Lord Wallace of Saltaire Portrait

Lord Wallace of Saltaire

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)

(since July 2017)
2 APPG memberships (as of 25 Aug 2021)
Data Analytics, Yorkshire and Northern Lincolnshire
1 Former APPG membership
UK-EU Relations
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
1st Jun 2015 - 28th Oct 2016
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
13th Oct 2010 - 7th May 2015
Lords Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)
5th Sep 2011 - 7th May 2015
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
25th Mar 1998 - 8th Apr 2010
European Union Committee
3rd Jun 1997 - 7th Nov 2002


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Thursday 10th June 2021
Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development etc.) (England) (Amendment) Order 2021
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 72 Liberal Democrat Aye votes vs 0 Liberal Democrat No votes
Tally: Ayes - 104 Noes - 241
Speeches
Thursday 16th September 2021
Government: Leadership Training

My Lords, I start by apologising to the House and the noble Lord, Lord Norton, that I am the only …

Written Answers
Thursday 24th June 2021
Higher Education: Costs
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the governments of the Crown Dependencies on the allocation …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Thursday 11th September 2014
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Wallace of Saltaire has voted in 161 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Wallace of Saltaire Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord True (Conservative)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
(62 debate interactions)
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(16 debate interactions)
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
(13 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(59 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(11 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Wallace of Saltaire's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Wallace of Saltaire, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Wallace of Saltaire has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Wallace of Saltaire has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Lord Wallace of Saltaire

Introduced: 11th September 2014

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 26th March 2015 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 10th May 2012

To make provision about the registration of electors and the administration and conduct of elections.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 31st January 2013 and was enacted into law.

Lord Wallace of Saltaire has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


28 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
9th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to finance the cost of extending overseas voting rights (1) directly, or (2) from fees attached to registration, or (3) by any other means.

The new burdens doctrine will cover any additional registration costs for the registration of newly enfranchised overseas electors. UK Parliamentary election costs are paid from the Consolidated Fund. Overseas electors are only eligible to vote in UK general elections.


In Budget 2021, for the coming year, the Government has provided an additional £2.5 million towards removing the arbitrary limit preventing British citizens who live overseas from voting after 15 years.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
16th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether it is their policy for contracts with private companies to prohibit those companies from making contributions to (1) political parties, and (2) think tanks by (a) those companies, and (b) their subcontractors; and if so, in what circumstances such a policy is altered.

The Public Contracts Regulations 2015 require contracting authorities to take appropriate measures to effectively prevent, identify and remedy conflicts of interest arising in the conduct of procurement procedures so as to avoid any distortion of competition and to ensure equal treatment of all economic operators.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the total number of overseas voters on the UK electoral roll was in (1) 2001, (2) 2005, (3) 2010, (4) 2015, and (5) 2017; and what is their current estimate of the total number of overseas registrations.

The Government does not hold data on the number of overseas voters, or their distribution by constituency or current country of residence. Electoral Registration Officers (ERO) maintain a register for their own local area, including the number of overseas electors registered in their area.

In its report on the 2019 UK Parliamentary General Election, published on 21 April 2020, the Electoral Commission noted that just over 230,000 people were registered as overseas electors at the time of the general election. The Office for National Statistics also publishes electoral statistics bulletins with some information on overseas electors.

The Government does not hold information on the proportion of EROs that retain complete constituency electoral registers. There is no statutory requirement for EROs to retain previous electoral registers. EROs do however currently keep registers for 15 years to enable them to check the eligibility of those applying to be overseas electors.

The Government is committed to removing the 15 year limit on overseas electors and we will do so in a way that is workable for both voters and electoral administrators.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the current distribution of electoral registration by overseas voters broken down by constituency.

The Government does not hold data on the number of overseas voters, or their distribution by constituency or current country of residence. Electoral Registration Officers (ERO) maintain a register for their own local area, including the number of overseas electors registered in their area.

In its report on the 2019 UK Parliamentary General Election, published on 21 April 2020, the Electoral Commission noted that just over 230,000 people were registered as overseas electors at the time of the general election. The Office for National Statistics also publishes electoral statistics bulletins with some information on overseas electors.

The Government does not hold information on the proportion of EROs that retain complete constituency electoral registers. There is no statutory requirement for EROs to retain previous electoral registers. EROs do however currently keep registers for 15 years to enable them to check the eligibility of those applying to be overseas electors.

The Government is committed to removing the 15 year limit on overseas electors and we will do so in a way that is workable for both voters and electoral administrators.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the distribution of registered overseas voters by their current country of residence.

The Government does not hold data on the number of overseas voters, or their distribution by constituency or current country of residence. Electoral Registration Officers (ERO) maintain a register for their own local area, including the number of overseas electors registered in their area.

In its report on the 2019 UK Parliamentary General Election, published on 21 April 2020, the Electoral Commission noted that just over 230,000 people were registered as overseas electors at the time of the general election. The Office for National Statistics also publishes electoral statistics bulletins with some information on overseas electors.

The Government does not hold information on the proportion of EROs that retain complete constituency electoral registers. There is no statutory requirement for EROs to retain previous electoral registers. EROs do however currently keep registers for 15 years to enable them to check the eligibility of those applying to be overseas electors.

The Government is committed to removing the 15 year limit on overseas electors and we will do so in a way that is workable for both voters and electoral administrators.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
16th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the total number of UK citizens resident outside the UK (1) who are eligible to vote in UK parliamentary elections under the present rule which bars British citizens who have lived abroad for more than 15 years from voting, and (2) who would be eligible following the extension of the right to vote to all adult UK citizens resident abroad.

Approximately 1.4 million British citizens living overseas have been registered to vote in the UK in the past 15 years and are therefore eligible to register to vote in UK parliamentary elections as overseas electors.

There are no official statistics on the number of adult British citizens resident abroad. We estimate, however, that there are a total of 4.9 million British citizens overseas who have previously lived in the UK and are of voting age.

The Government is considering the appropriate legislative vehicle to deliver votes for life, which is a manifesto commitment, and we will make an announcement on our intentions in due course.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
16th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of UK citizens who are dual nationals; of those, how many are estimated to be living in the UK; and what are the ten countries estimated to host the largest numbers of UK citizens with dual nationality living abroad.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
16th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the breakdown of UK citizens living abroad by their country of residence; and what estimate they have made of the proportion of UK citizens who hold dual nationalities.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to support further micro-hydropower schemes on rivers within the UK as part of a transition to renewable energy.

Meeting net zero is likely to lead to electricity demand doubling by 2050 as other sectors are electrified which will require a generation mix based primarily on renewables. The government acknowledges the valuable contribution of hydropower to the UK energy mix over many decades, including at times when other renewables do not generate. Most hydro capacity was installed during the last century in Scotland, with a smaller amount in Wales and England. Most of these installations are still operating.

Government schemes have supported hydro over many years. Hydro is a mature technology and sites for large projects have generally been exhausted, leaving only smaller schemes to be developed. It should be noted that projections from the comprehensive review for small hydro deployment were met five years early. Introduced last year, the Smart Export Guarantee gives small scale low-carbon electricity generators, such as hydro, the right to be paid for the renewable electricity they export to the grid.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what studies they have commissioned on the potential contribution that the harnessing of hydropower from rivers may make to the UK's energy requirements.

Hydropower accounts for almost 2% of total electricity generation in the UK with a capacity of almost 2GW. Studies in Scotland, England and Wales indicate that there is a maximum remaining technical potential of around 1.5GW for small-scale hydro across these countries, with the majority in Scotland. Economic and environmental constraints mean that in practice the viable remaining resource is less than 1GW or 1% of total electricity generation capacity.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, and if so, when, they will lay before Parliament the Framework for Data Processing by Government document, as provided for in section 191 of the Data Protection Act 2018.

The Data Protection Act 2018 gives the Secretary of State a discretionary power to publish a Framework for Data Processing by Government, which contains guidance about the processing of personal data in connection with the exercise of government functions. The Act requires the Secretary of State to consult the Information Commissioner and other persons he considers appropriate when developing the Framework, and to lay the final version in Parliament before it comes into effect. A laying date has not been set and no decisions have been taken about the nature of any further consultation.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to section 191(5) of the Data Protection Act 2018, which other persons may the Secretary of State “consider it appropriate to consult” before preparing the Framework for Data Processing by Government document and laying it before Parliament.

The Data Protection Act 2018 gives the Secretary of State a discretionary power to publish a Framework for Data Processing by Government, which contains guidance about the processing of personal data in connection with the exercise of government functions. The Act requires the Secretary of State to consult the Information Commissioner and other persons he considers appropriate when developing the Framework, and to lay the final version in Parliament before it comes into effect. A laying date has not been set and no decisions have been taken about the nature of any further consultation.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the governments of the Crown Dependencies on the allocation of costs for the extension of home fees to all students and institutions in England before that decision was announced.

We have updated our regulations to grant home fee status for those students from the Crown Dependencies who meet the residency requirements, and who come to England solely for the purposes of higher or further education study from the 2021/22 academic year. This underpins our strong commitment to the UK’s relationship with the Crown Dependencies.

Students from the Crown Dependencies make an important contribution to our universities, and it is testament to the appeal and success of our higher education sector that so many students from the Crown Dependencies choose to come and study here.

This decision was communicated to the respective governments of the Crown Dependencies, to the Office for Students, and on GOV.UK in January 2021, before regulations were made in February 2021, and came into force in March 2021.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultations they held with higher education institutions in England before they decided to extend the provision of home fees for students from the Crown Dependencies to all higher education institutions.

We have updated our regulations to grant home fee status for those students from the Crown Dependencies who meet the residency requirements, and who come to England solely for the purposes of higher or further education study from the 2021/22 academic year. This underpins our strong commitment to the UK’s relationship with the Crown Dependencies.

Students from the Crown Dependencies make an important contribution to our universities, and it is testament to the appeal and success of our higher education sector that so many students from the Crown Dependencies choose to come and study here.

This decision was communicated to the respective governments of the Crown Dependencies, to the Office for Students, and on GOV.UK in January 2021, before regulations were made in February 2021, and came into force in March 2021.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
28th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what financial arrangements, if any, they have agreed with the Crown Dependencies in recognition of the (1) availability, and (2) use, of NHS facilities by residents of such Dependencies who do not pay tax in the UK.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) companies, or (2) persons, subject to UK sanctions are also banned from initiating actions in UK courts.

The measures that may be imposed within the UK's independent sanctions framework include financial sanctions, immigration sanctions (travel bans), trade sanctions, and aircraft and shipping sanctions. Persons or entities designated under the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018 are not banned from initiating action in UK courts. Designated persons may seek an administrative review of their designation as set out in Chapter 2 of Part 1 of the Act and apply for judicial reviews of decisions in accordance with Chapter 4 of Part 1 of the Act. Guidance on how to challenge UK sanctions is on GOV.UK.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what contribution each of the Overseas Territories makes to the UK Exchequer in return for the UK Government (1) ensuring their security, and (2) representing their interests abroad.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. The Minister will write directly to the Member with a response shortly.
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the total number of UK citizens resident outside the UK; and whether they are confident in the accuracy of that estimate.

We do not register British nationals abroad, and do not therefore have numbers of British nationals in each country.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they are confident that the supply of weapons by Gulf states to Libyan forces loyal to Khalifa Haftar do not include transfers from supplies originally sourced from the UK.

All licence applications are assessed against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria, which includes Criterion One concerning the United Kingdom's international obligations to enforce certain arms embargoes, and Criterion Seven concerning the risk of equipment's diversion to an undesirable end-user or end-use. The Government can and does respond flexibly to changing or fluid international situations and is able suspend or revoke licences as necessary when circumstances require.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many UK residents claimed non-domiciled status in returns to HMRC in the most recent tax year for which figures are available.

The number of UK residents who claimed non-domiciled status in returns to HMRC is provided in the table below. Figures are provided for the last ten years, up to 2018-19, the most recent year for which figures are available. The decrease seen between 2015-16 and 2017-18 is explained by the deemed domicile rules introduced in April 2017.

Tax year

UK resident non domiciled individuals

2009-10

82,700

2010-11

81,000

2011-12

80,200

2012-13

82,000

2013-14

84,300

2014-15

86,500

2015-16

85,200

2016-17p

76,500

2017-18p

64,400

2018-19p

64,000

p = Figures for the most recent years are provisional and are subject to revision due to late filing of tax returns.

Further statistics and commentary are provided in the HMRC publication “Statistics on non-domiciled taxpayers in the UK” which is available on GOV.UK[1].

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-on-non-domiciled-taxpayers-in-the-uk

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
18th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many UK residents claimed non-domiciled status in returns to HMRC over the past five to 10 years; and whether the number of UK residents claiming non-domiciled status increased or decreased during this period.

The number of UK residents who claimed non-domiciled status in returns to HMRC is provided in the table below. Figures are provided for the last ten years, up to 2018-19, the most recent year for which figures are available. The decrease seen between 2015-16 and 2017-18 is explained by the deemed domicile rules introduced in April 2017.

Tax year

UK resident non domiciled individuals

2009-10

82,700

2010-11

81,000

2011-12

80,200

2012-13

82,000

2013-14

84,300

2014-15

86,500

2015-16

85,200

2016-17p

76,500

2017-18p

64,400

2018-19p

64,000

p = Figures for the most recent years are provisional and are subject to revision due to late filing of tax returns.

Further statistics and commentary are provided in the HMRC publication “Statistics on non-domiciled taxpayers in the UK” which is available on GOV.UK[1].

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-on-non-domiciled-taxpayers-in-the-uk

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
28th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what financial arrangements, if any, they have agreed with the Crown Dependencies in recognition of the assistance that UK police and intelligence services provide to such Dependencies.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Dissolution. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many applicants for (1) British citizenship, and (2) long-term residence in the UK, took the Life in the UK test in (a) Welsh, and (b) Scots Gaelic, in each of the last three years for which figures are available.

In the last 3 years, there has been one Life in the UK test taken in Welsh, and no tests have been taken in Scots Gaelic.

The test taken in Welsh was a customer applying for British Citizenship.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they calculate the fees for (1) British citizenship, and (2) long-term residence in the UK, applications; and whether those fees are used (a) only to cover the direct expenses incurred from such applications, and (b) to defray the overall Home Office budget.

All immigration and nationality fees are set taking account of the criteria set out at Section 68(9) of the Immigration Act 2014:

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2014/22/section/68

These criteria include the cost of processing the application; the benefits and entitlements provided by a successful application; and, the wider cost of running the Border, Immigration and Citizenship (BIC) System.

Fees from immigration products and services contribute to funding a sustainable BIC System and ultimately reduce the reliance on tax-payer funding. The Home Office keeps fees for immigration and nationality applications under review and ensures they are within the parameters agreed with Parliament.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which countries have agreed to contribute in (1) naval, or (2) logistical support, terms to the UK’s planned deployment of a Royal Navy carrier strike group to the Indo-Pacific region in 2021.

This will be a UK sovereign deployment but importantly it provides the opportunity to work with NATO allies and our global partners. On 19 January we were pleased to announce that the UK and US Governments have signed a Joint Declaration which allows a United States Navy destroyer and a detachment of United States Marine Corps F-35B fast jets to accompany the task group, together with their supporting personnel. Detailed planning continues and we will make a statement to the House in due course.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how the (1) financial, and (2) other, contributions made by the Crown Dependencies to the UK in return for UK provision of (a) defence, (b) security, (c) international representation, and (d) other services, are reported to Parliament.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Dissolution. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they last negotiated with each of the three Crown Dependencies the (1) financial, and (2) other, contributions they should make in return for the UK Government (a) ensuring their security, and (b) representing their interests abroad.

The Crown Dependencies are self-governing jurisdictions and do not receive funding from the UK Exchequer. The UK is constitutionally responsible for their defence and international relations, in recognition of which the Crown Dependencies make contributions to the UK Government, either financially (directly and indirectly) or by providing personnel. These contributions are based on longstanding arrangements with the Crown Dependencies that were last amended in 1987 for the Bailiwick of Guernsey, 1994 for the Isle of Man and 1988 for the Bailiwick of Jersey.

The Crown Dependencies’ contributions have not recently been reviewed and there are no plans to review them in the near future.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)