Pat McFadden Portrait

Pat McFadden

Labour - Wolverhampton South East

Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury

(since November 2021)
Shadow Economic Secretary (Treasury)
10th Apr 2020 - 29th Nov 2021
Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Panel of Chairs
23rd Mar 2020 - 22nd Apr 2020
Committee on the Future Relationship with the European Union
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Exiting the European Union
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on the Future Relationship with the European Union
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Committee on Exiting the European Union
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
20th Oct 2014 - 5th Jan 2016
Treasury Committee
14th Nov 2011 - 24th Nov 2014
Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards (Joint Committee)
16th Jul 2012 - 12th Jun 2013
Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Minister of State (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills)
9th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Member, Labour Party National Executive Committee
1st Jun 2007 - 6th May 2010
Minister of State (Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform) (Employment Relations and Postal Affairs)
2nd Jul 2007 - 5th Jun 2009
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
5th May 2006 - 28th Jun 2007


Department Event
Wednesday 7th September 2022
HM Treasury
Money Resolution - Main Chamber
Financial Services and Markets Bill
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Wednesday 7th September 2022
HM Treasury
Motion - Main Chamber
Financial Services and Markets Bill: Ways and Means
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Tuesday 13th September 2022
11:30
HM Treasury
Oral questions - Main Chamber
13 Sep 2022, 11:30 a.m.
Treasury (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
None available
Speeches
Tuesday 28th June 2022
Oral Answers to Questions
It is true that inflation is affecting a number of countries, but why does the Chancellor think that the UK …
Written Answers
Monday 25th July 2022
Department for Education: Pay
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) direct employees, (b) contractors, and (c) agency workers who …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 10th February 2020
1. Employment and earnings
23 January 2020, received payment of £400 from Guardian News and Media, Kings Place, 90 York way, London N1 9GU, …
EDM signed
Wednesday 21st June 2017
CUSTOMS UNION MEMBERSHIP
That this House notes the benefits of UK membership of the EU Customs Union which removes costly and time-consuming customs …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 3rd May 2016
Transparency and Accountability (European Union) Bill 2015-16
A Bill to establish an independent commission of inquiry to examine ways of improving parliamentary and other public scrutiny of …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Pat McFadden has voted in 452 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Pat McFadden Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
John Glen (Conservative)
(112 debate interactions)
Alison Thewliss (Scottish National Party)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Treasury)
(23 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
(18 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(302 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(24 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(11 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Pat McFadden's debates

Wolverhampton South East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

The Government must make a public statement on the #kissanprotests & press freedoms.

India is the worlds largest democracy & democratic engagement and freedom of the press are fundamental rights and a positive step towards creating a India that works for all.


Latest EDMs signed by Pat McFadden

Pat McFadden has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Pat McFadden, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Pat McFadden

Thursday 16th December 2021

Pat McFadden has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Pat McFadden has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


66 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
26th Jan 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many members of staff at the Serious Fraud Office are working full time on the recovery of public money lost to fraud and economic crime from emergency covid-19 support schemes.

Although no investigations have been formally announced, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) is investigating a number of suspected fraudulent applications for COVID loans.

In order to protect the investigative process, it is not always possible, or even desirable, for investigative bodies such as the SFO to announce investigations prematurely, or provide any details of the matters under investigation. The SFO proactively publishes information about its cases on its website whenever it is appropriate

SFO investigations follow the evidence, and their focus or scope may change as an investigation advances. The number of staff working on a specific case will fluctuate throughout an investigation’s lifecycle and will depend on factors such as the complexity of the allegations being investigated, and intelligence gathered or provided.

26th Jan 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many ongoing investigations are underway at the Serious Fraud Office to recover public money lost to fraud and economic crime from the emergency covid-19 support schemes.

Although no investigations have been formally announced, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) is investigating a number of suspected fraudulent applications for COVID loans.

In order to protect the investigative process, it is not always possible, or even desirable, for investigative bodies such as the SFO to announce investigations prematurely, or provide any details of the matters under investigation. The SFO proactively publishes information about its cases on its website whenever it is appropriate

SFO investigations follow the evidence, and their focus or scope may change as an investigation advances. The number of staff working on a specific case will fluctuate throughout an investigation’s lifecycle and will depend on factors such as the complexity of the allegations being investigated, and intelligence gathered or provided.

18th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the responsibilities of the Domestic and Economic (Efficiency and Value for Money) Committee include identifying savings in respect of civil service staffing.

The Terms of Reference of the Domestic and Economic (Efficiency and Value for Money) Committee are to drive efficiency, effectiveness and economy in government spending, and scrutinise plans to manage major current and future cost pressures. Further details about this committee were released on GOV.UK on 20 March 2022, accessible below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-efficiency-drive-to-cut-55-billion-of-government-waste.

There are a number of Cabinet Committees that could take agenda items related to civil service staffing. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees is not normally shared publicly.

Michael Ellis
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much (a) has been lost from the public purse as a result of fraud, scams and economic crime and (b) has been recovered to the public purse having been lost to fraud, scams and economic crime in each of the last five years.

The government publishes an Annual Fraud Landscape Report or Bulletin. The 2019/20 Fraud Landscape Bulletin states that our best estimate of the total fraud and error losses to the government is between £29bn and £52bn per year. This is an estimate built from the best available evidence on fraud and error loss.

HMRC produces annual estimates of loss (Measuring Tax Gaps) based on statistical sampling. The closest fit to fraud and economic crime are the criminal attacks and evasion categories. HMRC also produces a loss estimate for tax credits - this is made up of fraud and error - not just fraud. Since 2017 (1), HMRC has reported ‘additional tax generated,’ which is made up of a wide range of compliance activities to recover due tax, not all related to fraud. With regards to serious tax fraud, the HMRC Fraud Investigation Service has recovered over £1bn of criminal assets using a combination of both civil and criminal recovery powers over the last 5 years.

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

19/20

HMRC Criminal Attacks and Evasion + Tax Credit Estimated loss

£11.3bn

£11.6bn

£10.8bn

£11.2bn

£11.6bn

HMRC Additional Tax Generated

n/a

n/a

£26.1bn

£29.3bn

£31.8bn

DWP produces annual estimates of the fraud and error in the benefit system based on statistical sampling. The losses are apportioned between fraud and error. DWP also produces figures on recoveries of overpaid benefit each year, however, is it not possible to break this down to just fraud - it is made up of fraud, claimant error and official error. DWP’s reporting includes 2020/21 which shows a marked increase in loss level post-pandemic.

16/17

17/18

18/19

19/20

20/21

DWP Estimated Value of Fraud and Error

£3.6bn

£3.8bn

£3.9bn

£4.6bn

£8.4bn

DWP Estimated Value of Fraud

£2.0bn

£2.2bn

£2.1bn

£2.8bn

£6.3bn

DWP Recovered Fraud and Error (Official and Claimant)

£1.1bn

£1.1bn

£1.1bn

£1.0bn

£800m

The ‘rest of government’ (e.g. not HMRC and DWP) report detected fraud and recoveries through centrally and this is published in the Government’s Annual Fraud Landscape Report or Bulletin. Information on fraud recoveries was not collected until 2016/17. The rest of government figures are below:

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

19/20 (2)

Rest of Govt Detected Fraud

£73.6m

£119m

£151m

£99m

£227m

Rest of Govt Recovered Fraud

n/a

n/a

£12m

£22m

£26m

(1) The CCG (Customer Compliance Group) was created in 2017, hence the inability to report previous figures.

(2) The 19/20 figures largely predate Covid-related fraud.

Michael Ellis
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
6th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to ensure that those who work (a) directly in, (b) indirectly for, and (c) in agencies and public bodies connected to, his Department are paid at least (i) the UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London or (ii) the London Living Wage inside of Greater London, as determined in each case by the Living Wage Foundation.

This government is committed to paying people a decent living wage, which is being addressed through the statutory National Living Wage.

In April 2022, the National Living Wage increased to £9.50 per hour.

By 2024, the Government have committed that the National Living Wage will reach 66% of median UK earnings.

As of 12 July 2022, the total number of direct employees, contractors and agency workers in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy earning below the Real Living Wage rate of £9.90 per hour was zero.

As pay and conditions are set between employee and employer, the Department does not hold records on contractors. The Crown Commercial Service’s frameworks set a minimum requirement of the current wage legislation, which all suppliers must adhere to when negotiating contracts with Government Departments.

Jane Hunt
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy or Industrial Strategy, when prepayment meter customers will receive vouchers under the Energy Bills Support Scheme.

Energy suppliers will deliver this support to households with a domestic electricity meter over six months from October. Customers with pre-payment meters will have the money applied to their meter or paid via a voucher.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy or Industrial Strategy, what proportion of a default energy tariff at the April 2022 price cap the £400 Energy Bills Support Scheme represents for customers that pay via (a) prepayment meters and (b) direct debit at typical usage levels.

The proportion for prepayment meters as well as direct debit would be 20%. This calculation is for an average household with a due fuel tariff which uses 12,000 kWh of gas and 2,900 kWh of electricity and what proportion of this the £400 grant would thus make up.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the British Business Bank's performance targets are for lenders loan recovery in coronavirus business support loan schemes.

The Bounce Back Loan Scheme Guarantee Agreement and subsequent recovery principles document outline the Bank’s requirements and expectations for lenders participating in the scheme, including in terms of recoveries. The overall approach is that recoveries should be pursued in line with the lender’s existing standards for its own commercial lending. Under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme, lenders are expected to follow their own commercial procedures.

The ongoing lender audit assurance programme assesses the performance of lenders including in relation to their recovery activities. Where issues are identified the Bank can take remedial action.

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
28th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many businesses that received (a) bounce back loans, (b) coronavirus business interruption loans, and (c) coronavirus large business interruption loans are no longer trading.

The British Business Bank does not capture this information as part of its data recording. However, the Department has been objecting to strike-off proposals from companies that have outstanding government-backed loans. This policy was launched on the Bounce Back Loan Scheme in April 2021 and was extended to include CBILS, CLBILS and RLS in August 2021.

Through the bulk objection scheme, 63,968 companies have been prevented from striking off whilst holding a BBLS, CBILS, RLS or Future Fund facility. These facilities are worth £2.2 billion in total.

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether Greensill Capital is still an accredited lender under the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme; and if he will make a statement.

While the British Business Bank looks into Greensill’s position, it is not able to originate new lending that benefits from a Government guarantee.

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when Greensill Capital became an accredited lender under the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme; and if he will make a statement.

Greensill Capital was approved by the British Business Bank in June last year to provide finance through the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme.

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
6th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if they will take steps to pay all (a) employees, (b) contractors and (c) agency workers who work in their Department and relevant agencies and public bodies no less than the (i) UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London and (ii) London Living Wage inside of Greater London, as determined by the Living Wage Foundation.

This Government is committed to paying people a decent living wage, which is being addressed through the statutory National Living Wage. In April 2022, the National Living Wage increased to £9.50 per hour. By 2024, the government has committed that the National Living Wage will reach 66% of median UK earnings.

Public Bodies sponsored by DCMS, are their own employer and make their own decisions on pay, within the parameters of the Civil Service pay remit guidance.

Matt Warman
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) direct employees, (b) contractors, and (c) agency workers who work in her Department and relevant agencies and public bodies, receive a wage below that of either (i) the UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London, or (ii) the London Living Wage inside of Greater London, as determined by the Living Wage Foundation.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 25 July 2022 to Question 30189.

Will Quince
Minister of State (Education)
6th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) direct employees, (b) contractors, and (c) agency workers who work in their Department and relevant agencies and public bodies, receive a wage below that of either (i) the UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London, or (ii) the London Living Wage inside of Greater London, as determined by the Living Wage Foundation.

As of 6 July 2022, and taking into account relevant allowances such as London Weighting, the following organisations have direct employees (including apprentices) on wages lower than the Living Wage Foundation published rates. Where numbers in an organisation are below five individuals, this has been redacted at organisation level but included in overall totals.

Organisation

London

National

Total

Animal and Plant Health Agency

0

0

0

CEFAS

0

0

0

Consumer Council for Water

0

0

0

Defra

11

0

0

Environment Agency

0

0

0

Forestry Commission

0

0

0

Joint Nature Conservancy Council

0

0

0

Kew

80

0

80

Marine Management Organisation

0

0

0

Natural England

0

95

95

Ofwat

0

0

0

Rural Payments Agency

0

0

0

Total

91

104

195

For Natural England, a pay review is due with effect from 1 July which will uplift all employees above the Living Wage Foundation published rates.

For the Consumer Council for Water, with effect from 11 July, due to a change in responsibilities, no employees will remain below the Living Wage Foundation threshold.

Wage information relating to contractors is not held. The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 are complied with by all organisations, which ensure parity of pay for agency workers with rates paid to employees. As pay and conditions are set between employee and employer, records are not held on Agencies and/or Contractors. The Crown Commercial Service’s frameworks set a minimum requirement of the current legislative amounts allowed by employers to pay, which all suppliers must adhere to when negotiating contracts with Government Departments.

This government is committed to paying people a decent living wage, which is being addressed through the statutory National Living Wage. In April 2022, the National Living Wage increased to £9.50 per hour. By 2024, the Government has committed that the National Living Wage will reach 66% of median UK earnings.

The Government will always award contracts on the basis of the best value for money for the taxpayer.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many (a) direct employees, (b) contractors, and (c) agency workers who work in their Department and relevant agencies and public bodies, receive a wage below that of either (i) the UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London, or (ii) the London Living Wage inside of Greater London, as determined by the Living Wage Foundation.

The Department for International Trade does not have any direct employees, contractors or agency workers that receive a wage below the UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London or the London Living Wage inside of Greater London.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many qualified chiropodists there are in the NHS in England; and how many there were in 2010.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS) workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), but not staff working in primary care or in general practitioners surgeries, local authorities or other providers.

The following table shows the number of chiropodists employed at National Health Service trusts and CCGs as at October 2019, the latest available data compared to October 2010, full time equivalent.

October 2010

October 2019

Change

% Change

3,072

2,703

-369

12%

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average waiting time is for an NHS chiropody appointment in England.

The information requested is not centrally collected.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the NHS budget is for chiropody training; and what that budget was 2015.

There is no dedicated National Health Service budget for chiropody training, now formally called podiatry. Funding for elements of training, such as clinical placements, is included within the education and training tariff and paid to placement providers by Health Education England.

In December 2019 the Government announced additional maintenance grant funding, which will be available from September 2020 for new and continuing students of £5,000. In addition, students with child dependants will benefit from an extra £1,000 and new students studying a specialist subject including podiatry will be able to access a further £1,000. These grants are on top of student loan allowances and do not need to be re-paid.

18th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, which industry stakeholders his Department met with ahead of the 4 April 2022 announcement on the regulation of crypto-assets.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery.

Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel.

Richard Fuller
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, which industry stakeholders his Department met with ahead of the Bank of England's review of its approach to setting a minimum requirement for own funds and eligible liabilities (MREL).

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery.

Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

Richard Fuller
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what industry stakeholders his Department met with in advance of the announcement in the Queen's Speech 2022 that the Government will bring forward legislative proposals on ensuring access to cash.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery.

Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-giftsand-overseas-travel

Richard Fuller
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish a timeline for taking forward reforms to the UK’s financial services regulatory framework for capital markets.

As the Chancellor laid out in his speech at Mansion House on Tuesday 19th July, the Government will take forward reforms to the UK’s regulatory framework for capital markets in the Financial Services and Markets Bill.

In particular, the Bill will increase the competitiveness of our capital markets, allowing us to reform the Prospectus Regime, as recommended by Lord Hill. It will also take forward outcomes of the Wholesale Capital Markets review, stripping away poorly crafted EU rules like the double volume cap and the share trading obligation.

The roadmap for the delivery of the full set of reforms under the WMR is set out in detail in the recent consultation and consultation response document, which are both available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/uk-wholesale-markets-review-a-consultation.

While the Government has set out its prioritisation for its capital markets reforms, the exact timeline for delivery will rely on Parliamentary timetabling.

Richard Fuller
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent meetings he has had on the issue of non-domiciled tax status.

The Government keeps all tax policy under review, and the Chancellor attends policy discussions with officials as part of this process.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many responses his Department has received to its consultation on the regulation of buy now pay later.

The Government received 86 responses to its consultation on the regulation of Buy-Now Pay-Later. A list of respondents can be found in Annex A of the Government’s consultation response at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/regulation-of-buy-now-pay-later-consultation

Treasury Ministers and officials have held meetings with a wide variety of interested parties as part of the process of policy development and delivery. These have included meetings with consumer groups, with financial services sector trade bodies, and with a number of individual firms that will be affected by the regulation of Buy-Now Pay-Later.

Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

Richard Fuller
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, who officials in his Department have consulted in the development of its response to the consultation on the methodology used to set the SCAPE discount rate.

I refer the rt Hon Member to my answer of 19 July to PQ UIN 36751.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
12th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the value of fraudulent loans and grants recovered by the Taxpayer Protection Taskforce is since its inception.

At Spring Budget 2021 the Government announced a £100 million investment into the Taxpayer Protection Taskforce. The taskforce was established to extend HMRC’s work to tackle fraud and error in the COVID support schemes that they administered (Self Employment Income Support Scheme, Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, and Eat Out to Help Out). The taskforce does not deliver compliance across schemes administered outside HMRC.

Anyone who keeps grant money despite knowing they were not entitled to it, faces having to repay up to double the amount they received, plus interest and potentially criminal prosecution.

HMRC identifies claims for compliance checks where the amount of the claim is out of step with other information. The risk that the claim is incorrect may be due to either an honest mistake or fraud, therefore, the value of recovered grants does not distinguish between error and fraud.

As of July 2022, the taskforce was made up of 1,155 full-time equivalent staff (FTE). The FTE will vary across the year. The resource commitment is proportionate to the number of high-risk claims made and the risks posed by error and fraud in the HMRC administered schemes.

The taskforce commenced activity from April 2021 and will build on the £536 million already recovered in 2020-21. Taskforce performance for 2021-22 is covered in HMRC’s Annual Report and Accounts for 2021-22, which are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-annual-report-and-accounts-2021-to-2022. This is in addition to the amounts that HMRC prevented from being paid out on incorrect claims.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many full-time equivalent staff the Taxpayer Protection Taskforce employed as of 12 July 2022.

At Spring Budget 2021 the Government announced a £100 million investment into the Taxpayer Protection Taskforce. The taskforce was established to extend HMRC’s work to tackle fraud and error in the COVID support schemes that they administered (Self Employment Income Support Scheme, Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, and Eat Out to Help Out). The taskforce does not deliver compliance across schemes administered outside HMRC.

Anyone who keeps grant money despite knowing they were not entitled to it, faces having to repay up to double the amount they received, plus interest and potentially criminal prosecution.

HMRC identifies claims for compliance checks where the amount of the claim is out of step with other information. The risk that the claim is incorrect may be due to either an honest mistake or fraud, therefore, the value of recovered grants does not distinguish between error and fraud.

As of July 2022, the taskforce was made up of 1,155 full-time equivalent staff (FTE). The FTE will vary across the year. The resource commitment is proportionate to the number of high-risk claims made and the risks posed by error and fraud in the HMRC administered schemes.

The taskforce commenced activity from April 2021 and will build on the £536 million already recovered in 2020-21. Taskforce performance for 2021-22 is covered in HMRC’s Annual Report and Accounts for 2021-22, which are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-annual-report-and-accounts-2021-to-2022. This is in addition to the amounts that HMRC prevented from being paid out on incorrect claims.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether ministerial responsibilities in his Department have changed following the recent appointment of new ministers.

All ministerial responsibilities are published on gov.uk.

Alan Mak
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has met the (a) Taxpayer Protection Taskforce or (b) National Crime Agency to discuss fraud in the covid-19 support schemes since his appointment as Chancellor.

Treasury Ministers and officials regularly engage with the National Crime Agency and Taxpayer Protection Taskforce to discuss shared policy interests, such as the response to fraud.

The Government has invested over £100 million in the Taxpayer Protection Taskforce to combat fraud on the HMRC Covid-19 schemes, one of the largest and quickest responses to a fraud risk by HMRC.

In 2021-22 the Taxpayer Protection Taskforce prevented more than £350 million from being lost through error and fraud in the COVID-19 financial support schemes. Overall, since the start of the schemes, the amount of money either recovered or blocked from being paid out totals more than £1.2 billion, with compliance activity still ongoing.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many (a) direct employees, (b) contractors, and (c) agency workers who work in their Department and relevant agencies and public bodies, receive a wage below that of either (i) the UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London, or (ii) the London Living Wage inside of Greater London, as determined by the Living Wage Foundation.

As of 31/03/2022, the total number of full-time employees in HM Treasury earning below the London Living Wage rate of £11.05 per hour was 17. This number is comprised mainly of apprentices. The Living Wage rate is a suggested rate of pay by the Living Wage Foundation, rather than a legislated minimum wage.

All HM Treasury employees are paid above the statutory minimum wage. Since 31/03/2022 we have been conducting a review of all pay ranges across the department in line with this year’s Cabinet Office remit guidance.

As pay and conditions are set between employee and employer, the rate of pay for agency workers and contractors will be determined by the company for which they work and not HM Treasury.

Alan Mak
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if his Department will direct the Office for Budget Responsibility to produce a revised forecast of growth in real gross domestic product, consumer price inflation and public sector net borrowing for the 2022-23 financial year, incorporating the impact of announcements he made to the House on 26 May 2022.

The Chancellor will in due course commission a forecast from the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR), as set out by the Charter for Budget Responsibility. The OBR will incorporate the impact of new policy in their next economic and fiscal forecast, including measures that have been announced since the last forecast event.
26th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if his Department will place in the Library a revised forecast of the expected level of public sector net borrowing in the 2022-23 financial year, incorporating the impact of announcements made by the Chancellor to the House on 26 May 2022.

The Chancellor will in due course commission a forecast from the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR), as set out by the Charter for Budget Responsibility. The OBR will incorporate the impact of new policy in their next economic and fiscal forecast, including measures that have been announced since the last forecast event.
26th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the impact of his oral statement, Economy Update, on 26 May 2022, Official Report, on the cost of capital and investment for electricity generators in the context of uncertainty on the steps he plans to take in response to power generation profits.

As the Chancellor set out in his statement on the cost of living support the Government is urgently evaluating the scale of extraordinary profits in the energy generation sector and the appropriate next steps.

As part of this process, and to mitigate potential uncertainty, officials are urgently engaging with industry stakeholders on this matter.

28th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Wolverhampton South East (a) of 8 December 2021 on coronavirus loan fraud and (b) of 19 December 2021 on his visit to California; and for what reason he has not provided a timely response to that correspondence.

The Member’s letter of 8 December was passed to BEIS to reply and the response was issued on 22 December.

I responded to the Member’s letter of 19 December on 31 January.

26th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many members of staff at HMRC are working full-time on the recovery of public money lost to fraud and economic crime through the emergency covid-19 schemes as of 26 January 2022.

Throughout the pandemic, the Government’s number one priority has been to protect jobs and livelihoods whilst also supporting businesses and public services across the UK.

The overwhelming majority of people that claimed Covid-19 support did so legitimately. HMRC is also aware that mistakes can happen, which is why HMRC is supporting people who made a mistake to correct it. Those who keep money claimed from any of the Covid-19 support schemes despite knowing they were not entitled to it face having to repay up to double the amount they received, plus interest, and potentially criminal prosecution in the most serious of cases.

As published in HMRC’s Annual Report and Accounts 2020-21, over 1,300 Full Time Equivalent staff were deployed onto the COVID schemes during 2020-21. The full report can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-annual-report-and-accounts-2020-to-2021

The Government has since invested over £100 million in a Taxpayer Protection Taskforce of over 1,200 Full Time Equivalent of HMRC staff to combat fraud and error within the HMRC Covid-19 schemes, one of the largest and quickest responses to a fraud risk by HMRC.

The taskforce is funded for two years up to the year 2022-23 and will enable HMRC to increase their one-to-one checks to 30,000. The Taskforce is expected to recover between £800 million to £1 billion in overpayments.

Up to November 2021, HMRC issued over 74,000 letters asking claimants to check their claims and self-correct if they had got it wrong, and opened over 26,000 one-to-one checks where there was a risk that the grant had been overclaimed. HMRC’s 2020-21 compliance results for the Covid-19 schemes amounted to over £830 million, achieved by preventing losses by pre-payment activity and recovering overclaimed grants.

Taskforce performance for the year 2021-22 will be published in HMRC’s Annual Report and Accounts for 2021-22.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many ongoing investigations are underway at HMRC to recover public money lost to fraud and economic crime through the emergency covid-19 schemes as of 26 January 2022.

Throughout the pandemic, the Government’s number one priority has been to protect jobs and livelihoods whilst also supporting businesses and public services across the UK.

The overwhelming majority of people that claimed Covid-19 support did so legitimately. HMRC is also aware that mistakes can happen, which is why HMRC is supporting people who made a mistake to correct it. Those who keep money claimed from any of the Covid-19 support schemes despite knowing they were not entitled to it face having to repay up to double the amount they received, plus interest, and potentially criminal prosecution in the most serious of cases.

As published in HMRC’s Annual Report and Accounts 2020-21, over 1,300 Full Time Equivalent staff were deployed onto the COVID schemes during 2020-21. The full report can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-annual-report-and-accounts-2020-to-2021

The Government has since invested over £100 million in a Taxpayer Protection Taskforce of over 1,200 Full Time Equivalent of HMRC staff to combat fraud and error within the HMRC Covid-19 schemes, one of the largest and quickest responses to a fraud risk by HMRC.

The taskforce is funded for two years up to the year 2022-23 and will enable HMRC to increase their one-to-one checks to 30,000. The Taskforce is expected to recover between £800 million to £1 billion in overpayments.

Up to November 2021, HMRC issued over 74,000 letters asking claimants to check their claims and self-correct if they had got it wrong, and opened over 26,000 one-to-one checks where there was a risk that the grant had been overclaimed. HMRC’s 2020-21 compliance results for the Covid-19 schemes amounted to over £830 million, achieved by preventing losses by pre-payment activity and recovering overclaimed grants.

Taskforce performance for the year 2021-22 will be published in HMRC’s Annual Report and Accounts for 2021-22.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much HMRC plans to spend for the purposes of recovering public money lost to fraud and economic crime through covid-19 support schemes.

Throughout the pandemic, the Government’s number one priority has been to protect jobs and livelihoods whilst also supporting businesses and public services across the UK.

The overwhelming majority of people that claimed Covid-19 support did so legitimately. HMRC is also aware that mistakes can happen, which is why HMRC is supporting people who made a mistake to correct it. Those who keep money claimed from any of the Covid-19 support schemes despite knowing they were not entitled to it face having to repay up to double the amount they received, plus interest, and potentially criminal prosecution in the most serious of cases.

As published in HMRC’s Annual Report and Accounts 2020-21, over 1,300 Full Time Equivalent staff were deployed onto the COVID schemes during 2020-21. The full report can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-annual-report-and-accounts-2020-to-2021

The Government has since invested over £100 million in a Taxpayer Protection Taskforce of over 1,200 Full Time Equivalent of HMRC staff to combat fraud and error within the HMRC Covid-19 schemes, one of the largest and quickest responses to a fraud risk by HMRC.

The taskforce is funded for two years up to the year 2022-23 and will enable HMRC to increase their one-to-one checks to 30,000. The Taskforce is expected to recover between £800 million to £1 billion in overpayments.

Up to November 2021, HMRC issued over 74,000 letters asking claimants to check their claims and self-correct if they had got it wrong, and opened over 26,000 one-to-one checks where there was a risk that the grant had been overclaimed. HMRC’s 2020-21 compliance results for the Covid-19 schemes amounted to over £830 million, achieved by preventing losses by pre-payment activity and recovering overclaimed grants.

Taskforce performance for the year 2021-22 will be published in HMRC’s Annual Report and Accounts for 2021-22.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many investigations into fraud, scams and economic crime his Department has conducted in each of the last five years.

HM Treasury is a policy-making department and does not undertake investigations, except for the work of the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI).

As the competent authority for the implementation of financial sanctions in the UK, OFSI supports efforts to tackle economic crime by ensuring that financial sanctions are properly understood and enforced.

OFSI investigates all reported suspected breaches of financial sanctions. Its Annual Review publications are available on GOV.UK and provide further information about OFSI’s work.

25th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many investigations into fraud, scams and economic crime have resulted in money being returned to the public purse in each of the last five years.

Data on detected and prevented fraud and error, and trends in recoveries in the public sector are published annually by the Cabinet Office Government Counter Fraud Function (GCFF). The Cross-Government Fraud Landscape Bulletin is available on GOV.UK.

The outcomes of investigations into fraud, scams and economic crime are not centrally collated. Investigations are conducted by the appropriate Department with responsibility for policy delivery.

Investigations and enforcement activities are also undertaken by regulatory or enforcement agencies, such as the Financial Conduct Authority and National Crime Agency.

25th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many FTE staff in his Department have worked on tackling fraud and economic crime in each of the last five years.

HM Treasury takes a flexible and dynamic approach to resourcing to meet Government priorities. We have teams delivering priority work including economic crime reform. However, we do not routinely record the number of full time equivalent civil servants who work on individual policy initiatives.

Most of the responsibility for tackling fraud and economic crime is led by the Departments tasked with delivering Government policy. Investigations and enforcement activities are also undertaken by regulatory or enforcement agencies, including the Financial Conduct Authority and National Crime Agency respectively. The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI), part of HM Treasury, ensures financial sanctions are properly understood and enforced and investigates all reported suspected breaches.

25th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what his Department’s budget has been for tackling fraud, scams and economic crime in each of the last five years.

HM Treasury takes a flexible and dynamic approach to resourcing to meet Government priorities. We have teams delivering priority work including economic crime reform. However, we do not routinely record the number of full time equivalent civil servants who work on individual policy initiatives.

Most of the responsibility for tackling fraud and economic crime is led by the Departments tasked with delivering Government policy. Investigations and enforcement activities are also undertaken by regulatory or enforcement agencies, including the Financial Conduct Authority and National Crime Agency respectively. The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI), part of HM Treasury, ensures financial sanctions are properly understood and enforced and investigates all reported suspected breaches.

12th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of over how many years the £17 billion cost to the public purse will be realised as a result of the remedy contained in the Public Service Pensions and Judicial Offices Bill.

The remedy proposed in the Public Service Pensions and Judicial Offices Bill is designed to address the discrimination identified by the McCloud and Sargeant judgments. For the main unfunded public service pension schemes, in effect, remedy offers members in scope a choice between legacy or reformed scheme benefits for the remedy period, which runs from 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2022. Members in scope of remedy are those with service on or before 31 March 2012 and on or after 1 April 2015.

The cost of remedy is the cost of additional pension benefits accrued due to remedy. Those benefits will typically be paid out across the retirement of eligible members. The estimated £17 billion cost of remedy will, therefore, be paid out over many decades as the pensions of those in scope come into payment.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
19th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Treasury Committee report, Net Zero and the Future of Green Finance, published on 22 April 2021, what plans he has to ensure that there is a (a) clear timetable and (b) legislative pathway to deliver a UK taxonomy ahead of COP26 in November 2021.

In November 2020, the Chancellor announced that the UK would implement a Green Taxonomy to create a common understanding of which economic activities are environmentally sustainable, improving understanding of the impact of firms’ activities and investments on the environment.

The Government is required to make Technical Screening Criteria (TSC) via secondary legislation for climate change mitigation, and climate change adaptation no later than 1 January 2023. These TSC will be subject to appropriate, open consultation prior to making.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will list the dates of his contacts with David Cameron in relation to Greensill Capital.

Ministers routinely meet with a range of private sector stakeholders. Transparency releases are published on a quarterly basis and are currently publicly available for Ministerial meetings up to and including September 2020, which is in line with normal reporting timelines on disclosures.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish the notes made at the meetings between his officials and Greensill Capital.

Ministers routinely meet with a range of private sector stakeholders. Transparency releases are published on a quarterly basis and are currently publicly available for Ministerial meetings up to and including September 2020, which is in line with normal reporting timelines on disclosures.

26th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the risk of fraud in respect of raising the limit for contactless spending to £100; and if he will make a statement.

The Government’s EU exit deal allows the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to change the legal contactless limits, which were previously set by the European Commission. On 3 March, the FCA increased the legal single contactless payment limit from £45 to £100.

The FCA undertook a public consultation ahead of taking its decision and has carefully considered the potential impacts on fraud from these changes. When the contactless payment limits were last raised in Spring 2020 from £30 to £45 there was no significant recorded increase in fraud levels.

26th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent representations he has received on raising the limit for contactless spending to £100.

The Government’s EU exit deal allows the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to change the legal contactless limits, which were previously set by the European Commission. On 3 March, the FCA increased the legal single contactless payment limit from £45 to £100.

The FCA undertook a public consultation ahead of taking its decision and has carefully considered the potential impacts on fraud from these changes. When the contactless payment limits were last raised in Spring 2020 from £30 to £45 there was no significant recorded increase in fraud levels.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether fraud is an agenda item for the memorandum of understanding to be negotiated between the UK and the EU on financial services; and if he will make a statement.

We have committed, with the EU, to agreeing a Memorandum of Understanding to establish a framework for regulatory cooperation. This will allow for ongoing bilateral exchanges of views and analysis relating to regulatory initiatives and other issues of interest. This is not a prescriptive or exhaustive approach and will allow for discussions on a range of regulatory issues which are of common interest.
4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) direct employees, (b) contractors, and (c) agency workers who work in their Department and relevant agencies and public bodies, receive a wage below that of either (i) the UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London, or (ii) the London Living Wage inside of Greater London, as determined by the Living Wage Foundation.

In April 2016, the Government introduced a higher minimum wage called the National Living Wage, which was increased to £9.50 per hour for those aged 23 and over, on 1st April 2022. All employers in the UK are required to comply with National Minimum Wage legislation and all Home Office employees are paid at or above this rate.

The Living Wage Foundation (LWF) is an initiative by Citizens UK which advocates employers paying an alternative hourly rate known as the Living Wage or London Living Wage. which they believe represents a minimum income standard, reflecting the basic cost of living in the UK. The current Living Wage across the UK is £9.90 and London Living Wage is £11.05.

There are 495 staff, working nationally that are paid less than the LWF Living Wage. All staff based within London are paid above the LWF London Living Wage. This figure does not take into account the pay award for 2022 – 2023, where negotiations with the trades unions are currently taking place to determine the uplift to the AA grade (the grade affected by changes to either the Government NLW or LWFs London/living wage).

When the pay award is implemented, it will be backdated to July, the start of the pay award year.

Home Office does not require its contractors or suppliers (covering Agency workers) to comply with the London Living Wage although they must comply with pay legislation.

Of the agencies and public bodies sponsored by the Home Office, they currently have 22 direct employees outside Greater London who are paid less than National Living Wage.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
28th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many members of staff at the National Crime Agency are working full time on the recovery of public money lost to fraud and economic crime from the Government's emergency coronavirus support schemes.

The NCA do not comment on the number of current investigations by the Agency.

Kit Malthouse
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
28th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many ongoing investigations are underway at the National Crime Agency to recover public money lost to fraud and economic crime from the Government's coronavirus business support schemes.

The NCA do not comment on the number of current investigations by the Agency.

Kit Malthouse
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many suspicious activity reports were filed with regulators in (a) the UK and (b) other countries by UK based financial institutions in each of the last five years.

Suspicious Activity Reports are submitted by reporters to the UK Financial Intelligence Unit within the National Crime Agency.

In the last 5 years, the following volumes of Suspicious Activity Reports have been received by the UK Financial Intelligence Unit. The UK Financial Intelligence Unit does not hold data on whether an institution is based in the UK.

April 2019 to March 2020

April 2018-March 2019

April 2017-March 2018

October 2015 to September 2016

Oct 2014 to Sept 2015

Credit institution – banks

432,316

383,733

371,522

348,688

318,445

Credit institution – building societies

30,579

21,714

19,640

15,078

15,806

Credit institution – others

8,080

10,203

13,678

13,222

11,828

Financial institution – MSBs

17,701

18,940

21,198

10,091

11,120

Financial institution – others

58,930

24,911

21,446

14,496

6,835

The Home Office or National Crime Agency does not hold information relating to Suspicious Activity Reports submitted to other countries.

Suspicious Activity Report submission volumes can be found in the SARs Annual Reports which are published by the National Crime Agency, which includes breakdowns by sector. The 2019-2020 report can be found here:

https://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/who-we-are/publications/480-sars-annual-report-2020/file

Kit Malthouse
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what Action Fraud's annual budget is.

The Home Office provides annualised grant funding of £10.5 million to Action Fraud and National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) for running the service. In addition to this they receive funding from other sources.

Further details on funding of Action Fraud and funding providers are currently available on the City of London Police website: https://www.cityoflondon.police.uk/police-forces/city-of-london-police/areas/city-of-london/about-us/about-us/funding/.

Kit Malthouse
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the annual cost of fraud to UK consumers.

There are no Government estimates of the annual cost of fraud specifically for UK consumers. The Home Office has estimated that the total economic and social cost of fraud to individuals in England and Wales in 2015/2016 was £4.7bn [1].

Data on incidents of fraud is available from two key sources, the ONS Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) and Action Fraud supply data to the Home Office on the number of recorded fraud and computer misuse offences that have been reported to and recorded by them.

The CSEW report that in the year ending March 2020, there were an estimated 914,000 incidents of consumer and retail fraud.

[1]https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/732110/the-economic-and-social-costs-of-crime-horr99.pdf

Kit Malthouse
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) direct employees, (b) contractors, and (c) agency workers who work in their Department and relevant agencies and public bodies, receive a wage below that of either (i) the UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London, or (ii) the London Living Wage inside of Greater London, as determined by the Living Wage Foundation.

The information requested about contractors and agency workers is not held. It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the hon. Members Question about direct employees. I will write to him when the information is available, and a copy of my letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what fees have been paid to advertising agencies for work on levelling up advertisements in financial year 2021-22.

Spend on campaigns and their providers is published regularly on the Gov.uk.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, who the advertising agency is for Government advertisements relating to its levelling up agenda.

Spend on campaigns and their providers is published regularly on the Gov.uk.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how much has been spent on levelling up advertisements in the West Midlands region as of 14 March 2022.

Spend on campaigns and their providers is published regularly on the Gov.uk.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how much the Government has spent on levelling up adverts (a) on billboards, (b) in newspapers and (c) on digital channels in financial year 2021-22.

Spend on campaigns and their providers is published regularly on the Gov.uk.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what the Government's advertising budget is for levelling up in financial year 2021-22; and if he will publish a breakdown of spending by region.

Spend on campaigns and their providers is published regularly on the Gov.uk.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) direct employees, (b) contractors, and (c) agency workers who work in their Department and relevant agencies and public bodies, receive a wage below that of either (i) the UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London, or (ii) the London Living Wage inside of Greater London, as determined by the Living Wage Foundation.

I can confirm that the Ministry of Justice (including HMCTS and agencies) does not have any direct employees that receive a wage equivalent to below the 2021/22 Living Wage Foundation UK Real Living Wage (£9.90 per hour) or London Living Wage (£11.05 per hour).

Within HM Prisons & Probation Service, as at March 2022, there were 1,288 directly employed staff below the UK Real Living Wage (£9.90 per hour) outside of London and 22 staff below the London Living Wage (£11.05 per hour) in London.

This Government is committed to paying people a decent living wage, which is being addressed through the statutory National Living Wage. In April 2022, the National Living Wage increased to £9.50 per hour. By 2024, the Government has committed that the National Living Wage will reach 66% of median UK earnings. The National Living Wage is the statutory minimum for ages 23 and above, whereas both the UK and London Real Living Wages are voluntary. All employees across the MoJ and HMPPS are paid at, or above, the statutory minimum rates for their respective age groups.

As pay and conditions are set between employee and employer, neither the MoJ or HMPPS hold records on agencies and contractors. The Crown Commercial Service’s frameworks set a minimum requirement of the current legislative amounts allowed by employers to pay, which all suppliers must adhere to when negotiating contracts with Government departments.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prosecutions for fraud have taken place in UK courts in each of the last five years.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions for fraud offences in England and Wales up to December 2019, available in the ‘Outcomes by Offence’ data tool, which can be found here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938568/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2019.xlsx

In the data tool linked above, use the ‘Offence group’ filter to select ’10: Fraud offences’ and the number of defendants prosecuted for this offence group will populate in row 23 of the pivot table.

4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, how many (a) direct employees, (b) contractors, and (c) agency workers who work in their Department and relevant agencies and public bodies, receive a wage below that of either (i) the UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London, or (ii) the London Living Wage inside of Greater London, as determined by the Living Wage Foundation.

The Northern Ireland Office can confirm no employees either directly or indirectly employed by the department are paid below the UK Real Living Wage outside of Greater London or within London.

Conor Burns
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)