Esther McVey Portrait

Esther McVey

Conservative - Tatton

First elected: 8th June 2017

Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)

(since November 2023)

Esther McVey is not a member of any APPGs
5 Former APPG memberships
Chemical Industry, Gaps in Support, Haemophilia and Contaminated Blood, Pandemic Response and Recovery, Tenanted Pubs
Panel of Chairs
22nd Jun 2020 - 15th Nov 2023
Shark Fins Bill
9th Nov 2022 - 16th Nov 2022
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
24th Jul 2019 - 13th Feb 2020
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
8th Jan 2018 - 15th Nov 2018
Selection Committee
14th Nov 2017 - 11th Jan 2018
Committee of Selection
14th Nov 2017 - 11th Jan 2018
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
2nd Nov 2017 - 8th Jan 2018
Home Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 4th Dec 2017
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions) (Cabinet)
15th Jul 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Oct 2013 - 15th Jul 2014
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Sep 2012 - 7th Oct 2013


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Esther McVey has voted in 601 divisions, and 32 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Mar 2021 - Coronavirus - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 35 Conservative No votes vs 305 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 484 Noes - 76
22 Mar 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 253
10 Feb 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 327 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 526 Noes - 24
6 Jan 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative No votes vs 322 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 524 Noes - 16
30 Dec 2020 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 328 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 335 Noes - 212
1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
4 Nov 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 516 Noes - 38
13 Oct 2020 - Public Health: Coronavirus Regulations - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 82
6 Oct 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative No votes vs 285 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 287 Noes - 17
30 Sep 2020 - Coronavirus Act 2020 (Review of Temporary Provisions) - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Conservative No votes vs 330 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 330 Noes - 24
10 Mar 2020 - Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 301 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 306
27 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 256
28 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 321 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 256
20 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative No votes vs 265 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 268 Noes - 204
15 Nov 2021 - Social Security (Up-rating of Benefits) Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 296 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 300 Noes - 229
22 Nov 2021 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Conservative No votes vs 269 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 272 Noes - 246
23 Nov 2021 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 18 Conservative Aye votes vs 276 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 219 Noes - 280
23 Nov 2021 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 294 Noes - 244
30 Nov 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Conservative No votes vs 268 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 434 Noes - 23
30 Nov 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 259 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 36
3 Dec 2021 - Copyright (Rights and Remuneration of Musicians, etc.) Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 59 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 28 Noes - 59
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 38 Conservative No votes vs 271 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 441 Noes - 41
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 60 Conservative No votes vs 258 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 385 Noes - 100
25 Apr 2022 - Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 297 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 300 Noes - 220
25 Apr 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 276 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 278 Noes - 182
25 Apr 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 280 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 183
20 Jun 2022 - High Speed Rail (Crewe - Manchester) Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative No votes vs 201 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 205 Noes - 6
18 Oct 2022 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 103 Conservative No votes vs 113 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 297 Noes - 110
7 Dec 2022 - Financial Services and Markets Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 269 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 206 Noes - 271
22 Mar 2023 - CRIMINAL LAW - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Conservative No votes vs 282 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 290 Noes - 14
7 Mar 2023 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
Esther McVey voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 107 Conservative Aye votes vs 109 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 299
View All Esther McVey Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jim Shannon (Democratic Unionist Party)
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Human Rights)
(10 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(10 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(40 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(36 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(23 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Esther McVey's debates

Tatton Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the Government to commit to not signing any international treaty on pandemic prevention and preparedness established by the World Health Organization (WHO), unless this is approved through a public referendum.

Make it illegal for any employer to mandate vaccination for its employees. This should apply to all public sector (including the NHS, armed forces, care workers), third sector and all private sector.

Call on the government to consider holding debates in Parliament between MPs and university students to raise/discuss issues that affect them. It will allow students to voice their opinions and concerns about tuition fees of £9250 a year which are too high, particularly as grants have been removed

We ask Parliament to repeal the High Speed Rail Bills, 2016 and 2019, as MPs voted on misleading environmental, financial and timetable information provided by the Dept of Transport and HS2 Ltd. It fails to address the conditions of the Paris Accord and costs have risen from £56bn to over £100bn.

The University and College Union has repeatedly called on its members to strike. However, strikes are ineffective if students, not employees are the main source of revenue. For this to change, government needs to step in and require universities to reimburse tuition fees lost due to strike action.

All students should be reimbursed of this years tuition fees as universities are now online only due to COVID-19, with only powerpoints online for learning materials which is not worthy of up to £9,250. Furthermore, all assessments are being reconsidered to ‘make do’ and build up credits.

As students are unable to access facilities or continue with their eduction at their university setting in the following semester, we would like to request that the government considers refunding tuition payments for Semester 3.

The quality of online lectures is not equal to face-to-face lectures. Students should not have to pay full tuition fees for online lectures, without experiencing university life. The Government should require UK universities to partially refund tuition fees while online teaching is implemented.

Students across the UK have returned to University to be told our learning will be predominantly online for the foreseeable future. The Government should therefore lower our tuition fees and we should receive a partial refund for the effects this will have on our learning and university experience.

Weddings take months and even years of intricate planning. Myself and many others believe the maximum number of guests authorised at wedding ceremonies should be increased. The number of guests permitted at weddings should be calculated according to venue capacity.

Extend funding to nightclubs, dance music events and festivals as part of the £1.57bn support package announced by the government for Britain's arts and culture sector to survive the hit from the pandemic. #LetUSDance


Latest EDMs signed by Esther McVey

11th April 2019
Esther McVey signed this EDM on Thursday 11th April 2019

Exiting the European Union

Tabled by: William Cash (Conservative - Stone)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 (Exit Day) (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 2019 (S.I., 2019, No. 859), dated 11 April 2019, a copy of which was laid before this House on 11 April 2019, be annulled.
82 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Apr 2019)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 69
Independent: 6
Democratic Unionist Party: 6
Non-affiliated: 1
View All Esther McVey's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Esther McVey, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Esther McVey has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Esther McVey has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Esther McVey has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
20th Mar 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 3 March 2023 to Question 151283 on Vaccination: Death, and with reference to Tables 6 to 9 of the Age-standardised mortality rates for deaths by vaccination status, England: deaths occurring between 1 January 2021 and 31 May 2022, published on 6 July 2022, for what reason data for children aged 10 to 18 was not included in the Age-standardised mortality rates for deaths by vaccination status, England: deaths occurring between 1 April 2021 and 31 December, published on 21 February 2023; and whether this data will be released.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon lady’s Parliamentary Question of 20 March is attached.

23rd Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Office for National Statistics publication entitled Deaths by vaccination status, England, published on 21 February 2023, for what reason data for under 18s was omitted from that publication; and when that data will be published.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon. Member's Parliamentary Question of 23 February is attached.

19th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will disclose the method of payment for those people receiving an interim payment as part of the Infected Blood inquiry.

In his interim report of 29 July, Sir Brian Langstaff recommended that the amount of interim compensation should be "no less than £100,000, as recommended by Sir Robert Francis QC." The Government made a commitment to accept in full the recommendations of Sir Brian's interim report.

I can confirm infected individuals and bereaved partners who are registered with any of the four UK infected blood support schemes will receive interim compensation payments of £100,000 by the end of October. The administrators of the four schemes are writing to beneficiaries this week confirming the £100,000 alongside details of how the money will be paid.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the £100,000 interim compensation payment to people affected by infected blood.

In his interim report of 29 July, Sir Brian Langstaff recommended that the amount of interim compensation should be "no less than £100,000, as recommended by Sir Robert Francis QC." The Government made a commitment to accept in full the recommendations of Sir Brian's interim report.

I can confirm infected individuals and bereaved partners who are registered with any of the four UK infected blood support schemes will receive interim compensation payments of £100,000 by the end of October. The administrators of the four schemes are writing to beneficiaries this week confirming the £100,000 alongside details of how the money will be paid.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish a timetable for the interim compensation payments for the victims of the infected blood scandal.

In his interim report of 29 July, Sir Brian Langstaff recommended that the amount of interim compensation should be "no less than £100,000, as recommended by Sir Robert Francis QC." The Government made a commitment to accept in full the recommendations of Sir Brian's interim report.

I can confirm infected individuals and bereaved partners who are registered with any of the four UK infected blood support schemes will receive interim compensation payments of £100,000 by the end of October. The administrators of the four schemes are writing to beneficiaries this week confirming the £100,000 alongside details of how the money will be paid.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Jun 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to Excess deaths in England and Wales: March 2020 to December 2021 published by the Office for National Statistics on 22 March 2022, if the Government will publish data on death by data occurrence of those mentioned in those statistics.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Rt hon. Member'sParliamentary Questions of 10 June is attached.

10th Jun 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to Excess deaths in England and Wales: March 2020 to December 2021 published by the Office for National Statistics on 22 March 2022, what the cause of death was for excess deaths in males ages 15 to 19 years old.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Rt hon. Member'sParliamentary Questions of 10 June is attached.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to ONS data on excess deaths, published on 22 March 2022, what the time interval was between receiving a covid-19 vaccination and death for each 15 to 19 year old male who died between 1 May and 24 December 2021; and what that time interval was for females in that age group who died during that period.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Rt hon. Member's Parliamentary Questions of 14 April is attached.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the ONS data on excess deaths, published on 22 March 2022, how many and what proportion of the 402 males who died between 1 May and 24 December 2021 had received a covid-19 vaccination; and how many of the females who died during that period had received a covid-19 vaccination.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Rt hon. Member's Parliamentary Questions of 14 April is attached.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to ONS data on excess deaths in males aged 15 to 19 which accounts for registered deaths, published on 22 March 2022, how many deaths of males aged 15 to 19 have been reported to the regional coroner but not yet registered; and how that figure compares to the figure for (a) males aged 15 to 19 and (b) females aged 15 to 19 in each of the last five years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Rt hon. Member's Parliamentary Questions of 14 April is attached.

28th Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many excess deaths there were in week 17 to week 51 of 2021, compared with the 2015-2019 baseline.

I refer the Rt hon. Member to my answer to PQ 144893 on 28 March.

22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many excess deaths there were in week 17 to week 51 of 2021, compared with the 2015-2019 baseline.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Rt hon. Member's Parliamentary Question of 22 March is attached.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the process of notification is to hon. Members on the loss of civil service jobs in their constituency.

Departments are responsible for their individual operating model decisions.

The Government has committed to ensuring that the administration of Government is less London-centric by relocating 22,000 Civil Service roles out of central London and into the regions and nations of the United Kingdom by the end of the decade.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the attendance restrictions on weddings will be reviewed.

The Government continues to work closely with stakeholders in the wedding industry, to enable weddings and civil partnerships to continue to take place.

We recognise that the limit on attendees may be disappointing for those planning such events. By their nature, weddings and civil partnership ceremonies are events that bring families and friends together from across the country and sometimes across the world, making them particularly vulnerable to the spread of COVID-19. We do not wish to keep restrictions in place for any longer than we have to, and it will be kept under review in line with the changing situation. For further information, please refer to the guidance https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department has made (a) an assessment of the effectiveness of heat pumps in older homes and (b) the potential cost to rural home owners of upgrading their home insulation to increase the heat pumps effectiveness.

Government analysis suggests around 90% of fossil fuel heated homes, including 70% of fossil fuel heated homes built before 1919, are suitable for low temperature heat pumps, based on evidence of their energy efficiency and electrical connections.

A higher proportion of properties are likely to become suitable following energy efficiency upgrades or by using a high temperature heat pump.

The Government has published an online tool setting out the potential costs to households seeking to upgrade their energy efficiency.

The Government recognises that not all properties will be suitable for a heat pump and there will be a role for alternative low carbon technologies where heat pumps cannot be used.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, If he will make it his policy to increase the national grid capacity and network to encourage horticulture growers to invest in renewables .

The Government is committed to accelerating the delivery of new electricity network capacity to accommodate new renewable generation, as set out, jointly with Ofgem, in the Electricity Networks Strategic Framework. Through Ofgem’s Accelerating Strategic Transmission Investment work, approximately £20bn worth of network projects have been accelerated to support new renewable generation. In addition, Ofgem have removed or reduced the contribution to distribution network reinforcement costs which may be required to accommodate a connection. This has made it cheaper for customers, including horticulture growers, to connect renewables and other low carbon technologies to the electricity distribution network.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will extend the definition of energy-intensive industries to include (a) horticulture and (b) other energy intensive agriculture sectors.

The Government has no plans to extend the sectors included within the energy and trade intensive industries element of the Energy Bill Discount Scheme. The Energy Bill Relief Scheme review assessed qualitative and quantitative evidence from stakeholders on sectors that may be most affected by rising energy prices based on energy and trade intensity.

The outcome of the review informed the criteria of the Energy Bill Discount Scheme (EBDS) and the higher level of support to be provided for the most energy and trade intensive sectors which meet agreed thresholds for energy and trade intensity.

The methodology for determining the eligibility of SIC Codes for the higher Energy and Trade Intensive Industry (ETII) support is available on GOV.UK.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
15th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he will take to take to support remote rural businesses in 2023 to help assist those organisations with financial planning for 2024.

At the Autumn Statement, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced £13.6 billion of support for businesses over the next five years, reducing the burden of business rates for SMEs.

The Government is providing a range of support to help small and medium-sized businesses across the UK with rising costs, including those in rural communities. Government has cut fuel duty for 12 months, raised the Employment Allowance to £5,000, and is zero-rating VAT on energy-saving materials.

The Help to Grow’ schemes help SME businesses learn new skills, reach more customers and boost profits. The Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) provides a price reduction to ensure that all businesses and other non-domestic customers are protected from high energy bills.

Furthermore, the British Business Bank’s Northern Powerhouse Investment Fund, Midlands Engine Investment Fund and Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Investment Fund all work with Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs), combined authorities and Growth Hubs, as well as local accountants, fund managers and banks, to provide a mixture of debt and equity capital to SMEs across their entire regions, including in rural locations.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the positive merits of thermal storage technologies; and if he will bring forward (a) legislative proposals and (b) associated policies to support them.

As set out in the Heat and Buildings Strategy, flexible use of energy, including through the use of thermal storage, can help create a cost-effective, efficient and secure energy system.

The Government is supporting the development of novel thermal storage technologies through the Net Zero Innovation Programme, the Energy Entrepreneurs Fund, the long duration energy storage competition and at universities through research council funding; for example, through the “Heat Pump Fully Integrated with Thermochemical Store” innovation work at the University of Warwick. This will help inform future policy on such technologies.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the UK's ability to harness its renewable energy production through the use of (a) smart thermal storage heaters, (b) batteries, and (c) other existing energy storage technologies.

The Government published analysis which examined future requirements of flexible low carbon technologies including electricity storage and flexible heating alongside the joint BEIS and Ofgem Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan 2021 (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/transitioning-to-a-net-zero-energy-system-smart-systems-and-flexibility-plan-2021). Additionally, as part of our response to the Call for Evidence on Large Scale Long Duration Electricity Storage from Aug 2022, the Government published external analysis (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/benefits-of-long-duration-electricity-storage) the role that long-duration electricity storage could play in the system.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy for Ofgem to undertake a review of off-peak tariff pricing, in the context of the potential merits of that pricing for (a) existing customers and (b) emerging flexible electricity markets.

As set out in the 2021 Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan, the Government is working with Ofgem and industry to support the increased provision of “smart” tariffs that reward consumers for changing their pattern of consumption to benefit the electricity system. We will set out next steps on the future of the retail market in due course.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the potential impact of energy storage on (a) decarbonising the energy system and (b) helping to ensure security of energy supply.

The Government published analysis which examined future requirements of flexible low carbon technologies including electricity storage, alongside the joint BEIS and Ofgem Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan 2021.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of the Energy Price Guarantee on the level of storage capacity in the national grid.

The Government has not made an assessment of whether the Energy Price Guarantee will impact electricity storage on the grid.

The Government is facilitating the deployment of electricity storage at all scales through the joint 2021 BEIS and Ofgem Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of the energy price cap on (a) cost incentives and (b) carbon emissions arising from the use of storage heaters.

The Energy Price Guarantee scheme, which the Government implemented on the 1st October, reduces the cost of electricity and gas meaning that consumers can expect to pay well below the price cap figure of £3,549 for a typical dual fuel household.

The EPG does not incentivise increased energy use. Even with the EPG in place energy prices remain significantly above historic levels, incentivising consumers to use energy prudently. The Department will closely monitor the impact of prices on consumption over the months ahead and is actively considering how storage heaters are affected by the guarantee.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on investment in the north west of a commitment to develop a hydrogen village in that region.

The Government is supporting industry to deliver community trials of 100% hydrogen heating. BEIS and Ofgem received Gas Distribution Network Operators’ outline proposals for the village trial in December 2021. The Government expects that one or more of these will be selected to be developed into detailed proposals. The final decision on where the village trial will take place is expected in 2023 ahead of a trial start date of 2025.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the environmental benefits of remote working.

Assessing the environmental benefits of remote working is complex. Account needs to be taken of issues beyond commuter transport – for instance, the energy efficiency of our housing compared with that of commercial buildings and the increase in local travel which home-working can bring. Overall, the evidence on the net environmental benefits is mixed.

The policy opportunities associated with homeworking from a climate perspective are more likely to concern how we promote low carbon actions and behaviours when people are working from home, rather than simply asking people to work remotely.

12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of outreach post office services as a substitute for traditional post offices in (a) the Tatton constituency and (b) rural constituencies more widely.

The Government is committed to safeguarding the Post Office network and protecting existing rural services as we recognise the important role post offices play in serving their communities. The Government promotes access to rural post offices by setting accessibility criteria which the Post Office must meet. This ensures that in rural areas over 95% of people are within 3 miles of their nearest post office service. In remote and rural areas where it is difficult to deliver services to consumers via a permanent site, Post Office Limited use outreach services, such as a mobile van, or a village hall. These offer the same products and services as bricks-and-mortar branches. Within the Tatton constituency, there is one outreach service in Chelford.

12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that vulnerable people without an address can still access postal services.

The Government recognises how important access to post is for all, especially for those that are homeless or without stable abode. Government is working with a wide range of stakeholders to consider how to support these vulnerable groups. The universal postal service is intended to provide an accessible postal service for all.

Royal Mail operates two services to help vulnerable customers access their post. The first is its redirection service, which can be specially accessed by people with personal safety concerns. The second is its PO Box service, which provides options for vulnerable customers and is designed to meet specific circumstances and preferences.

The Government will continue to work with a wide range of stakeholder to find the best ways to support vulnerable people.

12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish an update on the distribution plans for the £177 million investment announced in the November 2020 spending review for the future of the post office network.

In the most recent Spending Review for 2021/2022, the Government announced Post Office investment funding of £177 million. This reflects the Government’s commitment to the role that post offices play in our communities. This funding will allow Post Office Ltd to invest for the future and to ensure the Post Office remains a vital force on our high streets.


The management of the Post Office network is an operational matter for the Company.

24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department plans to provide to businesses following the completion of the new Help to Grow programme.

The Government is committed to improving the provision of support to SMEs across the country. Following the completion of the programme, the Help to Grow: Management Programme will provide participants with further direct business-to-business support, through the alumni network.

Participants will also be signposted to other leadership programmes on the market if they wish to progress with further learning. This programme is one of range of opportunities that the Government provides to businesses to support their growth.

24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether there will be an application process for business mentors to get involved in the Help to Grow programme.

We are currently developing the mentoring element for the Help to Grow Management programme. We are looking at how mentors are onboarded and matched to participants. Our aim is to develop a high quality mentoring offer, which will support SMEs to boost their business performance, resilience and long term growth.

24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the credentials of the providers of the Help to grow programme announced on 3 March 2020.

The Help to Grow: Management Programme will be delivered by Business Schools who have obtained the Small Business Charter (SBC) accreditation.

A list of the SBC schools can be found here: https://smallbusinesscharter.org/find-business-school/.

We are currently in the process of determining the criteria for eligible providers for the Help to Grow Digital scheme. These will be published in due course.

24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the types of businesses that the 'help to grow' scheme announced 3 March 2021 is seeking to support.

The Government’s new ‘Help to Grow’ scheme will help small businesses across the UK learn new skills, reach new customers, and boost profits. We have consulted with key stakeholders from industry when designing this scheme including those who represent the breadth of UK SMEs.

Businesses across all sectors are welcome to apply for the Help to Grow Scheme so long as they meet the eligibility criteria as follows:

- Size of 5 to 249 employees​

- More than a year old​

- Attendee should be a decision-maker within the business e.g. CEO, Finance Director​​

- Must have at least one line of management in business employment structure

Those interested in participating can find further details about the Help to Grow Scheme by visiting: https://helptogrow.campaign.gov.uk/.

11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what comparative assessment he has had made of the difference in covid-19 transmission rates for in-store shopping and click and collect services.

Throughout the national restrictions, we have sought to keep as much of the retail sector open as possible, whilst balancing the need to reduce our day-to-day contact. All along we have taken evidence from SAGE into account when making decisions.

Click-and-collect services allow goods to be pre-ordered and collected without customers entering the premises. Customers thus remain in well ventilated spaces - which are, by definition, safer environments and where transmission is less likely to occur.

11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will (a) list the types of business that are eligible to operate a click-and-collect delivery policy during the covid-19 lockdown announced in January 2021 and (b) provide the risk assessment for covid-19 transmission for each of those business types.

All retailers, both essential and non-essential, can offer click-and-collect services during the current national restrictions.

We have published safer workplace guidance which provides information to help employers make their workplaces COVID-Secure for their employees, visitors, and customers. The guidance does not replace existing employment, health and safety or equalities legislation. It provides information to employers on how best to meet these responsibilities in the context of COVID-19.

Each individual business should complete a risk assessment which should be shared with their employees.

11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what scientific evidence on the transmission of covid-19 was used to determine that essential retail should remain open whilst non-essential retail should close during lockdown periods.

Throughout the national restrictions, we have sought to keep as much of the retail sector open as possible, whilst balancing the need to reduce our day-to-day contact. Throughout this we have taken evidence from SAGE into account when making decisions.

It is also important that consumers have access to food and essential items that they need.

Restrictions have been brought in because we have to limit social contact. That is why the decision to close non-essential retail is part of a wider package of measures to make clear that people should stay at home except for a limited set of exemptions – allowing non-essential retail to remain open would run contrary to that aim.

10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has in place for the gradual and safe reopening of the wedding industry to help the people who work in and support that sector.

On 22 February, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister published the Government’s COVID-19 Response-Spring 2021. The roadmap is a step-by-step plan to ease restrictions in England gradually , starting with education. Across the four steps, the roadmap sets out the sequencing and indicative timing for easing restrictions, including those on the wedding sector.

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of (a) Coronavirus Interruption Business Loan applications and (b) Bounce Back Loan applications have been declined.

A breakdown on the number of loans provided through the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, as of 24 January 2021, are provided in the table below.

Scheme

Number of Facilities Approved

Value of Facilities Approved

Total Number of Applications

Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme

87,529

£20.84 billion

201,343

Bounce Back Loan Scheme

1,471,001

£44.74 billion

1,953,564

The figures reported under the heading Total Number of Applications includes: approved applications; applications that are still to be processed; applications that have been declined; and applications that may turn out not to be eligible or cases where customers will decide not to proceed.

Decisions on whether to specifically capture information relating to declined loans are at the discretion of the lender.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the cost to the public purse of the Pfizer covid-19 vaccine to date; and when he plan to publish details of the estimated cost to all stakeholders for the manufacturing and rollout of that vaccine.

We are not able to disclose details of commercially sensitive contracts between the Government and vaccine manufacturers while negotiations are ongoing.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps were taken during the trial of the Pfizer covid-19 vaccine to test its effect on people with allergies.

The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine has met the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency’s robust standards of safety, quality, and effectiveness, and the safety data from the trials has set out how the COVID-19 vaccine works in different types of people. A robust and proactive safety monitoring strategy for COVID-19 vaccines is in place, which allows for rapid, real-time safety monitoring at population level.

4th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the use of waste incinerators on the Government's progress on the 2050 net zero emissions target.

The latest data shows that, in 2018, an estimated 6.0 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (MtCO2e) were emitted from waste incineration in the energy supply sector and 0.3 MtCO2e from waste incineration in the waste sector.

The UK’s climate change framework enables the Government to determine how best to balance emissions reductions across the economy. Emissions are managed within the Government’s overall strategy for meeting carbon budgets and the 2050 net zero target, as part of an economy-wide transition.

The UK Government has reduced carbon emissions by over 40% since 1990.

4th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of including waste incineration in the UK Emissions Trading scheme.

The Government Response to the Future of UK Carbon Pricing set out that the scope of the UK Emissions Trading Scheme will provide continuity and a smooth transition for participants. Most consultation respondents agreed with this approach. Energy from waste plants will not be in scope of the UK ETS for the period of 2021 to 2025. We do recognise the case for expanding carbon pricing and we committed to considering the option of expanding the scope of the UK ETS in the 2023 review.

25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of UK Research and Innovation's decision to withdraw extra grants for PhD students whose research has been affected by covid-19 on (a) those students and (b) long term research environment in the UK.

UKRI have acted to support PhD students during the pandemic. In March, UKRI worked to ensure that all the students it funds would continue to receive their maintenance stipend during the lockdown and would not have to suspend their studies; UKRI-funded students in receipt of a costed extension will continue to receive this stipend during their extension period. In April it was announced that UKRI-funded PhD students in the final year, whose studies have been disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic would be provided with additional support.

A review of the initial UKRI COVID-19 extension policy was published, bringing together evidence from students, grant holders and university management teams. On the 11th November, UKRI provided a further £19.1 million of funding, which particularly aims to support students who have recently gone into their final year of study (funding end date before or on 30 September 2021) and those with ongoing support needs. Students with ongoing support needs include disabled students, students with a long-term illness, those who are neurodivergent or those with caring responsibilities.

Combined, these two interventions have meant that UKRI has made over £60 million of financial support available to students most impacted by the pandemic. It is estimated that this funding is available for up to 12,000 students (over half of the students that UKRI funds). We are encouraging all PhD students to discuss with their supervisors how projects can be adjusted to complete their doctoral education within their funded period. We will continue to monitor how the pandemic is affecting PhD students and the wider research system.

In regard to the long term research environment, all UKRI funded PhD students are guaranteed their funding within their funded period. The support noted above should ensure the vast majority of students are able to complete their studies on time, or later with support, and able to embark on the next step of their research career.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to provide tailored support to the wedding industry during the covid-19 outbreak.

My Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer has laid out the Government’s Winter Economy Plan. This includes measures to support all businesses, such as extending the current government-backed loan schemes and introducing the Pay as You Grow and Job Support Schemes. There are also specific measures to support the self-employed, such as the SEISS Grant Extension.

8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the economic effect on the wedding industry of the further restrictions announced on 22 September 2020.

The Government has put in place a package of support to help employees and businesses through these exceptional times. These include business support grants for qualifying businesses, extended government-backed loans and the Job Support Scheme.

8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to provide specific support to the wedding industry during the covid-19 outbreak.

My Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer has laid out the Government’s Winter Economy Plan. This includes measures to support all businesses, such as extending the current government-backed loan schemes and introducing the Pay as You Grow and Job Support Schemes. There are also specific measures to support the self-employed, such as the SEISS Grant Extension.

8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason wedding venues that ensure table service, social distancing and prevent dancing are subject to different restrictions to restaurants.

Celebrations such as wedding receptions pose increased risks for transmission of COVID-19 as they involve people from multiple households meeting and spending extended periods of time together. They are by their nature events which bring people closely together. Wedding receptions and celebrations are one of the few exceptions to the gatherings limit of 6 people, which has applied from 14 September 2020.

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that soft tissue therapists can return to work.

We have now provided close contact services like Soft Tissue Therapists in England, except Leicester, with the certainty they need to reopen from Monday 13 July, subject to them following the COVID-secure guidelines.

We appreciate that this has been difficult for some businesses. Our approach is guided by the scientific and medical advice, and every step is weighed against the evidence, remembering that the more we open up the more vigilant we will need to be.