Lord Empey Portrait

Lord Empey

Ulster Unionist Party - Life peer

2 APPG memberships (as of 4 May 2022)
Aerospace, Transatlantic Trade
1 Former APPG membership
Ireland and the Irish in Britain
Financial Exclusion Committee
25th May 2016 - 25th Mar 2017
Information Committee (Lords)
8th Jun 2015 - 31st Aug 2016
Extradition Law
12th Jun 2014 - 25th Feb 2015
Personal Service Companies
12th Nov 2013 - 31st Mar 2014
Small and Medium Sized Enterprises Committee
29th May 2012 - 28th Feb 2013


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 25th May 2022
15:00
Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland Sub-Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Follow-up inquiry on the impact of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland
25 May 2022, 3 p.m.
At 3.10pm: Oral evidence
Matthew O'Toole MLA, SDLP
At 4.10pm: Oral evidence
Sorcha Eastwood MLA, Alliance Party
At 5.10pm: Oral evidence
Declan Kearney MLA, Sinn Féin
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 26th May 2022
09:00
Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland Sub-Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Follow-up inquiry on the impact of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland
26 May 2022, 9 a.m.
At 9.15am: Oral evidence
Rt Hon James Cleverly MP - Minister of State (Minister for Europe and North America) at Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office
View calendar
Division Votes
Wednesday 27th April 2022
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 2 Ulster Unionist Party No votes vs 0 Ulster Unionist Party Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 219 Noes - 229
Speeches
Tuesday 17th May 2022
Northern Ireland Protocol
My Lords, in the other place, the Secretary of State referred to unintended consequences. I have to say that all …
Written Answers
Thursday 28th April 2022
UK Shared Prosperity Fund
To ask Her Majesty's Government what criteria will be applied to funding decisions relating to the new UK Shared Prosperity …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 27th January 2020
Department of Health (Northern Ireland) Bill [HL] 2019-21
A bill to provide for the functions exercised by the Northern Ireland Department of Health to be exercised by the …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Empey has voted in 266 divisions, and 8 times against the majority of their Party.

23 Nov 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Empey voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Ulster Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Ulster Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 242
20 Oct 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Empey voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Ulster Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Ulster Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 395 Noes - 169
22 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Empey voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Ulster Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Ulster Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 122 Noes - 234
17 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Empey voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Ulster Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Ulster Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 280 Noes - 218
15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Empey voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Ulster Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Ulster Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 112 Noes - 388
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Empey voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Ulster Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Ulster Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 93 Noes - 418
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Empey voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Ulster Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Ulster Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 401
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Empey voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Ulster Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Ulster Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 409
View All Lord Empey Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Viscount Younger of Leckie (Conservative)
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
(23 debate interactions)
Lord True (Conservative)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
(13 debate interactions)
Lord Frost (Conservative)
(12 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(27 debate contributions)
Northern Ireland Office
(10 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Empey's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Empey, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Empey has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Empey has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by Lord Empey


A Bill to amend the Airports Act 1986.


Last Event - Order Of Commitment Discharged : House Of Lords
Friday 29th January 2016

A Bill to amend the Airports Act 1986.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Lords
Friday 9th November 2012

A bill to amend the Airports Act 1986.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Lords
Friday 16th March 2012

A bill to provide for the functions exercised by the Northern Ireland Department of Health to be exercised by the Secretary of State in the absence of a Northern Ireland Executive


Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Monday 27th January 2020
(Read Debate)

Lord Empey has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


205 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
25th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what criteria will be applied to funding decisions relating to the new UK Shared Prosperity Fund; who will make such funding decisions; and when will details of the application process and relevant timelines be made available to community, voluntary and social enterprise organisations in Northern Ireland.

In Northern Ireland, UK Government will have oversight of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF). We want to work closely with local partners to design a Northern Ireland investment plan. We will refine the plan in consultation with stakeholders in a way that reflects the needs of Northern Ireland’s economy and society. This group could include representatives from Northern Ireland Executive Departments, local authorities, businesses and the community and voluntary sector.

As noted in the UKSPF Prospectus published on April 13, from April to June/July 2022 UK Government will work with stakeholders in Northern Ireland to develop local investment plans. In Summer 2022 Application processes and templates for Northern Ireland will be published. The investment plan window closes on 1 August.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the territorial extent to the proposed Brexit Freedoms Bill.

Retained EU law applies in the whole of the UK. Accordingly, any legislation that allows for the amendment of retained EU law will need to make the appropriate provision for Northern Ireland.

Any legislation to address REUL is likely to have a UK extent. This is consistent with other Brexit legislation such as the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill and European Union (Future Relationship) Bill.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which provisions of the proposed Brexit Freedoms Bill (1) will, and (2) will not, apply to Northern Ireland.

Retained EU law applies in the whole of the UK. Accordingly, any legislation that allows for the amendment of retained EU law will need to make the appropriate provision for Northern Ireland.

Any legislation to address REUL is likely to have a UK extent. This is consistent with other Brexit legislation such as the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill and European Union (Future Relationship) Bill.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effect of triggering Article 16 on the remainder of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland.

Article 16 is a safeguard provision for addressing serious economic, societal and environmental difficulties. It is part of the Northern Ireland Protocol. Triggering it does not affect the standing of the Protocol as a whole.

9th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the recent flow of freight vehicles travelling between Great Britain and continental Europe.

Government continues to monitor the flow of freight vehicles travelling between the UK and EU nations, including those travelling between the Republic of Ireland, Great Britain and continental Europe.


DfT’s published road freight statistics can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/road-goods-vehicles-travelling-to-europe-july-2020-to-june-2021.

9th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the recent flow of freight vehicles travelling between the Republic of Ireland and Great Britain.

Government continues to monitor the flow of freight vehicles travelling between the UK and EU nations, including those travelling between the Republic of Ireland, Great Britain and continental Europe. Landbridge traffic is being monitored for the movements between EU Nations and the Island of Ireland.

Published DfT data can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/road-goods-vehicles-travelling-to-europe-july-2020-to-june-2021.

25th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the level of consent granted by representatives of the people of Northern Ireland for the implementation of a regulatory border in the Irish Sea.

The Protocol is explicit that it rests on the democratic consent of the people and elected representatives across Northern Ireland. All sides need to be sensitive to the social and political realities, including the reality that any arrangements involving Northern Ireland depend on cross-community confidence if they are to work successfully. We are listening carefully to the concerns of the people of Northern Ireland. Our actions are aimed at restoring that confidence and we have urged the EU to do the same.

25th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on the volume of trade between Great Britain and Northern Ireland since the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland entered into force on 1 January.

Goods are moving effectively between Great Britain and Northern Ireland and there are no significant queues at Northern Ireland’s ports. Overall freight flow between Great Britain and Northern Ireland appears to have returned to normal levels. We are continuing to monitor and assess the situation, including any potential change in trade patterns.

6th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the arrangements contained in the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland constitute a regulatory border in the Irish Sea.

Every part of the United Kingdom, including Northern Ireland, is an integral part of the Kingdom. As a result of the devolution settlements, there are legal and regulatory differences between the constituent nations. The Northern Ireland Protocol and the United Kingdom Internal Market Bill ensure unfettered access for goods from Northern Ireland to the rest of the Kingdom. The Protocol does make specific provisions in relation to the movement of goods, but it does not constitute a "border". The UK government has made extensive investment and arrangements to facilitate free movement of goods to Northern Ireland, and, working with the devolved administration, will keep under review all necessary actions to ensure that is delivered.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
8th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to allow the EU to open an office in Northern Ireland; and what kind of presence in Northern Ireland the EU has requested.

As is detailed in the Command Paper published on Gov.uk on 10 October, the arrangements we have reached in principle with the European Commission, are clear that there will be no EU Belfast embassy or mission. Instead, the arrangements we have agreed will enable the EU to exercise their rights under Article 12, including with appropriate access to the information needed to do so, while fully respecting the sovereignty of the United Kingdom.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
27th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the role of the Court of Justice of the European Union will be in relation to Northern Ireland from 1 January 2021.

The rules that apply to businesses and citizens in Northern Ireland derive from UK law, including rules given effect by the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018. The rules on how to interpret rules given effect by retained EU law, which the courts must follow, are set out in section 6 of the EU Withdrawal Act. Section 6 of the 2018 Act also sets out the role of the Court of Justice of the European Union.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
26th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 25 November, (HL10219), to (1) list the subset of rules concerning goods and electricity markets applying as a result of the Northern Ireland Protocol, (2) set out what, if any, consent arrangements were established for these rules to apply in Northern Ireland, and (3) set out what assessment they have made, if any, of the implications of these rules with regard to the European Commission exercising executive authority over Northern Ireland.

The rules applied by the Protocol are outlined in its text and Annexes. Parliament was provided with the assessments made regarding its implications during the passage of the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2020 which ratified the Withdrawal Agreement.

The consent arrangements are outlined in Article 18 of the Protocol and the Declaration of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland concerning the operation of the ‘Democratic consent in Northern Ireland’ provision of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland. These arrangements are being provided in domestic law through The Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland (Democratic Consent Process) (EU Exit) Regulations 2020, which is presently making its way through both Houses.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
11th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what powers will be exercised by the European Commission in Northern Ireland after the end of the transition period of the UK's departure from the EU; and within what legal framework any such powers will be exercised.

Further to my answer to PQ HL9634, all rules applied in Northern Ireland will be administered by the UK authorities.

As the Government set out in its Command Paper in May, the Northern Ireland Protocol applies a small subset of EU rules concerning goods and electricity markets for so long as the people of Northern Ireland vote to keep such arrangements in place.

Furthermore, in the case of any breach related to the Protocol the UK Government would always activate the appropriate formal dispute settlement mechanisms established under the Protocol in order to seek an appropriate solution.

Otherwise, the rules that apply to businesses and citizens in Northern Ireland derive from UK law, including rules given effect by EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018. The rules on how to interpret rules given effect by retained EU law, which the courts must follow, are set out in section 6 of the EU Withdrawal Act. The 2018 Act also provides for the dedicated mechanism, which also protects citizens in NI from any diminution of their human rights as a result of the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
11th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government to which courts any citizen or business in Northern Ireland may apply for relief if they disagree with a European Commission decision in Northern Ireland after the end of the transition period for the UK's departure from the EU; and whether the relevant courts will refer to UK or EU law.

Further to my answer to PQ HL9634, all rules applied in Northern Ireland will be administered by the UK authorities.

As the Government set out in its Command Paper in May, the Northern Ireland Protocol applies a small subset of EU rules concerning goods and electricity markets for so long as the people of Northern Ireland vote to keep such arrangements in place.

Furthermore, in the case of any breach related to the Protocol the UK Government would always activate the appropriate formal dispute settlement mechanisms established under the Protocol in order to seek an appropriate solution.

Otherwise, the rules that apply to businesses and citizens in Northern Ireland derive from UK law, including rules given effect by EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018. The rules on how to interpret rules given effect by retained EU law, which the courts must follow, are set out in section 6 of the EU Withdrawal Act. The 2018 Act also provides for the dedicated mechanism, which also protects citizens in NI from any diminution of their human rights as a result of the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
27th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any EU officials will be involved in inspecting (1) agricultural produce, (2) foods, or (3) other goods, entering Northern Ireland from Great Britain after 31 December.

Further to Article 12(1) of the Northern Ireland Protocol, the authorities of the United Kingdom are responsible for implementing and applying the provisions of Union law made applicable by the Protocol. This includes the administering of checks on agri-food moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland, from 1 January 2021.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
8th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to appoint a 'territorial minister' to answer for the Government in the House of Lords on matters relating to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Viscount Younger of Leckie speaks for the Northern Ireland Office and the Scotland Office, and Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist speaks for the Wales Office.

A full list of Government Ministers and Lords Spokespersons can be found here - https://www.lordswhips.org.uk/government-spokespersons

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
8th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what body will (1) determine, and (2) enforce, EU state aid rules in Northern Ireland after the end of the transition period.

The Northern Ireland Protocol sets out that EU state aid rules will apply in certain cases where relevant to trade between Northern Ireland and the EU. This does not mean that state aid rules will apply to Northern Ireland as they do today. State aid provisions apply only to trade ‘subject to the Protocol’. The Protocol is limited in scope to the movement of goods and wholesale electricity markets. Where trade is subject to the Protocol, the supervision and enforcement procedures it sets out will apply, as will the safety net provided by the UK Internal Market Bill.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
8th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made, if any, of the circumstances in which a company operating in both Great Britain and Northern Ireland would be subject to EU state aid rules in Northern Ireland but not subject to such rules in Great Britain.

The Northern Ireland Protocol sets out that EU state aid rules will apply in certain cases where relevant to trade between Northern Ireland and the EU. This does not mean that state aid rules will apply to Northern Ireland as they do today. State aid provisions apply only to trade ‘subject to the Protocol’. The Protocol is limited in scope to the movement of goods and wholesale electricity markets. Where trade is subject to the Protocol, the supervision and enforcement procedures it sets out will apply, as will the safety net provided by the UK Internal Market Bill.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to discuss the requirement for export declarations on goods moving between Northern Ireland and Great Britain as part of negotiations on the future UK–EU relationship.

As set out in the Command Paper ‘The UK’s approach to the Northern Ireland Protocol’, we will ensure unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods moving from Northern Ireland to Great Britain, and enshrine this in legislation by the end of the year. The document set out our approach, including that we will not require exit summary declarations on those movements.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
24th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the legal status of the common travel area between the UK, the Crown Dependencies and Ireland.

The Common Travel Area (CTA) is an arrangement between the UK, the Isle of Man, Guernsey, Jersey, and Ireland. It is underpinned by domestic law in each jurisdiction.

Both the UK and Irish Governments have committed to taking all necessary measures to ensure that the Common Travel Area and its associated rights and privileges are protected and maintained, including entering into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on 8 May 2019. We are not aware of any significant disputes that have arisen between the UK Government and Ireland over the operation of the Common Travel Area, nor of cases when a UK citizen has taken legal action against the UK Government over the operation of the Common Travel Area.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
24th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what mechanism exists to resolve disputes between the UK Government and the government of Ireland over the operation of the common travel area.

The Common Travel Area (CTA) is an arrangement between the UK, the Isle of Man, Guernsey, Jersey, and Ireland. It is underpinned by domestic law in each jurisdiction.

Both the UK and Irish Governments have committed to taking all necessary measures to ensure that the Common Travel Area and its associated rights and privileges are protected and maintained, including entering into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on 8 May 2019. We are not aware of any significant disputes that have arisen between the UK Government and Ireland over the operation of the Common Travel Area, nor of cases when a UK citizen has taken legal action against the UK Government over the operation of the Common Travel Area.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
24th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what, if any, disputes have arisen between the UK Government and the government of Ireland over the operation of the common travel area.

The Common Travel Area (CTA) is an arrangement between the UK, the Isle of Man, Guernsey, Jersey, and Ireland. It is underpinned by domestic law in each jurisdiction.

Both the UK and Irish Governments have committed to taking all necessary measures to ensure that the Common Travel Area and its associated rights and privileges are protected and maintained, including entering into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on 8 May 2019. We are not aware of any significant disputes that have arisen between the UK Government and Ireland over the operation of the Common Travel Area, nor of cases when a UK citizen has taken legal action against the UK Government over the operation of the Common Travel Area.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
24th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a UK citizen has ever taken legal action against the UK Government over the operation of the common travel area.

The Common Travel Area (CTA) is an arrangement between the UK, the Isle of Man, Guernsey, Jersey, and Ireland. It is underpinned by domestic law in each jurisdiction.

Both the UK and Irish Governments have committed to taking all necessary measures to ensure that the Common Travel Area and its associated rights and privileges are protected and maintained, including entering into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on 8 May 2019. We are not aware of any significant disputes that have arisen between the UK Government and Ireland over the operation of the Common Travel Area, nor of cases when a UK citizen has taken legal action against the UK Government over the operation of the Common Travel Area.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which customs regulations will be enforced at border control posts in Northern Ireland after 1 January 2021.

The Northern Ireland Protocol guarantees the place of Northern Ireland within the UK customs territory and internal market, upholding the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement. The Protocol will prevent a hard border on the island of Ireland, while explicitly recognising Northern Ireland’s integral place in the UK. Further details on the Government’s approach to the Protocol are outlined in our Command Paper, The UK's Approach to the Northern Ireland Protocol.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which court would determine the outcome of a dispute between Customs Officers and a person moving goods via a Border Control Post in Northern Ireland.

Any such disputes would be a matter for UK authorities and UK courts.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what sanctions they will apply to persons who breach customs regulations at border control posts in Northern Ireland after 1 January 2021.

The New Decade, New Approach agreement recognised the need to implement the Northern Ireland Protocol in a way that works for the restored Executive and Northern Ireland’s businesses. The Protocol text itself is explicit that its implementation “should impact as little as possible on the everyday life of communities”.

We are committed to implementing the Protocol in a manner that best serves the needs of the people and businesses in Northern Ireland. This includes continuing to tackle serious and organised crime, including in respect of breaches of applicable customs rules, from January 2021 as we are today.

We also note, as underlined in ‘The UK’s Approach to implementing the NI Protocol’, that we are committed to using the latest technology, risk and compliance techniques as part of our efforts. The Government will work closely with the Northern Ireland Executive and businesses on this.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to establish customs posts at ports and airports in Northern Ireland; and if so, (1) where those posts will be located, and (2) what will be the function and purpose of those posts.

On 20 May 2020 the UK Government set out our approach in the Command Paper ‘The UK’s Approach to the Northern Ireland Protocol’ confirming there will be no new physical customs infrastructure in Northern Ireland (or in Great Britain ports facing Northern Ireland). The limited additional processes required by the Protocol should be implemented in a way that takes account of all available flexibilities, and respects Northern Ireland’s place in the UK’s customs territory.

As ministers set out, we will expand some existing entry points for agrifood goods to provide for proportionate additional controls, in locations where these already take place such as Larne and Belfast. We will continue to work closely with the NI Executive to take that work forward.



Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what documentation businesses will have to provide to send goods from Northern Ireland to Great Britain after 1 January 2021.

The Protocol makes clear that Northern Ireland is and remains part of the UK’s customs territory and allows the UK to ensure unfettered market access for goods moving from Northern Ireland to Great Britain.

The Government has set out its approach clearly to implementing unfettered access in the Northern Ireland Protocol, first in the ‘New Decade, New Approach’ power-sharing deal, and last week in the Command Paper, ‘ The UK’s Approach to the Northern Ireland Protocol’. Our publication makes clear that we will not require exit declarations or any other regulatory processes or checks as these goods enter the rest of the UK from NI. We committed to legislate to guarantee unfettered access for NI businesses to the whole of the UK internal market, and ensure that this legislation is in force for 1 January 2021.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many COVID-19 related deaths in the UK resulted from a secondary bacterial infection leading to sepsis.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lord Empey,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking how many COVID-19 related deaths in the UK resulted from a secondary bacterial infection leading to sepsis (HL3127).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing weekly numbers of deaths registered in England and Wales. The most recent figures published are for deaths registered in 2018[1], however, we do publish provisional weekly deaths registrations which are currently published for deaths registered up to 10 April 2020[2]. National Records Scotland (NRS) and Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) are responsible for publishing the number of deaths registered in Scotland and Northern Ireland respectively.

Cause of death is defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10). Deaths involving COVID-19 are identified by the ICD-10 codes U07.1 and U07.2 and deaths involving sepsis are identified by the ICD-10 codes A40 and A41. Sepsis is likely to be caused by a bacterial infection, therefore we have assumed that all deaths involving sepsis would involve a bacterial infection and have therefore not searched for this separately.

Table 1 below shows the number of deaths occurring in March 2020 and registered by 10 April 2020 where the death involved both COVID-19 and sepsis, where COVID-19 caused the sepsis. The data covers deaths registered in Great Britain, as data for Northern Ireland is not yet fully coded.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number of deaths occurring in March 2020 involving COVID-19 and sepsis, where COVID-19 caused the sepsis, Great Britain[3][4]

Geography

Number of deaths

Great Britain

26

Source: Office for National Statistics, National Records Scotland

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/deathsregisteredinenglandandwalesseriesdrreferencetables

[2]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/weekending10april2020

[3]Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes U07.1, U07.2, A40 and A41.

[4]Figures are based on deaths occurring in March 2020, registered up until 10 April 2020

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what criteria they use to determine whether another nation state (1) is conducting, or (2) is guilty of, an act of hostility towards the UK.

Hostile activity can take many forms, including disinformation, cyber attacks and other hybrid methods. We know that certain states routinely use these as foreign policy tools.

It is absolutely unacceptable for any foreign government to seek to undermine the UK’s national security, the integrity of our democracy, public safety, reputation or economic prosperity. The government remains committed to securing the UK against all forms of hostile activity orchestrated by foreign states.

HM Government has acted to protect the UK and respond to the threat, including taking steps as part of the Defending Democracy programme, and through the creation of the National Cyber Security Centre and Joint State Threats Assessment Team. This approach allows us to identify, assess and, where necessary, respond to hostile activity; as can be seen from HM Government's response to the Salisbury novichok poisoning and the public attribution of the WannaCry, NotPetya and Cloudhopper cyber incidents.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
18th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to review employment law following the decision of P&O Ferries to dismiss its employees via a pre-recorded video.

The Government wrote to the Insolvency Service on 23 March asking it to undertake an urgent and thorough enquiry into the recent actions of P&O Ferries, to determine whether the law has been complied with and consider prompt and appropriate action where it has not.

The Insolvency Service confirmed on 01 April that following its enquiries it has initiated both formal and civil investigations into the circumstances surrounding the redundancies made by P&O Ferries.

You will appreciate that while these investigations are being progressed it would not be appropriate to make further comment but the Insolvency Service will provide an update in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of P&O Ferries' decision to terminate the employment of its workforce via a pre-recorded video.

The Government wrote to the Insolvency Service on 23 March asking it to undertake an urgent and thorough enquiry into the recent actions of P&O Ferries, to determine whether the law has been complied with and consider prompt and appropriate action where it has not.

The Insolvency Service confirmed on 01 April that following its enquiries it has initiated both formal and civil investigations into the circumstances surrounding the redundancies made by P&O Ferries.

You will appreciate that while these investigations are being progressed it would not be appropriate to make further comment but the Insolvency Service will provide an update in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the decision to ban the import of Russian oil into the UK, what financial protection is available to UK companies who chartered Russian oil tankers to deliver fuel to the UK.

Russian ships have been banned from UK ports, following UK sanctions against Russia. The ban includes any vessels owned or operated by anyone connected to Russia.

The UK will also stop importing Russian oil by the end of this year, building on the Government’s package of international economic sanctions.

The Government is confident that this can be achieved over the course of the year, providing enough time for companies to adjust while ensuring consumers are protected. The Government is already providing support worth around £21 billion during this year, and next, to help people with the cost of living and will continue to monitor the economic impact of the conflict and keep its approach under review.

The Department for International Trade has expanded its Export Support Service (ESS) to act as a single point of enquiry for businesses and traders with questions relating to the situation in Ukraine and Russia. Any business that has question about trading with Ukraine or Russia can visit the GOV.UK website to contact the export support team, or call our helpline using the number 0300 303 8955.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of the financial support they provided to the aerospace sector during the COVID-19 pandemic was allocated to aerospace manufacturers in the UK.

The Government has put in place substantial cross-economy support measures to help the UK economy through this pandemic.

Due to the nature of these support measures, it is not possible to set out in full the proportion provided to the aerospace sector. However, we are able to confirm that UK aerospace manufacturers and their aviation customers, over the next 3 years, will benefit from £8 billion in export guarantees and have utilised up to £2.6 billion in Covid Corporate Financing Facility support. The Aerospace sector will also continue to be supported by the £150 million per annum Aerospace Technology Institute research and development programme and the £125 million Future Flight research and development programme.

These figures do not include other measures such as the Job Retention Scheme which, we know, the aerospace sector will also have benefited from.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have made loan guarantees available to companies operating in the UK but who are registered offshore during the COVID-19 pandemic.

SMEs which are registered abroad are eligible to apply for the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS), provided the SME is trading in the UK, not just selling into the UK, has the core of its business operations in the UK, and the CBILS Facility is deployed to support business activity in the UK.

The turnover threshold applies to global turnover of the SME or the consolidated group where that applies, but the CBILS scheme can only be used to support UK-based activity.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, after the end of the transition period on 31 December 2020, Northern Ireland will be subject to the EU General Data Protection Regulation rules on data transfer even if the rest of the UK decides to introduce new rules.

At the end of the transition period, the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 (EUWA) will incorporate direct EU legislation into UK law, as well as saving EU-derived domestic legislation – collectively referred to as 'retained EU law'. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will become retained EU law for the whole of the UK.

We have made Regulations under the EUWA to make necessary and appropriate changes to the GDPR, which will become the UK GDPR, and the Data Protection Act 2018 so that the UK’s data protection law continues to function effectively after the transition period.

In respect of data transfer rules, the EU has an established mechanism to allow the unrestricted transfer (subject to GDPR compliance) of personal data to countries outside the EU, called ‘adequacy decisions’. At the end of the transition period, the UK will recognise EEA countries as continuing to be adequate for the purpose of the UK GDPR, so data can continue to flow from the UK to the EEA. In order for the free flow of data from the EEA to the UK to continue at the end of the transition period, we are seeking adequacy decisions from the EU under both the GDPR and the Law Enforcement Directive (LED). Adequacy talks between the UK and the EU began on 11 March and continue to progress.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why (1) paramedic science degrees are excluded from the Equivalent or Lower Qualifications exemption list, and (2) paramedic science students with previous degrees are denied access to student finance; and what assessment they have made of whether this exclusion is consistent with the inclusion of paramedics on the list of allied health professionals who are eligible for NHS grant funding.

As part of the reforms to healthcare education funding, we provided an exemption from equivalent or lower qualification (ELQ) rules for new students starting undergraduate pre-registration nursing, midwifery and certain allied health profession courses from academic year 2017/18 to allow students to receive support for these courses as a second course.

Paramedic science courses were not included in the reforms noted above as they were not previously part of the NHS bursary system (paramedic science students were already part of the standard student finance system) and therefore they were not included in the list of allied health professions exempt from the ELQ rules.

30th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what impact the decision by the EU to permit the feeding of animal remains to farm livestock will have on the importation of animal products into Great Britain from Northern Ireland.

The EU is introducing legislative changes which follow their agreed TSE roadmaps.

These proposals would authorise for the EU:

  • processed animal protein (PAP) of porcine origin to be fed to poultry and PAP of poultry origin to be fed to porcine animals;

  • animal protein derived from insects to be fed to poultry and porcine animals, under the same conditions as are already required for feeding aquaculture animals; and

  • products containing ruminant collagen and gelatine to be fed to poultry and porcine animals.

The rules will still be more stringent than those required by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) which only ban the use of ruminant proteins in feed for ruminant animals.

Pigs and poultry have not been shown to be susceptible to TSE. The proposals will not affect the existing bans on feeding animal proteins to ruminants and on intra-species recycling (feeding an animal with a product derived from the same species), and they do not include high-risk animal by-products which are incinerated. Nor would they permit the feeding of animal remains to farmed livestock, which is banned in the UK and the EU.

The restrictions on feeding of livestock in England will not be altered by EU legislation. Before taking any policy decision, officials would obtain advice from Government scientists and from the Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens (ACDP) regarding any potential risk to human or animal health; and engage closely with groups representing consumers, retailers, producers, farmers and other interested stakeholders.

Animal Health is a devolved matter, so this policy is devolved to the Scottish and the Welsh Ministers for their respective territories.

Under the terms of the Northern Ireland Protocol, the amendments will apply to Northern Ireland.

The UK does not ban the imports of pig and poultry meat products from countries where the feed rules comply with the OIE requirements. This means that imports of pig and poultry meat products from the EU or Northern Ireland will continue to be accepted into Great Britain.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the decision by the EU to allow animal remains to be fed to farm livestock will result in this practice being permitted in Northern Ireland.

The EU is introducing legislative changes which follow their agreed TSE roadmaps.

These proposals would authorise for the EU:

  • processed animal protein (PAP) of porcine origin to be fed to poultry and PAP of poultry origin to be fed to porcine animals;

  • animal protein derived from insects to be fed to poultry and porcine animals, under the same conditions as are already required for feeding aquaculture animals; and

  • products containing ruminant collagen and gelatine to be fed to poultry and porcine animals.

The rules will still be more stringent than those required by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) which only ban the use of ruminant proteins in feed for ruminant animals.

Pigs and poultry have not been shown to be susceptible to TSE. The proposals will not affect the existing bans on feeding animal proteins to ruminants and on intra-species recycling (feeding an animal with a product derived from the same species), and they do not include high-risk animal by-products which are incinerated. Nor would they permit the feeding of animal remains to farmed livestock, which is banned in the UK and the EU.

The restrictions on feeding of livestock in England will not be altered by EU legislation. Before taking any policy decision, officials would obtain advice from Government scientists and from the Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens (ACDP) regarding any potential risk to human or animal health; and engage closely with groups representing consumers, retailers, producers, farmers and other interested stakeholders.

Animal Health is a devolved matter, so this policy is devolved to the Scottish and the Welsh Ministers for their respective territories.

Under the terms of the Northern Ireland Protocol, the amendments will apply to Northern Ireland.

The UK does not ban the imports of pig and poultry meat products from countries where the feed rules comply with the OIE requirements. This means that imports of pig and poultry meat products from the EU or Northern Ireland will continue to be accepted into Great Britain.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to retain the ban on the feeding of animal remains to farm livestock in England.

The EU is introducing legislative changes which follow their agreed TSE roadmaps.

These proposals would authorise for the EU:

  • processed animal protein (PAP) of porcine origin to be fed to poultry and PAP of poultry origin to be fed to porcine animals;

  • animal protein derived from insects to be fed to poultry and porcine animals, under the same conditions as are already required for feeding aquaculture animals; and

  • products containing ruminant collagen and gelatine to be fed to poultry and porcine animals.

The rules will still be more stringent than those required by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) which only ban the use of ruminant proteins in feed for ruminant animals.

Pigs and poultry have not been shown to be susceptible to TSE. The proposals will not affect the existing bans on feeding animal proteins to ruminants and on intra-species recycling (feeding an animal with a product derived from the same species), and they do not include high-risk animal by-products which are incinerated. Nor would they permit the feeding of animal remains to farmed livestock, which is banned in the UK and the EU.

The restrictions on feeding of livestock in England will not be altered by EU legislation. Before taking any policy decision, officials would obtain advice from Government scientists and from the Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens (ACDP) regarding any potential risk to human or animal health; and engage closely with groups representing consumers, retailers, producers, farmers and other interested stakeholders.

Animal Health is a devolved matter, so this policy is devolved to the Scottish and the Welsh Ministers for their respective territories.

Under the terms of the Northern Ireland Protocol, the amendments will apply to Northern Ireland.

The UK does not ban the imports of pig and poultry meat products from countries where the feed rules comply with the OIE requirements. This means that imports of pig and poultry meat products from the EU or Northern Ireland will continue to be accepted into Great Britain.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the decision by the EU to lift the ban on feeding animal remains to pigs and poultry.

The EU is introducing legislative changes which follow their agreed TSE roadmaps.

These proposals would authorise for the EU:

  • processed animal protein (PAP) of porcine origin to be fed to poultry and PAP of poultry origin to be fed to porcine animals;

  • animal protein derived from insects to be fed to poultry and porcine animals, under the same conditions as are already required for feeding aquaculture animals; and

  • products containing ruminant collagen and gelatine to be fed to poultry and porcine animals.

The rules will still be more stringent than those required by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) which only ban the use of ruminant proteins in feed for ruminant animals.

Pigs and poultry have not been shown to be susceptible to TSE. The proposals will not affect the existing bans on feeding animal proteins to ruminants and on intra-species recycling (feeding an animal with a product derived from the same species), and they do not include high-risk animal by-products which are incinerated. Nor would they permit the feeding of animal remains to farmed livestock, which is banned in the UK and the EU.

The restrictions on feeding of livestock in England will not be altered by EU legislation. Before taking any policy decision, officials would obtain advice from Government scientists and from the Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens (ACDP) regarding any potential risk to human or animal health; and engage closely with groups representing consumers, retailers, producers, farmers and other interested stakeholders.

Animal Health is a devolved matter, so this policy is devolved to the Scottish and the Welsh Ministers for their respective territories.

Under the terms of the Northern Ireland Protocol, the amendments will apply to Northern Ireland.

The UK does not ban the imports of pig and poultry meat products from countries where the feed rules comply with the OIE requirements. This means that imports of pig and poultry meat products from the EU or Northern Ireland will continue to be accepted into Great Britain.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) beef, and (2) lamb, from Australia which has been (a) reared using antibacterial infusions, and (b) fed unrestricted amounts of GM produce, will be allowed into the UK as a result of the recently announced trade deal.

The UK is rightly proud of our world-leading food, health and animal welfare standards. As we have previously made clear, we will not compromise on these standards in our trade negotiations.

Our deal with Australia does not change any of our existing import requirements. All meat, and other animal products, imported into the UK under this deal will continue to be subject to clear controls on limits of veterinary medicine residues, including antimicrobials. Moreover, we have agreed to cooperate with Australia on combatting antimicrobial resistance. This demonstrates our commitment to values-based trade policy and is a very positive step.

Our rules on genetically modified (GM) organisms also remain in place and only authorised GM material will be permitted for import from Australia. However, it is important to clarify that products such as milk and meat derived from animals fed GM feed are not themselves GM organisms. Here in the UK we import approximately 3 million tonnes of authorised GM feed per year - approximately 70% of our total animal protein feed requirement. UK animal products fed with such feed are then exported in the same manner as those fed on non-GM diets and the same is true with Australian animal products. The industry operates in this way regardless of our trade agreement and it presents no weakening of standards on GM.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what funds have been paid to date to the Northern Ireland Executive for the creation of infrastructure at (1) ports, and (2) airports in Northern Ireland, as a result of the implementation of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland.

A total of £16 million was allocated to the Northern Ireland Executive in the 20/21 financial year for infrastructure, IT systems and personnel for the work necessary to carry out Sanitary and Phytosanitary checks at Northern Ireland’s Points of Entry required by the Northern Ireland Protocol.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the requirement of 'wash certificates' for all second-hand agricultural vehicles moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland; and what plans they have to provide financial assistance to traders of agricultural vehicles to cover the cost of those certificates.

Now that the transition period has ended, Great Britain is treated as a third country by the European Union and vice-versa. Building on the existing practice established to maintain the Single Epidemiological Unit on the island of Ireland, both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland remain aligned with EU Sanitary and Phytosanitary rules. Consequently, used agricultural machinery exported from England, Scotland or Wales to Northern Ireland are subject to EU import controls including the requirement for a phytosanitary certificate. Used agricultural and forestry machinery must be cleaned free of soil and plant debris prior to shipping to meet EU import requirements and in order for a phytosanitary certificate to be issued.

Defra has put in place the Movement Assistance Scheme (MAS) to support and assist traders moving plants, plant products, agrifood and agricultural machinery from GB to NI. In addition to providing advice and guidance through a dedicated helpline service, MAS minimises business uncertainty by reimbursing or defraying some of the direct costs of certification that traders will incur as a result of the new requirements. Therefore, if a business is moving used agricultural or forestry machinery from GB to NI, they do not need to pay for the phytosanitary certificates. Defra will monitor the performance of the scheme and review it after three months to determine how to best provide ongoing support to traders.

28th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on Lough Neagh eel fishermen of no longer being able to sell their produce to Great Britain; and what steps they will take to ensure that businesses in Northern Ireland can trade freely with Great Britain.

European Eel is a critically endangered species and, as such, its trade is tightly regulated. As a result of the Northern Ireland protocol, trade in European Eel to and from Northern Ireland now falls under the EU’s rules. Lough Neagh Fisherman's Co-operative can continue to access the EU market for European Eel, which normally accounts for over 80% of their sales. The UK Government has made the scientific case for some continued trade between Northern Ireland and Great Britain, on the basis that it would not be detrimental to the species as a whole. However, the EU have not accepted this case so, Lough Neagh Fisherman's Co-operative will be unable to trade European Eel with Great Britain during 2021. The Government is seeking independent peer review of the scientific case for ongoing trade and will re-present this case to the EU later in 2021, for further consideration. The Government is also exploring other options to reduce the regulatory requirements for movements from Northern Ireland to Great Britain of the limited goods to which they apply.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that meat and poultry imported from overseas has been raised in compliance with UK guidelines on the use of antibiotics in farming; what tests are carried out on imported meat and poultry; and whether the results of such tests are published.

Imported products of animal origin are monitored based on the nature of the products and the risk they represent, as required by Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2019/2130, which is part of EU retained law.

The UK Government is committed to working with global partners to improve standards on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), for example through participation in the Codex Alimentarius AMR Task Force revision of the “Code of Practice to Minimize and Contain Foodborne Antimicrobial Resistance”, as well as by promoting global ‘one health’ action on AMR through our commitments under the UK National Action Plan for AMR 2019-24.

9th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment have they made of the UK's performance in addressing antimicrobial resistance in animals compared to (1) the 27 Member States of the EU, and (2) other developed economies.

There is considerable variation in levels and trends of antimicrobial resistance between the UK and European Member States and other global partners, for example the USA, Canada and Japan. The UK is among those countries which have made most progress in addressing antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from animals in recent years.

In terms of comparing antibiotic sales between countries, the latest published data in the European Surveillance of Veterinary Antimicrobial Consumption project, which compared antimicrobial sales data for food producing animals across EEA countries and Switzerland for 2017 (published Oct 2019), shows that in 2017 the UK had the fifth lowest level of antibiotic consumption in food-producing animals (32.5 mg/kg) of the 31 European countries reporting this data (only Sweden, Finland, Norway, and Iceland are lower). This project is available here: https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/documents/report/sales-veterinary-antimicrobial-agents-31-european-countries-2017_en.pdf The US, Canada and Japan also publish antibiotic sales data: Canada published an overall sales figure for 2016 of 150mg/kg, which was an 18% reduction on their 2015 sales. USA and Japan do not report in mg/kg but do publish data on tonnes of antibiotic active ingredient used for food producing animals. The USA reported a reduction of 38% between 2015 and 2018 whereas Japan showed an increase of 2.8% between 2013 and 2016.

We continue to be committed to working with livestock sectors to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use and have achieved a 53% reduction in sales of antibiotics for food-producing animals between 2013 and 2018. We are also committed to working alongside our global partners to promote data sharing and responsible antibiotic use.

23rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the UK's progress in reducing the human consumption of veterinary antimicrobials; how this progress compares with that of other European countries; and whether the collection of data at farm level is adequate.

The Government is committed to reducing unnecessary use of antibiotics in animals. Over the last five years (2014-18) our approach has seen a 53% decrease in antibiotic sales for farmed animals, including a drop of two thirds in those antibiotics most critically important for human health, and in 2017 the UK had the fifth lowest level of antibiotic consumption in food-producing animals of the 31 European countries reporting these data. This has been achieved through working collaboratively with vets and farmers, most notably through the Targets Task Force chaired by the Responsible Use of Medicines in Agriculture Alliance to implement the goals of the UK National Action Plan, recognising that good farm management, biosecurity, and animal husbandry systems are crucial to minimise the occurrence of disease and therefore the need for antibiotics.

The UK’s sales and surveillance data is published in our annual Veterinary Annual Sales and Surveillance report and presents antibiotic usage data from ten sectors including the pig, poultry and fish industries. This data is collected on a voluntary basis by the livestock sectors and shared with the Veterinary Medicines Directorate; this demonstrates a strong willingness to share data openly and UK farming sectors are continuing to refine and develop new systems for collecting, and reporting on, antibiotic usage.

Data on human consumption of antimicrobials is monitored and published annually by Public Health England in its English Surveillance Programme for Antimicrobial Utilisation and Resistance[1] report.

[1] The English Surveillance Programme for Antimicrobial Utilisation and Resistance (ESPAUR), run by Public Health England, develops and maintains robust surveillance systems for monitoring and reporting trends in antimicrobial use and to develop systems to optimise antimicrobial prescribing across healthcare settings. The ESPAUR report 2018 to 2019 can be viewed here:

assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/843129/English_Surveillance_Programme_for_Antimicrobial_Utilisation_and_Resistance_2019.pdf.

20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government where they intend to establish border control posts in Northern Ireland.

The Northern Ireland Protocol was designed as a practical solution to avoiding a hard border on the island of Ireland, whilst ensuring that the UK, including Northern Ireland, could leave the EU as a whole. In implementing the Protocol, the Government’s top priority remains protecting Northern Ireland’s place in our United Kingdom, and preserving the huge gains from the peace process and the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement.

Whilst the Protocol is in force, both the UK and EU must respect and abide by the legal obligations it contains, as well as our other international law obligations.

The Protocol will require changes to provide for agrifood checks and assurance as goods move into Northern Ireland, building on the provisions that already exist to support the Single Epidemiological Unit on the island of Ireland. This will include a need for agrifood goods from Great Britain to enter Northern Ireland via a Border Control Post (BCP), designated for the type of goods it will handle.

As set out in the Command Paper on The UK’s Approach to the Northern Ireland Protocol published on 20 May, the Government is taking forward this work with the Northern Ireland Executive. We have already confirmed that existing BCP designations at Belfast Port, Belfast International Airport, Belfast City Airport and Warrenpoint Port will be maintained.

At a minimum we expect to expand the categories of commodities that can be handled at Belfast Port, and to designate Larne Port for live animal imports. Checks are already currently carried out at Larne on all livestock entering Northern Ireland from Great Britain, but the existing facility does not currently have formal EU approval. Subject to further work with the Northern Ireland Executive and delivery partners, further designations may also be required at other existing sites. There will be no construction at points of entry where no plant or animal health checks are currently carried out.

26th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the volume of trade coming from the Republic of Ireland via ports in Wales for onward transmission to continental Europe since 1 January.

The Department for International Trade does not hold the data requested.

The Intrastat data collection (collected by HMRC), which does not collect port information, is still being used in 2021 for Great Britain imports from the EU. Cabinet Office and HMRC continue to monitor the flow of freight vehicles travelling between the UK and EU nations, including those travelling between the Republic of Ireland, Great Britain, and continental Europe.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
10th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential use of import substitution in the UK.

HM Government has made no formal assessment of the potential use of import substitution in the UK. However, this Government pursues a free trade policy that is open and fair and is a strong supporter of the rules-based international system.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why tariffs are not charged on completed diesel generator sets imported into the UK from ‘most favoured nations’ when some of the components that are required to manufacture such sets in the UK are subject to tariffs.

The UK’s ‘Most Favoured Nation’ tariff, the UK Global Tariff (UKGT), replaced the EU’s Common External Tariff on 1 January 2021. The UKGT is a bespoke tariff schedule that is tailored to the needs of the UK economy and UK businesses, reflecting UK interests and our free trade ambitions.

In designing the UKGT, we sought to balance a wide range of considerations, such as the interests of UK consumers and producers, our ambitious trade agenda, our commitment to developing countries and feedback provided through the public consultation; to which we received over 1,300 responses from a wide range of stakeholders across the UK.

We cannot reliably inform on specific tariffs without the specific commodity codes. The new Trade Tariff lookup tool is a simple way to check the tariff rate applying to a particular product.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to establish a unit to deal with import substitution before the end of the transition period agreed with the EU.

The Department for International Trade has no current plans to establish an Import Substitution Unit.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress has been made in finding an export market for the new Type 31 class of frigate.

Work to identify an export market for the new Type 31 class of frigate is on-going. A General-Purpose Frigate Export Working Group (GPFEWG), with representatives from cross-Government and Industry, has been set up and is responsible for supporting the realisation of Type 31 export opportunities in support of the National Ship Building Strategy (NSBS). The GPFEWG is meeting regularly to agree the export opportunities and the strategy to pursue them.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
18th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the implications for connectivity within the UK of P&O Ferries' decision to cease its ferry operations from Larne to Cairnryan.

Officials have been working at pace to ensure vital capacity is secured. I am grateful to other ferry companies that have stepped up to provide the ferry capacity that has been temporarily - and at no notice - taken out of the market by P&O Ferries. We have assurances that DFDS, Irish Ferries (with eight vessels between them) have sufficient capacity to accommodate both freight and passenger vehicles in the coming days, including on the Larne to Cairnryan route, albeit with some delays.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of potential new testing measures for COVID-19 for air travellers entering the United Kingdom; and whom they have consulted about this (1) nationally, and (2) internationally.

The Government is actively working on the practicalities of using testing to release people from self-isolation earlier than 14 days. The Global Travel Taskforce (GTT) is working at pace to consider how testing, technology and innovation can drive a recovery for international travel and tourism, without adding to infection risk or infringing on our overall NHS test capacity.

In its work, the GTT will therefore seek to consult representatives from across the travel sector.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they had with the aviation sector before their decision to leave the European Union Aviation Safety Agency.

The Prime Minister has been clear that our future relationship with the EU must not entail any application of EU law in the UK or CJEU jurisdiction.

Continued UK participation in the EASA system would have been inconsistent with this approach.

This was set out in the UK’s approach to the negotiations published on 27 February. The EU also made it clear in its public mandate (25 February) that it is willing to negotiate regulatory cooperation on aviation safety but its mandate does not provide for UK participation in EASA.

The Government regularly engages with industry and will continue to do so as the negotiations progress. This includes extensive engagement with the aerospace manufacturing sector during EU Exit preparations.

We want to agree a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) with the EU to minimise regulatory burdens for industry. This will facilitate the recognition of aviation safety standards, maintain high safety outcomes and enable continued regulatory cooperation between the UK and EU.

The UK Civil Aviation Authority currently oversees most aspects of civil aviation safety in the UK. After the transition period the CAA will take on some additional functions from EASA and will continue to ensure that the UK has world-leading safety standards.

The CAA has been preparing for the possibility of leaving the EASA system since the EU referendum in 2016, the CAA will continue to refine these plans over the coming months, and may require additional resources. Progress will be closely monitored.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what alternative arrangements will be put in place to secure aviation safety in the UK following their decision to leave the European Union Aviation Safety Agency.

The Prime Minister has been clear that our future relationship with the EU must not entail any application of EU law in the UK or CJEU jurisdiction.

Continued UK participation in the EASA system would have been inconsistent with this approach.

This was set out in the UK’s approach to the negotiations published on 27 February. The EU also made it clear in its public mandate (25 February) that it is willing to negotiate regulatory cooperation on aviation safety but its mandate does not provide for UK participation in EASA.

The Government regularly engages with industry and will continue to do so as the negotiations progress. This includes extensive engagement with the aerospace manufacturing sector during EU Exit preparations.

We want to agree a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) with the EU to minimise regulatory burdens for industry. This will facilitate the recognition of aviation safety standards, maintain high safety outcomes and enable continued regulatory cooperation between the UK and EU.

The UK Civil Aviation Authority currently oversees most aspects of civil aviation safety in the UK. After the transition period the CAA will take on some additional functions from EASA and will continue to ensure that the UK has world-leading safety standards.

The CAA has been preparing for the possibility of leaving the EASA system since the EU referendum in 2016, the CAA will continue to refine these plans over the coming months, and may require additional resources. Progress will be closely monitored.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the funding required to maintain aviation safety in the UK following their decision to leave the European Union Aviation Safety Agency; and what will be the source of that funding.

The Prime Minister has been clear that our future relationship with the EU must not entail any application of EU law in the UK or CJEU jurisdiction.

Continued UK participation in the EASA system would have been inconsistent with this approach.

This was set out in the UK’s approach to the negotiations published on 27 February. The EU also made it clear in its public mandate (25 February) that it is willing to negotiate regulatory cooperation on aviation safety but its mandate does not provide for UK participation in EASA.

The Government regularly engages with industry and will continue to do so as the negotiations progress. This includes extensive engagement with the aerospace manufacturing sector during EU Exit preparations.

We want to agree a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) with the EU to minimise regulatory burdens for industry. This will facilitate the recognition of aviation safety standards, maintain high safety outcomes and enable continued regulatory cooperation between the UK and EU.

The UK Civil Aviation Authority currently oversees most aspects of civil aviation safety in the UK. After the transition period the CAA will take on some additional functions from EASA and will continue to ensure that the UK has world-leading safety standards.

The CAA has been preparing for the possibility of leaving the EASA system since the EU referendum in 2016, the CAA will continue to refine these plans over the coming months, and may require additional resources. Progress will be closely monitored.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to negotiate a bi-lateral Aviation Safety Agreement with the EU following their decision to leave the European Union Aviation Safety Agency.

The Prime Minister has been clear that our future relationship with the EU must not entail any application of EU law in the UK or CJEU jurisdiction.

Continued UK participation in the EASA system would have been inconsistent with this approach.

This was set out in the UK’s approach to the negotiations published on 27 February. The EU also made it clear in its public mandate (25 February) that it is willing to negotiate regulatory cooperation on aviation safety but its mandate does not provide for UK participation in EASA.

The Government regularly engages with industry and will continue to do so as the negotiations progress. This includes extensive engagement with the aerospace manufacturing sector during EU Exit preparations.

We want to agree a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) with the EU to minimise regulatory burdens for industry. This will facilitate the recognition of aviation safety standards, maintain high safety outcomes and enable continued regulatory cooperation between the UK and EU.

The UK Civil Aviation Authority currently oversees most aspects of civil aviation safety in the UK. After the transition period the CAA will take on some additional functions from EASA and will continue to ensure that the UK has world-leading safety standards.

The CAA has been preparing for the possibility of leaving the EASA system since the EU referendum in 2016, the CAA will continue to refine these plans over the coming months, and may require additional resources. Progress will be closely monitored.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they took the decision to leave the European Union Aviation Safety Agency.

The Prime Minister has been clear that our future relationship with the EU must not entail any application of EU law in the UK or CJEU jurisdiction.

Continued UK participation in the EASA system would have been inconsistent with this approach.

This was set out in the UK’s approach to the negotiations published on 27 February. The EU also made it clear in its public mandate (25 February) that it is willing to negotiate regulatory cooperation on aviation safety but its mandate does not provide for UK participation in EASA.

The Government regularly engages with industry and will continue to do so as the negotiations progress. This includes extensive engagement with the aerospace manufacturing sector during EU Exit preparations.

We want to agree a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) with the EU to minimise regulatory burdens for industry. This will facilitate the recognition of aviation safety standards, maintain high safety outcomes and enable continued regulatory cooperation between the UK and EU.

The UK Civil Aviation Authority currently oversees most aspects of civil aviation safety in the UK. After the transition period the CAA will take on some additional functions from EASA and will continue to ensure that the UK has world-leading safety standards.

The CAA has been preparing for the possibility of leaving the EASA system since the EU referendum in 2016, the CAA will continue to refine these plans over the coming months, and may require additional resources. Progress will be closely monitored.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will ensure that the disposal of landing slots at Heathrow and Gatwick, formally owned by Flybe, will not disadvantage access to those airports from regional airports in the UK.

Her Majesty’s Government recognises that airports are vital for local economies, providing domestic and global connectivity, employment opportunities, and a hub for local transport. To demonstrate this, a review of Regional Air Connectivity was recently announced to ensure all nations and regions of the UK have the domestic transport connections local communities rely on – including regional airports. Her Majesty’s Government plays no part in, and through regulations is legally prevented from intervening in, the airport slot allocation process.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the War Disablement Pension is disregarded in its entirety when calculating entitlement to social security benefits.

In the calculation of Universal Credit, War Disablement Pension is disregarded in its entirety.

In the calculation of the legacy income-related benefits administered by the Department which Universal Credit is replacing (Income Support, Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance and Income-related Employment & Support Allowance), there is a weekly disregard of £10.

A similar £10 weekly disregard also applies in State Pension Credit. With regards to Housing Benefit, regulations permit local authorities to disregard beyond the standard disregard amount of £10 a week, the whole or part of the War Disablement Pension.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the decision of UNICEF to commence feeding children in the UK.

No assessment has been made. Throughout this pandemic, this Government has delivered an unprecedented package of support to protect jobs and businesses and, for those in most need, injected billions into the welfare system. The new COVID Winter Grant Scheme builds on that support with an additional £170 million for local authorities in England, to support families with children and other vulnerable people with the cost of food and essential utilities this winter. Funding has been disbursed according to an authority’s population, weighted by a function of the English index of multiple deprivation.

Devolved Administrations have received equivalent funding through the upfront funding guarantee we have provided, which was recently increased to £16 billion for the year to support their COVID-19 response.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many planned discontinuation notices for the supply of medicines they have received as of 1 June 2021; and what steps they are taking to mitigate such notices.

We regularly receive notifications of discontinuations and possible discontinuations from suppliers, as well as information about shortages and potential shortages caused by a whole variety of reasons and numbers change daily. We are unable to provide this information as it is commercially sensitive.

The Department has well-established procedures to deal with medicines shortages and discontinuations and works with a range of stakeholders to ensure that the risks to patients are minimised when they do arise. Not all notifications will lead to the discontinuation of a medicine or a shortage in the market.

16th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on immigration to the UK.

The Department has made no such assessment.

27th Oct 2020
To ask the Leader of the House what guidance or training is given to Ministers on the requirements to answer written questions from Members of the House comprehensively.

As Leader of the House I take very seriously the responsibility incumbent on all Ministers to provide full, timely and comprehensive answers to Questions for Written Answers (QWAs). My office works closely with all departmental Parliamentary teams to help provide advice on what is expected of them in providing such answers.

Ministers are also reminded regularly of the importance of their obligations to the House.

Baroness Evans of Bowes Park
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
24th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what initial estimate they have made of the cost of plans to introduce same day mass testing for COVID-19 in England.

An evaluation of testing the whole of Liverpool will inform the potential rollout of whole town or city testing to other areas, as part of the Government’s commitment to make mass testing available. Same day testing will involve several different types of technology including lateral flow devices.

A £500 million investment will accelerate the next generation of technologies to support our existing systems and better understand how mass testing could be used.

Our top priorities for testing, as they have been throughout the pandemic, are to allocate testing where it is needed most to save lives, protect the most vulnerable, and enable vital health and care services to operate safely.

In the future, in addition to our existing priorities, we will aim to use new testing technologies to test a higher proportion of the population over time, targeted at where it will have the most impact, and use testing to support the economy and wider society to return to a normal way of life.

24th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether tests undertaken as part of plans to introduce same day mass testing for COVID-19 in England will be free at the point of delivery.

All testing carried out by National Health Service Test and Trace is free at the point of delivery.

29th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to fund research into antimicrobial resistance following the UK’s withdrawal from the EU; how such funds will be allocated; and who will allocate these funds.

The United Kingdom Government funds domestic research into antimicrobial resistance (AMR) through the UK Research and Innovation research councils and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The NIHR also supports AMR research for the primary benefit of people in low- and middle-income countries, using Official Development Assistance funding, as does the Department directly through the Global AMR Innovation Fund. These investments will continue after the end of the transition period. The NIHR welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including AMR. These applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the importance of the topic to patients and health and care services, value for money and scientific quality. It is not usual practice for the NIHR to ring-fence a proportion of its budget for research into particular topics or conditions.

16th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to extend preventative health care testing.

The UK National Screening Committee advises Ministers and the National Health Service in all four countries on all aspects of screening and routinely considers new conditions when evidence becomes available or when proposed through its annual call for topics. The annual call runs from September to December and allows members of the public and stakeholders to submit new conditions for the UK National Screening Committee to consider and assess against internationally recognised criteria.

16th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to establish an industry-wide consultative committee to promote a global-scale UK diagnostics sector.

The Government is working with the life sciences sector to strengthen United Kingdom resilience by developing proposals to build a long-term national diagnostics industry, and by exploring how the National Health Service market can make better use of innovative diagnostics.

We have also established the Accelerated Access Collaborative which brings together leaders from across industry, the NHS, regulators and the Government to get innovations, including the best new diagnostics, into the hands of patients and clinicians faster than ever before.

16th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the role played by UK-based companies in addressing COVID-19.

United Kingdom-based companies have played a major role in working with the Department on some of the most challenging healthcare areas of the response to COVID-19. These have included:

- building UK manufacturing of personal protective equipment (PPE) capacity by signing contracts to manufacture over three billion items of PPE with over 30 UK-based companies; and

- at the start of the COVID-19 outbreak in March there were more than 8,000 mechanical ventilators in hospitals across the UK. As of the end of July we now have over 30,000 mechanical ventilators available to the National Health Service. 14,679 of these are from new suppliers responding to the Prime Minister’s ventilator challenge and are mostly made in the UK.

16th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to make financial resources available to assist in the growth of the UK health care testing industry.

NHS Test and Trace is currently planning to spend in the region of £75 million which will be directed towards the evaluation and adoption of new technologies to ensure that we use the fullest range of innovations to support our testing policy as it develops.

Alongside this, the Government is working with the life sciences sector on proposals to strengthen the United Kingdom diagnostics industry and how the National Health Service market can make better use of innovative diagnostics.

6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the UK's future relationship with the European Centre for Disease Control after the transition period of the UK's departure from the EU.

As set out in the United Kingdom’s approach to negotiations with the European Union published on 27 February, the UK is ready to discuss how our citizens can be kept safe and benefit from continued international cooperation on health security following the end of the transition period, where it is in our mutual interest. The detail of the UK’s future relationship with the EU on health security is subject to the outcome of the ongoing negotiations. We welcome the discussions we have had so far on the scope of cooperation in this area and welcome continued talks going forwards.

24th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the UK's performance in collecting data on antimicrobial resistance, and (2) how the UK's outcome indicators compare with other European countries.

The United Kingdom has one of the most comprehensive antimicrobial resistance (AMR) surveillance systems in the world.

Published studies suggest that the UK has a lower incidence of resistant infections at 82 per 100,000 population than the European Union average of 131 per 100,000.

The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control annual epidemiological report for 2018 showed that total antibiotic consumption in the UK was 18.8 defined daily doses (DDD) per 1,000 population per day, which was lower than the population-weighted average consumption of 20.1 DDD per 1,000 population per day across the EU and European Economic Area.

22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the capacity in the UK to manufacture personal protection equipment during the COVID-19 pandemic.

As of 5 May, over 9,000 businesses have contacted the Government with offers of help on supplying personal protective equipment (PPE) which we are now taking forward, with 267 of these relating to the manufacture of PPE for National Health Service and care sectors. These are predominantly United Kingdom-based companies but include a strong representation from multinational companies.

The Department triages all offers to assess their potential to proceed, based upon whether the offer is from a high potential manufacturer who have existing domestic manufacturing capability that can rapidly be re-purposed to support the national effort.

As of 5 May, the Department has entered into contract and placed orders with seven manufacturers to provide PPE products to the NHS and carers, to all regions of the UK. Their volumes will increase in the coming weeks and in addition other suppliers will come on line to supply products.

11th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 26 February (HL1925), (1) whether they will provide a breakdown of how the £360 million invested in antimicrobial resistance research since 2014 was spent, (2) what assessment they have made of the outcomes from the investment in antimicrobial resistance to date, and (3) what is their strategy for incentivising the pharmaceutical industry to develop antibiotics.

The breakdown of the United Kingdom’s investment into antimicrobial resistance (AMR) research and development since 2014 is set out in the following table:

Investment amount

Item

UK domestic investment

£46 million

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI): Cross-Research Council AMR initiative

£10 million

Nesta: The Longitude Prize

£20 million

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) AMR-themed call

Approximately £8 million

NIHR-funded Health Protection Research Units: Healthcare-Associated Infections and AMR

£55 million

Department of Health and Social Care: AMR capital funding

£4 million

Medical Research Council (MRC): Antimicrobial Target Discovery and Validation

UK international investment/ official development assistance

£41 million

UKRI: Research Councils

£8.8 million

NIHR: Global Health Research programme

£12 million

Joint MRC/NIHR: 3-4 research consortia to identify the primary drivers of AMR in a global context.

£60.5 million (initial investment £50 million)*

Department of Health and Social Care: Global AMR Innovation Fund (GAMRIF)

Other investment

£107 million

Interdisciplinary AMR research (investments announced at United Nations General Assembly)

Note:

*Through GAMRIF, push funding into AMR research in development for low-and-middle income countries has also been used to leverage approximately £41 million from other funders.

Independent research, commissioned and funded by the NIHR Policy Research Programme, has been conducted on the implementation of the UK five-year AMR Strategy 2013-18, including an assessment of research activity. This evaluation will become publicly available following independent peer review.

The UK is undertaking world-leading work on potential solutions that address pharmaceutical market failure by testing an innovative model for the evaluation and purchase of antimicrobials. For our work to have the full effect, we need other countries to offer similar incentives in their own domestic markets, alongside regional or global market incentives solutions. The UK has taken the lead in lobbying for tangible commitments on market incentives in the 2019 G20 Leaders’ declaration and is working with a number of like-minded countries to advocate for clear, next steps from all G20 members.

10th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how the UK compares with the 27 EU Member States in efforts made to address antimicrobial resistance.

Published studies suggest that the United Kingdom has a lower incidence of resistant infections at 82 per 100,000 population while the European Union average is 131 per 100,000.

The UK aims to achieve antimicrobial usage levels as good as the best countries in the world. Modelling best practice at home, sharing our experiences and learning from the successes of other countries is key to our approach to tackling antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

On reviewing the UK’s approach to AMR, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control noted in 2019 that it is an example for other EU/European Economic Area countries to follow.

10th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the principal lessons that the UK could learn from the 27 EU Member States on how to improve performance in tackling antimicrobial resistance.

Published studies suggest that the United Kingdom has a lower incidence of resistant infections at 82 per 100,000 population while the European Union average is 131 per 100,000.

The UK aims to achieve antimicrobial usage levels as good as the best countries in the world. Modelling best practice at home, sharing our experiences and learning from the successes of other countries is key to our approach to tackling antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

On reviewing the UK’s approach to AMR, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control noted in 2019 that it is an example for other EU/European Economic Area countries to follow.

26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what funds they have made available for research into, and trials of, new antibiotics.

Research into new antibiotics falls within a wider portfolio of research and development to address the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Since 2014, the United Kingdom Government has invested more than £360 million in AMR research. The United Kingdom Research and Innovation councils support basic science relevant to AMR, including research into new antibiotics. In addition, through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the Department invests in applied health research to evaluate public health measures, healthcare interventions and health services addressing the use of antimicrobial drugs. This includes research to evaluate strategies to incentivise industry to develop new antibiotics. The NIHR also supports AMR research for the primary benefit of people in low- and middle-income countries, using Official Development Assistance funding.

21st Jan 2020
The Senior Deputy Speaker when the members' attendance feature will be restored to the parliamentary intranet site.

The Parliamentary Digital Service has completed work to build a new Lords Attendance Page which will allow Members of the House to access their attendance data while connected on the Estate. The Page is currently being tested by a small group of members and if the test proves successful the Digital Service will roll out the facility to all members of the House in due course.

18th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the benefits of maintaining full diplomatic relations with Russia following the invasion of Ukraine by that country.

There can be no normalisation in our relationship with Russia while it threatens the UK and our allies. We will not accept the campaign that Russia is waging to subvert its democratic neighbours. We do however need to maintain a robust diplomatic framework that allows us to manage disagreements, defend our values and co-operate where our interests align.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government who they are sending as delegates to the meeting of the Joint Committee on the Northern Ireland Protocol on 21 February.

The next meeting of the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee will take place on 21 February 2022. The meeting will be co-chaired by the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Affairs, Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss MP, on behalf of the UK. The Minister of State for Europe and North America, Rt Hon James Cleverly MP, and the Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office, Rt Hon Michael Ellis QC MP will also attend in their capacity as UK alternate co-chairs Representatives from the Northern Ireland Executive have been invited to attend.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (HL13254 and HL13255) on 24 February 2021, what discussions they have had with the government of Belgium regarding reports that the Chairman of the Libyan Investment Authority is being sought by Belgian authorities in connection with charges of corruption and embezzlement.

Her Majesty's Government has not engaged the Belgian authorities on this matter. Any criminal investigation is a matter for the relevant Belgian authorities.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to reconsider their decision not to publish The Shawcross Report: Compensation for Victims, completed in May 2020.

Mr Shawcross's report was commissioned as an internal scoping report, to provide internal advice to Ministers. Its content is based on private, confidential conversations and information shared on this basis.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the amount of (1) money, (2) explosives, and (3) other weaponry, provided by the government of Libya to the Provisional Irish Republican Army.

The Qadhafi regime's support for the IRA was extensive. It is widely documented in the public domain. It involved money, weapons and training from the 1970s onwards. The UK continues to press the Libyan authorities - including at the highest levels of the Libyan Government - to address the Libyan State's historic responsibility for the Qadhafi regime's support for the IRA.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to obtain the support of the government of Libya in securing compensation for UK victims of Irish Republican Army terrorism sponsored by former Libyan president Colonel Muammar Gadaffi.

The UK Government reiterates its profound sympathy for UK victims of Qadhafi-sponsored Irish Republican Army (IRA) terrorism and indeed for all victims of the Troubles. As set out in the 23 March Written Ministerial Statement: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2021-03-23/hcws874, providing compensation for the actions of the Qadhafi regime, separate from the UK-funded support that has already been made available for victims of the Troubles, is the responsibility of the Libyan State. The UK continues to press the Libyan authorities to address the Libyan State's historic responsibility for the Qadhafi regime's support for the IRA, and has raised this issue at the highest levels of the Libyan Government.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the decision by the government of Malta to unfreeze Maltese bank accounts held by Libyan citizens, and (2) whether that decision is consistent with United Nations' resolutions on Libyan frozen assets.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1970 (2011) decided that all Member States shall freeze assets owned or controlled by individuals or entities listed by the Libya Sanctions Committee. The aim of the Libya asset freeze is to ensure that the frozen funds are preserved until such a time as they can be made available to, and for the benefit of, the people of Libya. Any amendments to the asset freeze will require consensus at the UN and will be judged against this goal.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the future of Afghanistan under Taliban control; and whether they intend to recognise the Taliban as the legitimate government of Afghanistan.

The policy of the British Government is to recognise States, not Governments. As the Prime Minister has said, we will judge the Taliban by their actions not their words and respond accordingly. We will take a coordinated approach with our partners as the Prime Minister announced at the G7 Leaders meeting on 24 August.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the matter of compensation for the victims of Libyan-sponsored IRA terrorism was raised during their meeting with the interim Prime Minister of Libya on 24 June; and if so, what response they received.

The UK continues to press the Libyan authorities to address the Libyan State's historic responsibility for the Qadhafi regime's support for the IRA, and has raised this issue at the highest levels.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in seeking compensation from the government of Libya for the victims of Libyan-supplied semtex used by the IRA.

The UK continues to press the Libyan authorities to address the Libyan State's historic responsibility for the Qadhafi regime's support for the IRA, and has raised this issue at the highest levels.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the extent to which the government of Libya has complied with UN Security Council Resolutions pertaining to the freezing of Libyan assets, to justify a release of some or all of those assets.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1970 (2011) decided that all Member States shall freeze assets owned or controlled by individuals or entities listed by the Libya Sanctions Committee. The aim of the Libya asset freeze is to ensure that the frozen funds are preserved until such a time as they can be made available to, and for the benefit of, the people of Libya. Any amendments to the asset freeze will require consensus at the UN and will be judged against this goal.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assistance they have offered to the government of St Vincent and the Grenadines in response to the ongoing eruption of the La Soufrière volcano.

We are monitoring the situation in St Vincent and the Grenadines closely and our thoughts are with those affected by the eruption.

The UK has pledged an initial £200,000 to help address the immediate humanitarian impact of the volcano eruption, which will be used for emergency supplies and other immediate needs.

Urgently needed technical experts will support relief efforts on the ground, support emergency telecommunications, and restore critical lifeline facilities, like transport links.

We will continue to work with the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency to provide further support.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the government of Belgium about the treatment of frozen Libyan assets in Belgium.

The treatment of Libyan assets frozen in Belgium is a matter for the Belgian competent authorities within the framework of the relevant UN Security Council Resolutions. All exemption requests require full and careful compliance with relevant processes and procedures outlined in UNSCR 1970 (2011).

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the dispute between the government of Belgium and the Libyan Investment Authority over access to frozen Libyan assets in Belgium.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1970 (2011) decided that all Member States shall freeze assets owned or controlled by individuals or entities listed by the Libya Sanctions Committee. The Resolution also expresses the Council's intention to ensure that assets frozen shall at a later stage be made available to and for the benefit of the people of the Libya. UNSCR 1970 sets out exemptions to the asset freeze. All exemption requests require full and careful compliance with relevant processes and procedures outlined in UNSCR 1970.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Sugg on 15 June (HL4960), 29 June (HL5655), 22 July (HL6669) and 6 August (HL7207), whether they will now answer the questions put, in particular, on what date they were informed by the government of Ireland of its plans for passengers travelling from Great Britain to the Republic of Ireland to be subject to quarantine restrictions in Ireland; and how those plans were communicated.

Restrictions for passengers travelling from Great Britain to Ireland consisting of a requirement to complete a passenger locator form detailing arrangements for fourteen days' self-isolation came into effect from 26th April. Her Majesty’s Government was notified by the Irish Authorities of their intention to introduce these on 23rd April. The Irish authorities communicated these plans initially through discussions with the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and subsequently with our Embassy in Dublin and other UK Government Departments.

2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the request by the Libyan Investment Authority to the UN to access frozen assets, including assets frozen in London; and what steps they will take to ensure that such assets are not released without an agreement to compensate the victims of IRA terrorist acts.

Libyan assets in the UK were frozen in 2011 under UN Security Council Resolution 1973, at the request of the Libyan authorities. We are not aware of any formal request by the Libyan Investment Authority to access frozen assets. We are committed to supporting the victims of Qadhafi-sponsored IRA terrorism, and continue to believe the Libyan Government has a responsibility to address their claims.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the request by the Libyan Investment Authority to the UN to allow the Libyan Investment Authority to invest frozen assets; and what steps they plan to take in response.

Libyan assets in the UK were frozen in 2011 under UN Security Council Resolution 1973, at the request of the Libyan authorities. We are not aware of any formal request by the Libyan Investment Authority to access frozen assets. We are committed to supporting the victims of Qadhafi-sponsored IRA terrorism, and continue to believe the Libyan Government has a responsibility to address their claims.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Sugg on 15 June (HL4960), 29 June (HL5655) and 22 July (HL6669), whether they will now answer the questions put, in particular, on what date they were informed by the government of Ireland of its plans for passengers travelling from Great Britain to the Republic of Ireland to be subject to quarantine restrictions in Ireland; and how those plans were communicated.

We had a number of conversations with the Irish Government, including at Ministerial level, discussing our responses to the Covid-19 pandemic ahead of their decision to introduce a fourteen-day quarantine for all travellers coming into Ireland from 26 April.

21st Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish the findings of the Special Representative on UK victims of Qadhafi-sponsored IRA terrorism.

Ministers have now received the Special Representative's Scoping Report. We remain committed to ensuring the report receives the required Government time and resource. This has been challenging whilst the Government's main effort has been focussed on our response to the Covid-19 pandemic. The issue of UK victims of Qadhafi-sponsored IRA terrorism remains important to Her Majesty's Government. Government ministers will consider the report in detail in due course, including whether to publish any elements of it.

9th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government on what date they were notified by the government of Ireland that passengers travelling from Great Britain to the Republic of Ireland would be required to quarantine for fourteen days.

I refer the Honourable Lord to the answer I gave to his previous question (PQ HL5655) on 29 June.

15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they were consulted, or advised, by the government of the Republic of Ireland on that country's policy that passengers travelling from Great Britain to the Republic of Ireland would be subject to quarantine restrictions in Ireland.

Given our close relationship with the Irish Government we have regular conversations about emerging policy responses, including ahead of Ireland's decision to introduce a fourteen-day quarantine for all travellers coming into Ireland from 26 April. We continue to remain in regular contact at the highest levels with the Government of Ireland on our joint response to the Covid-19 pandemic, including discussions on the public health measures at the border.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Sugg on 1 June (HL4768), whether they were consulted in advance by the government of Ireland about its decision to introduce a fourteen-day quarantine period on all passengers travelling to Ireland from Great Britain; and if so, when they received advance notice of this specific decision.

Given our close relationship with the Irish Government we have regular conversations about emerging policy responses, including ahead of Ireland's decision to introduce a fourteen-day quarantine for all travellers coming into Ireland from 26 April. We continue to remain in regular contact at the highest levels with the Government of Ireland on our joint response to the Covid-19 pandemic, including discussions on the public health measures at the border.

20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they were consulted in advance by the government of Ireland about its decision to introduce a fourteen-day quarantine period on all passengers travelling to Ireland from Great Britain; and if so, when.

We remain in regular contact at the highest levels with the Government of Ireland on our joint response to the Covid-19 pandemic, including discussions on the public health measures at the border.

20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the implications for the operation of the Common Travel Area of the decision by the government of Ireland to impose a fourteen-day quarantine period on people travelling from Ireland to Great Britain.

The Common Travel Area (CTA) is a long-standing arrangement between the UK, the Crown Dependencies (Bailiwick of Jersey, Bailiwick of Guernsey and the Isle of Man) and Ireland. Both the UK and Irish Governments have committed to taking all necessary measures to ensure that these arrangements will continue to be protected.

22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Interior Minister of the government of Libya about (1) frozen Libyan assets, and (2) the provision of compensation to victims of IRA bombings that used Semtex and other material support supplied by the Gaddafi regime.

The UK is committed to supporting the victims of Libyan-sponsored IRA terrorism and wishes to see a just settlement for all victims. In March 2019 the former Foreign Secretary appointed William Shawcross as the UK's Special Representative on UK victims of Qadhafi-sponsored IRA terrorism. We have also raised the issue of a just settlement with the Libyan authorities. The Government has a longstanding position of not pursuing government-to-government negotiations with Libya on behalf of victims of Qadhafi-sponsored IRA terrorism, though we continue to provide support to the victims, their representatives and campaign groups, and we continue to press the Libyan authorities to engage constructively on this issue. Libyan assets in the UK were frozen under UN Security Council Resolution 1973 at the instigation of the Libyan authorities in 2011. These assets can only be unfrozen by gaining the agreement of all members of the UN Security Council.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the involvement of Russia in the internal affairs of Libya.

​We are aware of reports of Russian Private Military Companies operating in Libya, and take very seriously reports of any activity that would breach the UN Arms Embargo. As a permanent member of the UN Security Council, Russia has a responsibility to uphold UN Security Council Resolutions and international law.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have lodged a claim with the government of Libya on behalf of those UK citizens who suffered losses resulting from Libya’s support for IRA terrorists during the Northern Ireland Troubles.

The Libyan Government has a responsibility to deal with the legacy of the Qadhafi regime, as part of a broad process of national and international reconciliation and justice. We have a longstanding position of not pursuing government-to-government negotiations with Libya on behalf of victims of Qadhafi-sponsored IRA terrorism, but we continue to provide facilitation support to victims, their representatives and campaign groups. Ministers and our diplomats continue to press the Libyan authorities to engage constructively. The Government takes this issue extremely seriously, which is why on 6 March 2019, the Foreign Secretary appointed William Shawcross as Special Representative on UK victims of Qadhafi-sponsored terrorism.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports that the governments of Libya and Turkey are close to signing a memorandum of understanding in regard to compensation to be paid by Libya to Turkish businesses for (1) unpaid debts, and (2) loss or damage to Turkish equipment, as a result of the recent conflict in Libya.

​We are aware of media reporting of Turkish efforts to seek compensation from Libya for unpaid debts, and are following the issue.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any (1) capital,(2) interest, or (3) dividend revenues arising from frozen Libyan assets held in the UK have been distributed since the invocation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1970 in 2011.

Each year OFSI carries out an annual review of frozen assets held by UK institutions. £11.53 billion of Libyan frozen funds were reported to be held by UK businesses in OFSI’s 2020-21 Annual Review. This includes interest and other earnings accrued to frozen assets.

As set out in UN Security Council Resolution 2009 (2011), a key aim of the Libya financial sanctions regime is “to ensure that assets frozen pursuant to resolutions 1970 (2011) and 1973 (2011) shall as soon as possible be made available to and for the benefit of the people of Libya”.

Until that time, HM Treasury may only license the release of frozen funds according to the derogations set out in the Libya sanctions regime regulations. The Annual Review includes information about licences granted by OFSI under financial sanctions regimes.

Under the terms of the Libya financial sanctions regime, frozen assets continue to belong to the sanctioned entity or individual. However, the use of any frozen assets, or profits arising from those assets, is tightly constrained by the Libya financial sanctions regime.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
28th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the tax changes proposed by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in his Budget statement on 27 October will apply to Northern Ireland.

As set out in our Command Paper in July, we are seeking a more flexible settlement with regard to the Northern Ireland Protocol to ensure all of the UK can benefit from tax changes such as the alcohol duty reforms announced at Budget. The Government will continue to discuss the application of the alcohol duty reforms to Northern Ireland with the EU.

10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Northern Ireland Executive Minister of Finance has asked to roll over unspent resources from the current financial year into the next financial year; and if so, (1) when they received this request, and (2) what, if any, indication the Minister gave of the amount of unspent resources.

As set out in the Statement of Funding Policy, the Northern Ireland Executive are able to move funding between financial years through Budget Exchange. The total level of 2020-21 underspends will not be known until the end of the financial year and normal practice would be for the NIE to notify HMT of how it intends to use it’s budget exchange flexibilities at Supplementary Estimates 2021-22.

However, due to the exceptional circumstances this year, HM Treasury has worked closely with all three devolved administrations to provide additional flexibility. As a result the Northern Ireland Executive can now carry forward into 2021-22 over £300m of Barnett-based funding, as well as any business rates relief repaid, on top of Budget Exchange.

18th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what additional VAT will be paid by consumers in Northern Ireland who buy second-hand vehicles transported from Great Britain after the end of the transition period for the UK's departure from the EU.

The VAT paid by consumers buying second-hand vehicles will depend on the circumstances of the transaction and the seller of the vehicle.

The Northern Ireland Protocol frames the approach to VAT on goods, including the second-hand margin scheme, in Northern Ireland. As is the case for tax policy generally, the Government is keeping this under review.

22nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 22 September (HL7928), whether value added tax rates in Northern Ireland have the potential to rise above value added tax rates in Great Britain after (1) the end of the transition period, and (2) the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland and any new state aid rules are operational.

As described in my response of 22 September (HL7928), the Northern Ireland Protocol ensures that Northern Ireland remains part of the UK’s VAT system. Its provisions on VAT rates will provide the Government with the flexibility to introduce certain new zero and reduced rates in Northern Ireland.

It will allow the Government to introduce a zero rate for women’s sanitary products across the UK from 1 January 2021. Beyond that, the Government has no current plans to introduce new zero or reduced rates after the Northern Ireland Protocol comes into effect.

18th May 2020
VAT
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the (1) application, and (2) rates, of VAT will remain the same in Northern Ireland and Great Britain following the end of the transition period for the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

The Northern Ireland Protocol includes provisions that affect the operation of VAT and excise in Northern Ireland after the transition period.

The Protocol ensures that Northern Ireland remains part of the UK’s VAT and excise systems, with HMRC continuing to be responsible for the operation and collection of these revenues and Parliament responsible for setting rates across the UK.

The Protocol also ensures that the Government could apply certain zero-rates or reduced rates in the UK, including Northern Ireland, in the future; enabling, for example, the Government to meet its commitment to introduce a zero-rate for women’s sanitary products across the UK.

14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to augment customs arrangements between Great Britain and the Republic of Ireland after 1 January 2021.

The UK will be leaving the Customs Union at the end of this year. The Government will implement customs arrangements that facilitate trade and investment between the UK and EU, but that ensure customs authorities are able to protect their regulatory, security and financial interests.

14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether goods moving between Northern Ireland and Great Britain will be subject to customs inspections once the UK has fully withdrawn from the EU.

Under the UK’s Withdrawal Agreement, Northern Ireland remains part of the UK’s customs territory. As set out in the New Decade, New Approach deal, the Government has committed to legislate to guarantee unfettered access for Northern Ireland’s businesses to the whole of the UK internal market and to ensure that this legislation is in force for 1 January 2021. The arrangements that the Government introduces will reflect this approach and the Government will set out more detail in due course.

14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether customs officers will have powers to prevent goods moving between Northern Ireland and Great Britain following the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

Under the UK’s Withdrawal Agreement, Northern Ireland remains part of the UK’s customs territory. The Withdrawal Agreement allows the UK to ensure unfettered market access for goods moving from Northern Ireland to Great Britain. The arrangements that the Government introduces will reflect this approach and the Government will set out more detail in due course.

12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the ability of global markets to fund the borrowing by developed countries as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic

HM Treasury continuously monitors the global economy. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, developed countries have responded with considerable fiscal support. The IMF has affirmed the vital role of such support, and notes that markets expect sovereign bond yields to remain low in advanced economies over the medium term.

12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the likelihood of a rise in interest rates due to an increase in borrowing.

The Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee is responsible for setting interest rates to meet the inflation target, and has operational independence from the Government to determine the appropriate level of interest rates.

The Government is ultimately a price-taker, with the price of Government debt dictated by the market. UK debt benefits from “safe haven” status. The trust in the UK’s institutions makes gilts a popular form of sovereign debt compared to many other comparable issuers, keeping its borrowing costs low.

UK borrowing costs tend therefore to chiefly be driven by global risk sentiment and currently stand close to historical lows. The gilt market is deep and liquid with a good track record in responding smoothly to increases in gilt supply.

23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports of insurance companies refusing to pay claims from customers for business interruption on the grounds that the restrictions introduced by the Government to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic invalidated customers’ policies.

For those businesses which have an appropriate policy that covers government ordered closure and unspecified notifiable diseases, the Government’s social distancing instructions are sufficient to allow businesses to make a claim against their insurance, provided the other terms and conditions in their policy are met.

However, it is important to note that most businesses have not purchased insurance that covers losses from unspecified notifiable diseases, such as COVID-19. Insurance policies differ significantly, so businesses are encouraged to check the terms and conditions of their specific policy and contact their providers. Some policies cover losses arising from any disease classed as notifiable by the Government, however, most policies only cover a specific list of notifiable diseases. The terms of a policy cannot be changed retrospectively.

The Government recognises that businesses who do not have appropriate insurance cover will require support from elsewhere. The Government encourages businesses to seek assistance through the wider support package if they are in financial difficulty. Businesses should explore the full package of support set out by the Chancellor in recent weeks, which includes measures such as business rates holidays, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, and wage support.

23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with insurance companies that are refusing to pay claims to customers as a result of the restrictions introduced by the Government to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic.

For those businesses which have an appropriate policy that covers government ordered closure and unspecified notifiable diseases, the Government’s social distancing instructions are sufficient to allow businesses to make a claim against their insurance, provided the other terms and conditions in their policy are met.

However, it is important to note that most businesses have not purchased insurance that covers losses from unspecified notifiable diseases, such as COVID-19. Insurance policies differ significantly, so businesses are encouraged to check the terms and conditions of their specific policy and contact their providers. Some policies cover losses arising from any disease classed as notifiable by the Government, however, most policies only cover a specific list of notifiable diseases. The terms of a policy cannot be changed retrospectively.

The Government recognises that businesses who do not have appropriate insurance cover will require support from elsewhere. The Government encourages businesses to seek assistance through the wider support package if they are in financial difficulty. Businesses should explore the full package of support set out by the Chancellor in recent weeks, which includes measures such as business rates holidays, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, and wage support.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the ongoing costs associated with measures announced to assist businesses and individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Government has announced unprecedented support for public services, business and workers to protect against the current economic emergency. These steps are necessary to ensure that the country, economy and public finances are stronger in the longer-term.

Precise costs will depend on a range of factors including the impact of the crisis on the wider economy and the level of take up for each scheme.

The Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) have published a coronavirus reference scenario on 14th April which provides insight into the potential fiscal costs under a particular set of economic circumstances and have updated their policy costings table on 30th April. In their scenario, the OBR estimate the direct cost of Government decisions to be £103.7 billion in 2020/21. The OBR note that the measures taken should help limit the long-term damage to the economy and public finances – and the costs of inaction would have been higher.

A full assessment of the economic and fiscal position will be made at the next Budget alongside an updated OBR forecast.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to recover the costs associated with measures announced to assist businesses and individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Government has announced unprecedented support for public services, business and workers to protect against the current economic emergency. These steps are necessary to ensure that the country, economy and public finances are stronger in the longer-term.

The Government has announced substantial support through loans and guarantees, and businesses remain responsible for repaying government-supported loans.

It is clear that the costs of other measures of the Government's necessary response, and the impact on the economy, will lead to an increase in borrowing this year. The Government expects this increase in borrowing to be temporary and intends to finance this through the Government’s normal debt management operations. The OBR note that the measures taken should help limit the long-term damage to the economy and public finances, and that the costs of inaction would have been higher.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the UK's balance of payments.

Official balance of payments statistics relating to the period of COVID-19 disruption in the UK are not yet available. The Office for National Statistics will publish trade statistics for March 2020 in May, and will publish balance of payments statistics for the first quarter of 2020 towards the end of June.

The Government has announced unprecedented support for public services, business and workers to protect against the current economic emergency. Our economic response is one of the most generous and comprehensive globally and the government is now working urgently to deliver these schemes as quickly as possible.

The Government is monitoring the impact measures are having with regard to supporting public services, businesses, and individuals, and keeps all policies under review.

24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the status of the loan made by the UK to the Republic of Ireland following the financial crisis of 2008/09; what is the repayment schedule; and what are the servicing costs.

I refer the noble Lord to the most recent statutory report on the UK’s bilateral Loan to Ireland, which the Treasury provided to Parliament as required by Section 2 of the Loans to Ireland Act 2010. The most recent version of the report was laid in Parliament on 7 February 2020 and is available in the Printed Paper Office.[1]

The report shows that the first repayment on the loan took place in April 2019. To date, four repayments have been made according to the agreed schedule. £1,613,480,000 on the principal remains outstanding. The final repayment will take place in March 2021. The Government continues to expect the loan to be repaid on time and in full.

As stipulated under the loan’s Credit Facility Agreement, Ireland pays a service fee equal to 0.18% of the remaining tranches of the loan per annum. This fee is payable on 15 December and 15 June concurrently with interest payments on the remaining tranches of the loan.

[1]https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/864414/PU2193_Ireland_loan_statutory_report_2020.pdf

13th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish the findings of an investigation into the unexplained write-down by an unidentified financial institution of up to £840 million of frozen Libyan assets held in London.

The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) within HM Treasury continues to investigate a discrepancy outlined in our previous response. I cannot comment on ongoing cases.

OFSI only publishes a summary of a compliance case when an investigation into a breach of financial sanctions results in a monetary penalty. These summaries can be found on OFSI’s ‘Enforcement of Financial Sanctions’ page on GOV.UK. Further details of the circumstances in which OFSI would issue a monetary penalty are available in the ‘Monetary Penalties for Breaches of Financial Sanctions – Guidance’, also available on OFSI’s GOV.UK page.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the total amount of tax collected from frozen Libyan assets held in the UK since the UN Security Council Resolution 1973 (2011) S/RES/1973(2011).

Identifying tax receipts on frozen assets is complex, requiring entities on the sanctions list to be validated and matched against HMRC’s tax records. HMRC will do this as quickly as they can. The Treasury shall write to the Noble Lord shortly and place a copy of the letter in the Library of both Houses.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports that Libyan assets frozen in the UK have sustained a significant drop in value.

At close of business on Friday 28 September 2018 the approximate total value of frozen Libyan assets in the UK reported to the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) in the Treasury was £11.2 billion. The figures for 2019 are being finalised. OFSI undertakes an annual frozen asset review requiring all persons or institutions that hold or control frozen assets in the UK to report to OFSI, from which this figure is taken.

HM Government does not own or hold frozen assets as a result of UN and EU sanctions on Libya. It is the responsibility of individuals and entities (e.g. Financial Institutions) to ensure they comply with their asset freezing obligations under the relevant sanction’s regime.

In 2019, OFSI identified an inconsistent figure relating to Libyan frozen funds reported by a financial institution when conducting the 2018 review, and contacted the institution for an explanation of the figure. The financial institution stated that an incorrect figure had been submitted in the previous year as part of its submission. This artificially inflated the figure reported to HMT for the 2017 review and therefore the overall level of frozen assets recorded for 2017.

An incorrect submission to the Treasury does not represent a loss of frozen funds. There is currently no evidence to suggest that frozen funds have been depleted or moved.

OFSI is currently investigating the discrepancy, but I cannot comment on ongoing cases and the financial institution cannot be named for legal reasons.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the current value of Libyan assets frozen in the UK as a result of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1973 (2011) S/RES/1973 (2011).

At close of business on Friday 28 September 2018 the approximate total value of frozen Libyan assets in the UK reported to the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) in the Treasury was £11.2 billion. The figures for 2019 are being finalised. OFSI undertakes an annual frozen asset review requiring all persons or institutions that hold or control frozen assets in the UK to report to OFSI, from which this figure is taken.

HM Government does not own or hold frozen assets as a result of UN and EU sanctions on Libya. It is the responsibility of individuals and entities (e.g. Financial Institutions) to ensure they comply with their asset freezing obligations under the relevant sanction’s regime.

In 2019, OFSI identified an inconsistent figure relating to Libyan frozen funds reported by a financial institution when conducting the 2018 review, and contacted the institution for an explanation of the figure. The financial institution stated that an incorrect figure had been submitted in the previous year as part of its submission. This artificially inflated the figure reported to HMT for the 2017 review and therefore the overall level of frozen assets recorded for 2017.

An incorrect submission to the Treasury does not represent a loss of frozen funds. There is currently no evidence to suggest that frozen funds have been depleted or moved.

OFSI is currently investigating the discrepancy, but I cannot comment on ongoing cases and the financial institution cannot be named for legal reasons.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
25th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to introduce visa-free travel for relatives of UK citizens living in Ukraine during the current emergency.

There are no current plans to introduce visa free travel for relatives of UK citizens living in Ukraine. However, the Government has made a number of changes to help relatives of UK citizens to enter the UK.

On 27 February 2022, the Government made changes to allow Ukrainian family members of British nationals to apply for a family migration visa, free of charge, if the British national usually lives in Ukraine.

The Home Secretary announced on 1 March a fee free, bespoke Ukraine Family Scheme which allows both the immediate (spouse, civil partner, durable partner, minor children) and extended (parent, grandparent, adult children, grandchildren, siblings, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, in laws and their immediate family) family members to join their relatives in the UK. The sponsoring relative must be a British citizen, a person who is present and settled in the UK (including those with settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme), a person in the UK with refugee leave or with humanitarian protection or a person in the UK with limited leave under Appendix EU (pre-settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme). This route was launched on 4 March.

A Ukrainian national with a valid passport is able to apply online for a Ukraine Family Scheme visa without the need to enrol their biometrics until after arrival in the UK.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of undocumented people in the UK; and what steps they are taking to ensure that any such people people are tested or treated for COVID-19.

As you will appreciate, by its very nature, it is impossible to know the precise size of the illegal migrant population within the UK and thus the Home Office does not seek to make any official estimates.

The Home Office is following national guidance in relation to Covid-19 testing, as set out by Public Health England. Since quarantine measures were introduced in June, those individuals who are encountered illegally entering the UK have been placed in facilities where they must self-isolate for 14 days, given we cannot be certain which countries they have travelled through.

Anyone who is symptomatic will be taken to designated accommodation and tested according to Public Health England guidance. An adapted regime is in place in our facilities to enable social distancing and reasonable restrictions are in place to manage the risks of Covid-19 spreading.

Additionally NHS trusts have been advised that no immigration checks are required for overseas visitors that are known to be only undergoing testing or treatment for COVID-19: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/nhs-entitlements-migrant-health-guide

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what costs have been occurred so far in this financial year as a result of any increase in the number of people arriving in the UK by boat in order to claim asylum.

Whilst the numbers of people arriving in the UK by illegally-facilitated small boats have increased this financial year, numbers of those arriving by other illegal means, such as air, have fallen.

The Home Office publishes data regarding its financial accounts on the GOV.UK website as part of its financial reporting procedures, and also as part of the transparency agenda. The latest report can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2019-to-2020.

We do not routinely publish breakdowns of operational Departmental spending, and are unable to provide this information, as it could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with international partners about changing the criteria for eligibility to claim asylum in the UK.

To date, the Government has not held discussions with international partners about changing the criteria for eligibility to claim asylum in the UK.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether migrants who have crossed the English Channel and were subsequently detained by Border Force have been tested for COVID-19; and if so, what percentage of such migrants have so far tested positive.

Since we introduced quarantine measures in June, those who have come to the UK in illegally facilitated crossings have been placed in facilities where they must self-isolate for 14 days, given we cannot be certain which countries they have travelled through.

Anyone who is symptomatic will be taken to designated accommodation and tested according to Public Health England guidance.

Care pathways follow published HM Government guidance on COVID-19 and more detailed PHE and NHS England guidance on the management of COVID-19 in places of detention. Under these guidelines universal testing is not recommended.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to prepare to accommodate British National (Overseas) passport holders from Hong Kong; and where such passport holders will be accommodated.

The Home Secretary was pleased to recently announce details of the new immigration route for Hong Kong British National (Overseas) citizens, which can be found at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/hong-kong-bno-visa-policy-statement/hong-kong-british-national-overseas-visa-policy-statement-plain-text-version

This is a special bespoke set of arrangements, developed for the unique circumstances we face and in light of our historic commitment to the people of Hong Kong.

British National (Overseas) citizens who choose to come to the UK will need to be self-sufficient and will be able to work in the UK.

Recognising this new immigration route applies across the Union, Home Office officials, with support from the Territorial Offices, have already begun engaging with the Devolved Administrations. This engagement has kept the Devolved Administrations informed of the policy as it develops, which will enable them to co-ordinate the most effective response for their respective regions.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the devolved administrations about their plans to offer a route to British citizenship to British National (Overseas) passport holders from Hong Kong.

The Home Secretary was pleased to recently announce details of the new immigration route for Hong Kong British National (Overseas) citizens, which can be found at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/hong-kong-bno-visa-policy-statement/hong-kong-british-national-overseas-visa-policy-statement-plain-text-version

This is a special bespoke set of arrangements, developed for the unique circumstances we face and in light of our historic commitment to the people of Hong Kong.

British National (Overseas) citizens who choose to come to the UK will need to be self-sufficient and will be able to work in the UK.

Recognising this new immigration route applies across the Union, Home Office officials, with support from the Territorial Offices, have already begun engaging with the Devolved Administrations. This engagement has kept the Devolved Administrations informed of the policy as it develops, which will enable them to co-ordinate the most effective response for their respective regions.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the long term security implications of Russia's invasion of Ukraine; and what amendments they assess are required to the UK's defence posture and capabilities as a consequence.

Through his reckless actions, President Putin has severely damaged Russia's international reputation for many years to come. The UK's defence posture, deployments, and capabilities will continue to evolve, building on the work already set out in the 2021 Integrated Review. Alongside Allies and partners, we will ensure that we meet the challenges posed by President Putin.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, what plans they have to accelerate the Propulsion Improvement Programme for the Type 45 Destroyers to ensure that the fleet is fully operational before 2028 as currently scheduled.

We continually review optimal delivery within the Complex Warship Support Plan. The Type 45 ships remain available for operational tasking when not undergoing maintenance activity or their PIP conversion.

HMS DAUNTLESS, the first ship to undergo the PIP conversion, has commenced a harbour trials programme and is due to return to sea later this year for sea trials. HMS DARING is currently at the Cammell Laird shipyard in Birkenhead, with conversion work to be carried out during 2022. The Ministry of Defence will take into account the lessons learned from HMS DAUNTLESS and apply them to HMS DARING's conversion.

The programme is dependent on the availability of ships to undertake the upgrade, balanced against the Royal Navy's current and future operational commitments. PIP conversions are planned to take account of the regular Upkeep cycle to maximise overall class availability and meet the readiness profile required to meet Defence outputs.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the outbreak of hostilities in Ukraine, whether they will review the amount of national resources devoted to defence spending.

The Government is clear that Defence should be led by our understanding of the threats it needs to counter. The Government's Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy, published last year, sets out how the Department will respond to the threats to the UK and recognises that the 'bulk of the UK's security focus will remain' on the Euro-Atlantic region. This was supported by the Spending Review 2020 settlement of an additional £16.5 billion for Defence which will support modernisation of our Armed Forces.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the costs that will be incurred as a result of the decision to renew and expand nuclear warhead production.

The Replacement Warhead programme is in its early preliminary phases and it is therefore too early to provide a cost estimate at this stage.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Dec 2021
AWE
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent assessment they have made of the effectiveness of the Atomic Weapons Establishment.

As confirmed to Parliament by the Secretary of State for Defence on July 1 2021 [HCWS142] AWE plc became a Non-Departmental Public Body, wholly owned by the Ministry of Defence (MOD). That decision followed a review of the AWE governance model which concluded the change in operating model was required to enhance both the MOD and AWE’s ability to put in place the skills and facilities required to deliver the Replacement Warhead Programme and deliver value for money to the taxpayer.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) individuals, and (2) families, have had their applications to be relocated to the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy refused.

Regrettably we will not be able to evacuate all those we would hope to, and due to the pace at which we continue to receive and assess applications for relocation under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy (ARAP), it is not possible to quantify the number of applicants that have been rejected at this time.

Since its launch in April of this year, we have refused a proportion of applicants to the ARAP scheme on the grounds of eligibility. Additionally, a number of applicants were refused relocation under ARAP on the grounds of national security because we were unable to conduct an assessment due to inadequate information.

Thousands of vulnerable people who are not eligible for ARAP, including women, girls and minority groups, will be welcomed to the UK as the Home Office delivers what will be one of its most ambitious resettlement schemes: the Afghan Citizens’ Resettlement Scheme. This is also separate from, and in addition to, the ARAP.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) individuals, and (2) families, have been relocated to the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy.

Since the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy was established in April approximately 7,000 eligible Afghans and dependents have been relocated. The MOD is currently undertaking a data validation exercise and further information will be released to the House at the appropriate time.

Operation PITTING was the largest UK military evacuation since the second World War. We have worked tirelessly to ensure that as many people as possible, including thousands of British nationals and their families, Afghan former staff and their families and many highly vulnerable Afghan people - were relocated to the UK on over 100 RAF flights.

Our commitment to those who are not eligible under the ARAP, and the process to deliver it, is not time-limited and will endure. We will continue to do all that we can to support British Nationals who remain in Afghanistan and those Afghans who have supported us, and to put pressure on the Taliban to allow safe passage.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to bring the delivery of veterans’ aftercare within the remit of Veterans UK.

The Ministry of Defence’s review into the Ulster Defence Regiment and Royal Irish (Home Service) Aftercare Service has begun and is currently considering whether the remit of the Service should be widened to cover all HM Forces veterans living in Northern Ireland with Service-related injuries and conditions.

The review will consider all services currently provided to veterans in Northern Ireland via the Aftercare Service, alongside ongoing wider Government veterans’ programmes and initiatives. This presents a real opportunity to improve co-ordination of services to offer all veterans residing in Northern Ireland long-term stability for inclusive, coherent, and consistent support.

The review is ongoing, and no firm conclusions have yet been drawn on the future structure of veterans’ service delivery in Northern Ireland. The review is due to report in the spring of 2022.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the terms of reference for the Ulster Defence Regiment and Royal Irish Aftercare Service review; when the review is due to conclude; and which stakeholders have been consulted so far as part of the review.

Under the ‘New Decade New Approach’ political agreement, the UK Government committed to initiate a review of the Ulster Defence Regiment and Royal Irish Aftercare Service in Northern Ireland. The Terms of Reference for this review consider whether the remit of the Service should be widened to cover all HM Forces veterans living in Northern Ireland with Service-related injuries and conditions.

The review commenced in January 2021. Evidence-based options for Ministerial consideration on the future delivery of services to veterans living in Northern Ireland, based on service size, structure, and funding, will be brought forward in spring 2022.

This review continues to engage with stakeholders who have a role in supporting veterans living Northern Ireland. This includes: Veterans UK, the Ulster Defence Regiment and Royal Irish Aftercare Service, the Veterans Support Organisation (Northern Ireland), the Northern Ireland Veterans Commissioner, the Ministry of Defence, Office for Veterans Affairs, and the Northern Ireland Office. Further external engagement is being planned as the project evolves.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what engagement they have had about the Armed Forces Bill with (1) the Northern Ireland Executive, and (2) individual Ministers within the Northern Ireland Executive; when this engagement took place; and what the outcome was of any such engagement.

The Northern Ireland Executive and relevant Departments, along with representatives from the Scottish and Welsh Governments, were consulted during the development of the Armed Forces Bill, and the former Minister for Defence People and Veterans wrote to the Northern Ireland First Minister and Deputy First Minister on 17 March 2021 outlining the Government’s proposals for the new Covenant duty. The Department is currently engaging with the Northern Ireland Executive on the development of the statutory guidance that will support the new Covenant Duty, including a focus group the week of 19 July 2021, to ensure that the public bodies in scope have the information they need to better understand the impact of Service life on the Armed Forces Community.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government under what arrangements they can send armed forces personnel and military equipment to sovereign bases in Cyprus; and whether they are required to provide 15 days notice in advance of any such deployment.

The Sovereign Base Areas comprise a UK overseas territory, and there is no requirement for advanced notice of Armed Forces personnel or military equipment deploying/arriving from the UK.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they are required to notify any authorities of their intention to move armed forces personnel and military equipment to Gibraltar; if so, to whom they give notice; and under what conditions such movements are permitted.

Gibraltar is a UK overseas territory, and there is no requirement for advanced notice of Armed Forces personnel or military equipment deploying/arriving from the UK.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether military equipment being moved from Great Britain to Northern Ireland is required to undergo inspection under the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland; and if so, where any such inspections will take place.

The Protocol is clear that it respects the essential state functions and territorial integrity of the UK. It therefore places no restrictions on military movements between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

A NATO 302 Form is not needed under the Northern Ireland Protocol to move Armed Forces personnel or military equipment between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a NATO 302 form must be completed before they can move armed forces personnel and military equipment from Great Britain to Northern Ireland under the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland; and if so, why.

The Protocol is clear that it respects the essential state functions and territorial integrity of the UK. It therefore places no restrictions on military movements between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

A NATO 302 Form is not needed under the Northern Ireland Protocol to move Armed Forces personnel or military equipment between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they are required to give a 15 day period of advance notice of their intention to move armed forces personnel and military equipment from Great Britain to Northern Ireland under the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland; if so, (1) to whom they give notice, (2) whether such personnel and equipment can be refused entry, and (3) what emergency procedures can be implemented if any notice period cannot be adhered to; and whether any such requirement applies to all (a) British Army, (b) Royal Navy, and (c) Royal Air force, deployments.

The Protocol is clear that it respects the essential state functions and territorial integrity of the UK. It therefore places no restrictions on military movements between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

A NATO 302 Form is not needed under the Northern Ireland Protocol to move Armed Forces personnel or military equipment between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many veterans in Northern Ireland are in receipt of (1) a war disablement pension, or (2) Armed Forces compensation.

As at 31 March 2020 there were 3,558 UK Armed Forces veterans in receipt of a War Disablement Pension under the War Pension Scheme and 65 UK Armed Forces veterans in receipt of a tax-free monthly Guaranteed Income Payment under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme (AFCS) residing in Northern Ireland.

AFCS tax-free lump sum awards are paid to Service personnel and veterans as compensation for pain and suffering for an injury or illness that is predominantly caused or made worse by Service. Location data is not routinely updated following payment of a lump sum award. Where a lump sum award has been made at tariff levels 1-11 (reflecting a more serious injury/illness), the claimant will also be awarded a tax-free index-linked income stream known as a Guaranteed Income Payment (GIP).

As at 31 March 2020 there were 654 UK Armed Forces veterans in receipt of the War Pension Mobility Supplement under the War Pension Scheme residing in Northern Ireland.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many veterans in Northern Ireland are in receipt of a war pension scheme mobility supplement.

As at 31 March 2020 there were 3,558 UK Armed Forces veterans in receipt of a War Disablement Pension under the War Pension Scheme and 65 UK Armed Forces veterans in receipt of a tax-free monthly Guaranteed Income Payment under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme (AFCS) residing in Northern Ireland.

AFCS tax-free lump sum awards are paid to Service personnel and veterans as compensation for pain and suffering for an injury or illness that is predominantly caused or made worse by Service. Location data is not routinely updated following payment of a lump sum award. Where a lump sum award has been made at tariff levels 1-11 (reflecting a more serious injury/illness), the claimant will also be awarded a tax-free index-linked income stream known as a Guaranteed Income Payment (GIP).

As at 31 March 2020 there were 654 UK Armed Forces veterans in receipt of the War Pension Mobility Supplement under the War Pension Scheme residing in Northern Ireland.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made towards improving the effectiveness and reliability of power plants on Type 45 destroyers.

I refer the noble Lord to the reply given by my hon. Friend, the Minister for Defence Procurement (Jeremy Quin), in the House of Commons on 8 June 2020 to the hon. Member for Dunfermline and West Fife (Douglas Chapman), in response to Question numbers 53459 and 53460.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to accelerate the construction of the new Type 31 class of frigates for the Royal Navy, given the increasing workload being created by the situation in the Gulf and the imminent deployment of the Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers.

We remain committed to ensuring the Royal Navy has the ships and capabilities required to fulfil Defence commitments now and in the future.

The first Type 31 Frigate will be in the water in 2023 and Babcock is contractually obliged to deliver all five Type 31 Frigates to the Ministry of Defence by the end of 2028.

The Prime Minister has committed to undertake the deepest review of Britain's security, defence and foreign policy. This review will examine how we strengthen and prioritise our alliances, diplomacy and development and will consider all aspects of our defence and security capabilities, including our approach to procurement and maintaining our technological edge. We are considering a number of options to increase the availability of ships during this period.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the new Type 31 class of frigate will be fitted with an anti-ship missile system.

Flexible by design, the Type 31 frigates will be adaptable to a range of capabilities, which may include an anti-ship missile system.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the financial, (2) the social, and (3) the logistical implications, of the arrival of British National (Overseas) passport holders from Hong Kong to the UK.

The Government is working to understand the potential implications arising from British Nationals (Overseas) travelling to the UK from Hong Kong under the revised arrangements. Where this work meets the criteria of the new burdens doctrine on Local Government, it will include an assessment of financial and societal impact.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the challenges facing homeowners of properties that require an EWS1 Certificate in getting a surveyor's report within a reasonable time; and what steps they intend to take to alleviate delays in obtaining these certificates.

The EWS1 form was produced by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) on behalf of industry. The Government is aware of capacity issues impacting on its use and is working with industry to help them mitigate these.

Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many royal pardons were granted to people with terrorism-related convictions between 1991 and 2003.

I can confirm that no applications for Royal Prerogative of Mercy were recommended to Her Majesty the Queen for terrorism related offences between 1991 and 2003.

7th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar on 18 November (HL4189), why their records only date back to 2014; whether they were transferred to other government departments; and if so, which ones.

The previous answer of 2014 referred to above was an error. Records held in the Ministry of Justice date back to May 2003 and the answer should have been clear that records therefore date back 18 years. We now know that records were originally held by the Home Office and were transferred to the Ministry of Justice after it was created in May 2007. These records are selected for permanent preservation and are transferred to The National Archives. I can confirm that no applications for Royal Prerogative of Mercy were recommended to Her Majesty the Queen for terrorism related offences during this time.

18th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Royal Pardons have been issued to those convicted of terrorism in the last 30 years.

Our records date back to 2014 and there were no Royal Pardons issued to those convicted of terrorism in that time.

6th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they had with the government of Ireland regarding whether investigations should be undertaken into alleged crimes perpetrated by the Provisional Irish Republican Army before April 1998 at the meeting of the British-Irish Intergovernmental Conference on 2 December 2021; what decision the government of Ireland had made on this matter; and what assessment they have made of that decision.

The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland has raised with the Government of Ireland the issue of investigations into Troubles-related offences that were committed in Ireland and will continue to do so.

Lord Caine
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office)
6th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to set out a timetable to address legacy issues in relation to the Troubles in Northern Ireland.

As outlined in the Command Paper of July 2021, the Government remains committed to addressing the legacy of Northern Ireland’s past by bringing forward legislation that focuses on information recovery and reconciliation.

The Government was clear when we published the Command Paper that we would engage with a wide range of stakeholders on our proposals before introducing any legislation, and that is what we are doing. This is a complex and sensitive issue and it is important that we take the time to get this right.

The Government continues to engage and reflect on what we have heard, and we are considering our next steps carefully.

Lord Caine
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office)
6th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which legacy-related matters were discussed at the meeting of the British-Irish Intergovernmental Conference on 2 December 2021.

As stated in the joint communiqué published following the British-Irish Intergovernmental Conference (BIIGC) on 2 December 2021, the UK and Irish Governments discussed a range of legacy-related matters, including a review of the multi-party legacy engagement process that was initiated following the BIIGC in June 2021, as well as issues of concern in respect to a number of individual legacy cases.

Lord Caine
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office)
18th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of On The Run letters of assurance; and what plans they have, if any, (1) to withdraw such letters, and (2) to declare them ineffective.

In July 2014, Lady Justice Hallett published a report following her review of the “on the run” administrative scheme. The review found that while the scheme contained a number of flaws, it was not unlawful.

In September 2014, the Government set out fully its position in relation to the scheme in statements to the House of Commons. In doing so, the then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland made clear that the scheme was at an end and that there was no basis, legal or otherwise, for any reliance on letters received by so-called “on the runs” under the scheme.

Lord Caine
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office)
17th Nov 2021
IRA
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to discuss with the government of the Republic of Ireland the reported remarks made by Senator Michael McDowell about the decision not to investigate crimes by the Provisional Irish Republican Army that occurred before April 1998.

The UK Government engages regularly with the Irish Government, on a range of matters that require or benefit from the partnership between our two countries, including legacy matters. Legacy issues are due to be discussed during the British-Irish Intergovernmental Conference (BIIGC) on 2 December.

The UK and Irish Governments have also been undertaking a period of engagement regarding legacy issues, as announced following the BIIGC in June. During this engagement, the recent public intervention by former Attorney General and Justice Minister in Ireland, Michael McDowell, who stated that a de facto moratorium on the investigation and prosecution of IRA members exists in Ireland, has been discussed.

Lord Caine
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office)
21st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their agreement New Decade, New Approach, published on 8 January 2020, what funding related to the armed forces has been provided under that agreement; over what period each funding stream will be delivered; and what terms and conditions apply to each funding stream.

This Government is committed to an ambitious programme of Armed Forces modernisation.

Under the New Decade, New Approach agreement, the Government is supporting our Armed Forces and veterans in Northern Ireland through a range of measures, including UK-wide legislation to further incorporate the Armed Forces Covenant into law and the appointment of the Veterans Commissioner to act as an independent point of contact for veterans in Northern Ireland.

Up to £200,000 has already been provided for veterans’ support services from the New Decade, New Approach funding. Further details on funding allocations for veterans’ services will be set out in due course.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to legislate for language and cultural matters in Northern Ireland which are currently devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly.

The Government announced on 21 June in a Written Ministerial Statement (HLWS100) that should the Northern Ireland Executive not have progressed the legislation for the identity, language and culture package in the New Decade, New Approach agreement by the end of September, the UK Government will take the legislation through the UK Parliament in October 2021.

It is the Government’s preference that the Executive deliver its commitment on this carefully balanced package of measures, which was agreed to by the parties and helped to end the three-year political impasse in Northern Ireland.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to modify the provisions of the Northern Ireland Act 1998 that require the First Minister and Deputy First Minister to be drawn from the largest nationalist and unionist designations in the Northern Ireland Assembly.

The Government remains fully committed to the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement and has no plans to amend the provisions of the Northern Ireland Act 1998 that relate to the designation of Members of the Northern Ireland Assembly, or to modify provisions of that Act in respect of the appointment of the First Minister and deputy First Minister.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to amend the provisions of the Northern Ireland Act 1998 that require Members of the Legislative Assembly to designate themselves as nationalist, unionist, or other, upon taking their seats.

The Government remains fully committed to the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement and has no plans to amend the provisions of the Northern Ireland Act 1998 that relate to the designation of Members of the Northern Ireland Assembly, or to modify provisions of that Act in respect of the appointment of the First Minister and deputy First Minister.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what amount of Annually Managed Expenditure which was earmarked for the payment of Renewable Heat Incentive Schemes was not so used by the Northern Ireland Executive in each of the last three financial years.

The Renewable Heat Incentive Scheme is administered by the Department for the Economy in the NI Executive, while devolved fiscal matters are for the Department of Finance. A consultation document on the future of the RHI scheme has been published by DfE and includes information on the Annually Managed Expenditure budget for the last three years.

It is of course vital that there is accountability for public spending and the Executive is building sustainable public services. That is why the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland has pushed for the establishment of an Independent Fiscal Council, as per the New Decade, New Approach agreement. Such a body would provide an assessment of the Executive’s spending proposals and consider the sustainability of the Executive’s public finances, including the implications of spending policy and the effectiveness of long-term efficiency measures.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much match funding they have given the Northern Ireland Executive to address paramilitary activity up to the end of the current financial year; and how much they will provide (1) in the 2021/22 financial year, and (2) beyond.

The UK Government is committed to working with the Northern Ireland Executive in their work to tackle paramilitarism. Through the Fresh Start Agreement we have, to date, provided £25 million of match funding to the Executive’s Tackling Paramilitarism, Criminality and Organised Crime Programme. This funding ends in this financial year and further funding will be confirmed shortly.

In addition to this, the New Decade, New Approach Agreement 2020 also included a further UK Government commitment to provide additional funding for tackling paramilitarism. An announcement on this will also be made shortly.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
12th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of EU officials at Northern Ireland ports; and what agreement they reached with the EU about the (1) status, (2) powers, and (3) purpose, of those officials.

A small number of EU officials are present at Northern Ireland ports, in line with the arrangements provided for under Article 12 of the Northern Ireland Protocol. Union representatives have a right to supervise the enforcement of the Northern Ireland Protocol, as opposed to physically conducting the checks.

Article 12(2) of the Protocol establishes that EU officials have the right to be present during activities of the authorities of the United Kingdom, limited to the implementation and application of provisions of Union law under the terms of the Protocol, and activities related to the implementation and application of Article 5 of the Protocol.

Article 12(2) also includes that the United Kingdom shall provide, upon request, all relevant information relating to such activities, and that Union representatives may request UK authorities to carry out control measures in individual cases for duly stated reasons.

Decision No 6/2020 of the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee on arrangements under Article 12(2) of the Protocol establishes the details of these arrangements. These arrangements do not provide for the EU to establish a mission or embassy in Northern Ireland.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
6th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what financial resources are being made available to the Northern Ireland Executive to erect border inspection posts at ports in Northern Ireland.

The expansion of existing point of entry facilities in Northern Ireland for agrifood goods handled under the Protocol is being led by the Northern Ireland Executive with UK Government support.

In giving effect to these limited new procedures required under the Northern Ireland Protocol, we have been focused on keeping the facilities for checking animals and agrifood products at Belfast Port, Larne, Warrenpoint and Foyle to a minimum, reflecting the proportionate approach adopted. We have provided the funds to support this work, with £50m in support thus far, including £5m for the interim facilities that will operate in some areas from 1 January 2021 while the full builds are completed.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
16th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have a timetable for introducing their proposals on addressing legacy issues in Northern Ireland.

The Government has been clear that it will bring forward legislation to address the legacy of the Troubles that focuses on reconciliation, delivers for victims, and ends the cycle of investigations that has failed victims and veterans alike.

Notwithstanding the challenging circumstances presented by the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, which has affected progress, we are committed to working with all parts of the community in Northern Ireland to move forward on this issue as quickly as possible.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what resources they have made available for the establishment of border control posts in Northern Ireland; where any such posts will be established; and what is their current status of readiness.

The UK Government is committed to upholding its obligations under the Northern Ireland Protocol. That includes, as we have set out previously including in our Command Paper, expanding some existing Northern Ireland points of entry for agrifood goods. The construction of expanded point of entry facilities is being led by the Northern Ireland Executive, with UK Government support.

We are working closely with the Northern Ireland Executive, port authorities, district councils, and other stakeholders in Northern Ireland to take this work forward, and to take all measures possible in a timely way. We are also continuing discussions with the EU in the Joint Committee at pace, informed by close working with the Executive to secure a pragmatic approach to agrifood checks.



Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have reached an agreement on the future funding of the Electoral Office of Northern Ireland; and if so, what funds they are making available to fund this office (1) in the current financial year, and (2) in subsequent years.

The Northern Ireland Office is committed to ensuring that all of its sponsored bodies have the necessary resources to deliver their statutory functions. Budget allocations for the Electoral Office for Northern Ireland are kept under review throughout the year and discussions around funding take place at regular governance meetings.

Funding for subsequent years will be considered as part of the current Comprehensive Spending Review.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
24th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of claims made in the Irish Parliament on 22 September that the former chief of staff of the Provisional IRA was an informer for the Special Branch of the Garda in 1972; and what implications they consider these claims may have for relations with the government of Ireland.

I can confirm that the Government have held no discussions with the Irish Government on this matter. The Government have made no assessment of these claims at this time.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
24th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have held, if any, with the government of Ireland about claims made in the Irish Parliament on 22 September that the former chief of staff of the Provisional IRA was an informer for the Special Branch of the Garda in 1972.

I can confirm that the Government have held no discussions with the Irish Government on this matter. The Government have made no assessment of these claims at this time.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
29th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how the provisions of the Revised Protocol to the Withdrawal Agreement relating to EU regulations and goods manufactured in Northern Ireland will be incorporated into law in Northern Ireland; and who will bring forward this legislation.

The Northern Ireland Protocol was implemented into domestic law by the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020. This gives effect to certain aspects of EU law in Northern Ireland for as long as the Protocol alignment provisions remain in force, for the purposes of avoiding a hard border on the island of Ireland.

The delivery and implementation of the Protocol’s provisions, including any further legislation that is required, is for the UK Government and, where appropriate, devolved Northern Ireland authorities. The UK Government will continue to work closely with the Northern Ireland Executive on this.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
9th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, whether, in the High Court of Northern Ireland, they instructed a Queen's Counsel to argue that an application by a victim of the Troubles in Northern Ireland be set aside in favour of another application; and if so, why.

The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is working tirelessly to see a resolution on departmental designation by the Executive Office, which is the next vital step towards this scheme opening. Victims have waited too long for these payments and the Government is extremely disappointed by the lack of progress.

The High Court considered case management of two judicial reviews in respect of the Victims Payments Scheme on Friday 26 June.

As the Noble Lord will appreciate, the Government does not comment on ongoing legal proceedings.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
9th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to reports of delays by the Northern Ireland Executive in administering the payment of pensions to victims of the Troubles in Northern Ireland, what plans they have, if any, to ensure that these payments take place.

The Government is taking this matter very seriously and we are extremely disappointed by the current delay.

The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is working tirelessly to see a resolution on departmental designation by the Executive Office, which is the next vital step towards this scheme opening. The Executive needs to designate a department that can own the policy and implement the scheme so that applications can be processed and payments made to victims.

The Government provided a legislative framework for this scheme in the absence of an Executive and the Executive must now deliver.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
8th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to assume responsibility for administering the Northern Ireland Troubles-related incident victims payments scheme, following the missed deadline to open the scheme to applications on 29 May.

Under the Victims Payments’ Regulations 2020, the Executive is required to designate a Department to exercise the administrative functions of the Board on the Board’s behalf. In the absence of an Executive, the UK Government brought forward legislation in January fulfilling its commitment to support the progression of this scheme. The Executive committed to take forward a scheme and, under the provisions of the Regulations, is legally obligated to now do so.

The Executive needs to designate a department that can own the policy and implement the scheme so that applications can be processed and payments made to victims.

Sinn Féin has been clear that it wants to reopen the criteria by which eligibility for the scheme will be determined but this scheme provides a fair, balanced and proportionate basis for helping those who suffered through no fault of their own. It is therefore imperative that Sinn Féin, along with all the parties, enable the scheme to move forward as the time for delay is done.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
18th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to treat former members of the Ulster Defence Regiment and the Royal Irish Regiment who served in Northern Ireland in the same manner as soldiers who served both overseas and in Northern Ireland in the conduct of any investigations into allegations of historic misconduct, and any resulting prosecutions and claims for compensation.

This Government is committed to ending vexatious claims in the courts against members of our security forces. We have always been clear that any legacy reform must be balanced and proportionate, and it must deliver for all communities in Northern Ireland. We will now begin a period of intensive engagement with the NI Parties and the Irish Government and other stakeholders on the detail of the proposals that have been set out.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
18th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their definition of "compelling new evidence" for any investigation of cases related to the Troubles in Northern Ireland.

The Government is committed to addressing the legacy of the past in Northern Ireland in a way that focuses on reconciliation, delivers for victims, and ends the cycle of reinvestigations into the Troubles in Northern Ireland that has failed victims and members of the security services alike. The Government will be engaging intensively with the Northern Ireland parties, Irish Government, and other key stakeholders over the coming weeks on the detail of the proposals that have been set out.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
18th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to make public funds available to former members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary to support their defence during any investigation into their actions during the Troubles in Northern Ireland.

The courage and professionalism of the police and other security forces cannot be underestimated and this Government remains committed to ending the cycle of reinvestigations into the Troubles in Northern Ireland. Funding of legal support for former members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary is devolved and a matter for the Northern Ireland Executive.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
18th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to make any distinction between (1) regular soldiers who served in Northern Ireland, and (2) soldiers of the Ulster Defence Regiment and Royal Irish Regiment recruited locally during the Troubles, in any proposals they may bring forward to address legacy cases in Northern Ireland.

This Government is committed to ending vexatious claims in the courts against members of our security forces. We have always been clear that any legacy reform must be balanced and proportionate, and it must deliver for all communities in Northern Ireland. We will now begin a period of intensive engagement with the NI Parties and the Irish Government and other stakeholders on the detail of the proposals that have been set out.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
18th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to establish a specific body to deal with legacy issues in Northern Ireland; and whether any such body would be able to issue reports to families about allegations of non-criminal misconduct against former Members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary, whether living or deceased.

The Government remain committed to introducing legislation that will reform the legacy system in line with our commitments set out in ‘New Decade, New Approach’. We intend to bring forward measures which focus on reconciliation and information recovery, which is most likely to help families find out what happened to their loved ones and help Northern Ireland look to the future.

Further detailed proposals will be provided in due course and we will be engaging with the NI parties and Irish Government in the coming weeks.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Viscount Younger of Leckie on 25 February (HL1520), whether they intend to provide funding to the Northern Ireland Executive to enable it to sustain the Historical Inquiries Unit after its first five years of operation; and if so, at what level.

The Government has committed to making substantial financial contributions to addressing the legacy of the past in Northern Ireland. Planning and implementation will be the subject of engagement with the NI parties in due course.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
11th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what funds they have promised the Northern Ireland Executive to establish and support a Historical Investigations Unit, and any associated bodies; and over what time period any such funding will be made available.

In the 2014 Stormont House Agreement, the Government committed up to £30 million per year for five years to help address the legacy of Northern Ireland’s past. In January 2020, the Government committed funding to support the implementation of the Stormont House Agreement proposals on legacy.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
14th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish the full analysis of their consultation Addressing the Legacy of Northern Ireland's Past, first published on 11 May 2018.

A summary of responses to the Northern Ireland Office’s consultation ‘Addressing the legacy of Northern Ireland’s past’ was published in July 2019. We will continue to look at the consultation responses to inform the way forward.

8th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the budget of the Electoral Office of Northern Ireland for the last three years for which figures are available.

Budget figures for the Electoral Office for Northern Ireland (EONI) are available as follows:

Expenditure period

Resource Budget

Capital Budget

2016-17

£2.331m

£0.288m

2017-18

£1.825m

£0.355m

2018-19

£2.045m

£0.062m

In addition to EONI budget funding, the costs of Parliamentary and European Parliamentary elections are met from the consolidated fund. Assembly elections are paid for from the Northern Ireland block grant and local councils pay for the administration of local district council elections.

8th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they intend to take following the claims by a whistle-blower of the inefficiency of the Electoral Office of Northern Ireland during the 2019 General Election.

The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland has not made any assessment of the performance of the Electoral Office of Northern Ireland during the 2019 General Election. The Chief Electoral Officer is carrying out a post election review which will include an internal investigation into the allegations made concerning inefficiency. The Secretary of State has asked her to report the findings of that review to him as soon as possible. The Secretary of State has the power to commission further enquiries into these matters if he were to decide such enquiries are necessary following the Chief Electoral Officer’s investigations.

8th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the performance of the Electoral Office of Northern Ireland during the 2019 General Election.

The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland has not made any assessment of the performance of the Electoral Office of Northern Ireland during the 2019 General Election. The Chief Electoral Officer is carrying out a post election review which will include an internal investigation into the allegations made concerning inefficiency. The Secretary of State has asked her to report the findings of that review to him as soon as possible. The Secretary of State has the power to commission further enquiries into these matters if he were to decide such enquiries are necessary following the Chief Electoral Officer’s investigations.