. Data on children being taken into care does not identify the cases where female genital mutilation (FGM) was the reason for the child going into care.

FGM is child abuse and it is illegal. The government is determined to eradicate FGM here and abroad and it cannot be condoned or ignored on the basis of it being a 'cultural tradition'. Services should safeguard children from this abuse as from any other form of abuse. The statement of the knowledge and skills required by child and family social workers includes that they should be able to take account of harmful practices in specific communities such as female genital mutilation.

11th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of instances of taking children into care under safeguarding law in relation to female genital mutilation (FGM) only on the basis of risk factors, such as the fact that the child’s mother had been subject to FGM, without direct evidence that the child is going to be subjected to FGM.

This information is not held centrally. Data on children being taken into care does not identify the cases where female genital mutilation (FGM) was the reason for the child going into care.

FGM is child abuse and it is illegal. The government is determined to eradicate FGM here and abroad and it cannot be condoned or ignored on the basis of it being a 'cultural tradition'. Services should safeguard children from this abuse as from any other form of abuse. The statement of the knowledge and skills required by child and family social workers includes that they should be able to take account of harmful practices in specific communities such as female genital mutilation.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether female genital mutilation education in schools is having a positive impact.

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is child abuse and it is illegal. Services, including schools, should safeguard children from this abuse as from any other form of abuse.

Keeping children safe in education is statutory safeguarding guidance. All schools must have regard to it when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. The guidance sets out that safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility and that all school staff should receive appropriate safeguarding training at induction and that the training should be regularly updated. The guidance states that all staff should speak to the school’s designated safeguarding lead with regard to any concerns about FGM. It then goes on to explain the specific legal duty placed on teachers to report an act of FGM on a girl under the age of 18 to the police. The guidance is available here and attached: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/keeping-children-safe-in-education--2.

We want to support all young people to be happy, healthy and safe. We want to equip them for adult life and to make a positive contribution to society. From September 2020, we are making Relationships Education compulsory for all primary pupils, Relationships and Sex Education compulsory for all secondary pupils and Health Education compulsory for all pupils in state-funded schools.

The statutory guidance states that by the end of secondary education, pupils should have been taught about FGM. Schools should address the physical and emotional damage caused by FGM. They should also be taught where to find support and that it is a criminal offence to perform or assist in the performance of FGM or fail to protect a person for whom you are responsible from FGM. As well as addressing this in the context of the law, pupils may also need support to recognise when relationships (including family relationships) are unhealthy or abusive (including the unacceptability of neglect, emotional, sexual and physical abuse and violence, including honour-based violence and forced marriage) and strategies to manage this or access support for oneself or others at risk. All teaching for these subjects should be age as well as developmentally appropriate and sensitive to the needs of the pupil. This includes ensuring that no pupil feels stigmatised. Schools for example should work closely with the local community and key partners such as school nurses, as well as draw on local health data, when planning their teaching for any aspect of these subjects.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of female genital mutilation education in schools on any stigma experienced by children of African descent.

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is child abuse and it is illegal. Services, including schools, should safeguard children from this abuse as from any other form of abuse.

Keeping children safe in education is statutory safeguarding guidance. All schools must have regard to it when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. The guidance sets out that safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility and that all school staff should receive appropriate safeguarding training at induction and that the training should be regularly updated. The guidance states that all staff should speak to the school’s designated safeguarding lead with regard to any concerns about FGM. It then goes on to explain the specific legal duty placed on teachers to report an act of FGM on a girl under the age of 18 to the police. The guidance is available here and attached: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/keeping-children-safe-in-education--2.

We want to support all young people to be happy, healthy and safe. We want to equip them for adult life and to make a positive contribution to society. From September 2020, we are making Relationships Education compulsory for all primary pupils, Relationships and Sex Education compulsory for all secondary pupils and Health Education compulsory for all pupils in state-funded schools.

The statutory guidance states that by the end of secondary education, pupils should have been taught about FGM. Schools should address the physical and emotional damage caused by FGM. They should also be taught where to find support and that it is a criminal offence to perform or assist in the performance of FGM or fail to protect a person for whom you are responsible from FGM. As well as addressing this in the context of the law, pupils may also need support to recognise when relationships (including family relationships) are unhealthy or abusive (including the unacceptability of neglect, emotional, sexual and physical abuse and violence, including honour-based violence and forced marriage) and strategies to manage this or access support for oneself or others at risk. All teaching for these subjects should be age as well as developmentally appropriate and sensitive to the needs of the pupil. This includes ensuring that no pupil feels stigmatised. Schools for example should work closely with the local community and key partners such as school nurses, as well as draw on local health data, when planning their teaching for any aspect of these subjects.

10th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the All Party Parliamentary Group on Sexual and Reproductive Health, Women's Lives, Women's Rights: Strengthening Access to Contraception Beyond the Pandemic, published on 10 September, what plans they have to use primary care networks to provide opportunities to train the workforce in contraceptive care.

The All Party Parliamentary Group on Sexual and Reproductive Health’s report, Women's Lives, Women's Rights: Strengthening Access to Contraception Beyond the COVID-19 Pandemic, has raised a number of important issues. The recommendations, including those relating to the workforce, will be considered as part of our upcoming work to develop the sexual and reproductive health strategy.

10th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the average waiting time for a woman accessing long-acting reversible contraception.

The average waiting time for a woman accessing long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is not collected centrally. Data on restricted access to long-acting reversible contraception due to the COVID-19 pandemic in general practitioner surgeries and community sexual health clinics is also not currently available centrally.

The provision of LARC services is particularly challenging currently due to access not being possible remotely.

The Department is working with Public Health England and others to reduce waiting lists and backlogs that have occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare have also published clinical advice to support ongoing provision of effective contraception which health professionals should work to.

10th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) GP surgeries, and (2) community sexual health clinics, offering contraceptive services across England have restricted access to long-acting reversible contraception due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The average waiting time for a woman accessing long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is not collected centrally. Data on restricted access to long-acting reversible contraception due to the COVID-19 pandemic in general practitioner surgeries and community sexual health clinics is also not currently available centrally.

The provision of LARC services is particularly challenging currently due to access not being possible remotely.

The Department is working with Public Health England and others to reduce waiting lists and backlogs that have occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare have also published clinical advice to support ongoing provision of effective contraception which health professionals should work to.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) sexual and reproductive health and rights, and (2) female genital mutilation support, services exist for women with complications resulting from female genital mutilation in the UK.

National Health Service referral pathways are in place locally to respond to the physical, mental and sexual health needs of women and girls who have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM) through maternity and specialist paediatric services. Non-pregnant women over 18 can access a new pilot of eight FGM support clinics launched in September 2019 which provide a range of services, including deinfibulation if required.

Commissioning of FGM services is informed by NHS Digital’s FGM enhanced dataset.

Local authorities in England are mandated to commission comprehensive open access sexual health services for people present in their area based on an assessment of local need.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for expanding the provision of (1) sexual and reproductive health and rights, and (2) female genital mutilation support, services in the UK to support women and girls.

National Health Service referral pathways are in place locally to respond to the physical, mental and sexual health needs of women and girls who have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM) through maternity and specialist paediatric services. Non-pregnant women over 18 can access a new pilot of eight FGM support clinics launched in September 2019 which provide a range of services, including deinfibulation if required.

Commissioning of FGM services is informed by NHS Digital’s FGM enhanced dataset.

Local authorities in England are mandated to commission comprehensive open access sexual health services for people present in their area based on an assessment of local need.

16th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the projected budget for the global summit to promote freedom of religion or belief in London on 5–6 July 2022; and how many staff are expected to work on it.

In July 2022, the UK will host an international Ministerial conference to promote freedom of religion or belief for all. The conference will demonstrate the UK's international leadership on supporting partner countries towards freedom and openness, underpinning the Network of Liberty the UK is committed to building around the world.

A conference budget will be finalised next year in line with all future programme budgets under the FCDO's business planning process for 2022 onwards. A conference team is being built and will be further boosted by additional surge staff in the summer.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the cross-governmental review of official development assistance will take place; how long it will last; which departments will be involved; when it will report; and whether the report will be made public.

To maximise the Government's strategic focus in the use of ODA next year, the Foreign Secretary will run a short cross-government process to review, appraise and finalise all of the UK's ODA allocations. This will involve all current ODA spending departments. It is the Government's intention to conclude this process as soon as possible and communicate the outcome to the departments concerned.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what fiscal conditions need to be met to allow the UK's official development assistance to return to 0.7 per cent of gross national income.

The Government intends to return to the 0.7% target when the fiscal situation allows. We cannot at this moment predict with certainty when the current fiscal circumstances will have sufficiently improved.

27th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps the Home Office is taking to close safeguarding loopholes where a name is changed in relation to a change of gender.

The Government is clear that we want people who are transgender to be able to live their lives as they wish. We believe that the process of legally changing one’s gender is a serious and legally meaningful undertaking which requires appropriate checks and a level of formality.

Home Office policy is to allow a customer to change their gender without requiring a Gender Recognition Certificate (GRC), in line with the Equality Act 2010, which does not allow discrimination between people who have changed their gender through medical intervention, for example via surgery, and those who have not.

Statements from medical consultants are accepted if they are registered on a medical website, can provide proof of their medical qualification and HM Passport examiners can verify; if not HM Passport Office examiners request another letter from another medical consultant if the original person cannot meet the necessary criteria.

The Government has begun an internal review into name change more generally. The review is looking at the formal and informal methods by which someone can change their name provide assurance that, where necessary, appropriate safeguards exist.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many female genital mutilation protection orders were issued in (1) 2015, (2) 2016, (3) 2017, (4) 2018, and (5) 2019.

FGM is a crime and it is child abuse. The Government will not tolerate a practice that can cause extreme and lifelong physical and psychological suffering to women and girls. We significantly strengthened the law in 2015 in order to improve protection for victims and those at risk, and to break down the barriers to prosecution.

The first UK conviction for FGM took place on 1 February 2019 and the perpetrator was sentenced to 11 years in prison. The Home Office does not collate information on prosecutions centrally. Information on FGM prosecutions can be found in the Violence Against Women and Girls Reports, which are published annually by the Crown Prosecution Service.

We have not previously collected data on the number of FGM cases received under the mandatory reporting duty. However, to improve understanding of the prevalence of so called ‘honour-based’ abuse, including FGM, the Government amended the police Annual Data Requirement (ADR) to require police forces, from April 2019, to record where a crime has been committed in the context of preserving the ‘honour’ of a family or community. This new collection is also capturing police recorded offences of FGM which were initially reported to the police under the mandatory reporting duty. Subject to data quality checks, we expect the first dataset under this new mandatory ADR collection to be published by autumn 2020.

The Government will continue to keep the changes made in the Serious Crime Act 2015 under review in order to ensure that they are working effectively.

The Ministry of Justice publishes quarterly statistics on the number of FGM Protection Orders (FGMPOs) issued by the family courts in England and Wales, which can be found via the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/family-court-statistics-quarterly.

The figures from 2015-2019 are set out in the table below. To note that FGMPOs were introduced in July 2015 and the figures for 2019 cover the period up to 30 September 2019. Figures for the final three months of 2019 will be published in due course.

2015

32

2016

64

2017

109

2018

143

2019

141

Total

489

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many reports of cases of female genital mutilation, or suspected female genital mutilation, they have received under the mandatory reporting for under-18s duty in the Serious Crime Act 2015 since that Act received Royal Assent.

FGM is a crime and it is child abuse. The Government will not tolerate a practice that can cause extreme and lifelong physical and psychological suffering to women and girls. We significantly strengthened the law in 2015 in order to improve protection for victims and those at risk, and to break down the barriers to prosecution.

The first UK conviction for FGM took place on 1 February 2019 and the perpetrator was sentenced to 11 years in prison. The Home Office does not collate information on prosecutions centrally. Information on FGM prosecutions can be found in the Violence Against Women and Girls Reports, which are published annually by the Crown Prosecution Service.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the mandatory reporting of female genital mutilation for under 18s duty.

FGM is a crime and it is child abuse. The Government will not tolerate a practice that can cause extreme and lifelong physical and psychological suffering to women and girls. We significantly strengthened the law in 2015 in order to improve protection for victims and those at risk, and to break down the barriers to prosecution.

The first UK conviction for FGM took place on 1 February 2019 and the perpetrator was sentenced to 11 years in prison. The Home Office does not collate information on prosecutions centrally. Information on FGM prosecutions can be found in the Violence Against Women and Girls Reports, which are published annually by the Crown Prosecution Service.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the outcome of criminalising female genital mutilation.

FGM is a crime and it is child abuse. The Government will not tolerate a practice that can cause extreme and lifelong physical and psychological suffering to women and girls. We significantly strengthened the law in 2015 in order to improve protection for victims and those at risk, and to break down the barriers to prosecution.

The first UK conviction for FGM took place on 1 February 2019 and the perpetrator was sentenced to 11 years in prison. The Home Office does not collate information on prosecutions centrally. Information on FGM prosecutions can be found in the Violence Against Women and Girls Reports, which are published annually by the Crown Prosecution Service.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been (1) prosecuted for, and (2) found guilty of, female genital mutilation in the UK.

In the period between the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003 coming into force and 31 December 2018, there were 6 prosecutions and 0 convictions for female genital mutilation offences.

The media, however, reported on one conviction early in 2019, but that covers a period for which statistics will be published in May 2020.