Philip Davies Portrait

Philip Davies

Conservative - Shipley

Select Committees
Panel of Chairs (since January 2020)
Women and Equalities Committee (since June 2021)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 9th Nov 2020
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Sub-committee on Online Harms and Disinformation
10th Mar 2020 - 9th Nov 2020
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
15th Jul 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
DCMS Sub-Committee on Disinformation
15th Jul 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Women and Equalities Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Panel of Chairs
22nd Jun 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee
15th Jul 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Women and Equalities Committee
19th Dec 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Justice Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Panel of Chairs
28th Jun 2010 - 3rd May 2017
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
27th Feb 2006 - 30th Mar 2015
Backbench Business Committee
29th Jun 2010 - 1st May 2012
Privacy and Injunctions (Joint Committee)
14th Jul 2011 - 12th Mar 2012
Modernisation of the House of Commons
12th Mar 2007 - 6th May 2010


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 30th November 2021
15:15
Women and Equalities Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: The Government’s consultation on conversion therapy
30 Nov 2021, 3:15 p.m.
At 3.30pm: Oral evidence
Mike Freer MP - Minister for Equalities at Government Equalities Office
Anna Thompson - Deputy Director (LGBT domestic policy, strategy and comms) Government Equalities Office, the Equality Hub - part of the Cabinet Office
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 1st December 2021
14:00
Women and Equalities Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: The Rights of Cohabiting Partners
1 Dec 2021, 2 p.m.
At 2.15pm: Oral evidence
Elizabeth Darlington - Barrister at Parklane Plowden Chambers, Leeds; Member of the Family Law Bar Association National Committee
Michael Horton QC - Queen's Counsel at Coram Chambers and Member of the Family Law Bar Association National Committee
At 3.15pm: Oral evidence
Mr Harry Benson - Research Director at Marriage Foundation
Baroness Ruth Deech
View calendar
Division Votes
Tuesday 23rd November 2021
Health and Care Bill
voted Aye - against a party majority
One of 18 Conservative Aye votes vs 276 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 219 Noes - 280
Speeches
Wednesday 24th November 2021
Transport for the North

My constituents are not interested in quangos, but they are interested in actual transport infrastructure. The Minister knows how unhappy …

Written Answers
Wednesday 24th November 2021
UK Visas and Immigration: Asylum
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason people who have been refused asylum are …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 21st June 2021
City of Bradford (Referendum on Shipley and Keighley) Bill 2021-22
A Bill to make provision for a district-wide referendum in City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council area on the continued …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 18th October 2021
1. Employment and earnings
5 October 2021, received £500 from Reach Group Limited, 21st Floor, One Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London E14 5AP, for …
EDM signed
Monday 17th June 2019
IR35 OFF-PAYROLL TAX EXTENSION TO PRIVATE SECTOR
That this House notes with concern HM Treasury’s plans to extend the off-payroll (IR35) changes to the private sector; believes …
Supported Legislation
Monday 10th February 2020
Voter Registration Bill 2019-21
A Bill to prohibit persons from being registered to vote in Parliamentary elections at more than one address; and for …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Philip Davies has voted in 250 divisions, and 18 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Mar 2021 - Coronavirus - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 35 Conservative No votes vs 305 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 484 Noes - 76
22 Mar 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 253
10 Feb 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 327 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 526 Noes - 24
6 Jan 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative No votes vs 322 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 524 Noes - 16
1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
4 Nov 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 516 Noes - 38
13 Oct 2020 - Public Health: Coronavirus Regulations - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 82
6 Oct 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative No votes vs 285 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 287 Noes - 17
30 Sep 2020 - Coronavirus Act 2020 (Review of Temporary Provisions) - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Conservative No votes vs 330 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 330 Noes - 24
8 Jun 2020 - Divorce, Dissolution and Separation Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative No votes vs 207 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 231 Noes - 16
27 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 256
27 Apr 2021 - Delegated Legislation - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Conservative No votes vs 222 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 89
28 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 321 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 256
20 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative No votes vs 265 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 268 Noes - 204
8 Nov 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 278 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 283 Noes - 163
22 Nov 2021 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Conservative No votes vs 269 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 272 Noes - 246
23 Nov 2021 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 18 Conservative Aye votes vs 276 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 219 Noes - 280
23 Nov 2021 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Philip Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 294 Noes - 244
View All Philip Davies Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(10 debate interactions)
Priti Patel (Conservative)
Home Secretary
(7 debate interactions)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(6 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(20 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(7 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(5 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Philip Davies's debates

Shipley Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Shipley signature proportion
Petitions with most Shipley signatures
Philip Davies has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Philip Davies

13th May 2019
Philip Davies signed this EDM on Monday 17th June 2019

IR35 OFF-PAYROLL TAX EXTENSION TO PRIVATE SECTOR

Tabled by: Ged Killen (Labour (Co-op) - Rutherglen and Hamilton West)
That this House notes with concern HM Treasury’s plans to extend the off-payroll (IR35) changes to the private sector; believes that this could damage the UK’s flexible workforce, reducing avenues for work and harm the economy; further notes that the extension could force thousands of contractors into false-employment, potentially costing …
38 signatures
(Most recent: 7 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 19
Conservative: 7
Liberal Democrat: 5
Scottish National Party: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
1st May 2019
Philip Davies signed this EDM on Thursday 23rd May 2019

POLICE WIDOWS AND WIDOWERS PENSION EQUALITY

Tabled by: Holly Lynch (Labour - Halifax)
That this House recognises the invaluable contribution of all who have served, and continue to serve, in the police force, including those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the protection of others; acknowledges that the support provided by the spouse of a police officer is crucial both emotionally and practically; …
55 signatures
(Most recent: 3 Sep 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 25
Conservative: 16
Liberal Democrat: 5
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Philip Davies's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Philip Davies, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Philip Davies has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Philip Davies has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Philip Davies


A Bill to prohibit the use of affirmative and positive action in recruitment and appointment processes; to repeal the Sex Discrimination (Election Candidates) Act 2002; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 21st October 2011

A Bill to make provision for a district-wide referendum in City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council area on the continued inclusion of the areas covered by the Shipley and Keighley parliamentary constituencies in that district; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Monday 21st June 2021
Next Event - 2nd Reading (Commons)
Friday 25th February 2022

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for the succession of female heirs to hereditary titles; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 5th March 2019
(Read Debate)

29 Bills co-sponsored by Philip Davies

Voter Registration Bill 2019-21 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Peter Bone (CON)

Public Sector Exit Payments (Limitation) Bill 2019-21 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Mobile Homes Act 1983 (Amendment) Bill 2019-21 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Marriage and Civil Partnership (Minimum Age) (No.2) Bill 2019-21 - Private Members' Bill (under the Ten Minute Rule)
Sponsor - Pauline Latham (CON)

Bat Habitats Regulation Bill 2019-21 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Green Belt Protection Bill 2019-21 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Electronic Cigarettes (Regulation) Bill 2019-21 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Local Authorities (Borrowing and Investment) Bill 2019-21 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Caravan Sites Bill 2019-21 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

June Bank Holiday (Creation) Bill 2019-21 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Peter Bone (CON)

Drone (Regulation) (No. 2) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Peter Bone (CON)

Hospital (Parking Charges and Business Rates) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Peter Bone (CON)

Voter Registration (No. 2) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Peter Bone (CON)

Coastal Path (Definition) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Act 2018 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Peter Bone (CON)

Value Added Tax Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Prisons (Interference with Wireless Telegraphy) Act 2018 - Private Members' Bill (Ballot Bill)
Sponsor - Maria Caulfield (CON)

Principal Local Authorities (Grounds for Abolition) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Public Sector Exit Payments (Limitation) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Local Audit (Public Access to Documents) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Border Control Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Voter Registration Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

June Bank Holiday (Creation) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Peter Bone (CON)

Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act 2018 - Private Members' Bill (Ballot Bill)
Sponsor - Chris Bryant (LAB)

BBC Licence Fee (Civil Penalty) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Judicial Appointments and Retirements (Age Limits) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Benefits and Public Services (Restriction) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

International Development Assistance (Definition) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)

Local Authorities (Removal of Council Tax Restrictions) Bill 2017-19 - Private Members' Bill (Presentation Bill)
Sponsor - Christopher Chope (CON)


589 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the (a) value was of contracts issued, (b) which foreign governments were involved and (c) other communication services were provided by Government Communication Service International to foreign governments in the last 12 months.

Further to the information published in the Cabinet Office Annual Accounts for 2019-20, the total value of communications contracts issued by the Cabinet Office was £981,403 supporting UK security and trade objectives in Nigeria, Tunisia, Montenegro, Philippines and India. Government Communication Service International shares communication expertise and knowledge based on UK Government best practice in security, economy, health and education communications.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people have died from (a) influenza, (b) pneumonia and (c) a combination of influenza and pneumonia in each of the last 12 months, by (i) region and (ii) constituency.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Attorney General, what his current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in his (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

Throughout the pandemic, the Civil Service, including the Attorney General’s Office (AGO), Government Legal Department (GLD), Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Serious Fraud Office (SFO) and HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI), have followed, and continue to follow, the latest government guidance in relation to managing the risk of COVID-19 in the workplace, including any variations between the four nations of the UK.

In England, the BEIS ‘Working Safely during coronavirus (COVID-19)’ guidance provides sensible precautions employers can take to manage risk and support their staff. The guidance is available via this link: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-covid-19/offices-factories-and-labs#offices-7-2.

Whilst it is for individual employers to determine which mitigations are appropriate to adopt as they review their workplace risk assessments in light of the updated guidance. Face coverings, which are no longer required by law, are one possible mitigation employers could adopt if the situation / context warranted it.

HMCTS requires all court users to continue to wear face coverings in court buildings. The CPS’s advice to staff, which has been agreed with trade unions is that, unless exempt, all court users are required to wear a face covering in all public areas of court and tribunal buildings.

The AGO, GLD, CPS, SFO and HMCPSI fully support individuals who choose to wear a face covering in the workplace.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions for assaulting an emergency worker have related to assaults against (a) police officers, (b) NHS staff, (c) prison officers, (d) firefighters and (e) other emergency workers since the offence was introduced.

The Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act 2018 is legislation that amended section39 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 to provide offences relating to common assault or battery committed against an emergency worker while carrying out their duties.

The CPS maintains records of the number of offences in which a CPS prosecution commenced, including offences of assaulting an emergency worker. The data provided in the table detailed below shows the total number of offences in which a prosecution by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) commenced at magistrates’ courts under the Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act 2018 since it came into force on the 13th November 2018. However the CPS does not hold any central record of the details of complainants’ occupations.

2018/19 (Nov 18 - Mar 19)

2019/20

Total offences: Criminal Justice Act 1988 and section 1 of the Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act 2018 {39}

4,395

23,492

It should be noted that the figures relate to the number of offences and not the number of individual defendants. It may be the case that an individual defendant is charged with more than one offence. No data are held on the final outcome or if the charged offence was the substantive charge at finalisation.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a central record of the number of defendants charged with, or prosecuted for these offences. This information could only be obtained by examining CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Attorney General, what estimate she has made of the proportion of assaults on shop workers that were prosecuted in each of the last three years.

The CPS does not maintain a central record of complainants’ occupations, nor of the specific circumstances under which a person has been charged with an offence. This information could only be obtained by an examination of CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Attorney General, with reference to paragraph 2.4.137 in the report entitled The Independent Review of the Metropolitan Police Service's handling of non-recent sexual offence investigations alleged against persons of public prominence, published on 4 October 2019, what assessment the CPS has made of the potential merits of seeking the prosecution of the two individuals referred to as potential witnesses A and B for perverting the course of justice and wasting police time.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) prosecutes criminal cases that have been investigated by the police and other investigative organisations in England and Wales. If a crime is reported it is for the police to decide whether to investigate.

The CPS has not been asked to consider any charges against witness A or B, nor have they provided any early investigative advice to the police. It is a matter for the police as to whether they pursue an investigation in to witness A and witness B.

Once a case is referred to the CPS, any decision to prosecute is made in accordance with the Code for Crown Prosecutors, and must meet the evidential and public interest tests.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Attorney General, with reference to paragraph 1.37 of the report entitled The Independent Review of the Metropolitan Police Service's handling of non-recent sexual offence investigations alleged against persons of public prominence, published 4 October 2019, how many of the 159 cases of false allegations of rape or domestic violence were prosecuted; and how many of the (a) referrals and (b) subsequent prosecutions were related to (i) rape and (ii) domestic violence charges.

The Metropolitan Police Review refers to 159 cases of false allegations of rape and/or domestic violence made between January 2011 to May 2012. These were cases that had been referred to the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) for a charging decision. The Review erroneously refers to the period as being between 2013-14.

The 159 cases were reviewed by the DPP and the Crown Prosecution Service published a report of these cases, entitled ‘‘Charging Perverting the Course of Justice and Wasting Police Time in Cases involving allegedly False Rape and Domestic Violence Allegations’ in 2013.

Of the 159 cases referred for a charging decision,

  • 121 related to an allegedly false allegation of rape – of these 35 were prosecuted; 25 for perverting the course of justice and ten for wasting police time;

  • 27 related to allegedly false allegations of domestic violence (the term in use at the time) – six were prosecuted for perverting the course of justice and one for wasting police time.

  • 11 related to allegedly false allegations of both rape and domestic violence – three were prosecuted, all for perverting the course of justice.

During the period of the review there were 5,651 prosecutions for rape and 111,891 for domestic violence by the Crown Prosecution Service across England and Wales.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Attorney General, if she will extend the current 28 day limit for appealing a sentence under the unduly lenient sentence scheme; and if he will make a statement.

A referral to the Court of Appeal for consideration of a sentence as unduly lenient must be made within 28 days of the date of the sentence as set out in Schedule 3, Paragraph 1 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988. The 28 day statutory time limit is absolute; the statute provides no power to extend the time limit or to apply for leave to refer out of time.

There are no plans to extend the 28 day deadline. The current deadline provides an appropriate balance between the rights of victims and offenders, ensuring that offenders are not left uncertain of whether their sentence may be extended for a long period of time, whilst allowing victims sufficient time to request a review of the sentence under the scheme.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many of the cases referred to her Department under the unduly lenient sentence scheme were received on the 28th day after sentence outside office hours; and what proportion of those cases were (a) accepted and (b) refused in each of the last five years for which information is available.

2015 – of the 14 sentences that were received out of time only 1 was received on the 28th day and too late for it to be actioned.

2016 – of the 28 sentences that were received out of time only 1 was received on the 28th day and too late for it to be actioned.

2017 - of the 27 sentences that were received out of time only 1 was received on the 28th day and too late for it to be actioned.

2018 - of the 31 sentences that were received out of time 2 were received on the 28th day and too late for them to be actioned.

2019 - of the 43 sentences that were received out of time only 1 was received on the 28th day and too late for it to be actioned.

Whilst referrals for sentences are received and actioned on the 28th day, those are cases that are received early enough on the day to be actioned. An unduly lenient sentence case can only be taken forward if either myself or the Attorney General has approved action (on the basis of a complete prosecution file and proper legal advice) and an application has been filed with the Court of Appeal before the expiry of the statutory 28 day deadline. None of the above cases were accepted as being within time by my office as they were received too late to be actioned and consequently they were all marked as out of time.

A referral to the Court of Appeal for consideration of a sentence as unduly lenient must be made within 28 days of the date of the sentence as set out in Schedule 3, Paragraph 1 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988. The 28 day statutory time limit is absolute; the statute provides no power to extend the time limit or to apply for leave to refer out of time.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many of the cases referred to her Department under the unduly lenient sentence scheme were received before the 28th day after sentence time period had elapsed but outside office hours and where his office did not re-open until after that 28 day deadline had passed; and what proportion of those cases were (a) accepted and (b) refused in each of the last five years for which information is available.

2015 – of the 14 sentences that were received out of time only 1 was received on the 28th day and too late for it to be actioned.

2016 – of the 28 sentences that were received out of time only 1 was received on the 28th day and too late for it to be actioned.

2017 - of the 27 sentences that were received out of time only 1 was received on the 28th day and too late for it to be actioned.

2018 - of the 31 sentences that were received out of time 2 were received on the 28th day and too late for them to be actioned.

2019 - of the 43 sentences that were received out of time only 1 was received on the 28th day and too late for it to be actioned.

Whilst referrals for sentences are received and actioned on the 28th day, those are cases that are received early enough on the day to be actioned. An unduly lenient sentence case can only be taken forward if either myself or the Attorney General has approved action (on the basis of a complete prosecution file and proper legal advice) and an application has been filed with the Court of Appeal before the expiry of the statutory 28 day deadline. None of the above cases were accepted as being within time by my office as they were received too late to be actioned and consequently they were all marked as out of time.

A referral to the Court of Appeal for consideration of a sentence as unduly lenient must be made within 28 days of the date of the sentence as set out in Schedule 3, Paragraph 1 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988. The 28 day statutory time limit is absolute; the statute provides no power to extend the time limit or to apply for leave to refer out of time.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Attorney General, whether there is a legislative basis for the 28-day limit on appealing an unduly lenient sentence meaning something other than 28 days.

A referral to the Court of Appeal for consideration of a sentence as unduly lenient must be made within 28 days of the date of the sentence as set out in Schedule 3, Paragraph 1 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988. The 28 day statutory time limit is absolute; the statute provides no power to extend the time limit or to apply for leave to refer out of time.

An unduly lenient sentence case can only be taken forward if either myself or the Attorney General has approved action (on the basis of a complete prosecution file and proper legal advice) and an application has been filed with the Court of Appeal before the expiry of the statutory 28 day deadline. Tracey Hanson emailed the Attorney General’s office, requesting a review of a potentially unduly lenient sentence. The email was received by my office at 8.41pm on the 28th day and therefore was received after the close of court business. By the time my office received the email it was impossible to act on it and it was too late to file a referral with The Court of Appeal.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Attorney General, what the basis was for his authority to refuse the application of Tracey Hanson in relation to a potentially unduly lenient sentence; and if he will make a statement.

A referral to the Court of Appeal for consideration of a sentence as unduly lenient must be made within 28 days of the date of the sentence as set out in Schedule 3, Paragraph 1 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988. The 28 day statutory time limit is absolute; the statute provides no power to extend the time limit or to apply for leave to refer out of time.

An unduly lenient sentence case can only be taken forward if either myself or the Attorney General has approved action (on the basis of a complete prosecution file and proper legal advice) and an application has been filed with the Court of Appeal before the expiry of the statutory 28 day deadline. Tracey Hanson emailed the Attorney General’s office, requesting a review of a potentially unduly lenient sentence. The email was received by my office at 8.41pm on the 28th day and therefore was received after the close of court business. By the time my office received the email it was impossible to act on it and it was too late to file a referral with The Court of Appeal.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Attorney General, if he will extend the Unduly Lenient Sentence scheme to include additional offences.

The Unduly Lenient Sentence scheme is an important avenue for victims, family members and the public to ensure justice is delivered in the most serious cases.

This is why the Government has extended the scheme to cover further child sexual abuse offences, as well as some domestic abuse offences, including controlling and coercive behavior.

The remit of the scheme remains under constant review. We work closely with stakeholders to ensure it appropriately reflects the needs of victims, family members and the public.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of victims of violent crimes were (a) female aged 18 and over, (b) men aged 18 and over, (c) female under 18 and (d) male under 18 for the latest year for which figures are available.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the (a) age, (b) underlying medical conditions and (c) actual cause of death of each person recorded as having died in the last 14 days with or from covid-19.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what his current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in his (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

Throughout the pandemic, the Cabinet Office has followed, and continues to follow, the latest government guidance in relation to managing the risk of COVID-19 in the workplace, including any variations between the four nations of the UK.

In England, the BEIS ‘Working Safely during coronavirus (COVID-19)’ guidance provides sensible precautions employers can take to manage risk and support their staff. The guidance is available via this link: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-covid-19/offices-factories-and-labs#offices-7-2.

It is for individual employers to determine which mitigations are appropriate to adopt as they review their workplace risk assessments in light of the updated guidance.

Cabinet Office fully supports individuals who choose to wear a face covering in the workplace and asks staff to comply with any additional Health and Safety procedures in buildings they enter in the course of their work.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, on Unconscious bias training, what progress has been made on ensuring that (a) local government, (b) the police, (c) the NHS and (d) other parts of the public sector review their approaches to staff training as a result of the evidence and developments in the Civil Service.

Unconscious bias training courses were removed from the Civil Service cross-Civil Service curriculum in January 2021. The Cabinet Office also took action to remove unconscious bias training from any relevant learning and related materials. The Written Ministerial Statement on this was communicated to all departments.

The Civil Service is committed to maintaining a strong focus on diversity and inclusion. A review of existing learning is being conducted to ensure new learning utilises evidence-based interventions. The government expects other parts of the public sector to review their approaches in light of the evidence and developments in the Civil Service.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, on Unconscious bias training, what steps he has taken to ensure the phasing out of unconscious bias training for civil servants in Government departments.

Unconscious bias training courses were removed from the Civil Service cross-Civil Service curriculum in January 2021. The Cabinet Office also took action to remove unconscious bias training from any relevant learning and related materials. The Written Ministerial Statement on this was communicated to all departments.

The Civil Service is committed to maintaining a strong focus on diversity and inclusion. A review of existing learning is being conducted to ensure new learning utilises evidence-based interventions. The government expects other parts of the public sector to review their approaches in light of the evidence and developments in the Civil Service.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, what steps he has taken to phase out unconscious bias training in his Department.

Unconscious bias training courses were removed from the Civil Service cross-Civil Service curriculum in January 2021. The Cabinet Office also took action to remove unconscious bias training from any relevant learning and related materials. The Written Ministerial Statement on this was communicated to all departments.

The Civil Service is committed to maintaining a strong focus on diversity and inclusion. A review of existing learning is being conducted to ensure new learning utilises evidence-based interventions. The government expects other parts of the public sector to review their approaches in light of the evidence and developments in the Civil Service.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of people have died within 28 days of receiving a covid-19 vaccination.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of people have died within 28 days of receiving a covid-19 vaccination; and whether those people will all be considered to have died as a result of that vaccination.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will relocate some civil services jobs to Bradford district.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer given to PQ.133645.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what representations he has received from Bradford Council on the merits of relocating civil service jobs to Bradford district.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer given to PQ.133645.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2020.

The Cabinet Office promoted a number of virtual events to mark International Men’s Day on 19 November 2020, this included an event regarding Men & Mental Health.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in his Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.

The data requested could have the potential to identify an individual's personal information, and therefore would not normally be disclosed.

Information on senior salaries are already published in our annual reports. Information on salaries and roles for staff is published as Organogram of Staff Roles & Salaries on Gov.UK.

Salaries of individual civil servants may change because of promotions, re-ranking with a pay band, changes to Civil Service grade, or a change of role.

For 2020, pay awards were paid in accordance with appropriate central pay guidance which differ depending on grade and profession.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the cost-benefit analysis the Government has undertaken to inform its response to the covid-19 outbreak.

Government undertakes a wide range of analysis to support decision making and publishes information to keep Parliament and the wider public updated which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-statistics-and-analysis#social-impacts.

There is no single cost-benefit analysis.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people by ethnic group died from (a) flu and (b) pneumonia in each of the last five years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the mortality rates were for each ethnic group in each of the last five years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many (a) Union Jack, (b) St George, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) Flag of Wales flags his Department owns.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of the Cabinet Office and is included in this answer.

Cabinet Office and 10 Downing Street owns 29 Union Flags (including internal ceremonial flags), 3 St George’s, 4 Scottish Saltires and 2 Flags of Wales.

The information on how many times each flag has been flown is not held centrally.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many times the (a) Union Jack, (b) St George's flag, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) the flag of Wales has been flown from the Cabinet Office in each year since 2015.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of the Cabinet Office and is included in this answer.

Cabinet Office and 10 Downing Street owns 29 Union Flags (including internal ceremonial flags), 3 St George’s, 4 Scottish Saltires and 2 Flags of Wales.

The information on how many times each flag has been flown is not held centrally.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many (a) men and (b) women were killed by their (i) male and (ii) female current or ex-partner in the latest year for which information is available.

The information requested falls under the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many (a) men and (b) women were victims of homicide in the latest year for which information is available.

The information requested falls under the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in his (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

In line with Government guidelines and the Department’s risk assessment staff in BEIS offices are not required to wear face coverings but do have individual discretion to wear one should they wish to do so. It is the responsibility of individual employers to undertake a risk assessment and advise on the need for additional mitigations to be put in place within their buildings.

BEIS sponsors 5 Executive Agencies and 23 arm’s length bodies (Non-Departmental Public Bodies and Non-Ministerial Departments). They have organisational independence to set their own policies regarding the use of face covering which considers the risk assessment, the devolved administrations guidance and legislation that impacts on their location and operational need.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, what steps he has taken to phase out unconscious bias training in his Department.

The Written Ministerial Statement referred to in the question can be seen here: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2020-12-15/hcws652.

Since the removal of Unconscious Bias training from the core Civil Service learning offer in January 2021, BEIS no longer monitors activity or provides reports on completion.

Unconscious Bias is not on BEIS’s list of mandatory training courses and is not part of our forthcoming Diversity & Inclusion Curriculum.

Unconscious Bias training does not form part of BEIS’s Diversity & Inclusion Strategy.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to allow packaged and loose goods to be displayed in imperial measurements only.

The Government recognises that some people have a preference to use imperial units in their day to day lives. At the same time, it recognises that many others are not familiar with imperial units and that the use of metric is a necessity for British businesses to compete in markets around the world. Therefore, the UK system allows for information to be provided in imperial units alongside metric.

While the majority of trade in the UK is conducted using metric units to ensure consistency in commerce and science, there are already some limited exemptions that allow for certain traditional imperial measures to be used, without metric alongside, for specific uses. Now we have left the EU we will consider whether further limited exemptions can be applied for other traditional uses.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2020.

This Government is committed to levelling up opportunity and ensuring fairness for all - regardless of gender or background. International Men’s Day offers an opportunity to highlight where we need to do more to improve outcomes for men and boys and to talk about some of the work taken across the Government to support this work.

This work ranges from the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities, looking at outcomes for the whole population. This includes ethnic minorities and White British people, as well as preparation for an Employment Bill which, subject to further consultation, will make flexible working the default unless employers have good reason not to. We are also delivering the Suicide Prevention Workplan, which sets out action that is being taken across Government departments and the NHS to reduce suicides, including amongst men.

The Department marked International Men’s Day with an online ‘Being Real About Men’s Mental Health’ event, which all staff were invited to attend. We also shared resources with all Departmental staff on Movember and men’s health via the intranet, with links to websites offering advice and support.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in his Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.

The biggest pay rise given to an employee of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy in the last 12 months in percentage and cash terms was (a) 4.85%, and (b) £4,500.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many (a) new regulations have been introduced and (b) existing regulations have been abolished in each of the last four years.

BEIS does not have policy oversight for all regulations and does not maintain a central database of all those made and repealed. Information on all secondary legislation is available at www.legislation.gov.uk.

The annual business impact target reports available on GOV.UK include details of the regulatory provisions impacting business that have come into force or ceased to be in force since 2015.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many times the (a) Union Jack, (b) St George's flag, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) flag of Wales has been flown from the headquarters of his Department in London in each year since 2015.

The Department always flies the Union Jack. We do not hold records on how many times the St George’s flag, Scottish Saltire, and the flag of Wales have been flown.

Thirty-nine flag-flying events have taken place since 2017, with 15 instances where the type of flag flown was recorded.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many (a) Union Jack, (b) St George, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) Flag of Wales flags his Department owns.

The Department owns the following flags:

(a) Union Jack: 11

(b) St George: 1

(c) Scottish Saltire: 1

(d) Flag of Wales: 1.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
21st Feb 2020
Pay
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the increase in (a) the National Living Wage and (b) the National Minimum Wage in April 2020 on the number of (i) jobs and (ii) hours that people are employed.

Through the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and National Living Wage (NLW), we are ensuring the lowest paid are fairly rewarded for their contribution to the economy. This April, the NLW will increase by 6.2% to £8.72, meaning that a full-time worker on the wage will see their pay increase by over £930 over the year. Young workers on the NMW will see their pay increase between 4.6% and 6.5%. Collectively, these increases to the minimum wage are estimated to directly benefit 2.4 million workers.

In setting these rates, the Government consider the expert and independent advice of the Low Pay Commission (LPC). The LPC draws on economic, labour market and pay analysis, independent research and stakeholder evidence, to assess the impact of past minimum wage increases and their proposed rates for the following year.

To date, the LPC have found that the minimum wage has increased pay for the lowest earners without harming employment. They will publish their 2020 report later this year, which will contain a further assessment on the impact of the latest increases.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether it remains Government policy for new regulations to be subject to the one-in-two-out rule.

The Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015 requires the Government to set a Business Impact Target (BIT), which monitors changes to regulation and the economic impact this has on businesses. The ‘one-in-two-out’ rule has supported the BIT for previous Parliaments.

The Government is currently considering what the BIT should be for this Parliament.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress his Department has made on the review of charity lottery reforms announced in January 2020; and when he expects the review to be concluded.

Increases to society lottery sales and prize limits came into force in July 2020, and we committed to reviewing their impact after 12 months.

We have received initial data from the Gambling Commission and will respond further in due course.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what his current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in his (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

Throughout the pandemic, DCMS has followed, and continues to follow, the latest government guidance in relation to managing the risk of COVID-19 in the workplace, including any variations between the four nations of the UK.

In England, the BEIS ‘Working Safely during coronavirus (COVID-19)’ guidance provides sensible precautions employers can take to manage risk and support their staff. The guidance is available via this link: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-covid-19/offices-factories-and-labs#offices-7-2.

It is for individual employers to determine which mitigations are appropriate to adopt as they review their workplace risk assessments in light of the updated guidance. Face coverings, which are no longer required by law, are one possible mitigation employers could adopt if the situation/context warranted it. DCMS fully supports individuals who choose to wear a face covering in the workplace.

29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many gambling licences the Gambling Commission has (a) granted and (b) refused in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the average time taken by the Gambling Commission to make a determination on an application for a gambling licence. This is measured across all applicants, from the date their initial payment is received to the date a final decision is made and their case is closed.

Average time taken by the Gambling Commission to make a determination on an application for a gambling licence

Year

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

Time (days)

99 days

66 days

75 days

123 days

85 days

The increase from 66 days to 99 between 2019/20 and 2020/21 was a product of the COVID-19 pandemic affecting the Commission’s delivery capacity.

The average time is influenced by exceptional cases. These are reflected below in the table showing the longest time taken to make a determination on an application in each of the last five years.

Longest time taken by the Gambling Commission to make a determination on an application for a gambling licence

Year

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

Time (days)

945 days

370 days

254 days

2023 days

441 days

These are complex cases, some of which go to panel followed by appeals to the tribunal and court of appeal. Some cases resulted in the applicant withdrawing the application, or the applicant requesting additional time to provide the necessary information.

The table below shows the number of gambling licence applications that the Gambling Commission is currently considering, and the length of time that each of the applications has been under consideration.

No. of gambling licence applications the Gambling Commission is considering; and how long each of those applications has been under consideration

Time (days)

0-30 days

21-60 days

61-90 days

over 90 days

No. of licence applications

6

23

16

38

The Gambling Commission has granted 1,117 licences in total over the last five years, and the table below shows the number of gambling licence applications that the Gambling Commission has granted and refused during this period.

No. of gambling licences the Gambling Commission has granted / refused in each of the last five years

Year

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

No. of licences granted

170

216

212

291

228

No. of licences refused

2

1

3

8

4

The Commission introduced an incomplete application process in 2017/18, in order to prevent applications being submitted which would be refused owing to lack of necessary information. This has contributed to the small number of refused licences over the last three years, with rejected applications now tending to relate to novel betting products or uncertainty over an applicant’s source of funds.

29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many gambling licence applications the Gambling Commission is considering; and for how long each of those applications has been under consideration.

The table below shows the average time taken by the Gambling Commission to make a determination on an application for a gambling licence. This is measured across all applicants, from the date their initial payment is received to the date a final decision is made and their case is closed.

Average time taken by the Gambling Commission to make a determination on an application for a gambling licence

Year

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

Time (days)

99 days

66 days

75 days

123 days

85 days

The increase from 66 days to 99 between 2019/20 and 2020/21 was a product of the COVID-19 pandemic affecting the Commission’s delivery capacity.

The average time is influenced by exceptional cases. These are reflected below in the table showing the longest time taken to make a determination on an application in each of the last five years.

Longest time taken by the Gambling Commission to make a determination on an application for a gambling licence

Year

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

Time (days)

945 days

370 days

254 days

2023 days

441 days

These are complex cases, some of which go to panel followed by appeals to the tribunal and court of appeal. Some cases resulted in the applicant withdrawing the application, or the applicant requesting additional time to provide the necessary information.

The table below shows the number of gambling licence applications that the Gambling Commission is currently considering, and the length of time that each of the applications has been under consideration.

No. of gambling licence applications the Gambling Commission is considering; and how long each of those applications has been under consideration

Time (days)

0-30 days

21-60 days

61-90 days

over 90 days

No. of licence applications

6

23

16

38

The Gambling Commission has granted 1,117 licences in total over the last five years, and the table below shows the number of gambling licence applications that the Gambling Commission has granted and refused during this period.

No. of gambling licences the Gambling Commission has granted / refused in each of the last five years

Year

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

No. of licences granted

170

216

212

291

228

No. of licences refused

2

1

3

8

4

The Commission introduced an incomplete application process in 2017/18, in order to prevent applications being submitted which would be refused owing to lack of necessary information. This has contributed to the small number of refused licences over the last three years, with rejected applications now tending to relate to novel betting products or uncertainty over an applicant’s source of funds.

29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the longest time taken by the Gambling Commission to make a determination on an application for a gambling licence has been in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the average time taken by the Gambling Commission to make a determination on an application for a gambling licence. This is measured across all applicants, from the date their initial payment is received to the date a final decision is made and their case is closed.

Average time taken by the Gambling Commission to make a determination on an application for a gambling licence

Year

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

Time (days)

99 days

66 days

75 days

123 days

85 days

The increase from 66 days to 99 between 2019/20 and 2020/21 was a product of the COVID-19 pandemic affecting the Commission’s delivery capacity.

The average time is influenced by exceptional cases. These are reflected below in the table showing the longest time taken to make a determination on an application in each of the last five years.

Longest time taken by the Gambling Commission to make a determination on an application for a gambling licence

Year

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

Time (days)

945 days

370 days

254 days

2023 days

441 days

These are complex cases, some of which go to panel followed by appeals to the tribunal and court of appeal. Some cases resulted in the applicant withdrawing the application, or the applicant requesting additional time to provide the necessary information.

The table below shows the number of gambling licence applications that the Gambling Commission is currently considering, and the length of time that each of the applications has been under consideration.

No. of gambling licence applications the Gambling Commission is considering; and how long each of those applications has been under consideration

Time (days)

0-30 days

21-60 days

61-90 days

over 90 days

No. of licence applications

6

23

16

38

The Gambling Commission has granted 1,117 licences in total over the last five years, and the table below shows the number of gambling licence applications that the Gambling Commission has granted and refused during this period.

No. of gambling licences the Gambling Commission has granted / refused in each of the last five years

Year

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

No. of licences granted

170

216

212

291

228

No. of licences refused

2

1

3

8

4

The Commission introduced an incomplete application process in 2017/18, in order to prevent applications being submitted which would be refused owing to lack of necessary information. This has contributed to the small number of refused licences over the last three years, with rejected applications now tending to relate to novel betting products or uncertainty over an applicant’s source of funds.

21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, what steps he has taken to phase out unconscious bias training in his Department.

Following the Written Statement HCWS652, unconscious bias training was removed from DCMS’s core learning offer from January 2021 and replaced by a new learning module for all staff on ‘Inclusion in the Civil Service’. Unconscious bias training is no longer required to be completed by individuals serving on recruitment panels.

DCMS Arms-Length Bodies (ALBs) were made aware of this change and the new ‘Inclusion in the Civil Service’ course at a meeting of HR Directors on the 14th of January 2021.

18th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will introduce a registration and licensing regime for online gambling affiliates.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. This closed on 31 March and received approximately 16,000 submissions from a broad range of interested organisations and individuals, including representatives of gambling affiliates. We are considering all the evidence received carefully and aim to publish a white paper by the end of the year outlining conclusions and next steps.

18th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will bring online gambling affiliates under the purview of the Gambling Commission.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. This closed on 31 March and received approximately 16,000 submissions from a broad range of interested organisations and individuals, including representatives of gambling affiliates. We are considering all the evidence received carefully and aim to publish a white paper by the end of the year outlining conclusions and next steps.

18th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will meet with representatives of gambling affiliates to discuss the role they can play in promoting responsible gambling.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. This closed on 31 March and received approximately 16,000 submissions from a broad range of interested organisations and individuals, including representatives of gambling affiliates. We are considering all the evidence received carefully and aim to publish a white paper by the end of the year outlining conclusions and next steps.

17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much the Arts Council spent on (a) opera and (b) brass bands in each of the last two financial years.

The figures for Arts Council England funding for opera and brass bands in financial years 2019/20, 2020/21 are given below.

The figures for each year are broken down into primary and secondary funding and then a total. Primary classification indicates that, in this case, opera or brass bands, was a major focus of the activity funded with the assumption most of this amount went to funding this activity. Secondary classification indicates this was a minor focus of the activity and so it cannot be assumed this full amount of funding went towards this activity.

A small number of projects are classified under both opera and brass bands, so these figures cannot be added together, as these projects would be double counted.

ACE Opera Funding:

Year

Primary

Secondary

Total

2019/20

£59,230,322

£26,335,477

£85,565,799

2020/21

£61,920,159

£37,675,988

£99,596,147

ACE Brass Bands Funding:

Year

Primary

Secondary

Total

2019/20

£375,339

£765,573

£1,140,912

2020/21

£392,670

£5,132,587

£5,525,257



19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he plans to take fiscal steps to (a) promote boxing live events in the UK and (b) help ensure that a forthcoming boxing match between Anthony Joshua and Tyson Fury takes place in the UK.

The Government is supportive of bringing major sports events to the UK and our approach is set out in the Gold Framework publication. Fiscal responsibility sits with Her Majesty's Treasury.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will take steps to ensure that a forthcoming boxing match between Anthony Joshua and Tyson Fury takes place in the UK.

The UK is a world-leading host for major sporting events, having successfully delivered some of the biggest events in recent years. The location for this match is a matter for the organisers, promoters and athletes themselves to decide.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the Gambling Commission (a) received any external support or advice and (b) used the same framework for assessment of affordability thresholds as set out in the consultation’s call for evidence ahead of publishing its short survey seeking views on how gambling companies interact with their customers, published on 18 January 2021.

The Gambling Commission’s consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction explores new requirements for operators on identifying and intervening where customers may be at risk of experiencing gambling related harm. It covers a range of issues around identifying consumers in vulnerable situations and assessing affordability.

The Commission is working to obtain a wide range of evidence and will be led by the evidence it receives in deciding how to proceed. It has extended the consultation by a month to allow for more evidence to be submitted. The Commission designed its short survey to be consistent with the main consultation and call for evidence and to give the widest range of stakeholders an opportunity to contribute.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 30 November 2020 to Question 122643 on Gambling: Coronavirus, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of adult gaming centres, bingo halls and casinos reopening in tier three areas.

The government, with advice from SAGE, reviewed the impact of the previous tiering arrangements and decided that unfortunately stricter rules on tier 3 closures would be necessary to have an impact on the rate of transmission in very high alert areas. This led to the decision that all hospitality and indoor entertainment venues in tier 3 areas would have to close, including casinos, bingo halls and adult gaming centres. SAGE advice is independent and published on a regular basis on: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies

The government has continued to engage with the land-based gambling sector throughout the pandemic, including with its trade associations the Betting and Gaming Council, Bacta and the Bingo Association. The Minister for Sports, Heritage and Tourism has had a series of roundtable discussions with the industry to discuss the impact of Covid-19, including representatives from two of Britain’s largest AGC operators. DCMS officials have been in regular contact with the representative trade associations and fed their views into the government decision-making process, and they are continuing to do so.

Government has set out an analysis of the health, economic and social impacts of the tiered approach, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-health-economic-and-social-effects-of-covid-19-and-the-tiered-approach. As on previous occasions, local data packs have also been published.

Epidemiological data and projection models on local restriction tiers, including commentary on individual tier allocation decisions, can also be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938964/Coronavirus_England_briefing_26_November.pdf.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 30 November 2020 to Question 122644 on Gambling: Coronavirus, if he will publish the evidence on the rate of covid-19 transmissions in adult gaming centres, bingo hall and casinos supporting the decision to close them in tier three areas.

The government, with advice from SAGE, reviewed the impact of the previous tiering arrangements and decided that unfortunately stricter rules on tier 3 closures would be necessary to have an impact on the rate of transmission in very high alert areas. This led to the decision that all hospitality and indoor entertainment venues in tier 3 areas would have to close, including casinos, bingo halls and adult gaming centres. SAGE advice is independent and published on a regular basis on: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies

The government has continued to engage with the land-based gambling sector throughout the pandemic, including with its trade associations the Betting and Gaming Council, Bacta and the Bingo Association. The Minister for Sports, Heritage and Tourism has had a series of roundtable discussions with the industry to discuss the impact of Covid-19, including representatives from two of Britain’s largest AGC operators. DCMS officials have been in regular contact with the representative trade associations and fed their views into the government decision-making process, and they are continuing to do so.

Government has set out an analysis of the health, economic and social impacts of the tiered approach, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-health-economic-and-social-effects-of-covid-19-and-the-tiered-approach. As on previous occasions, local data packs have also been published.

Epidemiological data and projection models on local restriction tiers, including commentary on individual tier allocation decisions, can also be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938964/Coronavirus_England_briefing_26_November.pdf.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what opportunity the Government made available to (a) adult gaming centres, (b) bingo halls and (c) casinos to adopt covid-secure measures as a condition of re-opening in areas subject to Tier Three covid-19 restrictions from 2 December 2020.

The government, with advice from SAGE, reviewed the impact of the previous tiering arrangements and decided that unfortunately stricter rules on tier 3 closures would be necessary to have an impact on the rate of transmission in very high alert areas. This led to the decision that all hospitality and indoor entertainment venues in tier 3 areas would have to close, including casinos, bingo halls and adult gaming centres. SAGE advice is independent and published on a regular basis on: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies

The government has continued to engage with the land-based gambling sector throughout the pandemic, including with its trade associations the Betting and Gaming Council, Bacta and the Bingo Association. The Minister for Sports, Heritage and Tourism has had a series of roundtable discussions with the industry to discuss the impact of Covid-19, including representatives from two of Britain’s largest AGC operators. DCMS officials have been in regular contact with the representative trade associations and fed their views into the government decision-making process, and they are continuing to do so.

Government has set out an analysis of the health, economic and social impacts of the tiered approach, which can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-health-economic-and-social-effects-of-covid-19-and-the-tiered-approach. As on previous occasions, local data packs have also been published.

Epidemiological data and projection models on local restriction tiers, including commentary on individual tier allocation decisions, can also be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938964/Coronavirus_England_briefing_26_November.pdf.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what evidence his Department received on the rate of covid-19 transmission in (a) adult gaming centres, (b) bingo halls and (c) casinos to support the decision for those businesses based in tier three local covid alert level areas to remain closed from 2 December 2020.

The government, with advice from SAGE, reviewed the impact of the previous tiering arrangements and decided that unfortunately stricter rules on tier 3 closures would be necessary to have an impact on the rate of transmission in very high alert areas. This led to the decision that all hospitality and indoor entertainment venues in tier 3 areas would have to close, including casinos, bingo halls and adult gaming centres. SAGE advice is independent and published on a regular basis on: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies

The government has continued to engage with the land-based gambling sector throughout the pandemic, including with its trade associations the Betting and Gaming Council, Bacta and the Bingo Association. The Minister for Sports, Heritage and Tourism has had a series of roundtable discussions with the industry to discuss the impact of Covid-19, including representatives from two of Britain’s largest AGC operators. DCMS officials have been in regular contact with the representative trade associations and fed their views into the government decision-making process, and they are continuing to do so.

Government has set out an analysis of the health, economic and social impacts of the tiered approach, which can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-health-economic-and-social-effects-of-covid-19-and-the-tiered-approach. As on previous occasions, local data packs have also been published.

Epidemiological data and projection models on local restriction tiers, including commentary on individual tier allocation decisions, can also be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938964/Coronavirus_England_briefing_26_November.pdf.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2020.

International Men’s Day offers an opportunity to highlight where we need to do more to improve outcomes for men and boys and to talk about some of the work across Government to tackle those issues.

This work ranges from the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities looking at outcomes for the whole population - including ethnic minorities and White British people; preparation for an Employment Bill which, subject to further consultation, will make flexible working the default unless employers have good reason not to; delivering the Suicide Prevention Workplan, which sets out action that is being taken across Government departments and the NHS to reduce suicides, including amongst men.

This Government is committed to levelling up opportunity and ensuring fairness for all - regardless of gender or background.

9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how long it takes the Gambling Commission to approve an application from a charity for accreditation to receive LCCP RET contributions.

The Gambling Commission requires all operators licensed under the Gambling Act 2005 to make an annual contribution to fund research, prevention and treatment of problem gambling, and publishes a list of organisations to which operators may direct this contribution. The time taken by the Commission to reach a decision about whether an organisation can be included on that list depends on a number of factors. These include the quality and completeness of the information provided by the organisation, the complexity of issues associated with information provided and whether further investigation into independent oversight or potential conflicts of interest is required.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in his Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.

The biggest pay rise given to a member of staff in DCMS in the last 12 months was £20,035.00 which was an increase of 59.95%. This was a member of staff being promoted from close to the old band B minimum (£33,107) to the new band A floor (£51,729), plus a Recruitment & Retention Allowance to retain specialist skills within the organisation.The average pay increase as part of the pay award across the workforce was 2.5%.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he and his Ministers have had discussions with Ministers in the Departments for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and for Housing, Communities and Local Government on the potential effect on heritage railways of the (a) proposals in the DEFRA consultation on the cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels and wood and (b) number of planning permissions granted by MHCLG for new surface coal mines; and if he will make a statement.

I attended an MP-level meeting on the future of coal for heritage railways in March of this year. My Defra Ministerial colleague was in attendance at this meeting, at which discussions included the economic and social benefits of the heritage rail industry, the industry’s efforts to diversify the sector through carbon offsetting and seeking alternative fuels, and the status of extant planning permissions for mines in the UK.

My Defra Ministerial colleague confirmed that the consultation on the cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels and wood applies only to residential settings, thereby placing heritage railways outwith the scope of this consultation.

Heritage railway representatives took an action from the meeting to contact officials at MHCLG regarding planning permissions for new and existing surface coal mines.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when the Gambling Commission plans to announce the outcome of their consultation into Society Lotteries; and whether that announcement will include the implementation date for the new society lottery sales limits.

The Gambling Commission’s consultation on changes to its licence conditions and new transparency measures closes on 12 March. Secondary legislation to implement the reforms to society lotteries announced in July 2019 was laid in January 2020 and is scheduled to be debated on 9 March in the House of Lords, and 10 March in the House of Commons. The Gambling Commission expects to publish its response to the consultation in April, subject to the replies it receives.

A 3-month notice period for the sector is also required before the Gambling Commission is able to bring the changed licence conditions into force, so I therefore expect these changes to be introduced in the summer.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many times the (a) Union Jack, (b) St George's flag, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) flag of Wales has been flown from the headquarters of his Department in London in each year since 2015.

The Union flag is generally flown everyday above the DCMS offices. For certain occasions we fly other flags including the Commonwealth Flag, Merchant Navy Flag, Rainbow Flag, Armed Forces Flag, Transgender Flag and Red Ribbon Flag.

We have flown the Flag of St George on St George’s Day since 2007. We also fly the Home Nations flags in support of England, Scotland or Wales when they reach the latter stages of major sporting events.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many (a) Union Jack, (b) St George, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) Flag of Wales flags his Department owns.

The Department owns the following:

a) 260 Union Flags plus 114 Union Banners for flying in Windsor

b) 27 Flags of St George

c) 1 Scottish Saltire

d) 1 Flag of Wales

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the timeframe is for the proposed increase in charity lottery limits announced on 16 July 2019 to come into force.

New limits to the per draw sales, annual sales and maximum prize for society lotteries were announced on 16 July 2019. Affirmative secondary legislation is required to change the limits, and the Gambling Commission is also required to consult on changes to its Licence Conditions and Codes of Practice (LCCP).

I hope to lay the draft Order in Parliament in January 2020, and the changes to come into force during 2020. The Order will include transitional arrangements for the first year, to enable operators to take advantage of the new limits as soon as possible.

The Gambling Commission has already launched its consultation in anticipation of the legislation, and this will help ensure the new limits can come into force as swiftly as possible. Their consultation also covers measures to improve transparency of society lotteries and will run until 12 March 2020. There will then be a further 3 month notice period before the changes can be implemented, which is likely to be in the summer.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 7 September 2021 to Question 40787 on Free Schools: Sports, if he will set out the location and nature of the (a) indoor and outdoor facilities for sport and (b) site for additional sporting facilities referred to in the Answer.

One in a Million Free School currently has access to an indoor creative arts studio area and an outdoor single Multi-Use Games Area on site. The department does not hold information on the off-site facilities that the school is currently accessing. The site that the department has identified to provide additional sporting facilities for the school is on Bolton Road in Bradford and the department is currently in the process of assessing its suitability for use by the trust.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 23 July 2021 to Question 33181 on Free Schools: Sports, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the sporting facilities at One in a Million Free School.

One in a Million Free School currently has access to both indoor and outdoor facilities for sport, either within the school grounds or through off site arrangements. The Department has identified a site to provide additional sporting facilities for the school.

22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in his (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, the Department has followed, and continues to follow, the latest Government guidance in relation to managing the risk of COVID-19 in the workplace, including any variations between the four nations of the UK.

In England, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy ‘Working Safely during coronavirus (COVID-19)’ guidance provides sensible precautions employers can take to manage risk and support their staff. The guidance is available via the following link: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-covid-19/offices-factories-and-labs#offices-7-2.

It is for individual employers to determine which mitigations are appropriate to adopt as they review their workplace risk assessments in light of the updated guidance. Face coverings, which are no longer required by law, are one possible mitigation employers could adopt if the situation warranted it.

The Department fully supports individuals who choose to wear a face covering in the workplace.

Other related bodies to the Department set their own policies on how their staff should work in offices and are not required to report this back centrally.

14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of free schools which do not yet have adequate sporting facilities.

All free schools have indoor facilities for sport and are required to have suitable outdoor provision for physical education. This could be through sports facilities within the school grounds or through off-site arrangements.

21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, what steps he has taken to phase out unconscious bias training in his Department.

In October 2020, the Department began phasing out the unconscious bias training by removing the product from the mandatory training schedule.

Following the Ministerial Statement on 15 December 2020, in January 2021 the Department fully removed unconscious bias training.

16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of masks on levels of (a) learning and (b) development in secondary school students.

The Department continues to work closely with other Government Departments throughout its response to the COVID-19 outbreak, including Public Health England (PHE) and the Department of Health and Social Care, as well as stakeholders across the sector. The Department is continuing to work to ensure that our policy is based on the latest scientific and medical advice, in order to develop comprehensive guidance based on the PHE-endorsed ‘system of controls’ and to understand the effect of these measures on staff, pupils and parents.

On 22 February, the Department published ‘Evidence summary: COVID-19 - children, young people and education settings’, which includes a section on face coverings, details of which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/evidence-summary-covid-19-children-young-people-and-education-settings.

The Department recently published updated guidance for schools to support the return to full attendance, which includes updated advice on face coverings. The guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak.

In addition, the Department also published updated guidance on the use of face coverings in education for schools and other education institutions that teach people in Years 7 and above in England which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/face-coverings-in-education.

As the guidance outlines, in settings where pupils in Year 7 and above are educated, we recommend that face coverings should be worn by staff and pupils when moving around the premises, such as in corridors and communal areas where social distancing cannot easily be maintained.

Since 8 March, the Department has recommended that face coverings should also be worn by staff and pupils in classrooms and in other learning environments, such as workshops, and during activities, unless social distancing can be maintained.

The best available scientific evidence is that, when used correctly, wearing a face covering may reduce the spread of COVID-19 droplets in certain circumstances, helping to protect others.

We recognise that the wearing of face coverings may impact communication, but, on balance, increased use of face coverings will strengthen the current safety measures in place in schools following the increased transmissibility of new COVID-19 variants and whilst prevalence remains high in the community.

We are recommending these additional precautionary measures for a for a time limited period until Easter. As with all measures, we will keep this under review and update guidance as necessary.

3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of how much parents spend on average on school uniform, per (a) primary and (b) secondary pupil in the state-maintained sector each year.

The Department commissioned the Cost of School Uniform report in 2015: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/436576/RR474_Cost_of_school_uniform.pdf. This report found that the average expenditure for a school uniform at primary school was £192.14 for boys and £201.04 for girls. For secondary pupils, the average costs were £231.01 for boys and £239.93 for girls.

No school uniform should be so expensive as to leave pupils or their families feeling unable to apply to the school of their choice. The Government is supporting the current Private Members' Bill (Guidance about the Cost of School Uniform) which was introduced to Parliament on 5 February 2021, to make our guidance on the cost considerations for school uniform statutory.

3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of covid-19 lockdowns on the attainment gap between boys and girls in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools.

Understanding the impact of the COVID-19 disruption on the attainment and progress of all students is a key research priority for the Government, and we have commissioned an independent research and assessment agency to provide a baseline assessment of catch-up needs for pupils in schools in England and monitor progress over the course of the year. This research is based on assessments that schools are already using over this academic year. Initial findings from the research were recently published on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupils-progress-in-the-2020-to-2021-academic-year-interim-report. The next stages of the research will enable us to break down impacts on different subgroups of pupils, including analysis of how boys’ and girls’ attainment may have been differentially affected by time out of school due to COVID-19.

The Government recognises that extended school and college restrictions have had a substantial impact on children and young people’s education and are committed to helping pupils make up learning lost as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. In January 2021, my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister committed to work with parents, teachers and pupils to develop a long-term plan to help pupils make up their learning over the course of this Parliament.

In February 2021, the Department appointed Sir Kevan Collins as Education Recovery Commissioner to advise on the approach for education recovery and the development of a long-term plan to help pupils make up their learning over the course of this Parliament. As an immediate step, we have made available a further £700 million to support education recovery measures. This builds on the £1 billion from last year and brings total available in education recovery to £1.7 billion. Funding will support pupils across nurseries, schools and colleges and provides an additional one-off ‘Recovery Premium’ for schools, expansion of tutoring in schools and colleges, summer schools in 2021 and early language support.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish advice that received by his Department from the DHSC Moral and Ethical Advisory Group on the ethics of mass screening in children.

Lateral flow device (LFD) tests have been widely and successfully used to detect asymptomatic COVID-19 cases. The speed and convenience of the tests supports the detection of the virus in asymptomatic individuals, who would not otherwise have been tested. LFD tests are approved by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency for home use. The tests are highly specific, with low chances of false positives. For this reason, we have confidence in the value and accuracy of lateral flow tests.

Those who test positive using an LFD test at home are being asked to self-isolate and take a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to confirm the positive result. This is a further measure designed to minimise the chance of false positives. We are asking that the family members and close contacts self-isolate to help break the chains of transmission.

Regarding ethics, the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) have discussed ethical considerations with regard to testing in a number of forums. The Department for Education has not received separate advice from the DHSC Moral and Ethical Advisory Group, with minutes of meetings of this group found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/moral-and-ethical-advisory-group.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish his estimate of the number of family members required to self-isolate in England as a result of lateral flow test results in English school and college pupil and student populations.

Lateral flow device (LFD) tests have been widely and successfully used to detect asymptomatic COVID-19 cases. The speed and convenience of the tests supports the detection of the virus in asymptomatic individuals, who would not otherwise have been tested. LFD tests are approved by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency for home use. The tests are highly specific, with low chances of false positives. For this reason, we have confidence in the value and accuracy of lateral flow tests.

Those who test positive using an LFD test at home are being asked to self-isolate and take a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to confirm the positive result. This is a further measure designed to minimise the chance of false positives. We are asking that the family members and close contacts self-isolate to help break the chains of transmission.

Regarding ethics, the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) have discussed ethical considerations with regard to testing in a number of forums. The Department for Education has not received separate advice from the DHSC Moral and Ethical Advisory Group, with minutes of meetings of this group found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/moral-and-ethical-advisory-group.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish his assessment of the predictive (a) value and (b) accuracy of lateral flow tests in English (i) school and (ii) college pupil and student populations.

Lateral flow device (LFD) tests have been widely and successfully used to detect asymptomatic COVID-19 cases. The speed and convenience of the tests supports the detection of the virus in asymptomatic individuals, who would not otherwise have been tested. LFD tests are approved by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency for home use. The tests are highly specific, with low chances of false positives. For this reason, we have confidence in the value and accuracy of lateral flow tests.

Those who test positive using an LFD test at home are being asked to self-isolate and take a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to confirm the positive result. This is a further measure designed to minimise the chance of false positives. We are asking that the family members and close contacts self-isolate to help break the chains of transmission.

Regarding ethics, the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) have discussed ethical considerations with regard to testing in a number of forums. The Department for Education has not received separate advice from the DHSC Moral and Ethical Advisory Group, with minutes of meetings of this group found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/moral-and-ethical-advisory-group.

1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking in response to the World Health Organisation's guidance on the requirement for children to wear face masks in schools.

On 21 August 2020, the World Health Organisation published a statement advising that children aged 12 and over should wear a face covering “under the same conditions as adults, in particular when they cannot guarantee at least a 1-metre distance from others and there is widespread transmission in the area.” Therefore, since September 2020, face coverings have been included as an element of the system of controls that schools are putting in place to reduce risk.

The Department has recently published updated guidance to support the full opening to education from 8 March 2021, which includes updated advice on face coverings which can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/964351/Schools_coronavirus_operational_guidance.pdf.

The Department has also published its evidence summary, ‘COVID-19 – children, young people and education settings’, which can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/963639/DfE_Evidence_summary_COVID-19_-_children__young_people_and_education_settings.pdf.

As the guidance outlines, where pupils in Year 7 and above are educated, the Department recommends that face coverings should be worn by adults and pupils when moving around the premises, outside of classrooms, such as in corridors and communal areas where social distancing cannot easily be maintained.

In addition, from 8 March 2021, the Department now also recommends that in schools where pupils in Year 7 and above are educated, face coverings should be worn in classrooms unless social distancing can be maintained.

In primary schools, the Department recommends that face coverings should be worn by staff and adult visitors in situations where social distancing between adults is not possible (for example, when moving around in corridors and communal areas). Children in primary school do not need to wear a face covering.

The Department is recommending these additional precautionary measures for a limited period until Easter. As with all measures, the Department will keep this under review and update guidance as necessary.

1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he made of the benefits and risks of face masks for children before recommending face masks be worn by students in secondary schools.

The Department continues to work closely with other Government departments throughout its response to the COVID-19 outbreak, including Public Health England (PHE) and the Department of Health and Social Care, as well as stakeholders across the sector. The Department continues to work to ensure that policy is based on the latest scientific and medical advice, to develop comprehensive guidance based on the PHE-endorsed ‘system of controls’ and to understand the results and effectiveness of these measures on staff, pupils and parents.

The Department has recently published updated guidance to support the full opening to education from 8 March 2021, which includes updated advice on face coverings. The guidance can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/964351/Schools_coronavirus_operational_guidance.pdf.

The Department has also published its evidence summary, ‘COVID-19 – children, young people and education settings’, which can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/963639/DfE_Evidence_summary_COVID-19_-_children__young_people_and_education_settings.pdf.

As the guidance outlines, where pupils in Year 7 and above are educated, the Department recommends that face coverings should be worn by adults and pupils when moving around the premises, outside of classrooms, such as in corridors and communal areas where social distancing cannot easily be maintained.

In addition, from 8 March 2021, the Department now also recommends that in schools where pupils in Year 7 and above are educated, face coverings should be worn in classrooms unless social distancing can be maintained.

The best available scientific evidence is that, when used correctly, wearing a face covering may reduce the spread of COVID-19 droplets in certain circumstances, helping to protect others.

The Department recognises that the wearing of face coverings may impact communication. However, on balance, increased use of face coverings will strengthen the current safety measures in place in schools and colleges and support the return to face-to-face education.

The Department is recommending these additional precautionary measures for a limited period until Easter. As with all measures, the Department will keep this under review and update guidance as necessary.

24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the scientific evidence which shows that mask wearing among school children prevents transmission of covid-19 in a real world setting.

The Department continues to work closely with other government departments throughout its response to the COVID-19 outbreak, including Public Health England (PHE) and the Department of Health and Social Care, as well as stakeholders across the sector. We continue to work to ensure that our policy is based on the latest scientific and medical advice, to continue to develop comprehensive guidance based on the PHE-endorsed ‘system of controls’ and to understand the impact and effectiveness of these measures on staff, pupils and parents.

The Department has recently published updated guidance to support the full opening to education from 8 March, which includes updated advice on face coverings. The guidance can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/964351/Schools_coronavirus_operational_guidance.pdf

The Department has also published its evidence summary on COVID-19 – children, young people and education settings, which can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/963639/DfE_Evidence_summary_COVID-19_-_children__young_people_and_education_settings.pdf

As the guidance outlines, where pupils and students in Year 7 and above are educated, we recommend that face coverings should be worn by adults, pupils and students when moving around the premises, outside of classrooms, such as in corridors and communal areas where social distancing cannot easily be maintained.

In addition, from 8 March, the Department now also recommends that in those schools and colleges where pupils and students in Year 7 and above are educated, face coverings should be worn in classrooms unless social distancing can be maintained.

In primary schools, we recommend that face coverings should be worn by staff and adult visitors in situations where social distancing between adults is not possible (for example, when moving around in corridors and communal areas). Children in primary school do not need to wear a face covering.

The best available scientific evidence is that, when used correctly, wearing a face covering may reduce the spread of COVID-19 droplets in certain circumstances, helping to protect others.

The Department recognises that the wearing of face coverings may impact communication. However, on balance, increased use of face coverings will strengthen the current safety measures in place in schools and colleges and support the return to face-to-face education.

The Department is recommending these precautionary measures for a limited time during this period of high COVID-19 prevalence in the community. These measures will be in place until Easter, and as with all measures, we will keep this under review and update guidance at that point.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the (a) benefits and (b) harms of children wearing face masks in school; and if he will publish the scientific evidence upon which that assessment is based.

The Department continues to work closely with other government departments throughout its response to the COVID-19 outbreak, including Public Health England (PHE) and the Department of Health and Social Care, as well as stakeholders across the sector. We continue to work to ensure that our policy is based on the latest scientific and medical advice, to continue to develop comprehensive guidance based on the PHE-endorsed ‘system of controls’ and to understand the impact and effectiveness of these measures on staff, pupils and parents.

The Department has recently published updated guidance to support the full opening to education from 8 March, which includes updated advice on face coverings. The guidance can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/964351/Schools_coronavirus_operational_guidance.pdf

The Department has also published its evidence summary on COVID-19 – children, young people and education settings, which can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/963639/DfE_Evidence_summary_COVID-19_-_children__young_people_and_education_settings.pdf

As the guidance outlines, where pupils and students in Year 7 and above are educated, we recommend that face coverings should be worn by adults, pupils and students when moving around the premises, outside of classrooms, such as in corridors and communal areas where social distancing cannot easily be maintained.

In addition, from 8 March, the Department now also recommends that in those schools and colleges where pupils and students in Year 7 and above are educated, face coverings should be worn in classrooms unless social distancing can be maintained.

In primary schools, we recommend that face coverings should be worn by staff and adult visitors in situations where social distancing between adults is not possible (for example, when moving around in corridors and communal areas). Children in primary school do not need to wear a face covering.

The best available scientific evidence is that, when used correctly, wearing a face covering may reduce the spread of COVID-19 droplets in certain circumstances, helping to protect others.

The Department recognises that the wearing of face coverings may impact communication. However, on balance, increased use of face coverings will strengthen the current safety measures in place in schools and colleges and support the return to face-to-face education.

The Department is recommending these precautionary measures for a limited time during this period of high COVID-19 prevalence in the community. These measures will be in place until Easter, and as with all measures, we will keep this under review and update guidance at that point.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many meetings (a) he, (b) his Ministers and (c) his officials have had with Professor Ellen Townsend in each of the last 12 months.

The department does not have a record of any meetings between our ministers or officials with Professor Ellen Townsend in the last 12 months.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the value for money of sole-supply arrangements for school uniforms.

The Department has not carried out an assessment of the value for money of sole supply arrangements. The Department publishes guidance for schools on school uniform. Our guidance is clear that when deciding how to source school uniform, the governing body should give highest priority to the consideration of cost and value for money for parents. The governing body should be able to demonstrate how best value has been achieved. The guidance also recommends that schools avoid exclusive single-supply contracts unless a regular competitive tendering process is run to secure best value for parents. The Department believes that this approach provides the right balance to secure open and transparent arrangements and good value for money.

The Government is supporting the Education (Guidance about Costs of School Uniforms) Private Members' Bill to enable us to issue statutory guidance on the cost of school uniform. The Department’s existing guidance on cost considerations will form the basis for the new statutory guidance.

24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2020.

International Men’s Day offers an opportunity to highlight where we need to do more to improve outcomes for men and boys, as well as an opportunity to talk about some of the work being done across Government to tackle those issues.

Work includes preparation for an Employment Bill which, subject to further consultation, will make flexible working the default unless employers have good reason not to; and delivering the Suicide Prevention Workplan, which sets out action that is being taken across Government departments and the NHS to reduce suicides, including amongst men.

The Government is committed to levelling up opportunity and ensuring fairness for all - regardless of gender or background.

Civil Service Local events to mark the day were promoted by our staff networks. A virtual panel event was organised by the Black Asian Minority Ethnic Network in Coventry, to commemorate International Men's Day on the importance of role models and men’s mental health issues.

7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in his Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.

The highest individual pay award in the last 12 months for an employee of the Department, including its Executive Agencies, in a) percentage and b) cash terms is:

a) 9.94% and

b) £6,250.

These figures relate to two different individuals and do not include staff who have received an increased salary following a promotion or change of role.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many times the (a) Union Jack, (b) St George's flag, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) Welsh flag has been flown from the headquarters of his Department in London in each year since 2015.

?The table below shows the number of times per year that each flag has been flown from the Department for Education’s London headquarters, since 2015.

Flag type

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Union

365

366

365

365

365

St. George’s

0

0

0

6

3

Scottish Saltire

0

0

1

1

0

Welsh

0

1

0

0

0

26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) Union Jack, (b) St George, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) Flag of Wales flags his Department owns.

The Department owns one of each of the flags.

22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what his current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in his (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

Throughout the pandemic Defra, our Executive Agencies and Arms-Length Bodies have followed, and continue to follow, the latest Government guidance in relation to managing the risk of COVID-19 in the workplace, including any variations between the four nations of the UK.

In England, the BEIS 'Working Safely during coronavirus (COVID-19)' guidance provides sensible precautions employers can take to manage risk and support their staff. Guidance on face coverings is currently different for Wales and in Scotland so the respective guidance is followed for our workplaces located within those countries.

Our workplace risk assessments determine which mitigations are appropriate to adopt in light of the updated guidance. In line with the revised Government 'working safely' guidance it is expected and recommended that staff wear face coverings in our workplaces in specified areas and when using public transport for work-related travel. Additionally:

a) Within core Defra, face coverings may be required where a risk assessment has identified the need to wear one for a particular work activity or working environment.

b) Within Defra's departmental agencies, face coverings may be required where a risk assessment has identified the need to wear one for a particular work activity or working environment. Within science laboratories, there is currently a mandatory requirement to wear a face covering within specified areas and for certain laboratory-based work activities.

c) Within Defra's non-departmental public bodies and other related bodies, face coverings may be required where a risk assessment has identified the need to wear one for a particular work activity or working environment.

Organisational policies reflect that some people are not able to wear face coverings, and that face coverings may make it harder to communicate with people who rely on lip reading, facial expressions, and clear sound. We expect our employees to be mindful and respectful of such circumstances.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reasons he imposed a charging clean air zone in Bradford.

Air pollution is a major public health risk and is a particular threat to vulnerable groups including the elderly and those with chronic respiratory and heart diseases. The mortality burden of the air pollution mixture based on both PM2.5 and NO2 in the UK is an effect equivalent to 28,000 to 36,000 deaths (Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants, 2018).

Under the 2017 UK Plan for Tackling Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide Concentrations and its further Supplement in 2018, 61 local authorities were directed to develop plans for delivering NO2 compliance in the shortest possible time. Bradford was identified in the 2018 supplement as having roads exceeding legal levels for NO2, and since then has been working on a local plan to identify and implement measures to address these exceedances in the shortest possible time to safeguard public health.

As the 2017 plan sets out, it is for local authorities to determine what the appropriate solution is for tackling NO 2 concentrations, reflecting the highly localised nature of the problem. In some cases, local authorities will determine that a Clean Air Zone (CAZ) is the intervention required. However, given the potential impacts on individuals and businesses, when considering between equally effective alternatives to deliver compliance, Government has been consistently clear that if a local authority can identify measures other than charging zones that are at least as effective at reducing NO2 to legal levels but with less of an impact, those measures should be preferred. Any alternative will need to deliver compliance as quickly as a charging CAZ if it is to be preferred for inclusion in the plans which local authorities develop.

Having gone through a detailed business case development process following guidance provided by the Government's Joint Air Quality Unit, Bradford has identified that a Class C Clean Air Zone is needed in order to deliver the legal obligation to tackle NO2 exceedances in the shortest possible time. Government considered the business case submitted by Bradford earlier this year and has accepted Bradford's evidence that a class C CAZ is required. As part of this approvals process, the business case and supporting evidence were considered by an independent technical panel established to review the evidence submitted by local authorities to support their proposals. The Government is now working with Bradford on the implementation of the CAZ and has also provided Bradford with £31 million from the Clean Air Fund to help local businesses and individuals adapt to the CAZ, including grants to help upgrade vehicles.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, on Unconscious bias training, what steps he has taken to phase out unconscious bias training in his Department.

Defra draws its training provision from Civil Service Learning (CSL), which included access to unconscious bias training products for all staff including Senior Civil Servants. It is mandatory for civil servants to use CSL for their learning.

In January 2021, CSL took the decision to withdraw the product in line with the Ministerial Statement that outlined why this training should cease. The learning pages on our internal intranet were updated and staff are now directed to the CSL product called Inclusion in the Civil Service, therefore ensuring that unconscious bias training has been phased out in Defra. Natural England took the same action.

The Environment Agency removed unconscious bias training from its list of mandatory learning in January 2021. A short e-learning product remains accessible as a topic of interest.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2020.

Every year, International Men’s Day offers an opportunity to highlight how outcomes for men and boys can be improved and the important work going on every day to address this. This year’s theme was “Better health for men and boys”. Defra group marked this day with a blog by our Deputy Gender champion, Mark Thompson. Mark highlighted the inclusion agenda for men, in particular mental health issues and how our networks help and support employees. In addition, our newly formed Gender Board has raised the need to engage men better in gender equality conversations.

Linked to this year’s theme, details of the ASK TWICE campaign were shared with employees. The campaign is specifically aimed at men, and is part of the national Time To Change initiative led by Mind and Rethink Mental Illness which aims to change the way we think about, and take action on, mental health problems.

In addition to supporting International Men’s Day this November, across Defra group we support many UK gender-based initiatives, including Movember. One example is a panel discussion on International Men’s Day itself, hosted by our Women’s Network and the Defra Movember campaign. During this session various Equality, Diversity and Inclusion network leads discussed a range of subjects related to male stereotypes: e.g. men’s health, mental health, fatherhood and how to support men in the workplace. These sessions reflected the fact that these issues affect everyone: colleagues, friends, husbands, wives, partners, families and organisations. Another example this November has been the Defra Cancer Network partnering with our Black Asian and Minority Ethnic Network to run two online events highlighting how different aspects of cancer may affect individuals across gender lines. These events were supplemented by the sharing of personal stories of prostate cancer across the group via blogs, with the objective of tackling stigma around men’s health issues. This content featured links to useful information with messages encouraging employees “if in doubt, get it checked”.

To complement these network-led sessions, groups have been set up on our internal Yammer pages. Examples include #Team EA Movember which provides an opportunity for employees to fundraise and the Movember page for anyone wanting to join the conversation, or to become a Movember Workplace Ambassador. We have also started an anonymous WhatsApp group, providing a safe place for men to talk with others who are currently suffering or have previously suffered from cancer or mental health problems.

Finally, we use other opportunities throughout the year to raise and address issues of concern to men. For instance, Defra group marked Carers’ Rights Day on 26 November in support of men with caring responsibilities. Through our HR policies and standard work practices, Defra group continues to ensure all men have access to flexible working and shared parental leave, giving them the opportunity for work-life balance and the ability to take time away from the workplace to fulfil their caring responsibilities.

Defra organisations recognise that talking is important. We appreciate that for many people it is easier to simply say “I’m OK” than to admit they have problems. In recognition of our differences, Defra group is committed to finding ways that enable anyone and everyone to reach out for help, regardless of their gender identity - whether cis, trans, fluid or non-binary.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in his Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.

Defra follows the pay remit guidance set by HM Treasury for staff at delegated grades and Cabinet Office for Senior Civil Servants. For the most recent pay reviews, this meant that Defra implemented average pay awards within the 2.5% limit for delegated grades and 2% for Senior Civil Servants, as set out in the guidance.

The biggest pay rise given to someone in Core Defra in the last 12 months in percentage terms was 68.5%.

The biggest pay rise given to someone in Core Defra in the last 12 months in cash terms was £22,000.

These pay rises are the result of promotions to new roles with greater responsibilities and accountability.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of air quality levels across the Shipley constituency.

Local authorities take the lead on monitoring levels of air pollution within their boundaries. City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council (CBMDC) was one of eight local authorities directed in October 2018, as part of the supplement to the 2017 UK Plan for Tackling Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) Concentrations, to develop a local plan to tackle identified NO2 exceedances, following a Government-funded targeted feasibility study conducted by the council. This study identified persistent long-term exceedances of legal NO2 limit values in and around the city centre including the Shipley area, and that without further action CBMDC would not be compliant with legal NO2 limits until 2027.

Following approval of its plan early this year, CBMDC was subsequently directed and funded to introduce a charging Clean Air Zone in late 2021 that will cover the city centre, Canal Road corridor, Shipley and Saltaire, enabling CBMDC to achieve compliance by 2022.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions her Department has had with smokeless fuel manufacturers in the last two years; and if she will make a statement.

During the Government’s consultation on cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels and wood, Defra officials engaged with a wide range of stakeholders, including smokeless fuel manufacturers.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many meetings in his Department (a) Ministers and (b) officials have held with the Coal Merchants’ Federation in the last two years; and if he will make a statement.

Over the course of the consultation on cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels and wood, the Government has engaged with a wide range of stakeholders, including a number of trade organisations representing the coal industry. One meeting was held at official level with the Coal Merchants’ Federation. There have been no Ministerial meetings with this organisation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans his Department has to reduce the amount of wet wood (a) sold and (b) burnt in England for domestic heating; and if he will make a statement.

The Government response to the consultation on cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels and wood was published on 21 February 2020. This outlines plans to restrict the sale, distribution and marketing of wet wood. The proposed policy will require suppliers of wood sold in volumes below 2m3 to have their product tested and certified to show that its moisture content is below 20%, those supplying wood in volumes greater than 2m3 will be required to provide their customers with instructions for seasoning wet wood, which will be accompanied by a warning advising that the wood is not suitable to be burnt without appropriate drying. Further to this, retailers of wood in volumes below 2m3 will be required to store it in a way that ensures its moisture content is kept below 20%.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to his Department's press release entitled, Government takes bold action to cut pollution from household burning, published on 21 February 2020, what the evidential basis is for the statement that manufactured solid fuels are cheaper than house coal; and if he will make a statement.

Defra recognises that on face value, manufactured solid fuels (MSFs) are more expensive than coal, however, we are also aware that MSFs burn more efficiently than coal. Recent tests have found that coal is actually more expensive than MSFs when energy efficiency is taken into account. These tests suggest that coal burned on an open fire is more expensive per unit of heat output in all areas of England compared to the cheapest MSF fuel. The full results of the fuel efficiency tests have been published on gov.uk and can be found at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/867429/burning-wood-consult-bsria-report1.pdf

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate his Department has made of the potential reduction in emissions that will result from the phasing out of coal and wet wood for domestic heating from February 2021; and if he will make a statement.

The Government recently published its response to the consultation on using cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels and wood, which included proposals for the regulation of the sales, distribution and marketing of bituminous coal and wet wood sold in units of up to 2m3 and restricting the sale of manufactured solid fuels with a sulphur content greater than 2%. A full impact assessment was published alongside the Government response and is available on the GOV.UK website. This analysis estimates the following cumulative emission reductions between 2020 and 2030: 91.53kt of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), 24.9kt of sulphur dioxide (SO2) and 430kt of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e).

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/air-quality-using-cleaner-fuels-for-domestic-burning

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2019.

Every year International Men’s Day offers an opportunity to highlight how outcomes for men and boys can be improved and the important work going on every day to address this. Defra group marked the day through a webinar available to all staff entitled “Why We Need International Men’s Day”. This shared key information and work underway to address these issues. Other webinars included topics such as “Being a 21st Century man”, “Managing mental ill health from a male perspective” and “Raising boys”. The day concluded with a panel Q and A session comprising senior managers, the webinar presenters and the lead of the Women’s Network.

In addition to International Men’s Day, in November Defra group celebrated Carers’ Rights Day which also supports men with caring responsibilities. As part of the ‘Movember’ campaign we highlighted men’s health issues, from cancer to suicide prevention, and the Cancer and Mental Health Networks encouraged employees to support this initiative. More widely across Defra group we promote other gender-based initiatives, such as marking International Women's Day in March.

On an ongoing basis, we continue to support flexible working and shared parental leave for all employees across Defra. This gives men as well as women the opportunity to manage their work-life balance and take time away from the workplace to be with their new children.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions she has had with her Irish counterpart on that Government's consultation on the regulation of domestic burning of solid fuels and peat; and if she will make a statement.

The Secretary of State has not had discussions with her Irish counterpart on the Irish Government’s consultation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will publish a revised impact assessment before the Government publishes its response to the consultation on cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels and wood; and if she will make a statement.

We intend that a revised impact assessment will be published alongside our response to the consultation on the cleaner burning of solid fuels and wood in the near future.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make an assessment of the effects of a potential ban on house coal on former coalfield communities as part of the consultation on the cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels and wood; and if she will make a statement.

As we said when we consulted on our proposals, we want to ensure that our measures achieve environmental benefits but do not have an adverse impact on vulnerable groups. Our response to the consultation will reflect this approach, and we intend to publish this in the near future.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when she plans to publish the outcome of the consultation on Cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels and wood that closed on 12 October 2018; and if she will make a statement.

Following the required pause for the 2019 General Election, we are working at pace to publish our response to the consultation on the cleaner burning of solid fuels and wood as soon as possible.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many times the (a) Union Jack, (b) St George's flag, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) flag of Wales has been flown from the headquarters of her Department in London in each year since 2015.

DFID flies flags in accordance with DCMS policy.

In the London office the Union Jack is flown every day that another flag is not flown. The Scottish Saltire is flown every day from the DFID office in East Kilbride, Scotland.

Since 2015, the other flags were flown from the London office as follows:

Date

St. George

Scottish Saltire

Wales Flag

2015

1

0

0

2016

1

0

0

2017

1

1

0

2018

5

0

0

2019

1

0

0

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many (a) Union Jack, (b) St George, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) Flag of Wales flags her Department owns.

DFID has two headquarter buildings in the UK; one at 22 Whitehall and the other at Abercrombie house in East Kilbride.

DFID own and fly flags in accordance with DCMS policy. The total number of flags owned across both buildings are:

(a) 9 x Union Jacks

(b) 2 x St George

(c) 4 x Scottish Saltire

(d) DFID does not own any Welsh flags.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what her current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in her (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department remains aligned to the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy’s working safely during coronavirus (COVID-19) Guidance so does not currently mandate the wearing of face coverings in any of its UK offices. Those working for the Department are expected to follow guidance on face coverings in operation in the geographical area they are working while on official business.

The Department continues to prioritise other control measures such as minimising contact, ventilation, and screens over face coverings on its UK estate. The Department works with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office to agree working practices overseas in line with local guidance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, on Unconscious bias training, what steps she has taken to phase out unconscious bias training in her Department.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) stopped mandating completion of the Cabinet Office supplied Unconscious Bias (UB) digital (e-learning) training for all staff (including UKEF) in November 2019 when they replaced it with Diversity and Inclusion (2019) training. This was later superseded in 2020 with Inclusion in the Civil Service training.

All the above digital training is/was owned and supplied by Civil Service Learning (CSL) who are an expert service function of the Cabinet Office.

The DIT internal intranet site and Learning Hub were both updated in 2019 to remove reference to the standalone UB training and replaced with the new alternate recommended training. In addition, steps were taken to ensure relevant DIT policies and processes were updated to remove and/or replace reference to the standalone UB digital training as appropriate.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps her Department took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2020.

The Department for International Trade is committed to ensuring fairness for all - regardless of gender or background. International Men’s Day offers an opportunity to highlight how outcomes for men and boys can be improved and to talk about some of the work going on every day across Government to do this.

To mark International Men’s Day, the department undertook a range of events, including a virtual event held by the Gender network, mentoring sessions for male members of staff by the Permanent Secretary, and a conversation for men from the department hosted by the Second Permanent Secretary. The Permanent Secretary also spoke at two virtual Civil Service-wide events, including the Cross-Government Gender Network event.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in her Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.

The biggest pay rise given to employees in percentage and cash terms over the last 12 months for the Department for International Trade (DIT), including UK Export Finance (UKEF), is in the table below. Figures have been rounded to the nearest £100 to protect individual’s identities.

(a) highest percentage

(b) highest cash value

DIT

21%

£15,900

UKEF

29.6%

£11,700

For DIT, the pay increase was the consequence of a SCS1 (Deputy Director) being promoted to SCS2 (Director) via fair and open competition in line with the Civil Service Recruitment Principles and moving to the band minima of their new grade. The Civil Service pay range for SCS2 with effect from 1 April 2020 is £93,000 - £162,500.

For UKEF, the pay increase was the result of an employee at the minimum of their existing pay band being promoted to the minimum pay of the next pay band.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many times the (a) Union Jack, (b) St George's flag, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) flag of Wales has been flown from the headquarters of her Department in London in each year since 2015.

Records of flag flying are held by our facilities management provider. Records prior to 2018 are not held.

The Union Jack is flown all year round unless replaced with the flag of St. George.

The flag of St. George was flown 3 times in 2018, 5 times in 2019 and has not yet been flown in 2020.

The Scottish Saltire Flag or Welsh Flag were not flown in the period for which records are held.

Conor Burns
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with representatives of Bradford Council on its timetable for completing the feasibility study into the Shipley eastern bypass.

We are waiting for Bradford Council to submit the initial business case which will then be assessed.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many Penalty Charge Notices were issued to HS2 Ltd vehicles in (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021; and what the total value was of those charges in each of those years.

HS2 Ltd produces data on senior officials’ business expenses and hospitality and publishes all transaction over £25,000 and all corporate card transactions over £500. This is available on gov.uk and is updated quarterly. It is not possible to find the information you have requested within a reasonable cost and timeframe.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much was spent by HS2 Ltd on branded (a) hard hats, (b) overalls and (c) other workwear in (i) 2019, (ii) 2020 and (iii) 2021.

HS2 Ltd produces data on senior officials’ business expenses and hospitality and publishes all transaction over £25,000 and all corporate card transactions over £500. This is available on gov.uk and is updated quarterly. It is not possible to find the information you have requested within a reasonable cost and timeframe.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much was spent by HS2 Ltd on the design and manufacture of physical models of (a) trains, (b) platforms, (c) buildings and (d) other items associated with the project in (i) 2019, (ii) 2020 and (iii) 2021.

HS2 Ltd produces data on senior officials’ business expenses and hospitality and publishes all transaction over £25,000 and all corporate card transactions over £500. This is available on gov.uk and is updated quarterly. It is not possible to find the information you have requested within a reasonable cost and timeframe.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much was spent by HS2 Ltd on (a) calls to the speaking clock and (b) other directory enquiries in (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021.

HS2 Ltd produces data on senior officials’ business expenses and hospitality and publishes all transaction over £25,000 and all corporate card transactions over £500. This is available on gov.uk and is updated quarterly. It is not possible to find the information you have requested within a reasonable cost and timeframe.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much was spent by HS2 Ltd on childcare services and creches for HS2 staff in (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021.

HS2 Ltd produces data on senior officials’ business expenses and hospitality and publishes all transaction over £25,000 and all corporate card transactions over £500. This is available on gov.uk and is updated quarterly. It is not possible to find the information you have requested within a reasonable cost and timeframe.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with US authorities on general travel by British citizens from the UK to the US; when he expects such travel to be able to commence again; and if he will make a statement.

The Secretary of State for Transport has regular contact with the US, including the US Secretary of Transportation.

On 20 September the US government confirmed that they will be allowing vaccinated Brits into the US from early November, reciprocating the policy introduced by the UK on 2 August. This demonstrates the hard work and progress made by the UK-US Experts Working Group to restart transatlantic travel and kick start the economy. The Experts Working Group will continue to work together to ensure the return of safe and sustainable international travel.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in his (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department for Transport, its departmental agencies and related bodies are following the relevant guidance for each location and are undertaking all mitigations identified in each building’s risk assessment. All organisations fully support individuals who choose to wear a face covering in the workplace.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the longest time is that the DVLA has taken to issue a driving licence in each of the last five years.

The information requested cannot be retrieved in the format requested in the time available. Officials from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency will write to the Honourable Member when the information is available.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average time taken by the DVLA to issue driving licences was in each of the last five years.

The information requested cannot be retrieved in the format requested in the time available. Officials from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency will write to the Honourable Member when the information is available.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many driving licences the DVLA has issued in each of the last five years.

Guidance on how to apply for a driving licence is published on GOV.UK and can be found here.

The volume of driving licences issued in each of the last five years is shown in the table below:

Year

Number of Driving Licences Issued

2016 – 2017

10.4 million

2017 – 2018

11.2 million

2018 – 2019

10.6 million

2019 – 2020

11.2 million

2020 – 2021

8.8 million

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish the guidance issued by the DVLA on the process for issuing and reissuing driving licences.

Guidance on how to apply for a driving licence is published on GOV.UK and can be found here.

The volume of driving licences issued in each of the last five years is shown in the table below:

Year

Number of Driving Licences Issued

2016 – 2017

10.4 million

2017 – 2018

11.2 million

2018 – 2019

10.6 million

2019 – 2020

11.2 million

2020 – 2021

8.8 million

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 6 July 2021 to Question 24147 on High Speed 2 Railway Line: Construction, what estimate he has made of the pension liabilities incurred by people employed by the HS2 project.

HS2 Ltd has a Group Personal Pension plan in place for its employees so there are no future liabilities. The annual provision for employer contributions to that plan are published in the Annual Report & Accounts.

For further information please follow the below link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hs2-ltd-annual-report-and-accounts-2020-to-2021

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 6 July 2021 to Question 24147, on High Speed 2 Railway Line: Construction, what the highest salary is of a person at HS2 Ltd; and how many HS2 Ltd staff are earning over (a) £100,000 and (b) £150,000.

The highest earning individual at HS2 Ltd is the Chief Executive, Mark Thurston. We publish information regarding remuneration of those earning over £150,000 annually: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/senior-officials-high-earners-salaries

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people are employed by the HS2 project; and what the average salary is.

Staff numbers and average salaries (as at 31 March) are disclosed annually in the Company’s Annual Report and Accounts. However, as of 28 June 2021, HS2 Ltd directly employs 1,597 staff with an average salary of £60,198.44. The salaries are full-time equivalent Basic Pay (annual entitlement at point of reporting). This figure does not include Non-Executive Directors, Independent Panel Members, Project Representatives and non HS2 Ltd staff (secondees, Engineering Delivery Partners, agency staff, etc).

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will list the office spaces occupied by HS2 in the UK.

HS2 Ltd headquarters is at 2 Snowhill, Snowhill, Queensway, Birmingham, B4 6GA. In addition, it occupies space at 1 Eversholt Street, London, NW1 2DN and Albany House, Petty France, London, SW1 9EA. The Company also rents one room in Barlow House, Minshull Street, Manchester, M1 3DZ.

This list does not include site offices that are leased and occupied by suppliers working on behalf of HS2 Ltd.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the cost of HS2 Ltd’s office space in London was in (a) each financial year and (b) total since 2018.

(a) The HS2 Ltd London whole office estate costs are as follows:

2018/19 £7,270,000

2019/20 £5,180,000

2020/21 £5,280,000

Note the figures include rent, VAT on rent, utilities, facilities management costs, National Non Domestic rates and other building costs. Accommodation costs are disclosed in the HS2 Annual Report and Accounts.

(b) The total for the period 2018/19 to 2020/21 £17,730,000

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, on Unconscious bias training, what steps he has taken to phase out unconscious bias training in his Department.

In response to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, the Department has stopped providing interventions where the evidence does not support their continued use, this has been the case with unconscious bias training.

Most of Civil Service unconscious bias training was delivered via an e-learning platform, and is no longer available through this platform. The Department no longer promotes unconscious bias training to be included as part of any other training that is delivered elsewhere.

The Department is committed to maintaining a strong focus on diversity and inclusion. This includes deploying a range of evidence-based interventions within the Department, for example training to improve fairness in recruitment decisions, or new learning offerings targeted at working on creating more inclusive work cultures. We are using data to inform where bias may be occurring and to help eradicate it, for example in our approach to recruitment. This approach will allow us to ensure that activity can be focused on those interventions which do make a difference in order to progress this important work.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to review the mandatory use of face coverings on public transport.

Since 15 June, passengers travelling on the public transport network have been required to wear a face covering, unless exempt. On 14 December, the Secretary of State reviewed the regulations and deemed that this requirement remained necessary and proportionate in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. As set out in the roadmap, the Government will complete a review of social distancing and other long-term measures, which will inform decisions on the timing and circumstances under which the wearing of face coverings and other measures may be lifted. We have seen continued high compliance with face covering regulations and the latest evidence indicates that face coverings are likely to reduce the transmission of COVID-19 where used correctly. As such their continued use is important to ensure that those who need to travel now and in the future are able to do so in safety and with confidence.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the feasibility study for the Shipley Eastern Bypass will be completed.

The feasibility study for the proposed Shipley Eastern Bypass is being produced by Bradford Metropolitan Borough Council. I understand Bradford MBC are due to submit the study to my Department for consideration shortly.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Prime Minister, what steps his Office took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2020.

In a message on my official twitter account, I recognised the incredible contribution men and boys make to our society, and, in recognition of the mental health problems that 1 in 8 men face, made clear that support is available.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in his Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.

Between the period of 01/10/2019 - 30/09/2020 the biggest pay rise given to someone in the Department was (a) 6.9% in percentage terms and (b) £7,064 in cash terms. The mean average award for all staff for the same period was 2%.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 30 June to Question 62617, if he will provide a list of the (a) statutory and (b) non-statutory public inquiries currently being undertaken by his Department.

The Department is not undertaking any inquiries. It is currently contributing to the Home Office’s inquiry into the Manchester Arena attack.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the additional train services between Kings Cross, Shipley and Bradford as set out in the East Coast franchise will be fully delivered.

An additional service between Kings Cross, Shipley and Bradford will be delivered in July 2020. The outstanding committed services will be delivered as soon as capacity is available.

The introduction of the additional services was originally delayed from May 2019 because of delays to the introduction of LNER’s new Azuma trains, in line with guidance from the Industry Programme Management Office Steering Group established following the May 2018 timetable issues. Since then it has become clear that capacity constraints in the Bradford area mean that integrating the LNER services with the existing, intensive Northern commuter services, while protecting their reliability, will be challenging. Infrastructure upgrades may be needed to resolve these capacity constraints

I and my officials met by video conference with Network Rail and LNER, with the Honourable Member present, on 1 June 2020.

The Department has not made a specific recent estimate of the cost to the public purse. The additional services were contracted as part of an overall package in 2015 from Virgin Trains East Coast, the then franchisee, and delivery of them was not affected by the transfer of services to LNER. LNER expects the additional services to be revenue generative, and to have additional wider economic benefits for the areas and communities they serve

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, for what reason there has been a delay in the provision of additional train services between London Kings Cross, Shipley and Bradford as set out in the East Coast Franchise.

An additional service between Kings Cross, Shipley and Bradford will be delivered in July 2020. The outstanding committed services will be delivered as soon as capacity is available.

The introduction of the additional services was originally delayed from May 2019 because of delays to the introduction of LNER’s new Azuma trains, in line with guidance from the Industry Programme Management Office Steering Group established following the May 2018 timetable issues. Since then it has become clear that capacity constraints in the Bradford area mean that integrating the LNER services with the existing, intensive Northern commuter services, while protecting their reliability, will be challenging. Infrastructure upgrades may be needed to resolve these capacity constraints

I and my officials met by video conference with Network Rail and LNER, with the Honourable Member present, on 1 June 2020.

The Department has not made a specific recent estimate of the cost to the public purse. The additional services were contracted as part of an overall package in 2015 from Virgin Trains East Coast, the then franchisee, and delivery of them was not affected by the transfer of services to LNER. LNER expects the additional services to be revenue generative, and to have additional wider economic benefits for the areas and communities they serve

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when (a) Ministers and (b) officials in his Department last met with (i) Network Rail and (ii) LNER to discuss additional train services between London Kings Cross, Shipley and Bradford.

An additional service between Kings Cross, Shipley and Bradford will be delivered in July 2020. The outstanding committed services will be delivered as soon as capacity is available.

The introduction of the additional services was originally delayed from May 2019 because of delays to the introduction of LNER’s new Azuma trains, in line with guidance from the Industry Programme Management Office Steering Group established following the May 2018 timetable issues. Since then it has become clear that capacity constraints in the Bradford area mean that integrating the LNER services with the existing, intensive Northern commuter services, while protecting their reliability, will be challenging. Infrastructure upgrades may be needed to resolve these capacity constraints

I and my officials met by video conference with Network Rail and LNER, with the Honourable Member present, on 1 June 2020.

The Department has not made a specific recent estimate of the cost to the public purse. The additional services were contracted as part of an overall package in 2015 from Virgin Trains East Coast, the then franchisee, and delivery of them was not affected by the transfer of services to LNER. LNER expects the additional services to be revenue generative, and to have additional wider economic benefits for the areas and communities they serve

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse to provide the additional train services between London Kings Cross, Shipley and Bradford as set out in the East Coast franchise.

An additional service between Kings Cross, Shipley and Bradford will be delivered in July 2020. The outstanding committed services will be delivered as soon as capacity is available.

The introduction of the additional services was originally delayed from May 2019 because of delays to the introduction of LNER’s new Azuma trains, in line with guidance from the Industry Programme Management Office Steering Group established following the May 2018 timetable issues. Since then it has become clear that capacity constraints in the Bradford area mean that integrating the LNER services with the existing, intensive Northern commuter services, while protecting their reliability, will be challenging. Infrastructure upgrades may be needed to resolve these capacity constraints

I and my officials met by video conference with Network Rail and LNER, with the Honourable Member present, on 1 June 2020.

The Department has not made a specific recent estimate of the cost to the public purse. The additional services were contracted as part of an overall package in 2015 from Virgin Trains East Coast, the then franchisee, and delivery of them was not affected by the transfer of services to LNER. LNER expects the additional services to be revenue generative, and to have additional wider economic benefits for the areas and communities they serve

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when (a) Network Rail and (b) the East Coast Franchise Operator first notified his Department that the scheduled additional train services between London Kings Cross, Shipley and Bradford would not meet the 2019 timescale set out in the franchise.

The Department became aware in late 2018 that the additional train services would not be delivered in May 2019 due to delays to the delivery of the IEP fleet and as a consequence of the revised industry approach to timetable development following the May 2018 timetable change. Following our recent meeting on this issue, I look forward to working with my Honorable Friend to ensure these services are delivered as soon as is feasible.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many times the (a) Union Jack, (b) St George's flag, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) flag of Wales has been flown from the headquarters of his Department in London in each year since 2015.

The Union Jack has been flown every day since 2015 at the Department for Transport’s London headquarters building. The Department does not own any of the other flags mentioned.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many (a) Union Jack, (b) St George, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) Flag of Wales flags his Department owns.

The Department for Transport owns 5 Union Jack flags. The Department does not own any of the other flags mentioned.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, by what date all of the additional direct trains between Shipley/Bradford and London under the East Coast franchise will be introduced.

LNER intends to introduce the outstanding direct services as soon as possible and is working to finalise timescales. I’ve asked LNER to meet the Honourable gentleman to provide an update.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what her current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in her (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

Throughout the pandemic, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has followed, and continues to follow, the latest government guidance in relation to managing the risk of COVID-19 in the workplace, including any variations between the four nations of the UK.

All of our offices comply with the legal requirements of the UK government and where appropriate, of the devolved administrations. The wearing of face coverings remains a legal requirement in both Scotland and Wales

In England there is no such legal requirement but the latest BEIS guidance “encourage(s) the use of face coverings by workers or customers in enclosed and crowded spaces” https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-covid-19/offices-factories-and-labs#offices-7-2

DWP therefore strongly encourages the wearing of face coverings by customers in our job centres and colleagues when in communal areas.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what her Department's policy is on the wearing of face coverings for (a) staff at and (b) people attending job centres during the covid-19 outbreak.

Throughout the pandemic, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has followed, and continues to follow, the latest government guidance in relation to managing the risk of COVID-19 in the workplace, including any variations between the four nations of the UK.

All of our offices comply with the legal requirements of the UK government and where appropriate, of the devolved administrations. The wearing of face coverings remains a legal requirement in both Scotland and Wales

In England there is no such legal requirement but the latest BEIS guidance “encourage(s) the use of face coverings by workers or customers in enclosed and crowded spaces” https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-covid-19/offices-factories-and-labs#offices-7-2

DWP therefore strongly encourages the wearing of face coverings by customers in our job centres and colleagues when in communal areas.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, on Unconscious bias training, what steps she has taken to phase out unconscious bias training in her Department.

Standalone unconscious bias training ceased within the Department at the end of December 2020.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the proportion of her Department’s spending that was (a) fraud and (b) error in each of the last five years.

DWP takes fraud and error very seriously. Estimates of fraud and error levels in the benefit system in Great Britain in the financial years from 2005/2006 to 2020/2021 are available in the link below.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fraud-and-error-in-the-benefit-system-financial-year-2020-to-2021-estimates

The Department for Work and Pensions is increasingly moving from detecting fraud and error to actively preventing it from happening and has optimised its digital capability and organisational design to enable this. The recent money secured via the Spring Budget will enable the Department to expand the Integrated Risk and Intelligence Service (IRIS), develop pre-payment ‘risking’ techniques (Transaction Risking) and maintain the new Enhanced Checking Service, who intervene on high risk claims before they get in to payment.

Where fraud does enter the benefit system, there are dedicated teams to investigate this. The Department is committed to the use of appropriate penalties and the recovery of monies from the perpetrators, where fraud is established. To support this work, DWP’s Counter Fraud, Compliance and Debt team is undertaking an ambitious recruitment programme which will significantly further expand our counter-fraud capacity.

We will continue to work with other Government departments and law enforcement agencies nationally and across borders to ensure appropriate intelligence and resources are shared, enabling the totality of any criminality to be identified and investigated.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to eliminate (a) fraud and (b) error from the spending in her Department.

DWP takes fraud and error very seriously. Estimates of fraud and error levels in the benefit system in Great Britain in the financial years from 2005/2006 to 2020/2021 are available in the link below.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fraud-and-error-in-the-benefit-system-financial-year-2020-to-2021-estimates

The Department for Work and Pensions is increasingly moving from detecting fraud and error to actively preventing it from happening and has optimised its digital capability and organisational design to enable this. The recent money secured via the Spring Budget will enable the Department to expand the Integrated Risk and Intelligence Service (IRIS), develop pre-payment ‘risking’ techniques (Transaction Risking) and maintain the new Enhanced Checking Service, who intervene on high risk claims before they get in to payment.

Where fraud does enter the benefit system, there are dedicated teams to investigate this. The Department is committed to the use of appropriate penalties and the recovery of monies from the perpetrators, where fraud is established. To support this work, DWP’s Counter Fraud, Compliance and Debt team is undertaking an ambitious recruitment programme which will significantly further expand our counter-fraud capacity.

We will continue to work with other Government departments and law enforcement agencies nationally and across borders to ensure appropriate intelligence and resources are shared, enabling the totality of any criminality to be identified and investigated.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2020.

In the department (DWP), every year, International Men’s Day (IMD) offers an opportunity to highlight some key issues and policies that are available to support men. Our policies range from our flexible working hours, the introduction of shared parental leave, which allows men to take time away from the workplace and bond with their new children, benefitting that crucial long-term relationship for both parent and child, to our support for Domestic Abuse and Mental Health through our community of 1600+ Mental Health First Aiders.

In DWP we have a series of national events taking place over the week to mark IMD. The DWP’s Director General Gender Champion opened an IMD session which included male senior leaders talking about their own personal journey.

DWP have partnered with The Good Lad Initiative (GLI), following the success of last year’s events. The specific events cover Thinking about Masculinities and Workplace Cultures and Allyship and Inclusion - men reflecting on their own workplace cultures and positions as leaders and communication skills needed to be effective and compassionate bystanders and to generate debate around the question

DWP has also updated its Gender and Wellbeing pages with support available to colleagues and a number of blogs have been published by colleagues of all genders with titles ranging from “Men who inspire me”, “how talking has helped me” to men’s mental health.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the factors resulting in parents being unable to afford to feed their children.

Building on the significant support given to the most vulnerable during the pandemic, a new £170m Covid Winter Grant Scheme has been created to support children, families and the most at risk over winter. The funding will be ring-fenced, with at least 80% earmarked to help with food and bills, and will cover the period to the end of March 2021.

The Holiday Activities and Food programme, which has provided healthy food and enriching activities to disadvantaged children since 2018, will also be expanded across England next year. It will cover Easter, Summer and Christmas in 2021, and cost up to £220m. It will be available to children in every local authority in England, building on previous programmes – including this summers, which supported around 50,000 children across 17 local authorities.

In May, the Government provided £16m to charities to provide food for those struggling due to the immediate impacts of the pandemic. Earlier this month, a further £16m was announced to fund local charities through well-established networks and provide immediate support to front-line food aid charities who have a vital role to play in supporting people of all ages.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of trends in the level of the number of parents who cannot afford to feed their children.

Building on the significant support given to the most vulnerable during the pandemic, a new £170m Covid Winter Grant Scheme has been created to support children, families and the most at risk over winter. The funding will be ring-fenced, with at least 80% earmarked to help with food and bills, and will cover the period to the end of March 2021.

The Holiday Activities and Food programme, which has provided healthy food and enriching activities to disadvantaged children since 2018, will also be expanded across England next year. It will cover Easter, Summer and Christmas in 2021, and cost up to £220m. It will be available to children in every local authority in England, building on previous programmes – including this summers, which supported around 50,000 children across 17 local authorities.

In May, the Government provided £16m to charities to provide food for those struggling due to the immediate impacts of the pandemic. Earlier this month, a further £16m was announced to fund local charities through well-established networks and provide immediate support to front-line food aid charities who have a vital role to play in supporting people of all ages.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the proportion of parents of children entitled to free school meals who cannot afford to feed their children during the school holidays.

Building on the significant support given to the most vulnerable during the pandemic, a new £170m Covid Winter Grant Scheme has been created to support children, families and the most at risk over winter. The funding will be ring-fenced, with at least 80% earmarked to help with food and bills, and will cover the period to the end of March 2021.

The Holiday Activities and Food programme, which has provided healthy food and enriching activities to disadvantaged children since 2018, will also be expanded across England next year. It will cover Easter, Summer and Christmas in 2021, and cost up to £220m. It will be available to children in every local authority in England, building on previous programmes – including this summers, which supported around 50,000 children across 17 local authorities.

In May, the Government provided £16m to charities to provide food for those struggling due to the immediate impacts of the pandemic. Earlier this month, a further £16m was announced to fund local charities through well-established networks and provide immediate support to front-line food aid charities who have a vital role to play in supporting people of all ages.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effect on levels of unemployment in (a) the Shipley constituency, (b) the Bradford district and (c) West Yorkshire of being in Tier (i) 1, (ii) 2 and (iii) 3 of covid-19 restrictions.

The latest data on the level of unemployment available for Shipley, Bradford and West Yorkshire is for the period July 2019-June 2020. This is before the introduction of the tiered system of local COVID Alert Levels in England

The department is increasing unemployment support for people in all areas of the country, including Shipley, Bradford and West Yorkshire, through the Plan for Jobs package. Kickstart and Job Entry Targeted Support (JETS) were recently launched with the Job Finding Support Service to follow. In addition, 13,500 extra Jobcentre Work Coaches are being recruited nationally to support claimants to re-enter employment.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in her Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.

Within the last 12 months, the largest increase in pay, both in percentage and cash terms, awarded within the Department for Work and Pensions was a 15.8% increase in the amount of £17,700. The recipient was a Senior Civil Servant (SCS) Pay Band 2 member of staff.

The uplift was the result of a pay exception on appointment following a level transfer from another Government Department. This was based on the recipient’s high level of skill and experience, their sustained performance, the increased responsibility associated with the role as well as their relative position on the pay range in comparison with their peers. DWP fully complied with the pay exception control process for this increased pay on appointment, meeting all relevant criteria.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when her Department plans to review the uplift to universal credit.

On 20 March the Government announced a temporary increase to the Universal Credit standard allowance of £20 per week. Legislation allows this measure to continue for the 20/21 tax year.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when her Department plans to review the suspension of the requirement to attend Jobcentre appointments during the covid-19 outbreak.

We made the decision to temporarily suspend the requirement for face-to-face Jobcentre Plus appointments for all claimants in Universal Credit, New Style Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA) and Employment and Support Allowance (ESA), old-style JSA and ESA, and Income Support.

Arrangements after the 30th June will be communicated in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when her Department plans to review the suspension of face-to-face (a) work capability and (b) personal independence payment assessments during the covid-19 outbreak.

Our priority throughout this health emergency continues to be to protect the public and staff, while ensuring people get the benefits they are entitled to quickly and safely. Face to face assessments remain suspended while we review what activity we can gradually start reintroducing in line with the latest public health advice. We will confirm next steps as soon as possible.

18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many work capability assessments have been completed in each month since 1 February 2020.

Statistics on Employment and Support Allowance Work Capability Assessment (WCA) outcomes are published quarterly. The latest figures covering the number and outcome of completed initial and repeat WCAs, by month of completed assessment up to December 2019, can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/employment-and-support-allowance-outcomes-of-work-capability-assessment

Additional breakdowns of the ESA WCA figures can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance for users is available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

The statistics for completed assessments to March 2020 and June 2020 will be published in September and December 2020 respectively.

Statistics on Work Capability Assessments for Universal Credit claimants are intended for publication in the near future as Official Statistics.

12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will take steps to introduce an escalation route for complex benefits cases referred to her Department by Macmillan Cancer Support and other advice services so that urgent benefits cases can be resolved more swiftly.

We already have escalation routes in place. We have had assurance from Area Directors that escalation routes are open and working and have sufficient capacity. We are exploring alternatives to further refine the process.

We have previously advised Macmillan if they could provide specific examples of where a Jobcentre has not been able to support them or has not had capacity, that these could be shared with their National Account Manager within National Employer & Partnership Team in DWP.

In addition, we have now mobilised 10 senior safeguarding leaders who between them will cover all our regions, these roles are temporary and will be reviewed in 3 months. These leaders don’t replace any of our existing routes into DWP where there is a concern about a customer, but they are there to be the region’s escalation point if a solution cannot be found locally, or it is a serious and complex case. These leaders will also be active members of multi-agency boards in their geography.

23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people aged 100 years old and over receive the state pension in each country outside the UK.

The table below provides how many people aged 100 years old and over, who receive the State Pension in each country outside the UK.

Caseload

Abroad not known

20

Alderney

-

Australia

340

Austria

-

Bangladesh

-

Barbados

10

Belgium

-

Benin

-

Bermuda

-

Brazil

-

Canada

190

Cayman Islands

-

Chile

-

Cyprus

10

Denmark

-

Djibouti

-

Equatorial Guinea

-

France

30

Germany

10

Greece

-

Guernsey

10

Hong Kong

-

India

-

Israel

10

Italy

20

Jamaica

70

Jersey

10

Kenya

-

Latvia

-

Lithuania

-

Luxembourg

-

Monaco

-

Montserrat

-

New Zealand

150

Norway

-

Not known

20

Pakistan

20

Poland

-

Portugal

-

Republic of Ireland

100

Republic of Yemen

10

Sierra Leone

-

Somalia

-

South Africa

30

Spain

50

St Kitts and Nevis

-

St Lucia

-

St Vincent and The Grenadines

-

Sweden

-

Switzerland

-

Thailand

-

The Netherlands

-

Trinidad and Tobago

-

United Arab Emirates

-

USA

210

Zimbabwe

-

Total

1,390

Source: DWP Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study, August 2019.

Caseload figures have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Caseloads identified with ‘-‘ are negligible, but non-zero.

Caseloads exclude suspended cases.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will meet with the WASPI campaign group once the Court of Appeal proceedings are over.

The government won on all grounds in the High Court action of this matter - defending the actions of the Coalition government 2010-2015, the labour government 1997-2010 and the Conservative government 1992-1997; the department does not comment on live litigation.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of introducing an opt-out independent mental health advocacy service as part of his reforms of the Mental Health Act.

The white paper ‘Reforming the Mental Health Act’, published in January 2021, set out proposals to expand access to an advocate to voluntary or informal patients and to consider an ‘opt out model’. These proposals received significant support at public consultation and we are now exploring the associated costs and practicalities. This includes examining current independent mental health advocate uptake and existing opt out models which have been successfully implemented in some areas.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to help expand entitlement to independent mental health advocacy to voluntary or informal patients as part of his reforms of the Mental Health Act.

The white paper ‘Reforming the Mental Health Act’, published in January 2021, set out proposals to expand access to an advocate to voluntary or informal patients and to consider an ‘opt out model’. These proposals received significant support at public consultation and we are now exploring the associated costs and practicalities. This includes examining current independent mental health advocate uptake and existing opt out models which have been successfully implemented in some areas.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in his (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

A COVID-19 risk assessment has been carried out following the framework provided by the Health and Safety Executive. In line with this assessment, the Department does not currently require face coverings to be worn by staff in departmental buildings. Those who do wish to wear them will be supported to do so safely.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of people in hospital with covid-19 were (a) in hospital with another condition and contracted covid-19 while in hospital and (b) admitted to hospital with covid-19 in each of the last three months.

The information requested on the proportion of people who were admitted to hospital with COVID-19 and those who contracted the virus in the last three months is not available. The following table shows the number of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 whilst in hospital between 7 April and 30 June.

Month

Number of patients

7 - 30 April

1,957

May

1,479

June

2,799

Source: https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-hospital-activity/

Note:

  1. Data is only available from 7 April 2021.

The following table shows the number of patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 between 1 April and 30 June.

Month

Number of patients

April

5,258

May

2,569

June

4,158

Source: https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/details/healthcare

Note:

  1. Data only includes confirmed cases.
Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the consultation Women's Health Strategy Call for Evidence, if he will make it his policy to launch a consultation into men's health outcomes.

The women’s health strategy for England is in development. The Department does not have a specific men’s health strategy. However, relevant issues are identified and policy developed on a condition specific basis, for example in cardiovascular disease and mental health. There are no current plans to launch a consultation on men’s health outcomes.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve health outcomes for gender-specific health matters for (a) men and (b) women.

The women’s health strategy for England is in development. The Department does not have a specific men’s health strategy. However, relevant issues are identified and policy developed on a condition specific basis, for example in cardiovascular disease and mental health. There are no current plans to launch a consultation on men’s health outcomes.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will meet the Bradford District Care Trust to discuss the need for investment at Lynfield Mount Hospital.

We have no current plans to do so.

On 17 July we launched the process for trusts to express an interest in being selected for funding for eight new hospitals to be built by 2030 in England.

The Department welcomes applications from all trusts, including Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust, who meet the criteria. Local health systems have received confirmation of their capital funding for 2021/22 which enables them to progress priority investments agreed with local health partners.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of which mental health hospitals are most in need of capital investment.

The Department has made no specific assessments. Trusts are legally responsible for maintaining their estates and providing healthcare services, with their boards deciding which investments they make. The Estates Returns Information Collection is completed by all trusts, including mental health trusts, on an annual basis and contains information relating to the costs of providing, maintaining and servicing the National Health Service estate, including the capital cost of bringing the full estate to a defined standard. The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement draw on this assessment and other data to secure and direct national funding.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the level of need for capital funding in acute mental health hospitals.

The Department has made no specific assessments. Trusts are legally responsible for maintaining their estates and providing healthcare services, with their boards deciding which investments they make. The Estates Returns Information Collection is completed by all trusts, including mental health trusts, on an annual basis and contains information relating to the costs of providing, maintaining and servicing the National Health Service estate, including the capital cost of bringing the full estate to a defined standard. The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement draw on this assessment and other data to secure and direct national funding.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of people who have developed a disability as a result of receiving the covid-19 vaccination.

It is not possible at present to quantify the number of people left disabled as a result of a COVID-19 vaccination. Disability has a wide-ranging definition, including the length of time for which a condition persists. It should be noted that a report of an adverse drug reaction does not mean that it was caused by the drug or vaccine. Clinical decisions on whether a vaccine has caused a disability are considered on a case by case basis and will include consideration as to whether there may have been other factors involved, such as other pre-existing conditions. Any functionality outcomes for such patients evolve over time and depend on multiple factors such as type of adverse event that occurred, patient’s age and underlying conditions.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Written Statement of 15 December 2020, HCWS652, on Unconscious bias training, what steps he has taken to phase out unconscious bias training in his Department.

The Civil Service is committed to maintaining a strong focus on diversity and inclusion. This includes deploying a range of evidence-based interventions but where the evidence does not support its continued use, as is the case with unconscious bias training, we have removed from our mandatory training.

In line with advice and guidance from Civil Service Human Resources, we provide training that focuses on inclusion.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been left disabled as a result of a covid-19 vaccination.

It is not possible at present to quantify the number of people left disabled as a result of a COVID-19 vaccination. Disability has a wide-ranging definition, including the length of time for which a condition persists. It should be noted that a report of an adverse drug reaction does not mean that it was caused by the drug or vaccine. Clinical decisions on whether a vaccine has caused a disability are considered on a case by case basis and will include consideration as to whether there may have been other factors involved, such as other pre-existing conditions. Any functionality outcomes for such patients evolve over time and depend on multiple factors such as type of adverse event that occurred, patient’s age and underlying conditions.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been hospitalised within 28 days of receiving a covid-19 vaccination.

This data is not available in the format requested.

The technical briefing published by Public Health England provides the latest data regarding hospitalisations and deaths by variant, including the Delta variant and data on those who are vaccinated with one and both doses and unvaccinated. This data is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/investigation-of-novel-sars-cov-2-variant-variant-of-concern-20201201

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish a list of the equipment loaned by his Department to Omega Diagnostics; what the purpose is of each such loan; and what steps his Department has taken to ensure that the equipment is used exclusively for the purpose of delivering its contract with the Government formed in March 2021 for the manufacture of Lateral Flow Antigen tests for SARS-CoV-2.

The end date for the Omega Diagnostics contract is March 2022, with the option for a further year extension if necessary. The contract is a flexible contract which does not contain any commitment to volume or value. Manufacturers worldwide with tests validated for use in the United Kingdom were invited to make proposals including licencing production and were evaluated on the basis of a range of criteria including cost, performance and location/ability to provide security of supply. We engaged with the UK Rapid Test Consortium and members were invited to provide capability statements on their ability to manufacture at scale. Based on these statements, qualified Consortium members were invited to enter precontract agreements and contract discussions.

The following table shows the equipment loaned to Omega Diagnostics and the purpose of each loan. The equipment loaned is specific mass production technology to allow increased production for lateral flow antigen tests. All equipment has been loaned under strict contractual arrangements that constrain its use solely for the purpose of Government need in addressing the pandemic. No other use of the equipment is permitted.

Equipment

Function/purpose of loan

Laminator

Laminating

Reel to reel

Plotting

Reel to reel

Plotting

Reel to reel

Plotting

Laminator

Laminating

Reel to reel

Plotting

Foil wrapper

Wrapping

Thermal transfer printer

Wrapping

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Converging conveyor

Wrapping

Desiccant dispenser

Wrapping

Foil wrapper

Wrapping

Thermal transfer printer

Wrapping

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Converging conveyor

Wrapping

Desiccant dispenser

Wrapping

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what market engagement exercise took place which led to the formation of the contract with Omega Diagnostics in March 2021 for the manufacture of Lateral Flow Antigen tests for SARS-CoV-2.

The end date for the Omega Diagnostics contract is March 2022, with the option for a further year extension if necessary. The contract is a flexible contract which does not contain any commitment to volume or value. Manufacturers worldwide with tests validated for use in the United Kingdom were invited to make proposals including licencing production and were evaluated on the basis of a range of criteria including cost, performance and location/ability to provide security of supply. We engaged with the UK Rapid Test Consortium and members were invited to provide capability statements on their ability to manufacture at scale. Based on these statements, qualified Consortium members were invited to enter precontract agreements and contract discussions.

The following table shows the equipment loaned to Omega Diagnostics and the purpose of each loan. The equipment loaned is specific mass production technology to allow increased production for lateral flow antigen tests. All equipment has been loaned under strict contractual arrangements that constrain its use solely for the purpose of Government need in addressing the pandemic. No other use of the equipment is permitted.

Equipment

Function/purpose of loan

Laminator

Laminating

Reel to reel

Plotting

Reel to reel

Plotting

Reel to reel

Plotting

Laminator

Laminating

Reel to reel

Plotting

Foil wrapper

Wrapping

Thermal transfer printer

Wrapping

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Converging conveyor

Wrapping

Desiccant dispenser

Wrapping

Foil wrapper

Wrapping

Thermal transfer printer

Wrapping

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Converging conveyor

Wrapping

Desiccant dispenser

Wrapping

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the end date is of the contract with Omega Diagnostics signed in March 2021 for the manufacture of Lateral Flow Antigen tests for SARS-CoV-2; and what the value is of that contract.

The end date for the Omega Diagnostics contract is March 2022, with the option for a further year extension if necessary. The contract is a flexible contract which does not contain any commitment to volume or value. Manufacturers worldwide with tests validated for use in the United Kingdom were invited to make proposals including licencing production and were evaluated on the basis of a range of criteria including cost, performance and location/ability to provide security of supply. We engaged with the UK Rapid Test Consortium and members were invited to provide capability statements on their ability to manufacture at scale. Based on these statements, qualified Consortium members were invited to enter precontract agreements and contract discussions.

The following table shows the equipment loaned to Omega Diagnostics and the purpose of each loan. The equipment loaned is specific mass production technology to allow increased production for lateral flow antigen tests. All equipment has been loaned under strict contractual arrangements that constrain its use solely for the purpose of Government need in addressing the pandemic. No other use of the equipment is permitted.

Equipment

Function/purpose of loan

Laminator

Laminating

Reel to reel

Plotting

Reel to reel

Plotting

Reel to reel

Plotting

Laminator

Laminating

Reel to reel

Plotting

Foil wrapper

Wrapping

Thermal transfer printer

Wrapping

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Converging conveyor

Wrapping

Desiccant dispenser

Wrapping

Foil wrapper

Wrapping

Thermal transfer printer

Wrapping

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Automated assembler

Cassette assembling

Converging conveyor

Wrapping

Desiccant dispenser

Wrapping

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Cutter

Cassette assembling

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the UK Rapid Antigen Test Consortium's tendering process for contracts for rapid covid-19 tests is equitable and competitive.

The UK Rapid Test Consortium (UK-RTC) is not a Government organisation therefore the information requested on its creation and internal processes is not held centrally.

No funding has been allocated through the UK-RTC.

Members of the Consortium who have been awarded contracts have done so through compliant procurement processes unrelated to the UK-RTC.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the criteria are for membership of the UK Rapid Antigen Test Consortium.

The UK Rapid Test Consortium (UK-RTC) is not a Government organisation therefore the information requested on its creation and internal processes is not held centrally.

No funding has been allocated through the UK-RTC.

Members of the Consortium who have been awarded contracts have done so through compliant procurement processes unrelated to the UK-RTC.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding has been allocated to the UK Rapid Antigen Test Consortium (a) centrally and (b) to each of its members.

The UK Rapid Test Consortium (UK-RTC) is not a Government organisation therefore the information requested on its creation and internal processes is not held centrally.

No funding has been allocated through the UK-RTC.

Members of the Consortium who have been awarded contracts have done so through compliant procurement processes unrelated to the UK-RTC.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the membership of the UK Rapid Antigen Test Consortium; and on what date each Member was admitted to that consortium.

The UK Rapid Test Consortium (UK-RTC) is not a Government organisation therefore the information requested on its creation and internal processes is not held centrally.

No funding has been allocated through the UK-RTC.

Members of the Consortium who have been awarded contracts have done so through compliant procurement processes unrelated to the UK-RTC.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the purpose is of the UK Rapid Antigen Test Consortium; and on what date that consortium was founded.

The UK Rapid Test Consortium (UK-RTC) is not a Government organisation therefore the information requested on its creation and internal processes is not held centrally.

No funding has been allocated through the UK-RTC.

Members of the Consortium who have been awarded contracts have done so through compliant procurement processes unrelated to the UK-RTC.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has entered into any contracts for the provision of rapid covid-19 tests with organisations that are not members of the UK Rapid Antigen Test Consortium.

The Department has entered into contracts with Innova for the provision of self-test lateral flow devices (LFDs) and Innova, Abbott and Orient Gene, through their distributor Tanner Pharma, for the provision of assisted LFDs.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his cancellation of outstanding orders for rapid coronavirus (COVID-19) tests with Abingdon Health in January 2021, what steps he has taken to improve his Department’s commissioning process.

No contract was awarded to Abingdon Health Limited in October 2020.

The Department continues to use the appropriate procurement procedures within the Public Contract Regulations to award contracts to suppliers. All suppliers pass through a rigorous regulatory and validation process to ensure that they meet the same high quality standards.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which companies and organisations competed for the contract that was awarded in October 2020 to Abingdon Health to provide 1 million rapid covid-19 tests; and which criteria Abingdon Health fulfilled in order to be awarded that contract.

No contract was awarded to Abingdon Health Limited in October 2020.

The Department continues to use the appropriate procurement procedures within the Public Contract Regulations to award contracts to suppliers. All suppliers pass through a rigorous regulatory and validation process to ensure that they meet the same high quality standards.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how Surescreen Diagnostics was awarded a contract for 24 months until January 2023 for the manufacture of Lateral Flow Antigen tests for SARS-CoV-2; where and how that contract was advertised; and what criteria were used to select that company.

This contract was awarded in January 2021, before the current lockdown easing measures were announced. The contract is flexible and does not contain committed volumes of purchasing of tests. We are able to alter the amount of tests bought through this contract on a monthly basis and have the necessary contract clauses to exit the contract at short notice if required.

The contract was awarded under Regulation 32 measures in procurement procedures, based on the urgent nature of the requirement for lateral flow antigen tests and the lack of sovereign capability to produce these products in the United Kingdom. Worldwide manufacturers with tests validated for use in the UK were invited to make manufacturing proposals, including licencing production and were evaluated on the basis of a range of criteria including cost, performance and location/ability to provide security of supply.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason Surescreen Diagnostics has been awarded a contract for 24 months until January 2023 for the manufacture of lateral flow antigen tests for SARS-CoV-2 in the context of the potential removal of legal limits on social contact on 21 June 2021 as set out in the Government's roadmap out of lockdown.

This contract was awarded in January 2021, before the current lockdown easing measures were announced. The contract is flexible and does not contain committed volumes of purchasing of tests. We are able to alter the amount of tests bought through this contract on a monthly basis and have the necessary contract clauses to exit the contract at short notice if required.

The contract was awarded under Regulation 32 measures in procurement procedures, based on the urgent nature of the requirement for lateral flow antigen tests and the lack of sovereign capability to produce these products in the United Kingdom. Worldwide manufacturers with tests validated for use in the UK were invited to make manufacturing proposals, including licencing production and were evaluated on the basis of a range of criteria including cost, performance and location/ability to provide security of supply.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to Answer of 17 May 2021 to Question 165, what steps he has taken to record the number of urgent operations cancelled since the beginning of the covid-19 outbreak.

The collection of data on cancelled operations has remained paused in order to release capacity across the National Health Service to support the ongoing pandemic response.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of the (a) revenue and (b) capital expenditure of the NHS was spent on (i) physical health and (ii) mental health in each of the last three years.

Information on the capital and revenue spend on both mental and physical health is not held in the format requested. There is no specific measure for spending on ‘physical health’ and some spending on physical health conditions will include treatment for mental health. While spend on specialist mental health services is available, it is not known how much non-specialist activity is devoted to mental health.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many urgent operations have been cancelled since the beginning of the covid-19 outbreak in the UK in March 2020.

The information requested is not held.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data the Government holds on the amount of funding disbursed from the public purse for the provision of critical care beds in each of the last 30 years.

This information is not held centrally.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients were admitted from the community into NHS hospitals specifically for the treatment of covid-19 symptoms, as opposed to being discovered to be infected after admission, from 1 March 2020 to 1 August 2020; and of those so admitted, how many were (i) admitted from a care home and (ii) readmitted after prior discharge from hospital with a covid-19 diagnosis.

This data is not held centrally.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 3 March 2020 to Question 157049 on Coronavirus: Disease Control, what informal assessment has been made on that matter.

Public Health England (PHE) has made no such assessment.

PHE collects data on disease surveillance for example on flu and other respiratory pathogens. However, these reports do not show the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on immunity of children and adults.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what organisational change in public health he has identified as necessary to prepare for future pandemics.

As set out in the Written Ministerial Statement of 24 March (HCWS884), from 1 April, we will formally establish the new United Kingdom Health Security Agency (UKHSA). The UKHSA will be the country’s permanent standing capacity to prepare for, prevent and respond to threats to health.

While Public Health England’s remit has spanned both health protection and health improvement, the UKHSA will be focused entirely on planning for, preventing and responding to the risk of future infectious disease pandemics and other major health threats. The UKHSA will work with partners around the world, lead the UK’s global contribution to global health protection research and hold responsibility for health security scientific capabilities including those at Porton Down and Colindale.

The transition of responsibilities and capabilities from Public Health England and NHS Test and Trace into the new Agency will take place over the coming months, with the UKHSA fully operational from October 2021. Key performance metrics for the UKHSA will be determined as part of this transition.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has for the role of National Institute for Health Protection in public health; how that role will differ from the role currently performed by Public Health England; and what the body’s Key Performance Indicators will be.

As set out in the Written Ministerial Statement of 24 March (HCWS884), from 1 April, we will formally establish the new United Kingdom Health Security Agency (UKHSA). The UKHSA will be the country’s permanent standing capacity to prepare for, prevent and respond to threats to health.

While Public Health England’s remit has spanned both health protection and health improvement, the UKHSA will be focused entirely on planning for, preventing and responding to the risk of future infectious disease pandemics and other major health threats. The UKHSA will work with partners around the world, lead the UK’s global contribution to global health protection research and hold responsibility for health security scientific capabilities including those at Porton Down and Colindale.

The transition of responsibilities and capabilities from Public Health England and NHS Test and Trace into the new Agency will take place over the coming months, with the UKHSA fully operational from October 2021. Key performance metrics for the UKHSA will be determined as part of this transition.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made in establishing the National Institute for Health Protection as a replacement for Public Health England.

As set out in the Written Ministerial Statement of 24 March (HCWS884), from 1 April, we will formally establish the new United Kingdom Health Security Agency (UKHSA). The UKHSA will be the country’s permanent standing capacity to prepare for, prevent and respond to threats to health.

While Public Health England’s remit has spanned both health protection and health improvement, the UKHSA will be focused entirely on planning for, preventing and responding to the risk of future infectious disease pandemics and other major health threats. The UKHSA will work with partners around the world, lead the UK’s global contribution to global health protection research and hold responsibility for health security scientific capabilities including those at Porton Down and Colindale.

The transition of responsibilities and capabilities from Public Health England and NHS Test and Trace into the new Agency will take place over the coming months, with the UKHSA fully operational from October 2021. Key performance metrics for the UKHSA will be determined as part of this transition.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 22 March 2021 to Question 135878, on Coronavirus: Disease Control, in what format that data is available.

The data collected on each individual positive case from a specific date does not show whether that individual is later admitted to hospital.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, (a) how many and (b) on what topics Ministerial Directions have been issued by his Department to Public Health England.

Public Health England has not received any ministerial directions since its inception in April 2013.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the implications for its policies of the Leipzig University Hospital study relating to impaired breathing caused by face coverings.

The Department has not undertaken a specific assessment. However, the Scientific Group for Emergencies and Public Health England regularly monitor and review the international evidence on the effectiveness of face coverings.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of wearing a mask on the level of microplastic inhalation by the wearer.

Masks which fall under the classification of personal protective equipment (PPE) must meet stringent safety and technical standards, which are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/technical-specifications-for-personal-protective-equipment-ppe/essential-technical-requirements-for-ppe-medical-devices-further-information-for-manufacturers-and-suppliers

Any mask manufactured to a standard will have passed essential health and safety requirements. A product regulator such as the Health and Safety Executive or the Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency will have confirmed they are safe for use. For fabric face coverings, microplastic inhalation should not arise as the Government’s guidance states that a face covering should cover nose and mouth while allowing you to breathe comfortably and therefore be made of a material the wearer finds breathable, such as cotton.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of hospital beds that will be needed for (a) covid and (b) influenza patients in January 2022; and what steps he is taking to ensure that there is capacity in respect of (i) beds and (ii) staffing in the NHS during that period.

There remains significant uncertainty on scenarios for future hospital bed occupancy levels for COVID-19 and flu. Planning guidance for the National Health Service for the financial year 2021-2022 will be published shortly by NHS England and NHS Improvement.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 11 March 2021 to Question 157048, what investment he is making in primary care and community services to increase capacity to prepare for a potential increase in demand.

The NHS Long Term Plan guarantees that investment in primary medical and community services will grow faster than the overall National Health Service budget. The Plan commits to a record level of additional annual investment in primary medical and community care of an extra £4.5 billion in real terms by 2023/24. In 2020, committed to at least a further £1.5 billion in cash terms for general practice until 2023/24.

Recognising additional pressures on general practice as a result of the pandemic, NHS England has made available £150 million to help expand general practitioner capacity up to the end of March 2021. The potential need for further COVID-19 funding for the early part of 2021/22 is being kept under review.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that the evidence base for wearing facemasks during the covid-19 outbreak is kept up to date.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies and Public Health England (PHE) regularly monitor and review the international evidence on the effectiveness of face coverings. PHE has also undertaken rapid reviews of the evidence related to the effectiveness of face coverings in the community for reducing the transmission of COVID-19 with the latest update in January 2021.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 23 February to Question 157295 on Coronavirus: Protective Clothing, if he will publish those reviews and the scientific evidence upon which they were based.

Copies of the reviews ‘Face coverings in the community and COVID-19: a rapid review’ and ‘Face coverings in the community and COVID-19 A rapid review (update 1)’ are enclosed. Both documents contain references to the scientific literature that was reviewed as part of the study.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many meetings (a) he, (b) Ministers in his Department and (c) officials in his Department have had with Professor Neil Ferguson in each of the last 12 months.

Departmental Ministers have been present at two meetings where Professor Ferguson was invited to attend.

Departmental officials have been present at over 60 meetings where Professor Ferguson also attended. In addition, there are a range of standing weekly meetings where Professor Ferguson is a member or participant and Departmental officials are also present or provide the secretariat function.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what evidence his Department used to implement mandatory face coverings to control the transmission of covid-19.

Face coverings are largely intended to protect others and not the wearer against the spread of infection. Evidence on the effectiveness of face coverings is constantly developing.

In June 2020, Public Health England (PHE) used an established methodology to complete a rapid review of the evidence related to face coverings in the community and COVID-19 and concluded that “the beneficial effects of wearing masks may be increased when combined with other non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as hand washing and social distancing.” A second review, published in January 2021, found evidence consistent with the findings of the first review, that the use of face coverings in the community helped reduce the spread of COVID-19. Therefore, PHE continue to advocate the same measures of wearing face coverings in specified community settings. We keep our face covering policy under review, guided by the advice of scientific and medical experts.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of (a) lockdowns and (b) social distancing on the immunity of (i) children and (ii) adults to other viruses; and if he will publish the scientific evidence upon which that assessment is based.

No formal assessment has been made.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to permanently increase bed capacity in the NHS.

There are currently no plans to permanently increase bed capacity across the National Health Service. However, we continue to work closely with the NHS on capacity planning to ensure we have sufficient beds to meet future demand. Our hospitals continue to flex their bed capacity as part of planning to meet the demand from both elective and emergency streams and we are working hard with trusts to maximise the number of open beds.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the risk to public health of face coverings being discarded as litter.

COVID-19 is known to spread primarily through respiratory particles and the advice of our scientific experts has been that the risk of transmission is greater in enclosed, indoor spaces. Therefore, we do not expect face coverings that are incorrectly discarded as litter to pose a major source of transmission and hence a risk to public health.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policy on the compulsory wearing of face masks of the November 2020 Danish study on such coverings.

In January 2021, Public Health England (PHE) updated their rapid evidence review of the international literature on the effectiveness of face coverings for reducing community transmission of COVID-19. This review concluded that the use of face coverings in the community can help reduce the spread of COVID-19 in the community when used as part of a range of mitigations (including social distancing). PHE continues to monitor the evidence on the use of face coverings, including the DANMASK study, which reported inconclusive results.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to review the mandatory use of face coverings in shops.

The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Wearing of Face Coverings in a Relevant Place) (England) Regulations 2020, on the wearing of face coverings in shops, came into force on 24 July 2020. They include a requirement for a review to be undertaken within six months of coming into force. This internal review took place in January and concluded that the Regulations remain necessary, proportionate to protect public health and minimise the spread of COVID-19 and therefore should remain in force. The Principal Regulations will expire after 12 months from the day on which they came into force.

We keep our face covering policy under constant review, guided by the advice of our scientific and medical experts.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of face masks in controlling the transmission of covid-19.

In June 2020, Public Health England (PHE) completed a rapid review of the evidence related to face coverings in the community and COVID-19 and concluded that “the beneficial effects of wearing masks may be increased when combined with other non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as hand washing and social distancing.” A second review, published in January 2021, found evidence consistent with the findings of the first review, that the use of face coverings in the community helped reduce the spread of COVID-19. Therefore, PHE continue to advocate the same measures of wearing face coverings in specified community settings, alongside social distancing and good hand hygiene. We keep our face covering policy under review, guided by the advice of our scientific and medical experts.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many meetings (a) he, (b) his Ministers and (c) his officials have had with (i) Professor Robert Dingwall, (ii) Professor Carl Heneghan, (iii) Professor Anthony Brookes and (iv) Professor Hugh Pennington in each of the last 12 months.

The Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation (Lord Bethell) joined meeting 13 of the Moral and Ethical Advisory Group via teleconference on 10 June 2020 at which Professor Robert Dingwall was also present.

The Chief Medical Officer attended a roundtable meeting of scientists, chaired by the Prime Minister on 20 September 2020, at which Professor Carl Heneghan was present.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the level of reduction in transmission of covid-19 as a result of the public wearing face coverings.

In making its recommendations to the Government, the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies considered the evidence from a number of different studies and their conclusions are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sage-minutes-coronavirus-covid-19-response-21-april-2020

In June 2020, Public Health England (PHE) used an established methodology to complete a rapid review of the evidence related to face coverings in the community and COVID-19 and concluded that “the beneficial effects of wearing masks may be increased when combined with other non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as hand washing and social distancing”. A second review, published in January 2021, found evidence consistent with the findings of the first review, that the use of face coverings in the community helped reduce the spread of COVID-19. Therefore, PHE continue to advocate the same measures of wearing face coverings in specified community settings, alongside social distancing and good hand hygiene.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the full scientific basis for the compulsory wearing of face coverings in public places to control the spread of covid-19.

In making its recommendations to the Government, the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies considered the evidence from a number of different studies and their conclusions are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sage-minutes-coronavirus-covid-19-response-21-april-2020

In June 2020, Public Health England (PHE) used an established methodology to complete a rapid review of the evidence related to face coverings in the community and COVID-19 and concluded that “the beneficial effects of wearing masks may be increased when combined with other non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as hand washing and social distancing”. A second review, published in January 2021, found evidence consistent with the findings of the first review, that the use of face coverings in the community helped reduce the spread of COVID-19. Therefore, PHE continue to advocate the same measures of wearing face coverings in specified community settings, alongside social distancing and good hand hygiene.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 19 January 2021 to Question 135884 on Mental Health Services: Children and Young People, in what format his Department holds that information.

The annual data for mental health services presents numbers and percentages of individuals in contact with National Health Service-funded secondary mental health, learning disability and autism services including those referred throughout the year. This takes into account the fact that some individuals may have been referred multiple times during a year. Data is broken down by age and percentage of the population. Data relating solely to the rate of referrals per 100,000 population is not available.

Due to changes in the dataset in 2016/17, it is not possible to provide comparable rates for years prior to 2017/18. The annual data is published by NHS Digital as part of its annual mental health bulletin and the most recent publication, published on 28 January, is available at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/mental-health-bulletin

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 18 January 2021 to Question 100316 on Coronavirus: Contact Tracing, in what format his Department holds that information.

The following table shows the number of people in the Test and Trace Programme at each civil service grade.

Grade

Total

Administrative Officer

2

Executive Officer

138

Higher Executive Officer

399

Senior Executive Officer

212

Grade 7

301

Grade 6

181

Senior Civil Servant Payband 1

108

Senior Civil Servant Payband 2

31

Senior Civil Servant Payband 3

2

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 20 January 2021 to Question 135883 on Care Homes: Coronavirus, in what format his Department holds that information.

Information on the number of deaths in care homes involving COVID-19 notified to the Care Quality Commission in England is published by the Office of National Statistics is available at the following link:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/numberofdeathsincarehomesnotifiedtothecarequalitycommissionengland

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 19 January 2021 to Question 135882 on Hospitals: Coronavirus, in what format his Department holds that information.

Given the incubation period of the virus and local differences in application of testing protocols, it is not possible to definitively determine the number of people who contracted the virus while in hospital in England to date. NHS England and NHS Improvement publish daily deaths data, but the number of those who may have caught COVID-19 in hospital is not collected.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of trends in the rate of referrals to mental health services in 2020 for (a) adults and (b) children compared to previous years.

The information in the attached table shows that adult and child referrals to secondary mental health, learning disabilities and autism spectrum disorder services increased during the first and second month of 2020 compared with 2019. Referrals then decreased from March and increased again from June onwards. Data for November and December 2020 have not yet been published. We have provided the last two years of data, to data quality.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason there is no mass covid-19 vaccination centre in Yorkshire; and whether his Department plans to open a mass covid-19 vaccination centre in Yorkshire.

In England, latest published data shows that a total of 1,763 vaccination sites have now been established including 158 large scale vaccination centres in total and 6 mass vaccination centres in Yorkshire.

The location of vaccination sites is available at the following link:
https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/publication/vaccination-sites/

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the ratio of covid-19 (a) hospital admissions to (b) community infections in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Public Health England has not yet conducted an analysis of the ratio of COVID-19 hospital admissions to community infections.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS beds in acute hospitals were available for use on 31 December in each of the last 10 years.

The total number of National Health Service beds available in acute hospitals is not available in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment this Department has made of the number of daily deaths from covid-19 at which all covid-19 restrictions on (a) social and (b) economic activities can be removed.

The restrictions on social and economic activity are necessary to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, and in pursuing these policies we do take account of the burden on people, and on the economy. It was necessary to announce a national lockdown on 4 January to curb the spread of COVID-19 whilst we continue to vaccinate as many people as possible.

The Government keeps the restrictions under continual review and will make changes as and when the data and science support it but we expect that the national lockdown to last until at least mid-February.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people caught covid-19 as a hospital inpatient since September 2020; and how many and what proportion of those people died in hospital from covid-19.

This information is not held in the format requested. It is not possible to provide information on the estimated nosocomial infection rate for COVID-19 throughout 2020 in England.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people caught covid-19 in care homes since September 2020; and how many and what proportion of those people died from covid-19 in care homes.

The information is not available in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the rate of referrals per 100,000 is to mental health services for (a) children and (b) adults; and what those rates were in each of the last five years.

Data is not held in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of people who had covid-19 did not require hospitalisation on (a) 5 January and (b) the most recent date for which figures are available.

The data is not available in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2020.

The Health and Wellbeing Team, part of the Department’s Human Resources function, ran a 60 minute radio show for Departmental staff featuring three guest male speakers from across the Civil Service. In addition, the male Head of Wellbeing wrote a blog published on the Department’s intranet on the challenges that men often face in the modern world, with links on how to access emotional and mental health support.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the nature of potential adverse drug reactions from the covid-19 vaccine.

The safety profile, including the nature and frequency of any adverse reactions to COVID-19 vaccine(s) will be reviewed as part of any Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency authorisation, and evaluated against the benefits of the vaccine(s). Once authorised, this will be described in the product information available to health professionals and vaccines.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of people who may suffer an adverse drug reaction to the covid-19 vaccine.

The safety profile, including the nature and frequency of any adverse reactions to COVID-19 vaccine(s) will be reviewed as part of any Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency authorisation, and evaluated against the benefits of the vaccine(s). Once authorised, this will be described in the product information available to health professionals and vaccines.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of face masks in controlling the transmission of covid-19.

Face coverings are largely intended to protect others and not the wearer against the spread of infection. Evidence on the effectiveness of face coverings in preventing the spread of COVID-19 in community settings is constantly developing, and research is being conducted all over the world, leading to a variety of observations and suggested conclusions that vary in their degree of confidence.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has for capital expenditure at (a) Lynfield Mount in Bradford and (b) Airedale hospital.

As part of the recently announced £1.5 billion capital investment in the National Health Service for 2020-21, Airedale NHS Foundation Trust will receive £224,000 to upgrade its accident and emergency department and £1.7 million to address backlog maintenance at Airedale General Hospital. Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust will receive £10,000 for maintenance at Lynfield Mount Hospital.

Future NHS capital funding will be determined as part of the Department’s settlement at the upcoming Spending Review. Once our capital settlement has been confirmed with HM Treasury, we will consider carefully how future projects are prioritised within it. We recently confirmed funding for 40 hospitals, with a further eight schemes invited to bid for future funding to deliver 48 hospitals by 2030. A proportion will be mental health hospitals, and details on the bidding process will be released in due course.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reasons the headquarters of NHSX is in London.

NHSX offices are located in London and Leeds, in buildings shared with NHS England and NHS Improvement and the Department. NHSX is not headquartered in London - it works across both sites.

NHSX is a joint unit, and staff are employees of either NHS England and NHS Improvement or the Department. Vacancies are usually advertised for both Leeds and London, although some posts have been targeted at Leeds. The information requested on the number of permanent NHSX staff in London by pay band is shown in the following tables.

Departmental employees

Civil Service Grade

Number based in London

Administrative Officer

1

Executive Officer

7

Higher Executive Officer

7

Fast Stream

6

Senior Executive Officer

8

Grade 7

33

Grade 6

8

Senior Civil Servant

13

Total

83

NHS England and NHS Improvement employees

Agenda for Change Payband

Number based in London

Band 4

1

Band 5

9

Band 6

6

Band 7

19

Band 8a

12

Band 8b

18

Band 8c

15

Band 8d

10

Band 9

14

ESM 1

10

ESM 2

4

ESM 3

2

Total

120

NHSX is supporting digital transformation of the National Health Service and social care throughout England and takes a national and international view of the best technology to do this. NHSX sets the standards for digitisation, and provides front-line support, to allow local health and social care providers to secure the appropriate digital solutions, which means we have truly national scope.

In accordance with the Government’s levelling-up agenda, we are aiming to reduce our estates space in London with the Leeds office becoming the bigger site.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people are employed by NHSX in London by pay band.

NHSX offices are located in London and Leeds, in buildings shared with NHS England and NHS Improvement and the Department. NHSX is not headquartered in London - it works across both sites.

NHSX is a joint unit, and staff are employees of either NHS England and NHS Improvement or the Department. Vacancies are usually advertised for both Leeds and London, although some posts have been targeted at Leeds. The information requested on the number of permanent NHSX staff in London by pay band is shown in the following tables.

Departmental employees

Civil Service Grade

Number based in London

Administrative Officer

1

Executive Officer

7

Higher Executive Officer

7

Fast Stream

6

Senior Executive Officer

8

Grade 7

33

Grade 6

8

Senior Civil Servant

13

Total

83

NHS England and NHS Improvement employees

Agenda for Change Payband

Number based in London

Band 4

1

Band 5

9

Band 6

6

Band 7

19

Band 8a

12

Band 8b

18

Band 8c

15

Band 8d

10

Band 9

14

ESM 1

10

ESM 2

4

ESM 3

2

Total

120

NHSX is supporting digital transformation of the National Health Service and social care throughout England and takes a national and international view of the best technology to do this. NHSX sets the standards for digitisation, and provides front-line support, to allow local health and social care providers to secure the appropriate digital solutions, which means we have truly national scope.

In accordance with the Government’s levelling-up agenda, we are aiming to reduce our estates space in London with the Leeds office becoming the bigger site.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many new NHSX jobs are based in London.

NHSX offices are located in London and Leeds, in buildings shared with NHS England and NHS Improvement and the Department. NHSX is not headquartered in London - it works across both sites.

NHSX is a joint unit, and staff are employees of either NHS England and NHS Improvement or the Department. Vacancies are usually advertised for both Leeds and London, although some posts have been targeted at Leeds. The information requested on the number of permanent NHSX staff in London by pay band is shown in the following tables.

Departmental employees

Civil Service Grade

Number based in London

Administrative Officer

1

Executive Officer

7

Higher Executive Officer

7

Fast Stream

6

Senior Executive Officer

8

Grade 7

33

Grade 6

8

Senior Civil Servant

13

Total

83

NHS England and NHS Improvement employees

Agenda for Change Payband

Number based in London

Band 4

1

Band 5

9

Band 6

6

Band 7

19

Band 8a

12

Band 8b

18

Band 8c

15

Band 8d

10

Band 9

14

ESM 1

10

ESM 2

4

ESM 3

2

Total

120

NHSX is supporting digital transformation of the National Health Service and social care throughout England and takes a national and international view of the best technology to do this. NHSX sets the standards for digitisation, and provides front-line support, to allow local health and social care providers to secure the appropriate digital solutions, which means we have truly national scope.

In accordance with the Government’s levelling-up agenda, we are aiming to reduce our estates space in London with the Leeds office becoming the bigger site.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of NHSX to consider technology solutions outside of London.

NHSX offices are located in London and Leeds, in buildings shared with NHS England and NHS Improvement and the Department. NHSX is not headquartered in London - it works across both sites.

NHSX is a joint unit, and staff are employees of either NHS England and NHS Improvement or the Department. Vacancies are usually advertised for both Leeds and London, although some posts have been targeted at Leeds. The information requested on the number of permanent NHSX staff in London by pay band is shown in the following tables.

Departmental employees

Civil Service Grade

Number based in London

Administrative Officer

1

Executive Officer

7

Higher Executive Officer

7

Fast Stream

6

Senior Executive Officer

8

Grade 7

33

Grade 6

8

Senior Civil Servant

13

Total

83

NHS England and NHS Improvement employees

Agenda for Change Payband

Number based in London

Band 4

1

Band 5

9

Band 6

6

Band 7

19

Band 8a

12

Band 8b

18

Band 8c

15

Band 8d

10

Band 9

14

ESM 1

10

ESM 2

4

ESM 3

2

Total

120

NHSX is supporting digital transformation of the National Health Service and social care throughout England and takes a national and international view of the best technology to do this. NHSX sets the standards for digitisation, and provides front-line support, to allow local health and social care providers to secure the appropriate digital solutions, which means we have truly national scope.

In accordance with the Government’s levelling-up agenda, we are aiming to reduce our estates space in London with the Leeds office becoming the bigger site.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made on the effect of having NHSX headquartered in London on the Government's levelling-up agenda.

NHSX offices are located in London and Leeds, in buildings shared with NHS England and NHS Improvement and the Department. NHSX is not headquartered in London - it works across both sites.

NHSX is a joint unit, and staff are employees of either NHS England and NHS Improvement or the Department. Vacancies are usually advertised for both Leeds and London, although some posts have been targeted at Leeds. The information requested on the number of permanent NHSX staff in London by pay band is shown in the following tables.

Departmental employees

Civil Service Grade

Number based in London

Administrative Officer

1

Executive Officer

7

Higher Executive Officer

7

Fast Stream

6

Senior Executive Officer

8

Grade 7

33

Grade 6

8

Senior Civil Servant

13

Total

83

NHS England and NHS Improvement employees

Agenda for Change Payband

Number based in London

Band 4

1

Band 5

9

Band 6

6

Band 7

19

Band 8a

12

Band 8b

18

Band 8c

15

Band 8d

10

Band 9

14

ESM 1

10

ESM 2

4

ESM 3

2

Total

120

NHSX is supporting digital transformation of the National Health Service and social care throughout England and takes a national and international view of the best technology to do this. NHSX sets the standards for digitisation, and provides front-line support, to allow local health and social care providers to secure the appropriate digital solutions, which means we have truly national scope.

In accordance with the Government’s levelling-up agenda, we are aiming to reduce our estates space in London with the Leeds office becoming the bigger site.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what logistical support is provided to local authorities where mass testing is taking place to ensure that such testing is carried out effectively.

NHS Test and Trace regional convenors and Community Testing Programme Liaison Teams support local areas in designing schemes through to delivery. The regional convenors work with other members of the regional partnership team including the regional directors of public health, to provide a link to NHS Test and Trace, the Department and support coordination between areas and with Government agencies. As participating local areas are identified, local Liaison Teams can offer further guidance, detailed planning, logistical and communications support and share lessons learnt from other testing pilots and programmes.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the contribution of regular exercise to helping people to prevent the contraction of (a) the common cold, (b) influenza, (c) covid-19, (d) heart disease and (e) other (i) common pathogens and (ii) serious illnesses.

No specific assessments have been made. The Chief Medical Officer is clear that being physically active is important to long-term health and crucial for keeping people healthy during the ongoing pandemic. Evidence suggests that regular physical activity can promote good physical health and help manage stress and anxiety.

Throughout the pandemic, parks and outdoor green spaces have remained open. People are allowed to leave their homes for exercise and recreation outdoors, with their household or on their own, or with one person from another household or support bubble.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the reasons for undernutrition amongst children in the UK.

The reasons for ‘undernutrition’, which is more generally referred to as malnutrition, are varied and complex. ‘Undernutrition’ amongst children can be both a cause and a consequence of ill health and may be linked to clinical, social and economic factors. It may develop as a result of limited access to food, a disorder or disease that results in a poor appetite, makes eating or absorbing food difficult or results in a greatly increased requirement for energy and nutrients.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of children who suffer from undernutrition in the UK.

Estimates of the number of children who suffer from ‘undernutrition’ is not available.

The National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) reports the number of children who are underweight in England. NCMP data for 2019/20 shows that the number of underweight children in England aged four to five years old is 3,771 out of 399,470 measured (0.9%) and the number of children aged 10-11 years old is 6,969 out of 491,138 measured (1.4%). This is stable compared with previous years and is below the 2% level expected in a healthy population. This data is available at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/national-child-measurement-programme/2019-20-school-year

Underweight may reflect undernutrition in a child but may also reflect a small build. A child of any weight status (underweight, healthy weight, overweight or obese) may suffer from undernutrition if a diet is lacking the nutrients required for healthy growth.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the proportion of people who have died from covid-19 who would have died within 12 months in the event that they had not contracted covid-19.

The Department and the Office for National Statistics (ONS) jointly produced the paper ‘Direct and Indirect Impacts of COVID-19 on Excess Deaths and Morbidity: Executive Summary’ for the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies in which the ONS estimated that of the 32,000 COVID-19 deaths, which occurred between 21 March and 1 May 2020, 25,000 of them were deaths that would not have occurred otherwise within 12 months. Therefore, 7,000 of the 32,000 COVID-19 deaths are deaths which would have likely occurred within 12 months, had they not contracted COVID-19.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether specialist chocolate confectionary shops will fall under the scope of the proposed location restrictions set out in the Tackling Obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives strategy.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 15 September 2020 to Question 83713.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential economic effect on specialist confectionery shops of the proposed location restrictions set out in the Tackling Obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives strategy.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 15 September 2020 to Question 83713.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will place in the Library a copy of his Department's internal guidance for officials on the drafting of answers to parliamentary questions; and if he will set out his Department's step by step sign off procedure before Ministerial approval is given to answers.

The Department’s most recent internal guidance is attached.

The Office of the Leader of the House provides guidance to all departments on the practice of answering Written Questions. The full guide is available at GOV.UK at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/guide-to-parliamentary-work

Answers are cleared by a senior member of the civil service responsible for the relevant policy areas. The answers are then reviewed by special advisers before submitting to the relevant Minister for final clearance.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in his Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.

The largest pay rise given to someone in the Department in the last 12 months was 3% of base salary and £2,121 in cash terms.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will support the introduction of additional medical schools.

The Government has expanded the number of places available in medical schools in England and there are now an extra 1,500 student doctors who entered training over the past three years. As part of this expansion, five new medical schools have been opened around England.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many staff or consultants involved in the NHS Test and Trace programme are being paid (a) up to £25,000, (b) between £25,001 and £50,000, (c) between £50,001 and £75,000, (d) between £75,001 and £100,000, (e) between £100,001 and £150,000, (f) between £150,001 and £200,000 and (g) over £200,000 per annum or the equivalent amount pro rata.

The names of senior civil servants and senior officials in departments, agencies and non-departmental public bodies earning £150,000 and above as of 30 September is published annually on GOV.UK. Information on staff below this level is not held in the format requested.

The pay rates of individual consultants engaged from each supplier is commercially sensitive.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of the Association of Convenience Stores' estimate that refitting convenience stores under the proposals to restrict promotions by prominent location, as proposed in the Tackling Obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives strategy, will cost the sector of up to £483 million.

A full public consultation and impact assessment has been carried out for the proposal to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar in stores. This includes an assessment of the impact on small businesses. The Government’s response to the consultation and the impact assessment will be published shortly.

The Department of Health and Social Care and the Department for Food and Rural Affairs recently met with representatives from the food and drink industry to discuss measures set out in “Tackling Obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives”.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of exempting small shops under 280sqm from the siting restrictions set out in the Tackling Obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives strategy.

A full public consultation and impact assessment has been carried out for the proposal to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar in stores. This includes an assessment of the impact on small businesses. The Government’s response to the consultation and the impact assessment will be published shortly.

The Department of Health and Social Care and the Department for Food and Rural Affairs recently met with representatives from the food and drink industry to discuss measures set out in “Tackling Obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives”.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 tests have taken place per 100,000 of the population in (a) the Bradford district, (b) West Yorkshire and (c) England in each of the last six weeks for which data are available.

We publish data on the number of pillar 2 tests processed in each local authority weekly alongside the Test and Trace statistics publication on GOV.UK at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/nhs-test-and-trace-statistics-england-weekly-reports

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people who quarantined after returning to England since July 2020 from each country previously classed as an exempted destination have subsequently (a) tested positive for covid-19, (b) been hospitalised as a result of covid-19 and (c) died from covid-19.

The Department does not hold this information.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on small shops of restrictions on where high fat, salt and sugar products can be placed in stores.

A full public consultation and impact assessment has been carried out for the proposal to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar in stores. This includes an assessment of the impact on small businesses. The Government’s response to the consultation and the impact assessment will be published shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what the (a) amount, (b) recipient and (c) purpose of each grant distributed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission since 2016 was.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission is an independent public body and grants that it makes under Section 17 of the Equality Act 2006 decisions are matters for the Commission itself. I have therefore asked the Commission’s Chief Executive Officer to write to my Hon friend with the information requested. I will place a copy of the letter in the libraries of both Houses.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the (a) guidance issued to care homes in relation to the covid-19 outbreak since the start of 2020 and (b) the dates on which that guidance was issued.

We have published a range of guidance to care homes, as well as other care providers, unpaid careers and local authorities on how to continue giving care during the COVID-19 outbreak.

A list of the guidance we have published for care homes in relation to the COVID-19 outbreak since the start of 2020 is attached.

Further relevant guidance on adult social care can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/coronavirus-covid-19-social-care-guidance

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many times the (a) Union Jack, (b) St George's flag, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) flag of Wales has been flown from the headquarters of his Department in London in each year since 2015.

The Union flag is flown on most days and other flags are occasionally flown for events. The Department does not keep records of how many times flags are flown.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) Union Jack, (b) St George, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) Flag of Wales flags his Department owns.

The Department owns two Union flags, one St George flag and one Flag of Wales. The Department does not own the Scottish Saltire.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 13 January 2020 to Question 2446 on Urgent Treatment Centres, how many cities in England and Wales with a population smaller than Bradford have an urgent treatment centre.

The information is not held in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 13 January 2020 to Question 2446 on Urgent Treatment Centres, how many cities in England and Wales with a population greater than Bradford do not have an urgent treatment centre.

The information is not held in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 20 January to Question 2446 on Urgent Treatment Centres, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that Bradford gets an Urgent Treatment Centre.

Urgent treatment centres (UTCs) are commissioned by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) as they best know the needs of their local population.

The local accident and emergency (A&E) delivery board have been considering options for the future, including the development of a UTC, but will evaluate them all fully before reaching a conclusion.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which cities in England do not have an urgent treatment centre.

The cities of Gloucester, Lichfield, Hereford, Lancaster, Bradford, Salisbury, Winchester, Carlisle, Wells, Oxford, Ripon, Worcester do not have an urgent treatment centre (UTC).

Canterbury, Salford and Manchester do not currently have UTCs but plans are in place for delivery during 2020.

The cities of Chelmsford, Exeter, St Albans, Stoke-on-Trent and Sheffield are in health systems that are currently undergoing consultations about service reconfiguration and no decisions about UTC requirement have yet been made.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what information his Department holds on the number of (a) people who have been convicted of murder and (b) victims of murder who were transgender around the world.

The FCDO does not collect statistics for the number of people convicted of murder, or victims of murder who were transgender, around the world.

The Government firmly believes that the chance to live with dignity, free from violence or discrimination, should not depend on a person's sexual orientation or gender identity. We directly challenge governments that criminalise homosexuality, at the highest possible level. The UK is currently co-chair and a founder-member of the Equal Rights Coalition, a grouping of 42 countries committed to working together to promote LGBTI equality globally. We work with partner countries and through international organisations, including the UN, OSCE, the Council of Europe and the Commonwealth, to promote inclusion.

We believe that the strongest, safest and most prosperous societies are those in which all citizens can live freely without fear of violence or discrimination. The international community must uphold the universality of human rights.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2020.

FCDO recognises that men and boys, as well as women and girls, suffer from harmful social norms and violence. International Men's Day offers an opportunity to reflect on how outcomes for men and boys can be improved, as well as how men and boys can play a key role in advancing gender equality.

FCDO's policy and programmes look to support men and boys as survivors and victims of violence as well as responding to violence against women and girls. Last year we appointed male and female survivor champions to support our work on the Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative. We work with whole communities to challenge the acceptability of violence and bring about social change. For example, in Pakistan we supported an intervention which achieved significant reductions in corporal punishment at school and peer violence for boys as well as girls.

Men and boys can also be powerful change agents in their communities and positive role models. Many of our Girls' Education Challenge projects include activities to target boys and engage them as champions of gender equality. For example, in Mozambique and Nepal, marginalised boys as well as girls will be trained in peer education, life and vocational skills, and business initiatives.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in his Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.

FCDO cannot provide the data requested as it has the potential to identify an individual's personal information.

Information on the salaries of our Senior Board members are already published on an annual basis in our annual reports. Information on salaries and roles for all staff, highlighting those at Director and above is published as Organogram of Staff Roles & Salaries on Gov.UK; this information is updated every six months. Our annual pay awards are aligned to the Cabinet Office pay remits for delegated grades and SCS.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if the Government will include imports of coal from Russia in the list of sanctions against that country; and if he will make a statement.

The UK is committed to playing a leading role in sanctions against Russia. Sanctions are one of a range of measures we have taken, in concert with others, to defend our security and enhance our capabilities against Russian malign activity. During the transition period, EU sanctions on Russia will continue to apply in the UK. These measures do not currently include sanctions on the import of coal.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what his current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in his (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

Throughout the pandemic, the Civil Service / HM Treasury and its agencies and related bodies has followed, and continues to follow, the latest government guidance in relation to managing the risk of COVID-19 in the workplace, including any variations between the four nations of the UK.

In England, the BEIS ‘Working Safely during coronavirus (COVID-19)’ guidance provides sensible precautions employers can take to manage risk and support their staff. The guidance is available via this link: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-covid-19/offices-factories-and-labs#offices-7-2.

It is for individual employers to determine which mitigations are appropriate to adopt as they review their workplace risk assessments in light of the updated guidance. Face coverings, which are no longer required by law, are one possible mitigation employers could adopt if the situation warranted it.

HM Treasury fully supports individuals who choose to wear a face covering in the workplace.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Financial Conduct Authority’s recent extension of the Temporary Registration Regime for cryptoasset businesses.

The FCA’s competition objective, as set out in section 1E of the Financial Services and Market Act 2000 (FSMA), requires the FCA to promote effective competition in the interests of consumers in markets for regulated financial services. Activities relating to cryptoassets do not constitute regulated financial services, except where a cryptoasset qualifies as a Specified Investment under the Regulated Activities Order or is e-Money. The FCA’s competition objective therefore does not apply with respect to most markets for cryptoassets. Where a cryptoasset is a Specified Investment or e-Money, the cryptoasset business should already have been registered with the FCA for anti-money laundering supervision, independently of the new supervisory regime for cryptoasset businesses.

The FCA’s decision to extend the Temporary Registration Regime for cryptoasset businesses to 31 March 2022 will allow firms that are currently on the temporary register to continue operating whilst their applications are assessed, and preserve consumers’ access to a range of cryptoasset firms in the intervening period. This strikes an appropriate balance between mitigating the risk of money laundering in the cryptoasset sector, and ensuring that cryptoasset businesses based in the UK, and the customers they serve, are not subject to undue disruption.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to section 1E of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 on the competition objective, what assessment he has made of the performance of the Financial Conduct Authority in respect of the anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration of cryptoasset businesses.

The FCA’s competition objective, as set out in section 1E of the Financial Services and Market Act 2000 (FSMA), requires the FCA to promote effective competition in the interests of consumers in markets for regulated financial services. Activities relating to cryptoassets do not constitute regulated financial services, except where a cryptoasset qualifies as a Specified Investment under the Regulated Activities Order or is e-Money. The FCA’s competition objective therefore does not apply with respect to most markets for cryptoassets. Where a cryptoasset is a Specified Investment or e-Money, the cryptoasset business should already have been registered with the FCA for anti-money laundering supervision, independently of the new supervisory regime for cryptoasset businesses.

The FCA’s decision to extend the Temporary Registration Regime for cryptoasset businesses to 31 March 2022 will allow firms that are currently on the temporary register to continue operating whilst their applications are assessed, and preserve consumers’ access to a range of cryptoasset firms in the intervening period. This strikes an appropriate balance between mitigating the risk of money laundering in the cryptoasset sector, and ensuring that cryptoasset businesses based in the UK, and the customers they serve, are not subject to undue disruption.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will give overall responsibility to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) for maintaining a well-functioning cash system; and what discussions his Department has had with the FCA on that matter.

The Government’s consultation on proposals for protecting access to cash for the long term will be open until 23 September 2021. Following the consultation, the Government will set out next steps for delivering on its commitment for legislating to protect access to cash.

The consultation is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/access-to-cash-consultation.

As detailed in its consultation, the Government proposes that the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) becomes the lead regulator for oversight of the retail cash system, including having responsibility for monitoring and enforcing new legislative cash access requirements. In adopting this approach, the Government intends that the Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) and Bank of England continue with their existing functions with regards to cash; coordinated actions by the FCA and PSR on cash as part of the COVID-19 response have shown that joint working between the regulators, at both strategic and operational levels, is working effectively.

The Government has, and continues to be, closely engaged with the FCA, PSR, Bank of England, and industry in developing its cash access proposals, including through the Joint Authorities Cash Strategy Group, which provides a forum for the public bodies to formally co-ordinate respective approaches to access to cash. The Group is chaired by HM Treasury and attended by the Bank of England, PSR, and FCA.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the Government's timetable is for publishing a draft Bill on protecting access to cash in response to its consultation on legislative proposals; and what plans he has for how that draft legislation will relate to joint work by the Financial Conduct Authority, Payment Service Regulator and banking industry to protect access to cash.

The Government’s consultation on proposals for protecting access to cash for the long term will be open until 23 September 2021. Following the consultation, the Government will set out next steps for delivering on its commitment for legislating to protect access to cash.

The consultation is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/access-to-cash-consultation.

As detailed in its consultation, the Government proposes that the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) becomes the lead regulator for oversight of the retail cash system, including having responsibility for monitoring and enforcing new legislative cash access requirements. In adopting this approach, the Government intends that the Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) and Bank of England continue with their existing functions with regards to cash; coordinated actions by the FCA and PSR on cash as part of the COVID-19 response have shown that joint working between the regulators, at both strategic and operational levels, is working effectively.

The Government has, and continues to be, closely engaged with the FCA, PSR, Bank of England, and industry in developing its cash access proposals, including through the Joint Authorities Cash Strategy Group, which provides a forum for the public bodies to formally co-ordinate respective approaches to access to cash. The Group is chaired by HM Treasury and attended by the Bank of England, PSR, and FCA.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of the time taken to manage the anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration of cryptoasset businesses by the Financial Conduct Authority on the cryptoasset industry.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of the time taken to manage to the anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration of cryptoasset businesses by the Financial Conduct Authority on consumers.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of the time taken to manage the anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration of cryptoasset businesses by the Financial Conduct Authority on the international competitiveness and attractiveness of the UK.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Government’s consultation on the regulatory approach to cryptoassets and stablecoins, which closed on 21 March 2021, whether it remains the Government’s policy to create a regulatory environment in which cryptoasset firms can innovate.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of the time taken to manage the anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration of cryptoasset businesses by the Financial Conduct Authority on the Government’s objective to create a regulatory environment in which cryptoasset firms can innovate.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the time taken to manage the anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration of cryptoasset businesses by the Financial Conduct Authority on the Government’s objective to ensure that the UK remains the most open, competitive and innovative place to do financial services in the world.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the time taken to manage the anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration regime for cryptoasset businesses.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of the level of staff turnover within the Financial Conduct Authority on the timeliness of the anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration regime for cryptoasset businesses.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of the level of expertise within the Financial Conduct Authority on the timeliness of the anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration regime for cryptoasset businesses.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Financial Conduct Authority as the supervisor for the cryptoasset sector in light of the time taken to manage the anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration of cryptoasset businesses.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the appropriateness of the Financial Conduct Authority remaining the supervisor of the cryptoasset sector due to the time taken to manage the anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration of cryptoasset businesses.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 28 May 2021 to Question 6233 on Cryptocurrencies: Regulation, what the maximum length of time is in days that a company has had their application for anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration under review by the Financial Conduct Authority.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 28 May 2021 to Question 6233 on Cryptocurrencies: Regulation, what the median length of time is in days that a company has had their application for anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration under review by the Financial Conduct Authority.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 28 May 2021 to Question 6233 on Cryptocurrencies: Regulation, what the mean length of time is in days that a company has had their application for anti-money laundering / counter terrorist financing registration under review by the Financial Conduct Authority.

The Government is committed to retaining the UK’s global leadership position in fintech by creating a regulatory environment which promotes innovation whilst maintaining the highest regulatory standards, including for anti-money and counter-terrorist financing. Having an effective anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime underpins the competitiveness of British financial services firms and the UK as a whole, by providing confidence that our financial system is clean and safe, and that new technologies can be used both reliably and safely.

Any steps taken in light of the consultation on the Government’s regulatory approach to cryptoassets will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to foster competition and innovation in the sector.

In order to properly assess whether a cryptoasset firm meets the requirements for registration set out in the Money Laundering Regulations, the FCA are required to assess whether a firm and its officers, managers or beneficial owners are “fit and proper” with regard to the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing. The FCA are therefore assessing firms’ business models holistically, and it has been necessary, in many cases, for them to request additional information from the applicant firm. A significant reason for this has been that many applications have contained insufficient information on their business mode and evidence to demonstrate that the firm meets the required standard. The application process for cryptoasset firms has therefore taken longer than originally anticipated.

The mean length of time in days that a cryptoasset firm has had their application for registration under review by the FCA is 248 days. The median length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 252 days. The maximum length of time in days that a company has had their application for registration under review is 527 days.

The Government believes that the FCA’s expertise in the regulation of financial products, its membership of the Cryptoasset Taskforce, and its experience as anti-money laundering supervisor for other asset-based financial services firms makes it the right supervisor for the cryptoasset sector. As a result of the longer than anticipated time being taken to process applications, I can confirm that the FCA has increased considerably the resources allocated to assessing applications.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his oral contribution of 9 November 2020, Official Report, column 623, whether it remains the Government’s policy to ensure that the UK remains the most open, the most competitive and the most innovative place to do financial services anywhere in the world.

n a statement to the House of Commons in November, the Chancellor set out the Government’s vision for the UK’s financial services sector. This vision is of a sector that is more open; more technologically advanced; and a world-leader in the use of green finance, serving the communities and citizens of this country.

Since November, numerous steps have been taken to progress this vision, and these were strengthened further at Budget and by the passing of the Financial Services Act in April.

In addition, we have set out our response to Ron Kalifa’s review of UK Fintech to ensure we continue to build on our existing strengths as a world leader in financial technology.

We are also taking forward each of the recommendations in Lord Hill’s recent Listings Review that were addressed to the Treasury. We have shared our plans to consult on reforms to the wider capital markets regime this summer, with the aim of supporting competitiveness whilst ensuring the UK maintains high regulatory standards.

The government is also building new and deeper financial services relationships with countries across the globe via new trade agreements and through regular and established economic and financial dialogues.

Whether it be through our international engagement or domestic reviews, we are ensuring that the UK continues to be a world leader in financial services.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will meet with representatives of the ATM industry to hear their concerns on maintaining access to free-to-use cash machines.

LINK (the scheme that runs the UK's largest ATM network) has commitments to protect the broad geographic spread of free-to-use ATMs and is held to account against these commitments by the Payment Systems Regulator.

Specifically, LINK has committed to protect free-to-use ATMs more than one kilometre away from the next nearest free ATM or Post Office, and free access to cash on high streets (where there is a cluster of five or more retailers) that do not have a free-to-use ATM or a Post Office counter within one kilometre. Furthermore, LINK's members have made £5 million available to fund ATMs at the request of communities with poor access to cash.

LINK also publishes the total number of free-to-use ATMs across the UK online. As of April 2021, they reported that there were around 41,000 free-to-use ATMs in the UK. LINK’s Monthly ATM Footprint Report also publishes information monthly on the breakdown by constituency.

On bank branch closures, these decisions are taken by the management team of each bank on a commercial basis. However, the Government firmly believes that the impact of branch closures should be understood, considered, and mitigated where possible. In September 2020, the Financial Conduct Authority published guidance setting out their expectations of firms when they are deciding to close a branch or free-to-use ATM. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of a planned closure on their customers' everyday banking and cash access needs, and other relevant branch services, and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

More broadly, the Government recognises that cash is important to the daily lives of millions of individuals and businesses across the UK, and has therefore committed to legislating to protect access to cash for those who need it and ensuring that the UK's cash infrastructure is sustainable for the long term.

The Government made legislative changes to support the widespread offering of cashback without a purchase by shops and other businesses as part of the Financial Services Act 2021, and has announced that it will consult this summer on further legislative proposals for protecting cash for the long term.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of reversing the reductions made to the interchange fee as part of the Government's forthcoming legislative proposals on access to cash.

LINK (the scheme that runs the UK's largest ATM network) has commitments to protect the broad geographic spread of free-to-use ATMs and is held to account against these commitments by the Payment Systems Regulator.

Specifically, LINK has committed to protect free-to-use ATMs more than one kilometre away from the next nearest free ATM or Post Office, and free access to cash on high streets (where there is a cluster of five or more retailers) that do not have a free-to-use ATM or a Post Office counter within one kilometre. Furthermore, LINK's members have made £5 million available to fund ATMs at the request of communities with poor access to cash.

LINK also publishes the total number of free-to-use ATMs across the UK online. As of April 2021, they reported that there were around 41,000 free-to-use ATMs in the UK. LINK’s Monthly ATM Footprint Report also publishes information monthly on the breakdown by constituency.

On bank branch closures, these decisions are taken by the management team of each bank on a commercial basis. However, the Government firmly believes that the impact of branch closures should be understood, considered, and mitigated where possible. In September 2020, the Financial Conduct Authority published guidance setting out their expectations of firms when they are deciding to close a branch or free-to-use ATM. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of a planned closure on their customers' everyday banking and cash access needs, and other relevant branch services, and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

More broadly, the Government recognises that cash is important to the daily lives of millions of individuals and businesses across the UK, and has therefore committed to legislating to protect access to cash for those who need it and ensuring that the UK's cash infrastructure is sustainable for the long term.

The Government made legislative changes to support the widespread offering of cashback without a purchase by shops and other businesses as part of the Financial Services Act 2021, and has announced that it will consult this summer on further legislative proposals for protecting cash for the long term.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the contribution of access to cash to the economic recovery of (a) high streets after the covid-19 outbreak and (b) the UK more generally.

LINK (the scheme that runs the UK's largest ATM network) has commitments to protect the broad geographic spread of free-to-use ATMs and is held to account against these commitments by the Payment Systems Regulator.

Specifically, LINK has committed to protect free-to-use ATMs more than one kilometre away from the next nearest free ATM or Post Office, and free access to cash on high streets (where there is a cluster of five or more retailers) that do not have a free-to-use ATM or a Post Office counter within one kilometre. Furthermore, LINK's members have made £5 million available to fund ATMs at the request of communities with poor access to cash.

LINK also publishes the total number of free-to-use ATMs across the UK online. As of April 2021, they reported that there were around 41,000 free-to-use ATMs in the UK. LINK’s Monthly ATM Footprint Report also publishes information monthly on the breakdown by constituency.

On bank branch closures, these decisions are taken by the management team of each bank on a commercial basis. However, the Government firmly believes that the impact of branch closures should be understood, considered, and mitigated where possible. In September 2020, the Financial Conduct Authority published guidance setting out their expectations of firms when they are deciding to close a branch or free-to-use ATM. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of a planned closure on their customers' everyday banking and cash access needs, and other relevant branch services, and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

More broadly, the Government recognises that cash is important to the daily lives of millions of individuals and businesses across the UK, and has therefore committed to legislating to protect access to cash for those who need it and ensuring that the UK's cash infrastructure is sustainable for the long term.

The Government made legislative changes to support the widespread offering of cashback without a purchase by shops and other businesses as part of the Financial Services Act 2021, and has announced that it will consult this summer on further legislative proposals for protecting cash for the long term.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of bank branch closures on consumers' access to free-to-use cash machines in (a) the Bradford district, (b) Shipley constituency and (c) England.

LINK (the scheme that runs the UK's largest ATM network) has commitments to protect the broad geographic spread of free-to-use ATMs and is held to account against these commitments by the Payment Systems Regulator.

Specifically, LINK has committed to protect free-to-use ATMs more than one kilometre away from the next nearest free ATM or Post Office, and free access to cash on high streets (where there is a cluster of five or more retailers) that do not have a free-to-use ATM or a Post Office counter within one kilometre. Furthermore, LINK's members have made £5 million available to fund ATMs at the request of communities with poor access to cash.

LINK also publishes the total number of free-to-use ATMs across the UK online. As of April 2021, they reported that there were around 41,000 free-to-use ATMs in the UK. LINK’s Monthly ATM Footprint Report also publishes information monthly on the breakdown by constituency.

On bank branch closures, these decisions are taken by the management team of each bank on a commercial basis. However, the Government firmly believes that the impact of branch closures should be understood, considered, and mitigated where possible. In September 2020, the Financial Conduct Authority published guidance setting out their expectations of firms when they are deciding to close a branch or free-to-use ATM. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of a planned closure on their customers' everyday banking and cash access needs, and other relevant branch services, and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

More broadly, the Government recognises that cash is important to the daily lives of millions of individuals and businesses across the UK, and has therefore committed to legislating to protect access to cash for those who need it and ensuring that the UK's cash infrastructure is sustainable for the long term.

The Government made legislative changes to support the widespread offering of cashback without a purchase by shops and other businesses as part of the Financial Services Act 2021, and has announced that it will consult this summer on further legislative proposals for protecting cash for the long term.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of interchange fee reductions on the ability of cash machine operators to provide free-to-use cash machines.

LINK (the scheme that runs the UK's largest ATM network) has commitments to protect the broad geographic spread of free-to-use ATMs and is held to account against these commitments by the Payment Systems Regulator.

Specifically, LINK has committed to protect free-to-use ATMs more than one kilometre away from the next nearest free ATM or Post Office, and free access to cash on high streets (where there is a cluster of five or more retailers) that do not have a free-to-use ATM or a Post Office counter within one kilometre. Furthermore, LINK's members have made £5 million available to fund ATMs at the request of communities with poor access to cash.

LINK also publishes the total number of free-to-use ATMs across the UK online. As of April 2021, they reported that there were around 41,000 free-to-use ATMs in the UK. LINK’s Monthly ATM Footprint Report also publishes information monthly on the breakdown by constituency.

On bank branch closures, these decisions are taken by the management team of each bank on a commercial basis. However, the Government firmly believes that the impact of branch closures should be understood, considered, and mitigated where possible. In September 2020, the Financial Conduct Authority published guidance setting out their expectations of firms when they are deciding to close a branch or free-to-use ATM. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of a planned closure on their customers' everyday banking and cash access needs, and other relevant branch services, and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

More broadly, the Government recognises that cash is important to the daily lives of millions of individuals and businesses across the UK, and has therefore committed to legislating to protect access to cash for those who need it and ensuring that the UK's cash infrastructure is sustainable for the long term.

The Government made legislative changes to support the widespread offering of cashback without a purchase by shops and other businesses as part of the Financial Services Act 2021, and has announced that it will consult this summer on further legislative proposals for protecting cash for the long term.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of interchange fee reductions on consumers' access to free-to-use cash machines.

LINK (the scheme that runs the UK's largest ATM network) has commitments to protect the broad geographic spread of free-to-use ATMs and is held to account against these commitments by the Payment Systems Regulator.

Specifically, LINK has committed to protect free-to-use ATMs more than one kilometre away from the next nearest free ATM or Post Office, and free access to cash on high streets (where there is a cluster of five or more retailers) that do not have a free-to-use ATM or a Post Office counter within one kilometre. Furthermore, LINK's members have made £5 million available to fund ATMs at the request of communities with poor access to cash.

LINK also publishes the total number of free-to-use ATMs across the UK online. As of April 2021, they reported that there were around 41,000 free-to-use ATMs in the UK. LINK’s Monthly ATM Footprint Report also publishes information monthly on the breakdown by constituency.

On bank branch closures, these decisions are taken by the management team of each bank on a commercial basis. However, the Government firmly believes that the impact of branch closures should be understood, considered, and mitigated where possible. In September 2020, the Financial Conduct Authority published guidance setting out their expectations of firms when they are deciding to close a branch or free-to-use ATM. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of a planned closure on their customers' everyday banking and cash access needs, and other relevant branch services, and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

More broadly, the Government recognises that cash is important to the daily lives of millions of individuals and businesses across the UK, and has therefore committed to legislating to protect access to cash for those who need it and ensuring that the UK's cash infrastructure is sustainable for the long term.

The Government made legislative changes to support the widespread offering of cashback without a purchase by shops and other businesses as part of the Financial Services Act 2021, and has announced that it will consult this summer on further legislative proposals for protecting cash for the long term.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of which parliamentary constituency has the (a) most and (b) least access to free-to-use cash machines.

LINK (the scheme that runs the UK's largest ATM network) has commitments to protect the broad geographic spread of free-to-use ATMs and is held to account against these commitments by the Payment Systems Regulator.

Specifically, LINK has committed to protect free-to-use ATMs more than one kilometre away from the next nearest free ATM or Post Office, and free access to cash on high streets (where there is a cluster of five or more retailers) that do not have a free-to-use ATM or a Post Office counter within one kilometre. Furthermore, LINK's members have made £5 million available to fund ATMs at the request of communities with poor access to cash.

LINK also publishes the total number of free-to-use ATMs across the UK online. As of April 2021, they reported that there were around 41,000 free-to-use ATMs in the UK. LINK’s Monthly ATM Footprint Report also publishes information monthly on the breakdown by constituency.

On bank branch closures, these decisions are taken by the management team of each bank on a commercial basis. However, the Government firmly believes that the impact of branch closures should be understood, considered, and mitigated where possible. In September 2020, the Financial Conduct Authority published guidance setting out their expectations of firms when they are deciding to close a branch or free-to-use ATM. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of a planned closure on their customers' everyday banking and cash access needs, and other relevant branch services, and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

More broadly, the Government recognises that cash is important to the daily lives of millions of individuals and businesses across the UK, and has therefore committed to legislating to protect access to cash for those who need it and ensuring that the UK's cash infrastructure is sustainable for the long term.

The Government made legislative changes to support the widespread offering of cashback without a purchase by shops and other businesses as part of the Financial Services Act 2021, and has announced that it will consult this summer on further legislative proposals for protecting cash for the long term.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of which region of the UK has the (a) most and (b) least access to free-to-use cash machines.

LINK (the scheme that runs the UK's largest ATM network) has commitments to protect the broad geographic spread of free-to-use ATMs and is held to account against these commitments by the Payment Systems Regulator.

Specifically, LINK has committed to protect free-to-use ATMs more than one kilometre away from the next nearest free ATM or Post Office, and free access to cash on high streets (where there is a cluster of five or more retailers) that do not have a free-to-use ATM or a Post Office counter within one kilometre. Furthermore, LINK's members have made £5 million available to fund ATMs at the request of communities with poor access to cash.

LINK also publishes the total number of free-to-use ATMs across the UK online. As of April 2021, they reported that there were around 41,000 free-to-use ATMs in the UK. LINK’s Monthly ATM Footprint Report also publishes information monthly on the breakdown by constituency.

On bank branch closures, these decisions are taken by the management team of each bank on a commercial basis. However, the Government firmly believes that the impact of branch closures should be understood, considered, and mitigated where possible. In September 2020, the Financial Conduct Authority published guidance setting out their expectations of firms when they are deciding to close a branch or free-to-use ATM. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of a planned closure on their customers' everyday banking and cash access needs, and other relevant branch services, and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

More broadly, the Government recognises that cash is important to the daily lives of millions of individuals and businesses across the UK, and has therefore committed to legislating to protect access to cash for those who need it and ensuring that the UK's cash infrastructure is sustainable for the long term.

The Government made legislative changes to support the widespread offering of cashback without a purchase by shops and other businesses as part of the Financial Services Act 2021, and has announced that it will consult this summer on further legislative proposals for protecting cash for the long term.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether it remains the Government’s policy to ensure that the UK remains the most competitive place to do financial services in the world.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK’s financial services sector continues to remain global and competitive.

In a statement to the House of Commons in November, the Chancellor set out the Government’s vision for the UK’s financial services sector. This vision is of a sector that is more open; more technologically advanced; and a world-leader in the use of green finance, serving the communities and citizens of this country.

Since November, the Financial Services Act has been passed, which delivered a broad range of measures that significantly advanced these objectives.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on the UK’s international competitiveness of the delays to the Financial Conduct Authority’s crypto asset anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration regime.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on the UK’s attractiveness to new crypto asset businesses of the delays to the crypto asset anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration regime by the Financial Conduct Authority.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on the UK’s status as a FinTech hub of the delays to the crypto asset anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration regime by the Financial Conduct Authority.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the average length of time taken for the Financial Conduct Authority to process applications for anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing crypto asset registration.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the timeliness of the Financial Conduct Authority's anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration regime for crypto asset businesses.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Financial Conduct Authority's anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration regime for crypto asset businesses.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions he has had with consumer groups on the anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration regime for crypto asset businesses.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions he has had with the crypto asset industry on the anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration regime for crypto asset businesses.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions he has had with the Financial Conduct Authority on the anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration regime for crypto asset businesses.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many applications from crypto asset businesses for anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration have been rejected by the Financial Conduct Authority.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many crypto asset businesses that did not have temporary registration have received anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration from the Financial Conduct Authority since that regime was introduced in 2020.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many crypto asset businesses have received anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration from the Financial Conduct Authority since that regime was introduced in 2020.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many crypto asset businesses have outstanding applications for anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration with the Financial Conduct Authority.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the backlog of applications for crypto asset anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration; and if he will make a statement.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the anti-money laundering / counter-terrorist financing registration regime is for crypto asset businesses; and if he will make a statement.

The UK is committed to having a robust AML regime for cryptoassets which will help to bolster confidence in the UK as a safe and reputable place to start and grow a cryptoasset business.

On 10 January 2020, the FCA became the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for cryptoassets firms. Due to the complexity and standard of applications received, the FCA was not able to process and register all applications by the 10 January 2021 deadline. A significant number of firms have failed to implement appropriately robust AML control frameworks, and to employ fit and proper personnel.

On 16 December 2020 the FCA announced that it was establishing a ‘Temporary Registration Regime’, under which relevant firms are eligible to continue trading pending a decision. This is due to expire on 9 July 2021.

As of 24 May 2021, 5 cryptoasset businesses have received registration from the FCA since 10 January 2020. Of the firms assessed to date over 90% have withdrawn their application following FCA intervention. There are 167 cryptoasset businesses with outstanding applications for AML/CTF registration with the FCA. 77 new cryptoasset businesses have applications pending full assessment.

On 7 January HM Treasury published a consultation on the broader regulatory treatment of cryptoassets, with a focus on cryptoassets known as stablecoins. It also included a call for evidence on the use of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial markets. This consultation has now closed. The government is processing responses and will outline next steps in due course. Any future regulatory regime for cryptoassets  set out by the Government in light of this consultation will aim to balance the potential risk to consumers with the ambition to stimulate competition and innovation in the industry.

HM Treasury officials are in regular contact with the FCA, as well as individual firms, industry groups and associations and consumer facing organisations to listen to their concerns on the full range of financial services related issues including cryptoassets.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 9 March 2020 to question 160588 on Bradford and Bingley: Investment, if he will publish a breakdown of the figures for (a) Bradford and Bingley and (b) NRAM.

The figures in the OBR’s March 2021 Economic and Fiscal Outlook encapsulate the fiscal impact of the government’s interventions in both Bradford & Bingley plc (B&B) and NRAM Limited. More information on the financial record of B&B and NRAM are available in B&B’s Annual Report and Accounts, available on the UK Asset Resolution (UKAR) website.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the answer of 9 March 2021 of Question 160588 on Bradford & Bingley: Investment, if he will ensure Bradford & Bingley shareholders at the time it was taken into public hands receive a share of the profits that have been generated to the public purse by Bradford & Bingley since it was taken into public ownership.

Following the nationalisation of Bradford & Bingley (B&B) in 2008, the then government made the Bradford & Bingley plc Compensation Scheme Order, which provided that former shareholders should receive compensation in line with their value immediately before the government stepped in.

On 5 July 2010, Peter Clokey published his independent valuation establishing that the shares of B&B had no value at the time of nationalisation, and shareholders would have received nothing had the bank been allowed to fail. No compensation was therefore found to be payable to former shareholders.

This has been tested in the Courts and the government considers the matter closed.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much money was invested in Bradford and Bingley from the public purse (a) in the run up and (b) subsequent to the financial crash; and how much money has since been recovered from Bradford and Bingley.

Bradford & Bingley plc (B&B) fully repaid its loans from the Treasury in 2019.

The OBR’s Economic and Fiscal Outlook notes that B&B and NRAM Limited received £44.1bn of taxpayer support. As of 31 January 2021, B&B and NRAM had returned £51.4bn to taxpayers in the form of principal repayments and fees.

We are continuing to protect consumers while recovering significant amounts of money loaned to institutions as a result of the financial crisis by taxpayers, who have borne the risk of these institutions since their nationalisation.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people with trading profits of over £50,000 per annum and therefore ineligible for support from the Government during the covid-19 outbreak.

By 31 December 2020, 186,000 individuals have been assessed as ineligible for the third SEISS grant as their trading profits are over £50,000 per annum.

This figure was taken from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme statistics published on 28 January 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/self-employment-income-support-scheme-statistics-january-2021.

24th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department took to mark International Men's Day on 19 November 2020.

The Treasury believes that no one should suffer unfair treatment because of their gender. As such, it conducts internal communications activity around International Men’s Day as it does with other awareness days.

International Men’s Day offers an opportunity to highlight where we need to do more to improve outcomes for men and boys, as well as an opportunity to talk about some of the work being done across Government to tackle those issues.

This work includes preparation for an Employment Bill which, subject to further consultation, will make flexible working the default unless employers have good reason not to; and delivering the Suicide Prevention Workplan, which sets out action that is being taken across Government departments and the NHS to reduce suicides, including amongst men.

The Government is committed to levelling up opportunity and ensuring fairness for all - regardless of gender or background.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
16th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people received income tax relief as a result of their participation in (a) Save As You Earn and (b) Share Incentive Plan schemes in the 12 months year for which such data is available, by (i) basic rate income tax payers, (ii) higher income tax payers, (iii) additional rate of income tax payers and (iv) people who fell beneath the income tax threshold.

The Save As You Earn (SAYE) scheme and Share Incentive Plans (SIPs) are tax-advantaged employee share schemes offered by the Government.

Information on employees’ income tax band is not collected as part of SAYE or SIP returns. This information is therefore not readily available and could only be provided with disproportionate cost.

HMRC publishes annual statistics on participation in employee share schemes which are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/employee-share-schemes-statistics#national-statistics

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in his Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.


From the period of 6th October 2019 to 7th October 2020, the biggest pay rises HM Treasury awarded were:
? In cash terms, £8000, or
? In percentage terms, 7.3%.

To note, the increases above exclude pay rises as a result of promotions or equivalent.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many times the (a) Union Jack, (b) St George's flag, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) flag of Wales has been flown from the headquarters of his Department in London in each year since 2015.

HM Treasury flies the Union Flag daily at 1 Horse Guards Road. Any national flags are flown as and when required.

The Scottish Saltire and flag of Wales have not been flown at 1 Horse Guards Road.

The St George’s flag has been flown twice in 2018 and on five occasions in 2019. It has not yet been flown in 2020.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many (a) Union Jack, (b) St George, (c) Scottish Saltire and (d) Flag of Wales flags his Department owns.

HM Treasury owns two Union Flags, one St George’s flag, and one Scottish Saltire.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect that the increase in the Living Wage will have on small businesses; and what financial plans he has to support small firms to make this increase.

The Government recently published its Impact Assessment of the planned increases to the National Living Wage applying from this April. The Impact Assessment provides estimates of the costs the National Living Wage increases will place on some businesses. The Government recognises that the increases will mean extra costs for some businesses. However, it’s right that workers are fairly rewarded for their input into the economy.

More generally, since 2014 the Employment Allowance has helped businesses with the costs of employment, reducing employers’ National Insurance contributions bill by £3,000. Over 1 million employers are benefitting from this relief.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of reducing Pool Betting Duty to 10 per cent.

No recent estimate has been made. The Government recognises the popularity of the Football Pools. But reducing Pool Betting Duty is likely to have a negligible effect and could put revenue at risk, particularly through incentivising switching of products from fixed odds bets to pooled bets. HM Treasury however keeps all taxes under active review.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of reducing Pool Betting Duty to 10 per cent on the industry and economy of the north of England.

No recent estimate has been made. The Government recognises the popularity of the Football Pools. But reducing Pool Betting Duty is likely to have a negligible effect and could put revenue at risk, particularly through incentivising switching of products from fixed odds bets to pooled bets. HM Treasury however keeps all taxes under active review.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason people who have been refused asylum are able to access accommodation and other financial support from UK Visas and Immigration.

In order to fulfil our statutory obligations to meet minimum standards for failed asylum seekers, individuals are eligible to receive support under section 4(2) of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 provided they meet conditions set out in the Immigration and Asylum (Provisions of Accommodation to Failed Asylum-Seekers) Regulations 2005.

The regulations require the individuals to show they are destitute and they are taking reasonable steps to leave the UK or face a practical or legal obstacle which prevents their departure.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her current policy is on the wearing of face coverings in her (a) Department, (b) departmental agencies and (c) related bodies during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Home Office policy will follow the government’s guidance published by BEIS on 14 July 2021 which states that face coverings are no longer required by law. Based on a risk assessment there may be some indoor settings such as crowded, enclosed spaces where employees will be strongly encouraged to wear face coverings. Some operational settings that include higher risk activities may require PPE to be worn as a control for specific activities. Employees will be able to choose if they wish to wear a face covering in a work environment.

In respect of departmental agencies and related bodies they will be implementing local restrictions as required following the government’s guidance set out above.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 10277 on Homicide, in what format that information is held.

The information is held in the Home Office Homicide Index, a detailed record-level dataset on homicides recorded by the police in England and Wales. The Homicide Index is continually updated with revised information from the police as investigations continue and as cases are heard by the courts. Homicide cases are often complex and can take time to reach a conclusion.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 10276 on Homicide, in what format that information is held.

The information is held in the Home Office Homicide Index, a detailed record-level dataset on homicides recorded by the police in England and Wales. The Homicide Index is continually updated with revised information from the police as investigations continue and as cases are heard by the courts. Homicide cases are often complex and can take time to reach a conclusion.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 10275 on Homicide, in what format that information is held.

The information is held in the Home Office Homicide Index, a detailed record-level dataset on homicides recorded by the police in England and Wales. The Homicide Index is continually updated with revised information from the police as investigations continue and as cases are heard by the courts. Homicide cases are often complex and can take time to reach a conclusion.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 29 April 2021 to Question 187180, what the sex of the (a) perpetrator and (b) victim was in each of the cases of murder in the male and female residential categories.

The information as requested is not held in the relevant format.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 29 April 2021 to Question 187180, what the (a) sex and (b) ethnicity was of the perpetrator responsible for each of the murders.

The information as requested is not held in the relevant format.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 29 April 2021 to Question 187180, what the relationship was between the victim and the perpetrator in each murder case in the male and female residential categories.

The information as requested is not held in the relevant format.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) male and (b) female victims of murder were killed in a (a) public and (b) private place, by ethnicity in each of the last three years.

Information on homicide, including the sex and ethnicity of the victim and the location of the offence, is held in the Home Office Homicide Index, a record level dataset of homicides recorded by the police in England and Wales. The requested information is given in Annex A.

This information is correct as at 15 December 2020; figures are subject to revision as cases are dealt with by the police and by the courts, or as further information becomes available.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers reported being assaulted on 13 March 2021 in the course of the events linked to the event at Clapham Common that day; and how many people have subsequently been (a) arrested and (b) charged with offences that relate to assaulting a police officer.

Information regarding how many officers were assaulted and the number of individuals arrested during the Sarah Everard vigil is an operational matter for the Metropolitan Police Service. They have informed the Home Office that 14 police officers reported being assaulted in the course of events, with five of these reporting injuries.

One person has been arrested for two of the assaults and no one has yet been charged.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to bring into force the offence of threatening with an offensive weapon etc in a private place as provided for by section 52 of the Offensive Weapons Act 2019.

We intend to commence this measure, along with other measures provided for by the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 relating to knives and corrosive products and substances, later this year. We paused commencement of the Act temporarily because of the Covid-19 pandemic, but we are working now to bring the Act fully in to force as soon as we can.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many murders there have been where the victim was recorded as being transgender in each year for which information is available.

The Home Office collects data on homicide and murder offences recorded by the police in England and Wales, including the sex of victim. However, data on the gender identity of victims of murder is not collected centrally. Police forces may hold these data at the local level.

Information on homicide Offences recorded by the police are published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and can be found here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/articles/homicideinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2019

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will ensure that UK courts have the right to demand to see and assess evidence of a prima facie case to answer which has been collected by the requesting state in extradition cases after the transition period and (b) when that evidence is considered insufficient to refuse that request.

In the absence of an agreement on Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice with the European Union, the UK’s extradition relations with EU Member States would be governed by the European Convention on Extradition 1957 and its Additional Protocols. The prima facie evidence requirement for extradition requests from States which are parties to the European Convention on Extradition was removed when the Convention came into force in the UK in May 1991. To introduce a prima facie case requirement would be incompatible with the Convention.

The Government’s approach to negotiations with the EU provides for extradition arrangements which are more streamlined than the European Convention on Extradition. The Government has not sought to introduce a prima facie case requirement, as to do so would render future arrangements with the EU less effective at bringing fugitives to justice than the Convention. However, the Government is seeking to introduce further safeguards beyond those included in the EAW Framework Decision. These would guarantee a judge in the UK the ability to dismiss a warrant from an EU Member State on the basis that it is a disproportionate interference with the requested person’s rights and/or if there has not yet been a decision to charge and try them.

3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure customer service staff are protected from abuse during the covid-19 lockdown.

The Government is clear that any such abuse is unacceptable, and the Government is working closely with the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) to deliver a programme of work which aims to provide better support to victims, improve reporting, increase data sharing and raise awareness of this despicable crime.

The Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 provides the police, local authorities and other local agencies with a range of flexible tools and powers that can be used to respond quickly and effectively to anti-social behaviour.

No specific assessment has been made of the trends in the level of abuse experienced by customer service staff during the pandemic. However, the Government continues to work with different agencies to ensure anti-social behaviour is tackled. This includes marshals, stewards and ambassadors being deployed to engage members of the public and businesses to explain COVID-19 Secure guidelines and restrictions, and the police who continue to enforce where necessary.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of trends in the level of abuse experienced by customer service staff during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government is clear that any such abuse is unacceptable, and the Government is working closely with the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) to deliver a programme of work which aims to provide better support to victims, improve reporting, increase data sharing and raise awareness of this despicable crime.

The Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 provides the police, local authorities and other local agencies with a range of flexible tools and powers that can be used to respond quickly and effectively to anti-social behaviour.

No specific assessment has been made of the trends in the level of abuse experienced by customer service staff during the pandemic. However, the Government continues to work with different agencies to ensure anti-social behaviour is tackled. This includes marshals, stewards and ambassadors being deployed to engage members of the public and businesses to explain COVID-19 Secure guidelines and restrictions, and the police who continue to enforce where necessary.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the biggest pay rise given to someone in her Department was in (a) percentage and (b) cash terms in the last 12 months.

In the last 12 months the biggest percentage pay rise in the Home Office was 9% and the biggest pay rise in cash terms was £7,292.

17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers have been put into hotel accommodation in (a) Shipley constituency, (b) Bradford district, (c) West Yorkshire and (d) England in each of the last 12 months.

The number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets#asylum-support

This includes the number of those accommodated in hotels.

Data is published on a quarterly basis with the latest information covering until 31st June 2020. The next quarterly figures are due to be released in November 2020

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will list (a) the Non-Governmental Organisations with access to Immigration Removal Centres, (b) the purpose of their access and (c) which centres have they visited in the last 12 months.

Individuals or organisations who do not have a statutory right of access and who wish to view an immigration removal centre are required under the provisions of the Detention Centre Rules 2001 to obtain the permission of the Secretary of State. Published Detention Services Order 04/2012 ‘Visitors and visiting procedures’ sets out the practical arrangements in place for visitors to the immigration detention estate.

Several non-governmental organisations (NGOs) regularly visit immigration removal centres to provide a range of different services including advocacy, welfare services, religious support and mental health provision. In addition, the Home Office, NHS (England) and our suppliers have grant or contractual arrangements with a small number of NGOs.

Visiting NGOs include Samaritans; British Red Cross; Gatwick Detainee Welfare Group; Bail for Immigration Detainees; Medical Justice; and the Association of Visitors to Immigration Detainees (AVID). The Home Office does not hold a central record of NGO visits to individual centres.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many DNA profiles have been removed from the national DNA database since 1 April 2018.

Between 01/04/2018 and 31/03/2019 117,430 subject profile records and 4,846 crime scene profile records have been deleted from the National DNA Database.

Between 01/04/2019 and 31/03/2020 124,492 subject profile records and 7,597 crime scene profile records have been deleted from the National DNA Database.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the earliest date was of an application for asylum being rejected where the asylum seeker remains to be deported.

The Home Office is unable to provide timespans between asylum claims being initially refused and eventual return. There are many different factors that can impact on timescales ranging from legal interventions such as appeals and the raising of further submissions, to the ability to secure travel documents and individuals going to ground. Any figure would therefore be arbitrary and not indicative of the circumstances surrounding any individual case.

The Home Office publishes data on how many unsuccessful applicants left the UK either voluntarily or by enforced removal. The latest data can be found in the published immigration statistics, with table Ret_05 of the summary tables relating to both Asylum and Non Asylum returns.

Those whose asylum claim has been refused but could be liable to return can be found in table Asy_03 of the published immigration statistics at

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-protection-data-august-2020

Those with no right to be in the UK should return home. We expect people to leave the country voluntarily but, where they do not, Immigration Enforcement will seek to enforce their departure.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the longest period has been between an application for asylum being rejected and the asylum seeker being deported in each of the last three years.

The Home Office is unable to provide timespans between asylum claims being initially refused and eventual return. There are many different factors that can impact on timescales ranging from legal interventions such as appeals and the raising of further submissions, to the ability to secure travel documents and individuals going to ground. Any figure would therefore be arbitrary and not indicative of the circumstances surrounding any individual case.

The Home Office publishes data on how many unsuccessful applicants left the UK either voluntarily or by enforced removal. The latest data can be found in the published immigration statistics, with table Ret_05 of the summary tables relating to both Asylum and Non Asylum returns.

Those whose asylum claim has been refused but could be liable to return can be found in table Asy_03 of the published immigration statistics at

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-protection-data-august-2020

Those with no right to be in the UK should return home. We expect people to leave the country voluntarily but, where they do not, Immigration Enforcement will seek to enforce their departure.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people whose asylum claim has been rejected have not been deported.

The Home Office is unable to provide timespans between asylum claims being initially refused and eventual return. There are many different factors that can impact on timescales ranging from legal interventions such as appeals and the raising of further submissions, to the ability to secure travel documents and individuals going to ground. Any figure would therefore be arbitrary and not indicative of the circumstances surrounding any individual case.

The Home Office publishes data on how many unsuccessful applicants left the UK either voluntarily or by enforced removal. The latest data can be found in the published immigration statistics, with table Ret_05 of the summary tables relating to both Asylum and Non Asylum returns.

Those whose asylum claim has been refused but could be liable to return can be found in table Asy_03 of the published immigration statistics at

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-protection-data-august-2020

Those with no right to be in the UK should return home. We expect people to leave the country voluntarily but, where they do not, Immigration Enforcement will seek to enforce their departure.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average time taken was between an application for asylum being rejected and the asylum seeker being deported in each of the last five years.

The Home Office is unable to provide timespans between asylum claims being initially refused and eventual return. There are many different factors that can impact on timescales ranging from legal interventions such as appeals and the raising of further submissions, to the ability to secure travel documents and individuals going to ground. Any figure would therefore be arbitrary and not indicative of the circumstances surrounding any individual case.

The Home Office publishes data on how many unsuccessful applicants left the UK either voluntarily or by enforced removal. The latest data can be found in the published immigration statistics, with table Ret_05 of the summary tables relating to both Asylum and Non Asylum returns.

Those whose asylum claim has been refused but could be liable to return can be found in table Asy_03 of the published immigration statistics at

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-protection-data-august-2020

Those with no right to be in the UK should return home. We expect people to leave the country voluntarily but, where they do not, Immigration Enforcement will seek to enforce their departure.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are accommodated in (a) Shipley constituency, (b) Bradford district and (c) West Yorkshire.