Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town Portrait

Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town

Labour - Life peer

1 APPG membership (as of 6 Oct 2021)
Alcohol Harm
Shadow Minister (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Labour)
2nd Sep 2019 - 13th Oct 2021
Shadow Spokesperson (Cabinet Office, Constitutional and Devolved issues)
15th Apr 2020 - 13th Oct 2021
Shadow Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)
2nd Sep 2019 - 13th Oct 2021
Shadow Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
27th Jun 2017 - 13th Oct 2021
Shadow Spokesperson (Wales)
15th Apr 2020 - 17th May 2021
Shadow Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) (Charities)
15th Apr 2020 - 17th May 2021
Shadow Spokesperson (Equalities and Women's Issues)
14th Apr 2020 - 29th Sep 2020
Shadow Minister (Exiting the European Union)
2nd Sep 2019 - 31st Jan 2020
Shadow Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)
4th Jun 2018 - 17th Jul 2019
Shadow Spokesperson (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jul 2016 - 17th Jul 2019
Shadow Spokesperson (Exiting the European Union)
1st Jul 2016 - 17th Jul 2019
Shadow Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)
6th Sep 2012 - 27th Jun 2017
Shadow Spokesperson (Equalities and Women's Issues)
18th Sep 2015 - 9th Jan 2017
Shadow Spokesperson (Business, Innovation and Skills)
6th Sep 2012 - 14th Jul 2016
Opposition Whip (Lords)
17th Oct 2011 - 18th Sep 2015
Draft Defamation Bill (Joint Committee)
31st Mar 2011 - 12th Oct 2011


Select Committee Meeting
Monday 15th November 2021
15:00
Division Votes
Thursday 21st October 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 82 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 180 Noes - 130
Speeches
Thursday 21st October 2021
Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland: Effect of Renegotiation on Other Trade Negotiations

That really sounds like wishful thinking. We have heard about New Zealand, and indeed I think the noble Lord was …

Written Answers
Monday 18th October 2021
Letting Agents: Regulation
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to implement the recommendations of the report of the working group …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town has voted in 146 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord True (Conservative)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
(94 debate interactions)
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(45 debate interactions)
Lord Grimstone of Boscobel (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
(25 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(101 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(32 debate contributions)
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View all Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


93 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to implement the recommendations of the report of the working group on the Regulation of Property Agents, published on 18 July 2019.

The Government is committed to promoting fairness and transparency for homeowners and renters and making sure that consumers are protected from abuse and poor service. This commitment includes raising professionalism and standards amongst property agents, protecting consumers while defending the reputation of good agents from the actions of rogue operatives. We therefore welcome the ongoing work being undertaken by the industry itself to raise professionalism and standards across the sector.

The Government is considering the recommendations in the report received from the working group on the regulation of property agents. We welcome the work of the Noble Baroness as the Chair of the independent steering group on codes of practice for property agents, and we will continue to work with industry on improving best practice.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they make any assessment of the estimated costs arising from an amendment agreed to by the House of Lords to a Government Bill; and if so, (1) how, and (2) whether they publish that estimate.

The government does not always make an assessment of the costs arising from a non-government Lords amendment. If it is relevant to the question of whether a money resolution will be needed in the House of Commons, the government may provide an assessment to the Clerk of Legislation in the House of Commons to assist him in the advice he gives to the Speaker. Communications between the government and the Clerk are not published, but if the government has made an assessment, it may be published in the explanatory notes to the Lords Amendments.

Baroness Evans of Bowes Park
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Keen of Elie on 17 March (HL2334), when they first became aware of a request from a relative of the donor to return the money in the National Fund to the family; and whether they intend to make any change to the Attorney General's application to release the funds as a result.

In October 2019 the Attorney General’s Office was contacted by representatives of an individual who claimed to be a descendent of the anonymous donor that established the National Fund. They also claimed that the trust was void ab initio and that unless the court finds that the donor had a “paramount charitable intent”, the Fund belongs to his residuary estate.

The individual subsequently applied to join the proceedings initiated by the Attorney General in May 2018, in order to represent the interests of all persons who are or may be or become entitled to share in the residuary estate of the donor. In January 2020 the Court ordered that this individual be joined to the proceedings and that they serve evidence in support of their claim.

The Attorney General remains of the view that the trust establishing the National Fund is valid and its purposes exclusively charitable.

It is now for the High Court to determine the individual’s claims and decide whether the terms of the charitable trust should be varied as sought by the Attorney General. If the Attorney General’s application is successful the money in the fund will be paid over to the National Debt Commissioners towards the reduction of the national debt.

The hearing in the High Court is scheduled for October 2020.

9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Keen of Elie on 14 March 2019 (HL14162), what was the outcome of the Attorney General’s application to the High Court on 22 May 2018 to release the assets of the National Fund; and whether that charity’s up-to-date accounts have been filed with the Charity Commission.

The National Fund was created in 1928 with the purpose of paying off the entire national debt. At present the fund cannot be used unless it completely clears the national debt, due to the terms of the fund’s charitable trust.

On 22 May 2018 the then Attorney General made an application to the High Court to vary the terms of the charitable trust so that the National Fund can be used to help pay down the national debt.

It is now for the High Court to decide whether the terms of the charitable trust should be varied. If the application is successful the money in the fund will be paid over to the National Debt Commissioners towards the reduction of the national debt.

The hearing in the High Court is scheduled for October 2020.

The website of the Charity Commission indicates that the accounts of the National Fund for 05 April 2019 are overdue.

4th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many estates of people that died (1) without known entitled relatives, and (2) without leaving a will, were referred to the Bona Vacantia Division of the Government Legal Department in (a) 2017–18, and (b) 2018–19; and how many of those were referred by local authorities.

In 2017-2018 there were 2768 estates referred to the Bona Vacantia Division of the Government Legal Department of estates where people died without leaving known entitled relatives or a valid will of which 909 were referred by local authorities. There were 2 referrals of estates where the deceased died leaving a valid will which did not dispose of the entire of estate but without leaving known entitled relatives entitled to share in the undisposed residue, neither of which were referred by local authorities.

In 2018-2019 there were 1971 estates referred to the Bona Vacantia Division of the Government Legal Department of which 575 were referred by local authorities. There were 3 referrals of estates where the deceased died leaving a valid will which did not dispose of the entire of estate but without leaving known entitled relatives entitled to share in the undisposed residue, none of which were referred by local authorities.

4th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) how many, and (2) what proportion of, referrals to the Bona Vacantia Division of the Government Legal Department have come from (a) local authorities, (b) hospital trusts, (c) coroners, and (d) other organisations and individuals, in (i) 2017–18, and (ii) 2018–19.

In 2017-2018 there were 2770 estates referred to the Bona Vacantia Division of the Government Legal Department of which 33% were referred by local authorities, 4% were referred by hospital trusts, 63% by other organisations and individuals. There was one referral by a Coroner’s Office.

In 2018-2019 there were 1974 estates referred to the Bona Vacantia Division of the Government Legal Department of which 29% were referred by local authorities, 3% were referred by hospital trusts, 68% by other organisations and individuals. There were no referrals by Coroners.


27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many overseas electors are (1) on electoral rolls in the United Kingdom, (2) apply for a postal vote, and (3) voted in the 2019 general election.

There were 233,000 overseas electors registered in Great Britain for the 2019 general election. The Government does not hold data on the number of overseas electors who submitted a postal vote application or how many voted.

The Office for National Statistics also publishes electoral statistic bulletins with some information on overseas electors. This can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/elections/electoralregistration/bulletins/electoralstatisticsforuk/previousReleases.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
12th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the EU about the establishment of the Parliamentary Partnership Assembly, as provided for in the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement; and what has been the outcome of any such discussions.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement provides for a Civil Society Forum - composed of a balanced representation of UK and EU business and civil society groups - to discuss the implementation of aspects of the Agreement.

We are in contact with the EU about the operational guidelines for the conduct of this Forum and will work to facilitate its first meeting this year.

We will, of course, continue to engage with business and civil society in the usual way, including on issues relating to TCA implementation.

As for the Parliamentary Partnership Assembly, it is a matter for Parliament to consider the potential shape of the Parliamentary Partnership Assembly, within the framework set out in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

Lord Frost
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
12th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to establish the Civil Society Forum as provided for in the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement provides for a Civil Society Forum - composed of a balanced representation of UK and EU business and civil society groups - to discuss the implementation of aspects of the Agreement.

We are in contact with the EU about the operational guidelines for the conduct of this Forum and will work to facilitate its first meeting this year.

We will, of course, continue to engage with business and civil society in the usual way, including on issues relating to TCA implementation.

As for the Parliamentary Partnership Assembly, it is a matter for Parliament to consider the potential shape of the Parliamentary Partnership Assembly, within the framework set out in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

Lord Frost
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have for establishing the domestic advisory group or groups described in Article INST.7 of the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement

The Government is carefully considering how it provides for the necessary institutions provided for in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement. The Government consults with a wide range of businesses and civil society groups on an ongoing basis, including on the issues covered by the Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to publish (1) the Dunlop Review into the UK Government Union capability, and (2) the Review of Intergovernmental Relations.

We will publish Lord Dunlop’s review shortly. A full response will be published in due course.

We are pleased by the progress the UK Government and the devolved administrations have made in developing the package of Intergovernmental Relations reforms. Announcements will be made in the usual way.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the letter from the Commissioner for Public Appointments to the Chair of the Committee on Standards of Public Life, dated 7 October.

Public appointments must adhere to high standards and are regulated by an independent, external process via a Governance Code. The Commissioner for Public Appointments has not found breaches of this Code in respect of the concerns he raises in the letter.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
14th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of how many officials have been (1) recruited, and (2) redeployed to deliver the Government’s planned customs and border arrangements with the EU; and, if they have made such an assessment, how this compares with the number of officials employed by the European Commission.

Structured recruitment and training plans are ongoing to ensure that officials will be in place to deliver the planned customs and borders arrangements with the EU, once we leave the customs union on 31 December 2020.

The European Commission does not have operational responsibility for customs and borders and so a meaningful comparison between UK and European Commission officials cannot be made.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to use their powers under section 2(3) of the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-Party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014 to extend reporting requirements to Special Advisors.

As the Minister for the Constitution and Devolution set out in a letter to the Executive Secretary of the Group of States Against Corruption (GRECO) Secretariat, the Government will commence post-legislative scrutiny of Part 1 of the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014 Act (the Act) this year.

The letter is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/903767/Letter_of_24_July_from_Chloe_Smith_to_Gianluca_Esposito.pdf

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to adopt the recommendation in the report by the Group of States against Corruption, Fifth evaluation round - evaluation report - United Kingdom, published on the 17 May 2018, that the scope of the registry of consultant lobbyists be extended to include (1) third parties operating with in-house lobbyists, and (2) the lobbying of specialist advisors and senior civil servants involved in policy making.

As the Minister for the Constitution and Devolution set out in a letter to the Executive Secretary of the Group of States Against Corruption (GRECO) Secretariat, the Government will commence post-legislative scrutiny of Part 1 of the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014 Act (the Act) this year.

The letter is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/903767/Letter_of_24_July_from_Chloe_Smith_to_Gianluca_Esposito.pdf

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to begin post-legislative scrutiny of Part 1 of the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-Party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014.

As the Minister for the Constitution and Devolution set out in a letter to the Executive Secretary of the Group of States Against Corruption (GRECO) Secretariat, the Government will commence post-legislative scrutiny of Part 1 of the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014 Act (the Act) this year.

The letter is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/903767/Letter_of_24_July_from_Chloe_Smith_to_Gianluca_Esposito.pdf

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what measures have been put in place for enhanced monitoring of contracts awarded using the exemptions in Regulation 32(2)(c) of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The information requested is not held centrally. Details of central government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search

The Government has rigorous controls in place to challenge spend robustly and ensure that the actions of central government contracting authorities are open, fair and transparent.

Cabinet Office commercial spend controls aim to improve the value public spending delivers by leveraging expertise from Cabinet Office’s central functional teams in commercial contracting to scrutinise all contract awards with a value greater than £10m. These contract awards are subject to approval by the Chief Operating Officer for the Civil Service and Minister of State, Lord Agnew.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many contracts awarded using the exemptions in Regulation 32(2)(c) of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 during the COVID-19 pandemic have been published more than 20 days after being awarded.

The information requested is not held centrally. Details of central government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search

The Government has rigorous controls in place to challenge spend robustly and ensure that the actions of central government contracting authorities are open, fair and transparent.

Cabinet Office commercial spend controls aim to improve the value public spending delivers by leveraging expertise from Cabinet Office’s central functional teams in commercial contracting to scrutinise all contract awards with a value greater than £10m. These contract awards are subject to approval by the Chief Operating Officer for the Civil Service and Minister of State, Lord Agnew.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they are planning to introduce a Public Services Ombudsman.

I refer the noble Baroness to the answer given to HL2091 on 2 March 2020.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which statutory instruments can be made as an Order in Council without parliamentary approval.

An Order in Council made under an Act of Parliament is a form of secondary legislation. The enabling Act will specify whether or not an Order in Council is subject to a Parliamentary procedure, and if so what that parliamentary procedure is.

There are over 400 Acts of Parliament which provide Order in Council making powers to Her Majesty in Council. Orders in Council made under Act of Parliament without a parliamentary procedure cover a range of subject matter, including the commencement of primary legislation, the UK armed forces and devolution issues, as well as fishing limits, the carriage of goods by sea, and the implementation of international agreements such as those on child abduction, reciprocal enforcement of court judgements, and the Geneva Conventions.

Some other prerogative business made on the advice of the Privy Council by Order in Council is not subject to parliamentary procedure and relates almost exclusively to the affairs of Chartered bodies.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the reported comments by the First Minister of Wales that there had not been a "regular rhythm" to engagement between the UK Government and the devolved administrations in respect of proposals to ease the COVID-19 lockdown.

The UK Government is working constructively with the devolved administrations to keep the whole of the UK safe.

There have been frequent discussions between UK Government ministers and officials and their counterparts in devolved administrations. This includes through COBR and the Cabinet Committee structure established to deal with the health, economic, public sector and international impacts of the Covid-19 outbreak on behalf of the whole of the UK. We will continue positive engagement with the Devolved Administrations.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they informed the Welsh Government of the change of COVID-19 messaging to "stay alert"; and whether this was before the change had been reported in the media.

We have confronted this virus as one United Kingdom and have worked closely with the devolved administrations throughout with regular meetings and discussions with ministers and officials.

For example, during the week prior to the change in messaging, the Prime Minister had a call with First and deputy First Ministers of the Devolved Administrations, and the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster had a further call with them. This was on top of the ongoing work at official level on how we would tackle the virus together.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what engagement has taken place with the Welsh Government about plans for the end of the EU transition period, including with regard to which UK legislation will require Legislative Consent; and what engagement has particularly focussed on the possibility of the UK and the EU failing to reach agreement on future relations.

The UK Government has been working closely with the devolved administrations throughout negotiations with the EU. Engagement with the devolved administrations continues; the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, other Cabinet Office Ministers and officials have been in regular contact with their counterparts from the devolved administrations to update them on the negotiations.

The UK Government has worked with the Welsh Government to deliver on a wide range of legislative matters, and will continue to seek legislative consent, as appropriate.

The UK Government has noted the request of the Labour-run administration in Wales to extend the transition period but there is no change to the position that the Transition Period will end this year.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of their proposals for the Northern Ireland Protocol on Welsh ports.

Our proposals on the Northern Ireland Protocol will strengthen Northern Ireland’s place in the United Kingdom and its internal market. In taking our proposals forward we will continue to engage with businesses and ports, to ensure that right across the UK we can take advantage of the opportunities there will be as the UK grows its trade with countries around the world.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government why they do not pay community radio stations to broadcast public information notices; and whether they have any plans to do so.

The Government is strongly supportive of the community radio sector and recognises the great value that it offers to communities across the UK.

In light of COVID-19, the Government has developed a national campaign to provide information, guidance and reassurance to the public.

The campaign utilises a wide range of channels to maximise reach and engagement and to ensure our messaging reaches as many people as possible. This includes the use of paid-for advertising on community radio. We currently work with over 35 community radio stations on a weekly basis.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Institute of Government The civil service after Brexit: lessons from the Article 50 Period, published on 15 May, what plans they have to (1) amend, or (2) strengthen, the Ministerial Code with regard to the messages authorised to be used in government communications.

As has been the case under successive administrations, the Government keeps the Ministerial Code and the managing of public money under review. There are, however, no plans to amend or strengthen the Ministerial Code in the way suggested.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Institute of Government The civil service after Brexit: lessons from the Article 50 Period, published on 15 May, what plans they have to consider whether the ability of a civil servant to request a ministerial direction should be extended to actions other than just expenditure.

As has been the case under successive administrations, the Government keeps the Ministerial Code and the managing of public money under review. There are, however, no plans to amend or strengthen the Ministerial Code in the way suggested.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they had with the devolved administrations in preparation for their post-Brexit trade negotiation meetings with the European Commission in the week beginning 20 April.

We are committed to working closely with the devolved administrations throughout negotiations to secure a future relationship that works in the interests of the whole of the UK. The Cabinet Office is leading work across Whitehall to ensure the devolved administrations are engaged in key stages of the negotiations.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish their next report on progress towards removing retained EU law restrictions, as required by Schedule 3 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018.

The sixth European Union (Withdrawal) Act and Common Frameworks statutory report was published on 19 March 2020, covering the reporting period of 26 September 2019 to 25 December 2019. The seventh report, detailing work that has taken place between 26 December 2019 to 25 March 2020, will be published in the coming months.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultation has taken place with stakeholders and, in particular, consumers, in relation to UK-wide Common Frameworks, and what further consultations are planned.

The UK Government remains committed to transparency in the UK common frameworks programme. The Cabinet Office has overall responsibility for the frameworks programme and engages regularly with a wide range of stakeholder organisations, including businesses and consumers, as well as providing updates on the development of UK common frameworks through regular publications.

Departments across Whitehall are responsible for developing individual frameworks and therefore undertake consultation with relevant stakeholders. Officials are currently revisiting the format of stakeholder engagement in light of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
17th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to publish their draft legal text on the future relationship with the EU.

The UK and EU exchanged draft legal texts on 18 March 2020. Our overall approach to negotiations is already set out in detail in, “The Future Relationship with the EU: The UK’s Approach to Negotiations”, which was published on 27 February 2020. We will keep under review which documents it is appropriate to publish during the course of negotiations and whether it is useful to make them available more widely.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
17th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Intelligence and Security Committee about the publication of the report on the alleged Russian interference in the 2016 Brexit referendum; and in particular, when that report may be published.

In line with his responsibilities in the Justice and Security Act 2013, the Prime Minister carefully considered and approved the report, and is content that its publication would not prejudice the functions of those bodies that safeguard our national security.

We acknowledge the public’s interest in the publication of the report, however the report itself is the property of the independent ISC, as such it is not for the Government to publish ISC reports; it is for the ISC to lay them before Parliament. Once a new Committee has been established, it will be up to them to choose when they wish to publish it. The process to establish a new Committee has already begun.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many civil servants were employed by the Department for Exiting the European Union at the time of its winding up on 31 January.

The Department for Exiting the European Union did not directly employ any of its staff, other than the Permanent Secretary.

Everyone who worked for The Department for Exiting the European Union was transferred to the Cabinet Office on January 31st on level transfer under principles set out in the Cabinet Office Statement of Practice on Staff Transfers in the Public Sector (COSoP). Staff remain on their existing terms and conditions. Therefore no one has been offered, accepted, or rejected redundancy as a result of the closure. Fewer than five contractors were terminated early as a result of the winding up of the department.

Details of all staff transfers to other government departments have not yet been finalised.

Arrangements for any severance payment will be made in line with the Ministerial and Other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many civil servants (1) were offered, (2) have accepted, and (3) have rejected, redundancy as a result of the winding up of the Department for Exiting the European Union on 31 January.

The Department for Exiting the European Union did not directly employ any of its staff, other than the Permanent Secretary.

Everyone who worked for The Department for Exiting the European Union was transferred to the Cabinet Office on January 31st on level transfer under principles set out in the Cabinet Office Statement of Practice on Staff Transfers in the Public Sector (COSoP). Staff remain on their existing terms and conditions. Therefore no one has been offered, accepted, or rejected redundancy as a result of the closure. Fewer than five contractors were terminated early as a result of the winding up of the department.

Details of all staff transfers to other government departments have not yet been finalised.

Arrangements for any severance payment will be made in line with the Ministerial and Other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many civil servants employed at the Department for Exiting the European Union at its winding up on 31 January have now been deployed to permanent positions in other Government departments.

The Department for Exiting the European Union did not directly employ any of its staff, other than the Permanent Secretary.

Everyone who worked for The Department for Exiting the European Union was transferred to the Cabinet Office on January 31st on level transfer under principles set out in the Cabinet Office Statement of Practice on Staff Transfers in the Public Sector (COSoP). Staff remain on their existing terms and conditions. Therefore no one has been offered, accepted, or rejected redundancy as a result of the closure. Fewer than five contractors were terminated early as a result of the winding up of the department.

Details of all staff transfers to other government departments have not yet been finalised.

Arrangements for any severance payment will be made in line with the Ministerial and Other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many civil servants have, as a result of the winding up of the Department for Exiting the European Union on 31 January, (1) been offered, (2) accepted, and (3) rejected, offers of other civil service roles with a lower level of overall remuneration.

The Department for Exiting the European Union did not directly employ any of its staff, other than the Permanent Secretary.

Everyone who worked for The Department for Exiting the European Union was transferred to the Cabinet Office on January 31st on level transfer under principles set out in the Cabinet Office Statement of Practice on Staff Transfers in the Public Sector (COSoP). Staff remain on their existing terms and conditions. Therefore no one has been offered, accepted, or rejected redundancy as a result of the closure. Fewer than five contractors were terminated early as a result of the winding up of the department.

Details of all staff transfers to other government departments have not yet been finalised.

Arrangements for any severance payment will be made in line with the Ministerial and Other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many contract staff have had their roles terminated as a result of the winding up of the Department for Exiting the European Union on 31 January.

The Department for Exiting the European Union did not directly employ any of its staff, other than the Permanent Secretary.

Everyone who worked for The Department for Exiting the European Union was transferred to the Cabinet Office on January 31st on level transfer under principles set out in the Cabinet Office Statement of Practice on Staff Transfers in the Public Sector (COSoP). Staff remain on their existing terms and conditions. Therefore no one has been offered, accepted, or rejected redundancy as a result of the closure. Fewer than five contractors were terminated early as a result of the winding up of the department.

Details of all staff transfers to other government departments have not yet been finalised.

Arrangements for any severance payment will be made in line with the Ministerial and Other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether departmental ministers serving at the Department for Exiting the European Union immediately before its winding up on 31 January have received compensation for the loss of their role; and if so, how much.

The Department for Exiting the European Union did not directly employ any of its staff, other than the Permanent Secretary.

Everyone who worked for The Department for Exiting the European Union was transferred to the Cabinet Office on January 31st on level transfer under principles set out in the Cabinet Office Statement of Practice on Staff Transfers in the Public Sector (COSoP). Staff remain on their existing terms and conditions. Therefore no one has been offered, accepted, or rejected redundancy as a result of the closure. Fewer than five contractors were terminated early as a result of the winding up of the department.

Details of all staff transfers to other government departments have not yet been finalised.

Arrangements for any severance payment will be made in line with the Ministerial and Other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
16th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Grimstone of Boscobel on 15 July (HL1644), which regulators covered by the Professional Qualifications Bill do not already have the powers to enter into recognition agreements with counterparts from other countries.

The Professional Qualifications Bill will allow the relevant national authority to enable regulators to enter into regulator recognition agreements with their overseas counterparts. Such arrangements are led by regulators.

The existing powers available to regulators differ depending upon the relevant underpinning legislation. Some regulators may need additional powers to enter into recognition agreements, if regulators choose to do so. This will complement existing legislation. Some examples of regulators in this position include:

  • The Architects Registration Board;
  • The Intellectual Property Regulation Board;
  • The General Dental Council; and,
  • The General Osteopathic Council

This list is not exhaustive, as not all government departments and regulators have assessed whether or not they deem that they have the powers to enter into regulator recognition agreements. We would expect engagement to be carried out with the relevant regulator before any regulations were laid to provide these additional powers.

The Government will continue to engage with regulators on the Professional Qualifications Bill, including on whether they may benefit from additional powers to enter into regulator recognition agreements.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
1st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why they decided to launch a pilot grant funding programme for UK professional and business services regulators rather than establishing such a programme on a permanent basis.

The Government announced the Pilot Recognition Arrangements Grant Programme on 29 June, and it opened to applications on 8 July. Guidance on the application process is available on GOV.UK. The programme is targeted at supporting the costs of acquiring additional technical expertise incurred by regulatory and professional bodies in preparing for or negotiating a recognition arrangement. Many regulators and professional bodies have agreed recognition arrangements already, this programme will support the establishment of additional recognition arrangements.

Successful applicants will be able to apply for reimbursement of 80% of eligible costs for technical expertise to support the agreement of recognition arrangements. Regulators will be able to seek reimbursement of up to £20,000 for individual applicant bodies and £40,000 for groups of applicants. Eligible regulators and professional bodies will be required to submit a business case to apply for funding, and applications will be assessed and ranked against objective criteria. The total grant funding available under the pilot programme is £210,000.

The programme is open to regulators that control access to professions regulated in law, and professional bodies that award professional titles and voluntarily regulate professions without underpinning legislation. These bodies must operate within at least one of the four UK nations and must operate within the Professional and Business Services sector, in professions such as accounting, audit, engineering and legal services.

The Government has launched the grant programme as a pilot in order to assess the demand and potential value-add of government funding for recognition agreements. The programme will initially run for this financial year only and will undergo monitoring and evaluation to assess the efficacy of direct financial support for regulators and professional bodies in this area. Consideration will then be given as to whether the programme should be extended or not.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
1st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) how many, and (2) which, regulators will be eligible for the pilot grant funding programme for UK professional and business services regulators announced on 29 June.

The Government announced the Pilot Recognition Arrangements Grant Programme on 29 June, and it opened to applications on 8 July. Guidance on the application process is available on GOV.UK. The programme is targeted at supporting the costs of acquiring additional technical expertise incurred by regulatory and professional bodies in preparing for or negotiating a recognition arrangement. Many regulators and professional bodies have agreed recognition arrangements already, this programme will support the establishment of additional recognition arrangements.

Successful applicants will be able to apply for reimbursement of 80% of eligible costs for technical expertise to support the agreement of recognition arrangements. Regulators will be able to seek reimbursement of up to £20,000 for individual applicant bodies and £40,000 for groups of applicants. Eligible regulators and professional bodies will be required to submit a business case to apply for funding, and applications will be assessed and ranked against objective criteria. The total grant funding available under the pilot programme is £210,000.

The programme is open to regulators that control access to professions regulated in law, and professional bodies that award professional titles and voluntarily regulate professions without underpinning legislation. These bodies must operate within at least one of the four UK nations and must operate within the Professional and Business Services sector, in professions such as accounting, audit, engineering and legal services.

The Government has launched the grant programme as a pilot in order to assess the demand and potential value-add of government funding for recognition agreements. The programme will initially run for this financial year only and will undergo monitoring and evaluation to assess the efficacy of direct financial support for regulators and professional bodies in this area. Consideration will then be given as to whether the programme should be extended or not.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
1st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the maximum size of the grant available to regulators as part of the pilot grant funding programme for UK professional and business services regulators announced on 29 June.

The Government announced the Pilot Recognition Arrangements Grant Programme on 29 June, and it opened to applications on 8 July. Guidance on the application process is available on GOV.UK. The programme is targeted at supporting the costs of acquiring additional technical expertise incurred by regulatory and professional bodies in preparing for or negotiating a recognition arrangement. Many regulators and professional bodies have agreed recognition arrangements already, this programme will support the establishment of additional recognition arrangements.

Successful applicants will be able to apply for reimbursement of 80% of eligible costs for technical expertise to support the agreement of recognition arrangements. Regulators will be able to seek reimbursement of up to £20,000 for individual applicant bodies and £40,000 for groups of applicants. Eligible regulators and professional bodies will be required to submit a business case to apply for funding, and applications will be assessed and ranked against objective criteria. The total grant funding available under the pilot programme is £210,000.

The programme is open to regulators that control access to professions regulated in law, and professional bodies that award professional titles and voluntarily regulate professions without underpinning legislation. These bodies must operate within at least one of the four UK nations and must operate within the Professional and Business Services sector, in professions such as accounting, audit, engineering and legal services.

The Government has launched the grant programme as a pilot in order to assess the demand and potential value-add of government funding for recognition agreements. The programme will initially run for this financial year only and will undergo monitoring and evaluation to assess the efficacy of direct financial support for regulators and professional bodies in this area. Consideration will then be given as to whether the programme should be extended or not.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
1st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the total amount of funding available as part of the pilot grant funding programme for UK professional and business services regulators announced on 29 June.

The Government announced the Pilot Recognition Arrangements Grant Programme on 29 June, and it opened to applications on 8 July. Guidance on the application process is available on GOV.UK. The programme is targeted at supporting the costs of acquiring additional technical expertise incurred by regulatory and professional bodies in preparing for or negotiating a recognition arrangement. Many regulators and professional bodies have agreed recognition arrangements already, this programme will support the establishment of additional recognition arrangements.

Successful applicants will be able to apply for reimbursement of 80% of eligible costs for technical expertise to support the agreement of recognition arrangements. Regulators will be able to seek reimbursement of up to £20,000 for individual applicant bodies and £40,000 for groups of applicants. Eligible regulators and professional bodies will be required to submit a business case to apply for funding, and applications will be assessed and ranked against objective criteria. The total grant funding available under the pilot programme is £210,000.

The programme is open to regulators that control access to professions regulated in law, and professional bodies that award professional titles and voluntarily regulate professions without underpinning legislation. These bodies must operate within at least one of the four UK nations and must operate within the Professional and Business Services sector, in professions such as accounting, audit, engineering and legal services.

The Government has launched the grant programme as a pilot in order to assess the demand and potential value-add of government funding for recognition agreements. The programme will initially run for this financial year only and will undergo monitoring and evaluation to assess the efficacy of direct financial support for regulators and professional bodies in this area. Consideration will then be given as to whether the programme should be extended or not.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
14th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Professional Qualifications Bill, what additional powers are provided to staff of the assistance centre by placing it on a statutory footing.

The assistance centre supports professionals with overseas qualifications intending to work in the UK, and UK qualified professionals seeking to practise overseas. Its website and telephone advice service help professionals identify the right regulators, which may not always be clear.

Some regulators are pursuing recognition arrangements with EU counterparts, and the Government is agreeing new trade deals with provisions on the recognition of professional qualifications. The assistance centre will be useful to UK professionals as they make use of these provisions to work or provide services overseas.

Finally, the assistance centre provides support and guidance to authorities responsible for regulating professions in the UK. Many authorities use the assistance centre as a source of information on international recognition agreements.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is responsible for making arrangements in relation to the assistance centre.

The current assistance centre, the UK Centre for Professional Qualifications, has 2.5 full time equivalent staff and is provided at a very modest cost. The exact terms of the contract for the service are commercially sensitive.

The UK had a National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications in 2007 when the legislation implementing the Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2005/36/EC came into force. It was initially housed within government before a contract to run the service was awarded to ECCTIS Limited in December 2008.

The Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2013/55/EU changed the requirement from each EU Member State having a National Contact Point to having an assistance centre. When the implementing legislation for this Directive came into force, the UK National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications changed to the UK National Assistance Centre in January 2016. The requirement for the assistance centre was preserved in retained EU law at the end of the Transition Period.

Providing a statutory basis for the continued existence of an assistance centre in the Bill includes placing a duty on competent authorities to cooperate with it. This is to ensure that the assistance centre has the necessary information to help support the delivery of its functions, rather than relying on voluntary information sharing arrangements. The information shared by regulators with the assistance centre is limited in nature, so this is not an onerous duty for regulators.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
14th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Professional Qualifications Bill, on what date the assistance centre was created.

The assistance centre supports professionals with overseas qualifications intending to work in the UK, and UK qualified professionals seeking to practise overseas. Its website and telephone advice service help professionals identify the right regulators, which may not always be clear.

Some regulators are pursuing recognition arrangements with EU counterparts, and the Government is agreeing new trade deals with provisions on the recognition of professional qualifications. The assistance centre will be useful to UK professionals as they make use of these provisions to work or provide services overseas.

Finally, the assistance centre provides support and guidance to authorities responsible for regulating professions in the UK. Many authorities use the assistance centre as a source of information on international recognition agreements.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is responsible for making arrangements in relation to the assistance centre.

The current assistance centre, the UK Centre for Professional Qualifications, has 2.5 full time equivalent staff and is provided at a very modest cost. The exact terms of the contract for the service are commercially sensitive.

The UK had a National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications in 2007 when the legislation implementing the Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2005/36/EC came into force. It was initially housed within government before a contract to run the service was awarded to ECCTIS Limited in December 2008.

The Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2013/55/EU changed the requirement from each EU Member State having a National Contact Point to having an assistance centre. When the implementing legislation for this Directive came into force, the UK National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications changed to the UK National Assistance Centre in January 2016. The requirement for the assistance centre was preserved in retained EU law at the end of the Transition Period.

Providing a statutory basis for the continued existence of an assistance centre in the Bill includes placing a duty on competent authorities to cooperate with it. This is to ensure that the assistance centre has the necessary information to help support the delivery of its functions, rather than relying on voluntary information sharing arrangements. The information shared by regulators with the assistance centre is limited in nature, so this is not an onerous duty for regulators.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
14th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Professional Qualifications Bill, how much annual funding the assistance centre receives.

The assistance centre supports professionals with overseas qualifications intending to work in the UK, and UK qualified professionals seeking to practise overseas. Its website and telephone advice service help professionals identify the right regulators, which may not always be clear.

Some regulators are pursuing recognition arrangements with EU counterparts, and the Government is agreeing new trade deals with provisions on the recognition of professional qualifications. The assistance centre will be useful to UK professionals as they make use of these provisions to work or provide services overseas.

Finally, the assistance centre provides support and guidance to authorities responsible for regulating professions in the UK. Many authorities use the assistance centre as a source of information on international recognition agreements.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is responsible for making arrangements in relation to the assistance centre.

The current assistance centre, the UK Centre for Professional Qualifications, has 2.5 full time equivalent staff and is provided at a very modest cost. The exact terms of the contract for the service are commercially sensitive.

The UK had a National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications in 2007 when the legislation implementing the Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2005/36/EC came into force. It was initially housed within government before a contract to run the service was awarded to ECCTIS Limited in December 2008.

The Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2013/55/EU changed the requirement from each EU Member State having a National Contact Point to having an assistance centre. When the implementing legislation for this Directive came into force, the UK National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications changed to the UK National Assistance Centre in January 2016. The requirement for the assistance centre was preserved in retained EU law at the end of the Transition Period.

Providing a statutory basis for the continued existence of an assistance centre in the Bill includes placing a duty on competent authorities to cooperate with it. This is to ensure that the assistance centre has the necessary information to help support the delivery of its functions, rather than relying on voluntary information sharing arrangements. The information shared by regulators with the assistance centre is limited in nature, so this is not an onerous duty for regulators.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
14th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Professional Qualifications Bill, how many members of staff the assistance centre has.

The assistance centre supports professionals with overseas qualifications intending to work in the UK, and UK qualified professionals seeking to practise overseas. Its website and telephone advice service help professionals identify the right regulators, which may not always be clear.

Some regulators are pursuing recognition arrangements with EU counterparts, and the Government is agreeing new trade deals with provisions on the recognition of professional qualifications. The assistance centre will be useful to UK professionals as they make use of these provisions to work or provide services overseas.

Finally, the assistance centre provides support and guidance to authorities responsible for regulating professions in the UK. Many authorities use the assistance centre as a source of information on international recognition agreements.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is responsible for making arrangements in relation to the assistance centre.

The current assistance centre, the UK Centre for Professional Qualifications, has 2.5 full time equivalent staff and is provided at a very modest cost. The exact terms of the contract for the service are commercially sensitive.

The UK had a National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications in 2007 when the legislation implementing the Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2005/36/EC came into force. It was initially housed within government before a contract to run the service was awarded to ECCTIS Limited in December 2008.

The Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2013/55/EU changed the requirement from each EU Member State having a National Contact Point to having an assistance centre. When the implementing legislation for this Directive came into force, the UK National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications changed to the UK National Assistance Centre in January 2016. The requirement for the assistance centre was preserved in retained EU law at the end of the Transition Period.

Providing a statutory basis for the continued existence of an assistance centre in the Bill includes placing a duty on competent authorities to cooperate with it. This is to ensure that the assistance centre has the necessary information to help support the delivery of its functions, rather than relying on voluntary information sharing arrangements. The information shared by regulators with the assistance centre is limited in nature, so this is not an onerous duty for regulators.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
14th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Professional Qualifications Bill, which minister is responsible for the assistance centre.

The assistance centre supports professionals with overseas qualifications intending to work in the UK, and UK qualified professionals seeking to practise overseas. Its website and telephone advice service help professionals identify the right regulators, which may not always be clear.

Some regulators are pursuing recognition arrangements with EU counterparts, and the Government is agreeing new trade deals with provisions on the recognition of professional qualifications. The assistance centre will be useful to UK professionals as they make use of these provisions to work or provide services overseas.

Finally, the assistance centre provides support and guidance to authorities responsible for regulating professions in the UK. Many authorities use the assistance centre as a source of information on international recognition agreements.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is responsible for making arrangements in relation to the assistance centre.

The current assistance centre, the UK Centre for Professional Qualifications, has 2.5 full time equivalent staff and is provided at a very modest cost. The exact terms of the contract for the service are commercially sensitive.

The UK had a National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications in 2007 when the legislation implementing the Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2005/36/EC came into force. It was initially housed within government before a contract to run the service was awarded to ECCTIS Limited in December 2008.

The Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2013/55/EU changed the requirement from each EU Member State having a National Contact Point to having an assistance centre. When the implementing legislation for this Directive came into force, the UK National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications changed to the UK National Assistance Centre in January 2016. The requirement for the assistance centre was preserved in retained EU law at the end of the Transition Period.

Providing a statutory basis for the continued existence of an assistance centre in the Bill includes placing a duty on competent authorities to cooperate with it. This is to ensure that the assistance centre has the necessary information to help support the delivery of its functions, rather than relying on voluntary information sharing arrangements. The information shared by regulators with the assistance centre is limited in nature, so this is not an onerous duty for regulators.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
14th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Professional Qualifications Bill, what are the objectives and responsibilities of the assistance centre.

The assistance centre supports professionals with overseas qualifications intending to work in the UK, and UK qualified professionals seeking to practise overseas. Its website and telephone advice service help professionals identify the right regulators, which may not always be clear.

Some regulators are pursuing recognition arrangements with EU counterparts, and the Government is agreeing new trade deals with provisions on the recognition of professional qualifications. The assistance centre will be useful to UK professionals as they make use of these provisions to work or provide services overseas.

Finally, the assistance centre provides support and guidance to authorities responsible for regulating professions in the UK. Many authorities use the assistance centre as a source of information on international recognition agreements.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is responsible for making arrangements in relation to the assistance centre.

The current assistance centre, the UK Centre for Professional Qualifications, has 2.5 full time equivalent staff and is provided at a very modest cost. The exact terms of the contract for the service are commercially sensitive.

The UK had a National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications in 2007 when the legislation implementing the Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2005/36/EC came into force. It was initially housed within government before a contract to run the service was awarded to ECCTIS Limited in December 2008.

The Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive 2013/55/EU changed the requirement from each EU Member State having a National Contact Point to having an assistance centre. When the implementing legislation for this Directive came into force, the UK National Contact Point for Professional Qualifications changed to the UK National Assistance Centre in January 2016. The requirement for the assistance centre was preserved in retained EU law at the end of the Transition Period.

Providing a statutory basis for the continued existence of an assistance centre in the Bill includes placing a duty on competent authorities to cooperate with it. This is to ensure that the assistance centre has the necessary information to help support the delivery of its functions, rather than relying on voluntary information sharing arrangements. The information shared by regulators with the assistance centre is limited in nature, so this is not an onerous duty for regulators.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made on securing exemptions to visa requirements for (1) UK nationals performing short-term paid work in the EU, and (2) EU nationals undertaking such work in the UK.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) already includes measures for short-term business visitors, who can perform a list of 11 activities without requiring a work-permit, subject to a limited number of Member State reservations. EU Member States may allow more activities without a work-permit than those specified in the agreement. This will vary country to country.

Visa-free travel is not usually part of Free Trade Agreements, although the UK and EU both allow visa-free visits in their domestic laws. EU nationals can visit the UK for up to 6 months and perform a wide range of business activities (which can be found under the ‘Permitted Activities’ of the Immigration Rules). UK nationals can visit the EU for 90 days in every 180 days and also perform a range of visitor activities, although these will vary from Member State to Member State.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 5 May (HL3252), which paragraph of the?Government guidance on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme clarifies that pregnant employees can be furloughed under the Scheme if they and their employer agree, and provided they meet the normal eligibility requirements.

The Job Retention Scheme has been designed to help employers retain staff during the coronavirus outbreak. The guidance explains that anyone who meets the eligibility requirements can be considered for the Scheme - where the employee and employer agree. That includes pregnant women. The limited number of exclusions are explicitly set out in the guidance.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to issue further guidance on the process and deadlines for applying to the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund.

Detailed guidance for businesses about the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund is published on GOV.UK setting out the process, eligibility and deadlines for applying to the scheme. This guidance is updated regularly to include additional information where necessary.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of EU State Aid rules on large charity retailers seeking support through the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund.

Although the UK has left the EU, under the terms of the Withdrawal Agreement, the EU State Aid rules continue to apply in the UK until the end of the Transition Period.

As a result of the Coronavirus pandemic, the European Commission has introduced some welcome flexibilities into the rules to deal with the impacts of the Coronavirus, in the form of a Temporary Framework. This facilitates aid going to the businesses who need it most, quickly and more efficiently.

A business can receive up to EUR 800,000 of Temporary Framework aid. Other support can be given under the normal de minimis rules. These allow up to EUR 200,000 to be given to a business in a three-year period. De minimis aid can be received in addition to Temporary Framework aid.

The Retail, Hospitality & Leisure Grant Fund is under the provisions of the Temporary Framework. A grant for a specific shop would come out of a charity’s €800,000 allowance if that charity were considered to control that retail shop. A case by case analysis of each charity retailer’s company structure and activities would be necessary to determine this. The number of shops each charity would be considered to control boils down to whether it exercises sufficient control (either legally or factually) over shops such that they ought to be considered for state aid purposes to be one organisation.

The combination of these and other measures constitute an unprecedented programme of Government support for business to address the impacts of the Coronavirus pandemic.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what legislation, if any, prevents the (1) selling, and (2) re-selling, of recalled electrical goods.

The law is clear: only safe products may be placed on the market.

Under the Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations 2016 any distributor, including those selling second-hand goods online, must act with due care to ensure that electrical products are safe. Where a product is found not to be in conformity with essential safety requirements, they have a duty to take corrective action. This may include withdrawing the electrical equipment or issuing a recall.

The General Product Safety Regulations 2005 (GPSR) also place a requirement on distributors not to supply products for sale that they know, or should know, are dangerous.

The Government is clear that anyone involved in the supply of goods should take the necessary action to ensure public safety. If a product is recalled because it is unsafe it should not be supplied second hand or made available for resale. Information on current recalls is available online on the Government's product recall campaign website.

13th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what, if any, recent advice has been given to local authorities on regulating the sale of second hand electrical goods.

Local Authorities are responsible for enforcing a wide range of legislation and ensuring their staff are suitably trained and competent to enforce it. The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) funds the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) to provide learning and development activities to front line officers. The current planned programme of training for 2020 includes regulation of the sale of second hand electrical goods.

13th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what, if any, consideration is being given to registration of white electrical goods at the point of sale.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) is conducting extensive research with 4,000 consumers to understand their attitudes to product registration and trial different approaches. Officials are developing proposals to increase registration, including assessing the merits of mandatory registration for electrical products as part of this work.

13th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, following the departure of the UK from the EU, they will remain a part of the Rapid Alert System for Non-Food Products (RAPEX); and, in this context, whether they intend to continue to exchange relevant information with the EU Commission and EU member states.

Whether the UK will remain a part of RAPEX is dependent on the outcome of the negotiations on the future economic partnership between the UK and the EU. It is the Government’s intention to seek deep regulatory cooperation with the EU as part of a new free trade agreement.

In November, the Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) launched the Product Safety Database to enable national and local regulators in the UK to share information on product safety notices.

13th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions the Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) had with Whirlpool in advance of the company issuing a product recall of its Hotpoint and Indesit washing machines in December 2019; and whether Whirlpool issued the product recall at the request of the OPSS.

The Government is committed to protecting consumers from unsafe products. Legislation is in place to require that manufacturers only place safe products on the market and take action where they identify a safety issue with products already on the market.

Whirlpool informed OPSS in October 2019 that it was investigating a potential issue with door locks on some models of washing machine. OPSS required the company to provide detailed data on this issue in order to have clarity on the nature and scale of the problem and to identify the appropriate response to protect public safety. Following assessment of the issue, it was agreed that a full recall should be instigated and the recall programme was announced on 17 December 2019.

OPSS is now monitoring the recall closely and will hold the company to account if it does not an effective recall.

13th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what advice has been given by the Office for Product Safety and Standards to online marketplaces following the product recall of Hotpoint and Indesit washing machines in December 2019.

The Government is committed to protecting consumers from unsafe products. The Chief Executive of the Office for Product Safety and Standards wrote to online platforms when the recall was announced by Whirlpool requesting them to take steps to ensure affected washing machines and other recalled items were not available on their platforms to protect public safety.

My hon. Friend the Minister for Small Business, Consumers and Corporate Responsibility, has previously written to the UK heads of Amazon, Alibaba, eBay, Facebook and Gumtree to ensure they are playing their part in protecting UK consumers from unsafe goods and is closely monitoring the situation.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that UK-based mountain tourism businesses can continue to employ UK nationals as tourist guides in the EU.

The Withdrawal Agreement protects UK nationals who live or are a frontier worker in an EU Member State at the end of the Transition Period. Those who have had a professional qualification recognised under the EU legislation listed in the Withdrawal Agreement will keep the right to practise the profession in the Member State in which they live or work. This includes many professions in scope of the Mutual Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive such as engineering and accounting.

As of 1 January 2021, UK-qualified professionals who wish to supply services in the EU should seek recognition for their qualifications using the national rules in EU Member States. Professionals should check the European Commission’s Regulated Professions Database to find out if their profession is regulated in the state in which they are seeking to work. They should then contact the single point of contact for that country to find out how to get their professional qualification recognised. Alternatively, they can seek advice from the UK Centre for Professional Qualifications (UK NARIC) to find out which regulatory or professional body they should contact.

The UK-EU TCA provides a framework under which the UK and the EU may agree Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs) on the recognition of professional qualification covering the UK and all 27 EU Member States. Once an arrangement is adopted under the TCA, UK professionals will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition for their professional qualifications within EU Member States.

Arrangements are implemented on a profession-by-profession basis and depend upon reciprocal cooperation from both the UK and EU Member States. The framework enables UK and EU professional bodies or authorities to make recommendations on MRAs to the Partnership Council.  Once an arrangement has been adopted, a professional qualified in the UK (e.g. an engineer) will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition of their qualifications within an EU Member State.

The Government continues to engage with stakeholders in the tourism sector to hear their priorities for the UK’s future relationship with the EU. Officials are currently engaging with the tourism trade bodies, including the British Association of International Mountain Leaders (BAIML) to gather feedback on priority regulators and qualifications for the tourism sector.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress has been made on the Mutual Recognition of Professional Qualifications under the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement; and whether they will take steps to ensure that UK mountain professionals benefit from Mutual Recognition Agreements.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) provides a framework under which the UK and the EU may agree Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs) on the recognition of professional qualification covering the UK and all 27 EU Member States. Once an arrangement is adopted under the TCA, UK professionals will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition for their professional qualifications within EU Member States.

Arrangements are implemented on a profession-by-profession basis and depend upon reciprocal cooperation from both the UK and EU Member States. The framework enables UK and EU professional bodies or authorities to make recommendations on MRAs to the Partnership Council.  Once an arrangement has been adopted, a professional qualified in the UK (e.g. an engineer) will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition of their qualifications within an EU Member State.

The Government continues to engage with stakeholders in the tourism sector to hear their priorities for the UK’s future relationship with the EU. Officials are currently engaging with the tourism trade bodies, including the British Association of International Mountain Leaders (BAIML) to gather feedback on priority regulators and qualifications for the tourism sector.

The government will provide help and guidance to UK regulatory authorities and professional bodies to help them benefit from these provisions as well as other recognition paths. Where visas apply, our agreement with the EU contains measures that will help ensure processes are as prompt and smooth as possible.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment, if any, they have made of the impact of the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on (1) UK professional international mountain leaders, generally, and (2) those leading mountain tours across several EU member states.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) provides a framework under which the UK and the EU may agree Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs) on the recognition of professional qualification covering the UK and all 27 EU Member States. Once an arrangement is adopted under the TCA, UK professionals will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition for their professional qualifications within EU Member States.

Arrangements are implemented on a profession-by-profession basis and depend upon reciprocal cooperation from both the UK and EU Member States. The framework enables UK and EU professional bodies or authorities to make recommendations on MRAs to the Partnership Council.  Once an arrangement has been adopted, a professional qualified in the UK (e.g. an engineer) will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition of their qualifications within an EU Member State.

The Government continues to engage with stakeholders in the tourism sector to hear their priorities for the UK’s future relationship with the EU. Officials are currently engaging with the tourism trade bodies, including the British Association of International Mountain Leaders (BAIML) to gather feedback on priority regulators and qualifications for the tourism sector.

The government will provide help and guidance to UK regulatory authorities and professional bodies to help them benefit from these provisions as well as other recognition paths. Where visas apply, our agreement with the EU contains measures that will help ensure processes are as prompt and smooth as possible.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they last reviewed the regulation of cold calling, taking into account (1) the Consumer Rights Act 2015, (2) the powers of the Office of Information Commissioner, (3) the role of the Financial Conduct Authority, and (4) any other legislation.

Government recognises that, for many, nuisance calls are at best a source of irritation, but for the most vulnerable they can be particularly stressful and damaging. We have been clear that there is no place for nuisance calls in our society and have taken a number of proactive actions in an attempt to resolve the problem.

The Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (PECR) governs unsolicited live or automated direct marketing calls, unsolicited direct marketing emails and SMS text messages. The Information Commissioner is the UK's independent regulator for data protection. DCMS is the sponsoring government department of the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). As part of fulfilling its sponsorship role, DCMS continues to work with the ICO to ensure the UK implements its high standards of data protection effectively.

The introduction of the GDPR provided strict guidelines which strengthened the definition of consent for direct marketing. Further to this, we reviewed PECR in January 2019 where we introduced a ban on cold calling relating to pensions. The ban prohibited the selling of pension services by pension providers unless the consumer has explicitly agreed to be contacted.

In addition, the Consumer Protection (Amendment) Regulations 2014 created a private right of redress for consumers who have entered into a contract as a result of misleading actions or aggressive practices as defined in the Regulations. Under these provisions, the consumer has the right to take civil action in the courts to have the contract unwind (so they are put back in the position they were in before the contract was made) and to receive a refund and to seek compensation for damages for any additional losses or harm suffered as a result of the trader’s actions”.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have made any assessment of the estimated costs arising from an amendment agreed to by the House of Lords to the Agriculture Bill; and if so, (1) how, and (2) whether they publish that estimate.

The Government's assessment of the estimated costs of Lords Amendment 18 to the Agriculture Bill was published in the explanatory notes to the Lords Amendments to that Bill.

17th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the implications for any delay in dealing with the Agriculture Bill and the Fisheries Bill for preparations for (1) the UK’s departure from the transition period at the end of December, and (2) businesses adjusting to the new regimes.

We are working to ensure that essential Parliamentary business can continue as far as possible during this period.

With reference to the Agriculture Bill, the Government remains committed to reforming English agricultural policy, so that we can reward our farmers and land managers for protecting our environment, improving animal welfare and providing a supply of healthy, home-grown produce. We know that farmers and land managers need as much certainty as possible. The Government will reflect on any delays to Parliamentary business and legislation and provide more information in due course.

The Government remains committed to progressing the Fisheries Bill. The Bill will allow us to manage our fisheries more sustainably and appropriately after the transition period. As with agriculture, however, we know that fishers need certainty. This is why the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 will convert the body of EU law in force at that time into retained EU law, appropriately amended by statutory instruments. We continue to work closely with stakeholders to ensure they are informed and prepared.

14th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps, if any, they are taking to prepare for potential delays in Anglesey, and at or near other ports in the UK, after 31 December.

Ports policy in Wales is devolved and is a matter for the Welsh Government. The Department for Transport is working closely with and supporting the Cabinet Office’s Border and Protocol Delivery Group (BPDG) on delivering the required preparations for the end of the transition period. In July 2020, the government committed to spending £470 million on new border infrastructure to support ports in building extra capacity to meet the new control requirements where there is space to do so, and, if necessary, to build additional inland sites across the country where checks can take place.

The Port Infrastructure Fund (PIF) will support ports in preparing for any potential disruptions that may occur at the end of the transition period. The PIF has been open for applications from 2 October and industry is encouraged to utilize the fund where applicable.

HMG is also working with Welsh and Scottish Governments to confirm the infrastructure requirements for Wales and Scotland. This includes sites which will be required to be in place to support both Holyhead in Anglesey and specific ports in South West Wales.

DfT officials are working closely with English Local Resilience Forums (LRFs) with high volume EU facing Roll-on Roll-off ports in their areas, ensuring that these LRFs have the required information and analysis to enable them to put in place appropriate traffic management plans in case of traffic disruption following the end of the EU Transition Period.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for more toilets in Kent for lorry drivers due to potential congestion post-Brexit, and whether they have assessed how many lorries could be caught up in any such delays.

We published our revised reasonable worst-case scenario planning assumptions on 23 September for the end of the Transition Period. Such a scenario could lead to queues of up to 7,000 HGVs in Kent. We are working with the Kent Resilience Forum to maintain traffic flow and to mitigate the effects of any disruption that occurs. This includes additional holding capacity for HGVs in Kent.

The Kent Resilience Forum’s preparations include a Driver Welfare plan that will provide reasonable and proportionate distribution of welfare to both passenger and freight traffic during significant congestion. It covers the deployment of food, water, medicine, warmth and sanitation. This can be adjusted to respond to different levels of congestion. This will benefit from the Forum’s experience of previous incidents where there has been congestion in Kent as a result of delays in crossings of the Short Straits.

Our delivery plans ensure that all Inland Border Facilities will have adequate toilet facilities for drivers and any driver companions to use, including accessible and children toilets.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of improving labelling on alcohol products on reducing obesity.

We are committed to consult shortly on our intention to make companies provide calorie labelling on all pre-packaged alcohol they sell. The consultation will also cover introducing calorie labelling on alcoholic drinks sold in the out of home sector, for example bought on draught or by the glass. An impact assessment will be published alongside the consultation.

1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made on their commitment to introducing a new addiction strategy.

Due to the pressures of the COVID-19 pandemic, the addiction strategy has been delayed. Work is expected to resume later in 2021.

5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports that they awarded personal protective equipment (PPE) contracts to companies with records of human rights abuses; what steps they are taking in response to any such assessment; whether their requests for tenders for the supply of PPE stipulate that (1) the International Labour Organization minimum standards, (2) human rights legislation, or (3) their equivalent requirements, must be met; and what checks they undertake to ensure that those requirements are met before awarding any contract.

The Government’s guidance advises public sector contracting authorities on how to assess suppliers in terms of mitigating the risk of modern slavery. Contracts are normally placed in line with Departmental terms and conditions which include clauses requiring Good Industry Practice to ensure that there is no slavery or human trafficking in supply chains. Suppliers appointed to our NHS Supply Chain frameworks must comply with the Labour Standards Assurance System or they can be removed from consideration for future opportunities.

1st Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the findings of the report by the Alcohol Health Alliance UK Small change: alcohol at pocket money prices, published in November, what steps they are taking to limit the sale of cheap, strong alcohol.

The Government has taken measures to tackle alcohol consumption through pricing interventions including banning sales of alcohol below the level of duty plus VAT which set an important regulatory precedent.

HM Treasury introduced a higher duty band on cider at 6.9% and 7.5% alcohol by volume in February 2019. This targeted measure is to tackle cheap high strength ‘white’ ciders to encourage reformulation to lower alcohol levels and discourage consumption so as to help to reduce the harm associated with these drinks.

The Department wants to increase the general drinking population towards lower strength alternatives to moderate drinking habits. We will work with industry to create more consumer choice and availability in the low and no alcohol sector.

29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many mechanical ventilators are currently available to the NHS.

At the start of the crisis in March the National Health Service across the United Kingdom had access to over 9,000 mechanical ventilators including 7,484 in England and 1,655 in the devolved administrations.

Today, there are around 30,400 (current total 30,382) mechanical ventilators available to patients across the UK. The additional stock comprises 6,089 from established suppliers (118 manufactured in UK, the rest overseas) and 15,154 from new suppliers, through the Prime Minister’s ventilator challenge, mostly made in the UK.

17th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what advice they are giving, further to their advice on COVID-19, to industries where social interaction is a key element of the role of a business, in particular property sales, letting and management.

On 27 March, the Government published new guidance for those who are buying, selling or letting properties during the pandemic. This guidance includes advice to both the public and industry.

Buyers who are due to move into an empty property are being advised to go ahead, but others have been told to delay their transaction.

The Government stressed that while there was no need to pull out of a purchase, people must currently stay at home to help prevent COVID-19 from spreading.

17th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to participate in any future meetings or discussions with EU health ministers about COVID-19.

COVID-19 is a global public health emergency. The United Kingdom is playing a leading role in the global response and we will continue to work closely with the G7, the World Health Organization, the European Union and other international partners at both Ministerial and official level.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are planning to take to ensure that health inequalities due to alcohol-related harm do not widen.

The Government is committed to tackling health harms from alcohol and supporting the most vulnerable at risk from alcohol misuse. We continue to support and deliver programmes at both national and local levels to address harms including establishing Alcohol Care Teams in the hospitals with the highest rates of alcohol related admissions and a commitment in the Prevention Green paper to encourage drinking habits towards low and no alcohol products. The Department of Health and Social Care is working jointly with the Department for Work and Pensions investing £6 million on a programme of work which started in 2018/19, to improve outcomes and support for children whose parents are alcohol dependent. This includes nine local areas which are testing innovative and collaborative working; funding for voluntary sector organisations to develop new resources and training; a helpline and contact services for children, and funding several projects in the voluntary sector over 2020/21 to support those living with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and to reduce the number of alcohol exposed pregnancies to prevent new cases of FASD.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that dependent drinkers who are not in treatment receive the support they require.

The Government is committed to tackling health harms from alcohol and supporting the most vulnerable at risk from alcohol misuse. We continue to support and deliver programmes at both national and local levels to address harms including establishing Alcohol Care Teams in the hospitals with the highest rates of alcohol related admissions and a commitment in the Prevention Green paper to encourage drinking habits towards low and no alcohol products. The Department of Health and Social Care is working jointly with the Department for Work and Pensions investing £6 million on a programme of work which started in 2018/19, to improve outcomes and support for children whose parents are alcohol dependent. This includes nine local areas which are testing innovative and collaborative working; funding for voluntary sector organisations to develop new resources and training; a helpline and contact services for children, and funding several projects in the voluntary sector over 2020/21 to support those living with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and to reduce the number of alcohol exposed pregnancies to prevent new cases of FASD.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Leader of the House which minister in the House of Lords will answer questions on the UK’s negotiations with the EU on the future relationship.

In his capacity as Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord True will answer questions, and repeat statements, in the House of Lords on the UK's negotiations with the EU on the future relationship.

Baroness Evans of Bowes Park
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
1st Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for increasing alcohol duty to raise additional revenue to support the economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Government keeps alcohol duties under review and the impact of changes to alcohol duty is considered carefully at each fiscal event, including its effects on society, the economy and wider needs.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
1st Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for setting alcohol duty rates at a level where revenue from alcohol duty will match the costs of alcohol to society.

The Government keeps alcohol duties under review and the impact of changes to alcohol duty is considered carefully at each fiscal event, including its effects on society, the economy and wider needs.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
1st Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Office for National Statistics release Quarterly alcohol-specific deaths in England and Wales: 2001 to 2019 registrations and Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) to Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2020 provisional registrations, published on 2 February; and what assessment they have made of the case for increasing alcohol duty to save lives.

Alcohol duties are kept under review and the impact of a change to alcohol duty is considered at each fiscal event. This takes a variety of data sources into account, including those relating to public health as well as the financial implications of any change.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential financial benefit of increasing alcohol duty to reduce the cost of alcohol-related illness and harms to the NHS.

All taxes are kept under review and the impact of a change to alcohol duty is considered at each fiscal event, including its effect on health.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
1st Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure the new alcohol duty system (1) protects public health, and (2) helps to reduce alcohol harm.

The Treasury is conducting a review of the alcohol duty system. As part of this it is engaging with public health groups along with other interested stakeholders. However, while public health is an important factor, it is not the sole consideration, as the Government will also need to take account of the wider fiscal and economic implications of reform.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether the Financial Conduct Authority has sufficient powers to regulate claims management companies, particularly in relation to cold calling.

The Government is confident that the FCA has a broad suite of authorisation, supervision and enforcement powers to regulate the conduct of claims management companies (CMCs). The Financial Guidance and Claims Act 2018 transferred responsibility for the regulation of CMCs from the Claims Management Regulator, a unit of the Ministry of Justice, to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), as of 1 April 2019.

This transfer was intended to enable the application of the FCA’s Senior Managers Regime to CMCs, allow for the creation of more detailed conduct rules to address issues that were causing consumer detriment, and effectively facilitate tougher regulation. The Act also provided for a ban on cold calling, unless prior consent has been given, by amending the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations.

Following the transfer, the FCA is currently carrying out a process of re-authorisation, whereby all CMCs must re-apply for permission to operate in the sectors regulated by the FCA. Once this process of re-authorisation has progressed further, HM Treasury will be able to make any necessary assessments of whether the current model for CMC regulation is operating effectively.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Leader of the House which minister will answer questions in the House of Lords on the work of the Joint Committee overseeing the withdrawal agreement with the EU.

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster has overall responsibility to Parliament for the Joint Committee, therefore Lord True will answer questions and repeat statements in the House of Lords.

Baroness Evans of Bowes Park
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Housing Associations will be able to access the Remedial Fund for Cladding without having to use charitable resources ring fenced for charitable purposes and without having to charge leaseholders.

We continue to engage with the social sector to ensure that leaseholders are supported and do not have to bear the costs associated with remediation of unsafe non-ACM cladding. Housing Associations will be able to apply for funding to cover the cost of remediation that they would otherwise pass on to leaseholders. Each Housing Association will need to make its own assessment as to how best to meet the remaining remediation costs in line with their business plans and different sources of income.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have undertaken a review to ascertain whether leaseholders of Housing Associations properties might be unfairly discriminated against in relation to leaseholders of private landlords in the allocation of the Remedial Fund for Cladding.

The Secretary of State considered the decision to launch the Building Safety Fund in line with requirements under the Public Sector Equality duty. Funding is being provided to support leaseholders in both the social and private sectors. Where funding is claimed from government, the costs of remediating unsafe non-ACM cladding systems cannot be passed onto leaseholders.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to develop the application process, including the criteria and decision-making process for applications, for the UK Shared Prosperity Fund, and when they will publish these details.

Government has committed to creating a UK Shared Prosperity Fund to succeed European structural funds and bind together the whole of the United Kingdom, tackling inequality and deprivation in each of our four nations. The UK Government can cut out bureaucracy and create a fund which invests in UK priorities and is easier for local areas to access.

The government understands the importance of this investment for people, business and places and will set out further plans for the fund in due course. Final decisions on the design of the fund will need to be taken after a cross-Government Spending Review. In the meantime, we will continue to work closely with interested parties whilst developing the fund.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they are making on plans to introduce mandatory electrical safety checks in the private rented sector.

On 13 January 2020, the Government laid before Parliament new regulations that will require private landlords to make sure the electrical installations in their properties are safe.

The Electrical Safety Standards in the Private Rented Sector (England) Regulations 2020 require that:

  • Electrical installations must be inspected and tested by a qualified and competent person at least every five years;
  • Electrical safety standards must be met;
  • Reports (known as ‘Electrical Installation Condition Reports or ‘EICRs’) must be provided to tenants, and to local authorities on request.

The Regulations also set out enforcement powers for local authorities who will be able to tackle those rogue landlords who breach their new duties under the Regulations.

Subject to approval by parliament, these requirements will come into force for all new tenancies from 1 July 2020 and for all existing tenancies from 1 April 2021.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they intend to take as a result of the European Commission's rejection of the UK's application to join the Lugano Convention.

The Government is aware of the European Commission’s notification that it is not in a position to give its consent to UK accession to the Lugano Convention 2007. However, we understand that member states have not yet been given an opportunity to formally vote on that position.

We are committed to ensuring cross-border legal disputes can be resolved smoothly, in the interests of families, consumers and businesses both in the UK and across Europe. We maintain that we meet the criteria for accession – it is open to countries outside the EU; all non-EU parties to Lugano support UK membership.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)