Alex Norris Portrait

Alex Norris

Labour (Co-op) - Nottingham North

Shadow Minister (Health and Social Care)

(since April 2020)

There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 30th November 2021
Public Health
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 160 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 36
Speeches
Tuesday 30th November 2021
Oral Answers to Questions

The Biya Government’s hard-handed approach to calls for reform from those living in the Anglophone region has led to violence, …

Written Answers
Monday 29th November 2021
Borderline Substances Advisory Committee
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 16th March 2020
Assaults on Retail Workers (Offences) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to make certain offences, including malicious wounding, grievous or actual bodily harm and common assault, aggravated when perpetrated …
Tweets
Wednesday 1st December 2021
22:21
MP Financial Interests
Monday 26th July 2021
1. Employment and earnings
6 July 2021, received £275 from Ipsos MORI, 3 Thomas More St, London E1W 1YW, for a survey. Hours: 70 …
EDM signed
Monday 25th October 2021
Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Alex Norris has voted in 330 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Alex Norris Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Edward Argar (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
(59 debate interactions)
Jo Churchill (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(55 debate interactions)
Philippa Whitford (Scottish National Party)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Health and Social Care)
(16 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(240 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Alex Norris's debates

Nottingham North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

In 2014 the Human Medicines Act was amended so that schools could keep emergency stocks of salbutamol inhalers without prescription. Asthma is increasing in the UK and we believe that adult sufferers of Asthma working in high-risk commercial kitchens should have similar life-saving support.

Endometriosis and PCOS are two gynaecological conditions which both affect 10% of women worldwide, but both are, in terms of research and funding, incredibly under prioritised. This petition is calling for more funding, to enable for new, extensive and thorough research into female health issues.

Cervical screening needs to be every year.

This is because women are dying, mothers, wives, daughters, granddaughters and sisters are dying.

Enact legislation to protect retail workers. This legislation must create a specific offence of abusing, threatening or assaulting a retail worker. The offence must carry a penalty that acts as a deterrent and makes clear that abuse of retail workers is unacceptable.

I want the Government to prevent any restrictions being placed on those who refuse to have any potential Covid-19 vaccine. This includes restrictions on travel, social events, such as concerts or sports. No restrictions whatsoever.

12 kids in the UK are diagnosed with cancer daily. 1 in 5 will die within 5 years, often of the deadliest types like DIPG (brainstem cancer) - fatal on diagnosis & other cancers on relapse. Yet there has been little, or no, funding for research into these cancers and little, or no, progress.


Latest EDMs signed by Alex Norris

23rd September 2021
Alex Norris signed this EDM on Monday 25th October 2021

Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall

Tabled by: Afzal Khan (Labour - Manchester, Gorton)
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; notes that this memorial now includes over 150,000 hand-painted hearts to symbolise all those who lost their lives during the coronavirus pandemic; praises the work of Covid-19 Bereaved Families for …
132 signatures
(Most recent: 16 Nov 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 95
Scottish National Party: 13
Liberal Democrat: 10
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Conservative: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
13th July 2021
Alex Norris signed this EDM on Wednesday 14th July 2021

Reductions to the regional political monitoring of Parliament

Tabled by: Ian Mearns (Labour - Gateshead)
That this House is deeply concerned by proposals to slash the number of staff working in the BBC Regional Political Unit based at Millbank by over a third; notes that the unit is the eyes and ears of the BBC English regions in Westminster, coordinating political newsgathering for the BBC’s …
15 signatures
(Most recent: 14 Jul 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 13
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
View All Alex Norris's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Alex Norris, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Alex Norris has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Alex Norris has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Alex Norris


A Bill to make certain offences, including malicious wounding, grievous or actual bodily harm and common assault, aggravated when perpetrated against a retail worker in the course of their employment; to make provision about the sentencing of persons convicted of such aggravated offences; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Monday 16th March 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision about offences when perpetrated against retail workers; to make certain offences aggravated when perpetrated against such workers in the course of their employment; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 9th October 2018
(Read Debate)

Alex Norris has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


589 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Attorney General, whether her Department's investigation into British American Tobacco in South Africa and Zimbabwe included investigating the allegations and interviewing the witnesses in the BBC Panorama programme on this topic; and whether the Serious Fraud Office plan investigating these allegations further.

Following a three-year investigation, the SFO determined that this case did not meet the evidential tests as defined in the Code for Crown Prosecutors. As with all cases that fail this first limb of the Code, it was therefore not in the public interest to continue with the investigation. The SFO does not provide detailed commentary on how it conducts its investigations.

The SFO continues to assist our international law enforcement partners with ongoing investigations related to this matter and will assess any new material it receives.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he has taken to progress a public inquiry into the Government’s handling of the covid-19 outbreak; and when the commencement date will be announced.

On 12 May, the Prime Minister confirmed that a public inquiry into COVID-19 will be established on a statutory basis, with full formal powers, and that it will begin its work in spring 2022. The independent chair of the inquiry will be appointed by the end of this year. Further details will be set out in due course.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent progress his Department has made on holding a public inquiry into the Government’s handling of the covid-19 outbreak; and when will that inquiry's commencement date will be announced.

On 12 May, the Prime Minister confirmed that a public inquiry into COVID-19 will be established on a statutory basis, with full formal powers, and that it will begin its work in spring 2022. The independent chair of the inquiry will be appointed by the end of this year. Further details will be set out in due course.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Government Department is responsible for overseeing the implementation of the policies set out in the Government's Covid-19 Response: Spring 2021 document, published in February 2021, CP 398.

The COVID-19 Task Force in the Cabinet Office is responsible for coordinating the Government’s response to the pandemic. The Task Force has oversight of the implementation of the policies set out in the Covid-19 Response - Spring 2021, however accountability for individual COVID-19 related programmes rests with Senior Responsible Owners within Government departments.

The COVID-19 Task Force works with departments across Government to perform this role including: supporting decision-making through Cabinet committees; developing overarching strategy; and providing data and analysis.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what (a) correspondence and (b) representations he has received on proposals to engage citizens in the Constitution, Democracy and Rights Commission; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has received assorted correspondence on the proposals for a Commission. The Government will publish more details on this work programme in due course.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Prime Minister's oral Answer of 15 January 2020, Official Report column 1019 on Constitutional Reform, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of including citizen engagement in plans for the Constitution, Democracy and Rights Commission; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has received assorted correspondence on the proposals for a Commission. The Government will publish more details on this work programme in due course.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that employment protections are retained for immunocompromised people who are less protected by covid-19 vaccines.

There are a range of existing legal protections which can be engaged where an individual has an underlying health condition.

An immunocompromised person may be considered to have a disability and benefit from protections under the Equality Act, which include the duty on an employer to make reasonable adjustments. A disability under the Equality Act is defined as a physical or mental impairment that has a ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ negative effect on your ability to do normal daily activities.

Immunocompromised employees may also be protected against unfair dismissal. An employment tribunal will consider all the relevant facts around a dismissal in judging whether it was fair or not. This could include public health guidance regarding coronavirus for those who are immunocompromised, alongside other issues including individual behaviour.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the timeframe is for the phasing out of high carbon fossil fuel heating from all homes, as outlined in the Energy White Paper.

Achieving net zero means buildings need to be almost completely decarbonised by 2050. As set out in my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution, over the next 15 years we will gradually transition away from fossil fuel boilers and incentivise people to switch to low-carbon alternatives as appliances are replaced in a way that is fair, affordable and practical following the grain of the market.

The Government is planning to publish a Heat and Buildings Strategy in due course, which will set out our approach in more detail.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the lifetime bill savings for homes who have had energy efficiency measures installed under the Energy Company Obligation since its inception in 2013.

Between January 2013 and March 2021, approximately 1.6 million measures have been delivered through the Affordable Warmth element of the Energy Company Obligation (ECO), targeted at reducing home heating costs for low income, fuel poor and vulnerable people, corresponding to an estimated £16.2bn in lifetime bill savings.

Details are published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/household-energy-efficiency-statistics-headline-release-june-2021 (Table 2.1).

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to issue a third Life Sciences Sector Deal.

In Summer 2021, the Government will publish a new Life Science Vision which will set out our ambitious plans for the next decade to ensure the UK’s scientific excellence, partnered with the dynamism of industry, is positioned to assist the NHS in solving the most pressing health challenges of our generation now and in the future. The Vision is being jointly developed by Government and the sector to ensure we maintain the UK’s position as a global life science leader – building on the successes of rapid scientific and technological development during the pandemic - especially in vaccines and research - and benefitting from the regulatory freedoms and opportunities created by Brexit.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has plans to strengthen workplace guidance by highlighting how businesses can confirm the efficacy claims of the (a) hand sanitiser and (b) surface disinfectant products they are purchasing in order to protect staff and customers.

BEIS has worked closely with Health and Safety Executive and Public Health England to ensure that the Safer Working guidance for businesses is based on the most up to date understanding of Covid-19. Guidance is kept under constant review and it is updated accordingly. Businesses should carry out Covid-19 risk assessments and follow the Safer Working guidance.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the adequacy of existing requirements on (a) hand sanitiser and (b) surface disinfectant products to prove efficacy claims made in their marketing and packaging via appropriate testing in an accredited laboratory.

BEIS has worked closely with Health and Safety Executive and Public Health England to ensure that the Safer Working guidance for businesses is based on the most up to date understanding of Covid-19. Guidance is kept under constant review and it is updated accordingly. Businesses should carry out Covid-19 risk assessments and follow the Safer Working guidance.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government's Covid-19 Response: Spring 2021 document, published in February 2021, CP 398, whether office workers and corporate building occupiers are permitted to return to covid-secure physical workspaces under the terms of Step 3 of the roadmap set out in that document.

People should currently continue to only travel to work if it is not reasonable for them to work from home. On 29 March, the Stay at Home message will be removed. However, people should continue to work from home where they can. We have published COVID-Secure guidance which sets out the steps that businesses should take to keep their staff and customers safe, if they are permitted to open. The Government will update COVID-Secure guidance to provide further advice on how businesses can improve fresh air flow in indoor workplaces and introduce regular testing.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what guidance he plans to publish to raise awareness that essential businesses affected by covid-19 restrictions are eligible for the lockdown discretionary grant fund announced on 5 January 2021.

Guidance for the January Business Support Package was published on 13th January. The discretionary funding announced on 5th January provides further resource to the Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG). The ARG is a discretionary fund which is managed by local authorities. As such, schemes vary between areas and are managed and advertised locally.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he is prioritising households using legacy prepayment meters for smart meter upgrades; and what steps he is taking to deliver those upgrades.

Smart meters bring significant benefits to prepayment consumers and have been invaluable during the COVID-19 pandemic. Smart prepayment services enable consumers to top-up remotely without leaving home and without needing to reach inaccessible meters. They also allow consumers to track their balance easily so they do not unknowingly run out of credit.


Energy suppliers are installing second generation smart (SMETS2) meters in prepayment mode across Great Britain. The Government has taken a number of steps to ensure that consumers with low incomes or with prepayment meters can benefit from smart meters. For example, the Government put in place an explicit objective for Smart Energy GB (the industry body responsible for leading coordinated consumer engagement) to assist consumers with low incomes or prepayment meters. Establishing partnerships with trusted organisations, including local community groups, to provide training and tailored information on smart metering has helped to raise awareness of smart metering, ensuring that all consumers are able to realise the benefits as soon as practicable.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will ensure that the 90 million doses of potential covid-19 vaccines which the UK has purchased are allocated according to the WHO Equitable Allocation Framework.

We are actively working with vaccine alliance GAVI, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations and the World Health Organisation to meet our ambition of access to vaccine for all countries – this includes working alongside other countries to support the development of the COVID-19 Global Vaccine Access Facility (COVAX) facility. The priority of the entire world is securing a vaccine as quickly as possible, and our investment is supporting that effort.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that the UK deal to purchase 90 million potential covid-19 vaccine doses complements global efforts to co-ordinate vaccine supplies and ensure priority groups in every country are vaccinated first.

The UK is working closely with international partners to ensure that when a vaccine is available, it will be accessible to everyone who needs it as soon as possible.

The UK has committed alongside other countries to support equitable and affordable access to COVID-19 vaccines and treatments for example, committing up to £250 million of UK aid to the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) for the development of coronavirus vaccines. The UK has already committed £48 million to the COVID-19 Global Vaccine Access Facility (COVAX) Advanced Market Commitment (AMC) which supports low and middle-income countries (LMICs) to access a successful vaccine.

The UK is also working closely with CEPI, GAVI (Vaccine Alliance) and the WHO to shape the emerging proposal for the self-financing arm of COVAX, which can support both domestic access and equitable access to LMICs.

We continue to work with our international partners to ensure that where countries have bilateral deals – including whether we be in the fortunate position where we have excess doses, these could be contributed to the COVAX facility.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what methodology his Department was used to determine a tax-free payment value of £6 per week for people required to work from home.

In order to determine a tax-free payment value of £6 per week for people required to work from home due to Covid-19, the Department followed the guidance set out by HM Revenue and Customs of £26 per month as a fair contribution towards the utility costs of employees. This guidance is set out at: https://www.gov.uk/tax-relief-for-employees/working-at-home.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to promote awareness by employers of the potential for prolonged covid-19 symptoms.

Someone’s ability to do their job can be affected by health conditions such as covid-19 symptoms. Several laws are relevant when managing sick leave and return to work. These include the Equality Act, the Employment Rights Act and the Health and Safety at Work etc Act.

During the Covid-19 crisis, the Government has worked with a wide range of businesses, trade unions and representative organisations to issue guidance on safe return to work. This guidance has been regularly updated in line with scientific advice.

In line with employment and health and safety law, guidance issued by the Health and Safety Executive sets out that employers should have policies and procedures on managing sick leave. They should develop these in consultation with workers and their representatives. The guidance states that employers should:

- record and monitor sick leave to help them identify trends and manage risk

- train their managers on how to manage sick leave and return to work

- keep in contact with workers who are off sick, ensuring the conversation remains focused on their health, safety and wellbeing and their return to work

- consider making workplace adjustments to help workers return to work. This could include shorter hours, flexible or part-time working, or adapting work equipment

- review their health and safety risk assessment where a worker’s health condition makes them or others more vulnerable to workplace risks

- get professional advice on issues such as fitness to work or workplace adjustments, for example from an occupational health provider.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the preparation undertaken by businesses to support people that are vulnerable to covid-19.

Employers have a duty under UK law to protect the health and safety of their workers and other people who might be affected by their business. This includes considering the risks that COVID-19 represents.

Our guidance outlines steps employers should consider, and employers should use the guidance to create specific plans for their business in consultation with those who are affected by their operations, including workers and contractors.

We know that every organisation is different. Each business’s plan will depend on the nature of the business, such as the sector, and the details of the workforce and operations.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government has taken to ensure the safety of (a) residents and (b) technicians during smart meter installation as the covid-19 restrictions are eased.

The Government is working closely with industry to support the adoption of guidance published on 11 May 2020 on working safely in people’s homes during COVID-19.

Energy UK and the Association of Meter Operators have also been working with their member organisations to support compliance with the Government guidance and share good practice related to all aspects of remobilisation, including undertaking smart meter installations in consumer’s homes. Energy suppliers, meter operators and energy networks will need to continue to have the health and wellbeing of their customers and staff as their central priority.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making it compulsory for all homes to have a smart meter at (a) the point of sale where the property is owner-occupied and (b) the change of tenancy where the property is privately rented.

The Government has consulted on proposals for a new policy framework to continue to drive market-wide rollout of smart meters after the current duty on energy suppliers ends in December 2020. This consultation sought views from stakeholders about what policy measures the Government should consider in order to complement the proposed market-wide rollout obligation.

We are carefully considering the range of responses and evidence submitted, ahead of publishing a Government response. We will see seek to do this as soon as is practicable.

In the meantime, the Government has updated the ‘How to Let’ and ‘How to Rent’ guides for tenants and landlords in the private rented sector to make clear the rights and responsibilities for accepting and installing a smart meter.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, in circumstances in which a SMETS2 smart meter cannot be installed for a customer, whether it is Government policy to install a SMETS1 meter until a SMETS2 solution is found.

Energy suppliers are required by licence conditions to take all reasonable steps to provide second generation smart (SMETS2) meters to their customers.

SMETS1 meters will only normally be installed where energy suppliers are unable to provide a SMETS2 service, despite having taken all reasonable steps to provide one and the energy consumer prefers to have a SMETS1 service rather than wait for a SMETS2 service to become available .

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the level of debt that has accumulated in the energy sector since the covid-19 outbreak; and what plans he has to support (a) suppliers and (b) consumers in tackling that debt in the short term.

On 19 March the Government established an industry-wide voluntary agreement to a set of principles for assisting energy consumers, through difficulties caused by Covid-19. The support offered is based on the individual circumstances of the customer and the systems, processes and capability of the supply company, but includes measures such as extending discretionary or friendly credit, adjusting payments and the recovery of debts and sending out a pre-loaded top up card for traditional prepay customers who are unable to top up.

Government has also introduced wider schemes to assist both consumers and businesses during the Covid-19 outbreak, including schemes to provide affordable government backed loans. Government has supported household incomes through the Job Retention Scheme to enable employers to furlough staff and the Self Employment Income Support scheme. Government has also introduced a number of temporary changes to Universal Credit to better support consumers on low incomes through the outbreak, including significant increases to payments.

Government and Ofgem have supported energy suppliers in their ability to manage costs and support their customers by providing a loan to the Low Carbon Contracts Company (LCCC) to ease the additional pressures on supplier Contracts for Difference (CfD) payments and the ability for suppliers to defer part of the network charges, in order to free-up short term working capital and enable the support of customers in need.

It is too early to say what level of debt has accumulated since the Covid-19 outbreak. Government continues to regularly engage with Ofgem energy suppliers and consumer advocates to understand the evolving picture.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made a recent assessment of the potential effect on levels of employment of making energy efficiency a national infrastructure priority; and if he will make a statement.

Upgrading energy efficiency supports jobs and economic activity right across the country, from rural areas to large cities. In 2018, the domestic and non-domestic energy efficiency sector employed 153,600 people, with turnover of £21 billion and exports of almost £900 million. It also delivers a wide range of other economic benefits, for example: lower energy bills, reduced carbon emissions, fewer households in fuel poverty, lower costs of decarbonisation, and improved health and air quality.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made a recent estimate of the proportion of Energy Company Obligation funding spent on identifying suitable homes for energy efficiency measures.

The costs for identifying suitable homes has been estimated at around £257m for the three and a half year duration of ECO3 (2018 – 2022). That would be around 11% of the total estimated cost of the scheme.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to paragraph 2.15 of the Budget 2020 Red Book, what his timetable is for bringing forward amendments to the non-domestic Renewable Heat Incentive Scheme Regulations 2018.

On 28th April 2020 BEIS published a Stakeholder Notice on changes to the Renewable Heat Incentive Schemes (RHI). The proposals were to extend the Domestic RHI for a further year, introduce a new allocation of Tariff Guarantees on the Non-Domestic RHI and extend current Tariff Guarantee commissioning deadlines. These proposed changes are designed to provide for a smooth transition into the future support schemes for low carbon heat and afford large scale projects impacted by delays to construction due to Covid-19 additional time to commission and receive RHI funding. This Notice closed to responses on 19th May 2020.

BEIS understands the importance of delivering as much certainty to industry as possible at this time. As such, having now analysed the responses received to the Notice, officials are working to publish the Government Response and make the necessary regulatory changes in the coming weeks.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of low carbon heating technologies on new build homes; and what steps the Government is taking to provide financial support for those technologies.

In the Government’s Future Homes Standards consultation, which closed 7 February, we proposed that new homes built to this standard should have 75-80% fewer CO2 emissions than those built to current building regulation standards. An impact assessment on the Future Homes Standard will be published when we consult on the details of the policy proposals. We will carefully consider any impacts on costs and housing supply as part of the consultation.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether local authorities are legally empowered to enforce compliance with energy efficiency standards for homes.

Since 1 April 2020, The Energy Efficiency (Private Rented Property)(England and Wales) Regulations 2015 (“the Regulations”) require that, subject to certain exemptions, all domestic private rented sector landlords improve their properties to a minimum energy efficiency standard of Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) band E. Local authorities have a range of powers under the Regulations to enforce compliance with the minimum energy efficiency standard, including the ability to serve a compliance notice, a financial penalty and/or a publication penalty that makes details of the breach available to the public.

The Department has launched a landlord exemptions register (“the PRS Exemptions Register”) which is used by local authorities to help target their enforcement activity, and is conducting enforcement pilots with local authorities to develop best practice around enforcement of the Regulations.

In addition, local authorities use the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (“HHSRS”), a health-based, risk assessment framework, to evaluate 29 specific hazards, including excess cold, in homes. For private rented sector properties, if a HHSRS assessment identifies a hazard at 'category 1' level, then local authorities have a duty to take formal enforcement action, ranging from a Hazard Awareness Notice to an Emergency Remedial Action (where remedial works are carried out immediately by the local authority and the landlord billed). The HHSRS also forms part of the Decent Homes Standard, the minimum standard that social housing should meet.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government has taken to support energy suppliers in meeting smart meter installation targets during the covid-19 outbreak.

Ofgem wrote to energy suppliers on 8 April 2020 to provide them with flexibility to temporarily deprioritise non-essential meter installations. This enabled energy suppliers to focus on: ensuring that customer needs were met, particularly the most vulnerable; maintaining secure, reliable and safe supplies of energy to consumers in the short to medium term; and ensuring the safety and protection of consumers and their workforces.

The Government is working with energy suppliers to re-mobilise the roll-out of smart meters, further to guidance published on 11 May 2020 on working safely in people’s homes during COVID-19.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to make installation of smart meters in residential homes mandatory to help ensure targets for installation of that technology are met.

The Government has consulted on proposals for a new policy framework to continue to drive market-wide rollout of smart meters after the current duty on energy suppliers ends in December 2020.

We are carefully considering the range of responses and evidence submitted, ahead of publishing a Government response. We will see seek to do this as soon as is practicable.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making it compulsory for new build homes to be fitted with smart meters.

The New and Replacement Obligation (NRO) in requires energy suppliers to take all reasonable steps to install a compliant smart meter where a meter is fitted for the first time including in new build properties.

The Government has consulted on proposals for a new policy framework to continue to drive market-wide rollout of smart meters after the current duty on energy suppliers ends in December 2020. This consultation sought views from stakeholders about what policy measures the Government should consider in order to complement the proposed market-wide rollout obligation.

We are carefully considering the range of responses and evidence submitted, ahead of publishing a Government response. We will see seek to do this as soon as is practicable.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether brewery businesses with fewer than 50 employees will be eligible for payments from the Discretionary Fund for local authorities announced on 2 May 2020.

The Government has announced that up to £617 million is being made available to Local Authorities in England to allow them to provide discretionary grants as part of the suite of Business Support grants to support businesses and local economies across England.

The additional Local Authority Discretionary Grants Fund is aimed at small businesses with ongoing fixed property-related costs but not liable for business rates or rates reliefs. We are asking local authorities to prioritise businesses in shared spaces, regular market traders, small charity properties that would meet the criteria for Small Business Rates Relief, and bed and breakfasts that pay council tax rather than business rates.

Local Authorities are responsible for defining precise eligibility for this fund and may choose to make payments to other businesses based on local economic need, subject to those businesses meeting the specific eligibility criteria. Businesses seeking information should refer to their Local Authority for further information on their discretionary scheme. Businesses already in receipt of the Small Business Grant Fund (SBGF), Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF) or Self-employed Income Support Scheme are not eligible.

Guidance, intended to support Local Authorities in administering the Discretionary Grants Fund, was published 13th May.

Guidance here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-business-support-grant-funding

This will not replace existing guidance for the Small Business Grant Fund (SBGF) or the Retail Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF).

Guidance here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-business-support-grant-funding-guidance-for-businesses

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing an exemption for pubs with a rateable value of £51,000 or above to enable them to be eligible for local authority business support grant funding.

Under the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF) businesses in England that would have been in receipt of the Expanded Retail Discount (which covers retail, hospitality and leisure) on 11 March 2020, with a rateable value of less than £51,000, will be eligible for cash grants of up to £25,000 per property. Businesses with a rateable value of £51,000 or over are not eligible for this scheme.

Businesses which are not eligible for the grants schemes should be able to benefit from other measures in the Government’s unprecedented package of support for business, including:

  • An option to defer VAT payments by up to twelve months;
  • The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, now extended to cover all businesses including those which would be able to access commercial credit;
  • The Bounce Back Loan scheme, which will ensure that small and micro businesses can quickly access loans of up to £50,000 which are 100% guaranteed by the Government;
  • The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, to support businesses with their wage bills;
  • The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, to provide support to the self-employed.
Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of British Beer and Pub Association statement that at the end of April 2020 only 40 per cent of pubs had received local authority business support grants for which they were eligible.

As of 3 May, over 697,000 business premises have received grants across the Small Business Grants Fund and Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grants Fund, totalling over £8.6 billion. We do not receive management information from local authorities broken down by sector. We have, however, published, a full breakdown of grant funding allocated to and distributed by each local authority here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-grant-funding-local-authority-payments-to-small-and-medium-businesses.

Government has made £12.3 billion available to businesses under the Small Business Grants Fund and the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grants Fund. On 1 May, the Government announced a further £617 million available to help those small businesses with high fixed property-related costs that are not eligible for the current grant schemes. We will be issuing Local Authority Discretionary Grants Fund guidance for local authorities in due course. Local authorities are responsible for delivering these grants to businesses and government is working closely with all local authorities to help deliver grants as quickly and efficiently as possible.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the level of additional business support grants required by businesses in sectors that will remain closed for an extended period after the lockdown is eased.

The Small Business Grant Fund (SBGF) and the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF) are just a part of the Government’s unprecedented package of support for businesses to help with their ongoing business costs in recognition of the disruption caused by Covid-19.

On 1 May 2020 the Business Secretary announced that up to £617 million is being made available to Local Authorities in England to allow them to provide discretionary grants. This is an additional 5% uplift to the £12.33 billion funding previously announced for the Small Business Grants Fund (SBGF) and the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grants Fund (RHLGF).

The additional Local Authority Discretionary Grants Fund is aimed at small businesses with ongoing fixed property-related costs but not liable for business rates or rates reliefs.

We are asking local authorities to prioritise businesses in shared spaces, regular market traders, small charity properties that would meet the criteria for Small Business Rates Relief, and bed and breakfasts that pay council tax rather than business rates.

Local Authorities are responsible for defining precise eligibility for this fund and may choose to make payments to other businesses based on local economic need, subject to those businesses meeting the specific eligibility criteria. Businesses already in receipt of the Small Business grant, a Retail, Hospitality and Leisure grant or Self-employed Income Support Scheme payment are not eligible.

Businesses which are not eligible for the grants schemes should be able to benefit from other measures in the Government’s unprecedented package of support for business, including:

o An option to defer VAT payments by up to twelve months;

o The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, now extended to cover all businesses including those which would be able to access commercial credit;

o The Bounce Back Loan scheme, which will ensure that small and micro businesses can quickly access loans of up to £50,000 which are 100% guaranteed by the Government;

o The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, to support businesses with their wage bills;

o The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, to provide support to the self-employed.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits on an application to the European Commission for a derogation of State Aid rules in relation to local authority business support grant payments.

Although the UK has left the EU, under the terms of the Withdrawal Agreement, the EU State aid rules continue to apply in the UK until the end of the Transition Period.

Whilst the European Commission has declined to suspend the State aid rules because of the Coronavirus pandemic, the Commission has introduced some welcome flexibilities into the rules to deal with the impacts of the Coronavirus, in the form of a Temporary Framework. This facilitates aid going to the companies who need it most, quickly and efficiently.

Following work by BEIS officials, the COVID-19 Temporary Framework was approved by the Commission under the Temporary Framework on 6 April. This allows public authorities to introduce their own aid measures without the necessity of obtaining an individual Commission approval. This provides cover for measures such as the Retail Hospitality and Leisure grants from local authorities.

I would also add that other local authority support, such as Small Business grants, can be given under the normal de minimis rules. These allow up to EUR 200,000 to be given to a business in a three-year period. De minimis aid can be received in addition to Temporary Framework aid.

The combination of these and other measures constitute an unprecedented programme of Government support for business to address the impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether pub businesses with fewer than 50 employees are eligible for payments from the discretionary fund for local authorities announced on 2 May 2020.

On 1 May 2020 the Business Secretary announced that up to £617 million is being made available to Local Authorities in England to allow them to provide discretionary grants. This is an additional 5% uplift to the £12.33 billion funding previously announced for the Small Business Grants Fund (SBGF) and the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grants Fund (RHLGF).

The additional Local Authority Discretionary Grants Fund is aimed at small businesses with ongoing fixed property-related costs but not liable for business rates or rates reliefs.

Pub businesses with less than 50 employees, not directly liable for business rates and thus not eligible for either Small Business or Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grants, could be in-scope subject to them being in business on 11th March, not having received any other Government grant funding, having ongoing relatively high fixed building-related costs (e.g. rent and service charges) and experiencing a significant loss of income due Covid-19 impacts. Local authorities will run these schemes locally.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th May 2020
Whether the Government has made an estimate of the number of businesses that do not qualify for the Government’s covid-19 grant schemes.

Local Authorities are responsible for identifying and contacting eligible businesses for either the Small Business Grants or the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grants. No assessment has been made of the number of businesses not qualifying for the schemes; rather we estimate about 1 million businesses will benefit.

I am personally calling local authorities that have reported slow progress to offer any support they need to get grants out to businesses as soon as possible.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, for what reason the Government is not yet in a position to publish the (a) evidence and (b) report on the event research programme.

The Events Research Programme report was published on Friday 25 June and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/events-research-programme-phase-i-findings

The Events Research Programme is a joint programme between DCMS, DHSC, and BEIS overseen by an industry-led steering group co-chaired by Sir Nicholas Hytner and David Ross. Evidence from the pilot events is considered by the group to make recommendations to the Prime Minister and the Secretaries of State for DCMS, BEIS and DHSC on how restrictions could be safely lifted at Step 4 of the Roadmap.

The report has been subject to a comprehensive and rigorous coordination and approval process across departments, academic institutions and ERP governance boards, and takes into account the latest public health data.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what criteria the Government will use to determine the outcome of the Events Research Programme.

The Events Research Programme will run around a dozen pilot events using enhanced testing approaches and other measures to run events with larger crowd sizes and reduced social distancing to evaluate the outcomes.The evidence will then be shared across the event economy so that venues can prepare to accommodate fuller audiences.

Settings will include small indoor venues that have a capacity of circa 200 people, where a gig or comedy night would take place, to large outdoor venues such as Wembley stadium. Decisions on the number of spectators allowed into the pilot events are yet to be taken and will be subject to discussions with event organisers and local authorities.

The programme will include looking at risk factors in indoor and outdoor settings; small and large venues; seated and standing events and different forms of audience participation. The pilots will also test a range of non-pharmaceutical mitigating interventions during non-socially distanced events such as layout of the venue, face coverings and ventilation.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many people will take part in each test event as part of the Government's Events Research Programme.

The Events Research Programme will run around a dozen pilot events using enhanced testing approaches and other measures to run events with larger crowd sizes and reduced social distancing to evaluate the outcomes.The evidence will then be shared across the event economy so that venues can prepare to accommodate fuller audiences.

Settings will include small indoor venues that have a capacity of circa 200 people, where a gig or comedy night would take place, to large outdoor venues such as Wembley stadium. Decisions on the number of spectators allowed into the pilot events are yet to be taken and will be subject to discussions with event organisers and local authorities.

The programme will include looking at risk factors in indoor and outdoor settings; small and large venues; seated and standing events and different forms of audience participation. The pilots will also test a range of non-pharmaceutical mitigating interventions during non-socially distanced events such as layout of the venue, face coverings and ventilation.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many test events will take place as part of the Government's Events Research Programme.

The Events Research Programme will run around a dozen pilot events using enhanced testing approaches and other measures to run events with larger crowd sizes and reduced social distancing to evaluate the outcomes.The evidence will then be shared across the event economy so that venues can prepare to accommodate fuller audiences.

Settings will include small indoor venues that have a capacity of circa 200 people, where a gig or comedy night would take place, to large outdoor venues such as Wembley stadium. Decisions on the number of spectators allowed into the pilot events are yet to be taken and will be subject to discussions with event organisers and local authorities.

The programme will include looking at risk factors in indoor and outdoor settings; small and large venues; seated and standing events and different forms of audience participation. The pilots will also test a range of non-pharmaceutical mitigating interventions during non-socially distanced events such as layout of the venue, face coverings and ventilation.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of potential merits of extending eligibility to bingo clubs for access to the Culture Recovery Fund.

The Culture Recovery Fund is being delivered by DCMS Arm’s Length Bodies - Arts Council England, the National Lottery Heritage Fund, Historic England, and the British Film Institute. These bodies can spend Government money on individuals or organisations within the sector they are responsible for.

The government recognises that the ongoing impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic continue to be extremely challenging for businesses, including in the Bingo sector. Bingo clubs have accessed £44m of government support via the Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme (£26.8m), Eat Out to Help Out (£600k), Business Rates Relief (£15.9m) and Grant funding (£1.6m). We are continuing to work with organisations in the land-based gambling sector to understand the impacts and how we may be able to support them.

10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the ability of charities working with BAME communities to access the Government's £350 million support for charities.

DCMS and the National Lottery Community Fund (NLCF - our distribution partners for the Coronavirus Community Support Fund) have been - and continue to - engage extensively with BAME organisations during the development of the response and are working with a number of organisations to improve the reach of the Coronavirus Community Support Fund.

A diverse advisory panel has been set up to assist in the distribution process for the fund. DCMS will continue to work closely to assess how we can support BAME charities and social enterprises in doing their important work. The Minister for Civil Society holds a fortnightly roundtable to hear directly from BAME civil society organisations to highlight concerns and responses to Covid-19. DCMS will continue to work closely to assess how we can support BAME charities and social enterprises in doing their important work.

We have published clear and comprehensive guidance on the £750 million, plus other sources of support, at

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/financial-support-for-voluntary-community-and-social-enterprise-vcse-organisations-to-respond-to-coronavirus-covid-19.

This is a package of emergency response to help groups in need and to provide other essential services. It builds on the significant package of support available across sectors, including the Job Retention Scheme.

9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to ensure that funding from the charity relief package announced in April 2020 is reaching those that most need it.

The government has pledged £750 million to meet the needs of vulnerable groups through targeted support for voluntary and community sector organisations on the frontline of the Covid response. This includes £360m distributed through government departments and £200m for the Coronavirus Community Support Fund, being delivered by The National Lottery Community Fund. A diverse advisory panel has been set up to assist in the distribution process for the fund.

The government has also unlocked a further £150 million from dormant bank and building society accounts, which will be distributed to organisations to support urgent work for groups in need to tackle youth unemployment, expand access to emergency loans for civil society organisations and help improve the availability of fair, affordable credit to people in vulnerable circumstances.

We have published clear and comprehensive guidance on the £750 million, plus other sources of support, at

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/financial-support-for-voluntary-community-and-social-enterprise-vcse-organisations-to-respond-to-coronavirus-covid-19.

The VCSE Support Package builds on the significant package of support available across sectors, including the Job Retention Scheme.

16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to provide Arts Council England with the final funding information relating to Music Education Hubs in England; and if he will ensure that Music Hubs urgently receive confirmation of funding levels in order to avert the termination of agreements.

Music Education Hubs have a vital role to play not only in core school music but also in ensuring children have access to all the benefits of a wider musical education through instrumental lessons and ensembles. They have acted swiftly and innovatively to support schools through the COVID-19 outbreak, including the continuation of continuing professional development to classroom teachers.

Following the one-year Spending Review settlement, the Department will continue to fund Music Education Hubs for the financial year 2021-22. Funding has been confirmed with Arts Council England and all Music Education Hubs organisations were updated on this matter. Further details on specific funding allocations for each hub will follow shortly, alongside an announcement on Department funding for music education nationally.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment the Department has made of the effect of the UK failing to agree a deal on the future relationship with the EU on food pricing on the provision of school meals.

The UK has agreed a deal with the EU which is based on friendly cooperation between sovereign equals, centred on free trade and inspired by our shared history and values.

The UK has a high level of food security built upon a diverse range of sources, including strong domestic production and imports from other countries. This continues to be the case.

The government is working in partnership with food suppliers to ensure that there continues to be a flow of food into the country. Schools are responsible for the provision of school meals and may enter individual contracts with suppliers and caterers to meet this duty. We are confident that schools will continue to be able to provide pupils with nutritious school meals from the 1 January onward.

The government has published advice for the food and drink sector on working with the EU following the agreement of a free trade deal, available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-food-and-drink-sector-and-preparing-for-eu-exit.

A range of guidance for schools, including advice on food supplies, is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/guidance-for-schools-during-the-transition-period-and-after-1-january-2021.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the UK leaving the EU on the school catering workforce.

The UK has agreed a deal with the EU which is based on friendly cooperation between sovereign equals, centred on free trade and inspired by our shared history and values.

The UK has a high level of food security built upon a diverse range of sources, including strong domestic production and imports from other countries. This continues to be the case.

The government is working in partnership with food suppliers to ensure that there continues to be a flow of food into the country. Schools are responsible for the provision of school meals and may enter individual contracts with suppliers and caterers to meet this duty. We are confident that schools will continue to be able to provide pupils with nutritious school meals from the 1 January onward.

The government has published advice for the food and drink sector on working with the EU following the agreement of a free trade deal, available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-food-and-drink-sector-and-preparing-for-eu-exit.

A range of guidance for schools, including advice on food supplies, is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/guidance-for-schools-during-the-transition-period-and-after-1-january-2021.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to support the school catering industry during the covid-19 outbreak.

Until the end of the summer term, schools could continue to make payments to suppliers under the provisions of the Cabinet Office guidance for public bodies in ‘Procurement Policy Note 02/20’ and ‘Procurement Policy Note 04/20’ if they considered it appropriate in order to maintain delivery of critical services. These are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/procurement-policy-note-0220-supplier-relief-due-to-covid-19 and: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/procurement-policy-note-0420-recovery-and-transition-from-covid-19. Payments covered the cost of free school meals and universal infant free school meals, but not the costs of meals usually purchased by parents for pupils who are not eligible for free school meals.

More recently, the government has updated its wide package of measures to help support businesses. Further details are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/financial-support-for-businesses-during-coronavirus-covid-19.

Companies within the catering industry may also be able to claim support under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, which has been extended to 30 April 2021. Further details are available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-for-wages-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress his Department has made on the teaching of menstrual wellbeing in schools.

The Department wants to support all young people to be happy, healthy and safe, and to equip them for adult life and to make a positive contribution to society. That is why we have made Relationships Education compulsory for all primary school age pupils, Relationships and Sex Education compulsory for all secondary school age pupils, and Health Education compulsory for pupils in all state funded schools.

Schools are expected to start teaching the new subjects by at least the start of the summer term in 2021. Considering the circumstances faced by our schools, the Department is reassuring schools that they have flexibility over when they discharge their duty within the first year of compulsory teaching.

The statutory guidance sets out that as part of Health Education, primary and secondary school pupils should be taught about menstrual wellbeing, including key facts about the menstrual cycle. The statutory guidance can be accessed at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/relationships-education-relationships-and-sex-education-rse-and-health-education.

Schools also have the flexibility to design the content of their curriculum in an age appropriate and developmentally sensitive way, to support their cohort of pupils. To help schools design their curriculum, the Department has signposted them to expert advice from Public Health England on reproductive health.

The Department’s guidance for teaching about relationships, sex and health covers all of the teaching requirements in the statutory guidance and includes online modules on teaching about menstrual wellbeing. The Department’s full guidance is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/teaching-about-relationships-sex-and-health.

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of ending the Construction Industry Training Board levy.

There is no assessment planned with regards to the merits of ending the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) levy. The most recent assessment completed as a tailored review, was undertaken, and published in November 2017. As well as providing several recommendations to CITB, it concluded that the current levy process was the most appropriate way to specifically support and incentivise the sector.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will introduce a deadline for the use of free school meal vouchers during the covid-19 outbreak.

I refer the hon. Members to the answer I gave on 23 June 2020 to Question 54195.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that schools put in place plans to recommence serving students lunches provided by their school food suppliers.

The government is continuing to provide schools with their expected funding, including funding to cover benefits-related free school meals and universal infant free school meals, throughout this period. We are asking schools to support children at home who are eligible for and claiming benefits-related free school meals, by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. We know that many schools are successfully delivering food parcels or arranging food collections for eligible children, and we encourage this approach.

As schools prepare to open more widely, they should speak to their school catering team or provider about the best arrangements for school meals. Schools should ensure that catering teams and food suppliers are supported to return to school to provide meals both for those children attending school and for those remaining at home who are eligible for free school meals. If a school catering service cannot provide meals or food parcels for children who are at home, the school can continue to offer vouchers to families of eligible pupils if needed.

Our guidance on free school meals during this period is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

These are rapidly developing circumstances. We continue to keep the situation under review and will keep Parliament updated.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will ensure that schools do not use Edenred and other suppliers' vouchers when their usual school meal provider is able to provide meals to children in receipt of free school meals.

The government is continuing to provide schools with their expected funding, including funding to cover benefits-related free school meals and universal infant free school meals, throughout this period. We are asking schools to support children at home who are eligible for and claiming benefits-related free school meals, by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. We know that many schools are successfully delivering food parcels or arranging food collections for eligible children, and we encourage this approach.

As schools prepare to open more widely, they should speak to their school catering team or provider about the best arrangements for school meals. Schools should ensure that catering teams and food suppliers are supported to return to school to provide meals both for those children attending school and for those remaining at home who are eligible for free school meals. If a school catering service cannot provide meals or food parcels for children who are at home, the school can continue to offer vouchers to families of eligible pupils if needed.

Our guidance on free school meals during this period is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

These are rapidly developing circumstances. We continue to keep the situation under review and will keep Parliament updated.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether it is the Government's policy that the school meal voucher scheme provided by Edenred and other providers is a temporary measure during the covid-19 outbreak.

Around 1.3 million children are eligible for and claiming benefits-related free school meals. During this period, we are asking schools to support these children by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. We know that many schools are successfully delivering food parcels or arranging food collections for eligible children and we encourage this approach where it is possible.

However, we recognise that providing meals and food parcels is not a practicable option for all schools. That is why on 31 March we launched a national voucher scheme as an alternative option, with costs covered by the Department for Education.

The purpose of the voucher scheme is to ensure children eligible for benefits related free school meals who are not in school will continue to have access while schools are closed to most pupils due to the COVID-19 outbreak. It is not intended to replace long term contractual arrangements.

Guidance on providing free school meals has been updated to reflect that, as schools open more widely and their kitchens reopen, they should provide meal options for all children who are in school, free of charge for those eligible for free schools meals, and should make food parcels available for collection or delivery for any children that are eligible for free school meals who are staying at home. If schools are unable to provide food parcels, they can continue using the national voucher scheme to provide vouchers for children at home.

Schools can also apply to be reimbursed for any additional costs associated with providing free school meals at this time, where those costs are not covered by the national voucher scheme: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

The latest advice on free school meals is available on the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether schools should be serving their pupils with meals provided by their usual suppliers when schools reopen for (a) some year groups on 1 June 2020 and (b) all year groups when lockdown restrictions are eased during the covid-19 outbreak.

Around 1.3 million children are eligible for and claiming benefits-related free school meals. During this period, we are asking schools to support these children by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. We know that many schools are successfully delivering food parcels or arranging food collections for eligible children and we encourage this approach where it is possible.

However, we recognise that providing meals and food parcels is not a practicable option for all schools. That is why on 31 March we launched a national voucher scheme as an alternative option, with costs covered by the Department for Education.

The purpose of the voucher scheme is to ensure children eligible for benefits related free school meals who are not in school will continue to have access while schools are closed to most pupils due to the COVID-19 outbreak. It is not intended to replace long term contractual arrangements.

Guidance on providing free school meals has been updated to reflect that, as schools open more widely and their kitchens reopen, they should provide meal options for all children who are in school, free of charge for those eligible for free schools meals, and should make food parcels available for collection or delivery for any children that are eligible for free school meals who are staying at home. If schools are unable to provide food parcels, they can continue using the national voucher scheme to provide vouchers for children at home.

Schools can also apply to be reimbursed for any additional costs associated with providing free school meals at this time, where those costs are not covered by the national voucher scheme: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

The latest advice on free school meals is available on the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will take steps to encourage schools to use their school meal providers to provide school meals when schools reopen on 1 June 2020 during the covid-19 outbreak.

Around 1.3 million children are eligible for and claiming benefits-related free school meals. During this period, we are asking schools to support these children by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. We know that many schools are successfully delivering food parcels or arranging food collections for eligible children and we encourage this approach where it is possible.

However, we recognise that providing meals and food parcels is not a practicable option for all schools. That is why on 31 March we launched a national voucher scheme as an alternative option, with costs covered by the Department for Education.

The purpose of the voucher scheme is to ensure children eligible for benefits related free school meals who are not in school will continue to have access while schools are closed to most pupils due to the COVID-19 outbreak. It is not intended to replace long term contractual arrangements.

Guidance on providing free school meals has been updated to reflect that, as schools open more widely and their kitchens reopen, they should provide meal options for all children who are in school, free of charge for those eligible for free schools meals, and should make food parcels available for collection or delivery for any children that are eligible for free school meals who are staying at home. If schools are unable to provide food parcels, they can continue using the national voucher scheme to provide vouchers for children at home.

Schools can also apply to be reimbursed for any additional costs associated with providing free school meals at this time, where those costs are not covered by the national voucher scheme: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

The latest advice on free school meals is available on the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if his Department will provide further guidance to schools on using their usual school meal providers when schools reopen during the covid-19 outbreak.

Around 1.3 million children are eligible for and claiming benefits-related free school meals. During this period, we are asking schools to support these children by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. We know that many schools are successfully delivering food parcels or arranging food collections for eligible children and we encourage this approach where it is possible.

However, we recognise that providing meals and food parcels is not a practicable option for all schools. That is why on 31 March we launched a national voucher scheme as an alternative option, with costs covered by the Department for Education.

The purpose of the voucher scheme is to ensure children eligible for benefits related free school meals who are not in school will continue to have access while schools are closed to most pupils due to the COVID-19 outbreak. It is not intended to replace long term contractual arrangements.

Guidance on providing free school meals has been updated to reflect that, as schools open more widely and their kitchens reopen, they should provide meal options for all children who are in school, free of charge for those eligible for free schools meals, and should make food parcels available for collection or delivery for any children that are eligible for free school meals who are staying at home. If schools are unable to provide food parcels, they can continue using the national voucher scheme to provide vouchers for children at home.

Schools can also apply to be reimbursed for any additional costs associated with providing free school meals at this time, where those costs are not covered by the national voucher scheme: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

The latest advice on free school meals is available on the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect on the educational attainment of white working class boys of encouraging those boys to develop their (a) reading skills and (b) vocabulary at an early age.

The Department is committed to raising literacy standards – ensuring all children, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds, can read fluently and with understanding. Fluency in the English language is an essential foundation for success in all subjects. Improving vocabulary and reading skills are fundamental parts of this.

Our proposed reforms to the Early Years Foundation Stage, including revisions to the curriculum activities and assessment goals under the seven areas of learning, are intended to improve early language and literacy outcomes for all children – particularly those from a disadvantaged background. We have also launched Hungry Little Minds – a three-year campaign to encourage parents to engage in activities that support their child’s language and literacy.

To continue improving early reading, in 2018 we launched the £26.3 million English Hubs Programme. We have appointed 34 primary schools across England as English Hubs. The English Hubs programme is supporting nearly 3000 schools across England to improve their teaching of reading through systematic synthetic phonics, early language development, and reading for pleasure. The English Hubs are focused on improving educational outcomes for the most disadvantaged pupils in Reception and Year 1.

Evidence has shown that phonics is a highly effective component in the development of early reading skills, particularly for children from disadvantaged backgrounds. The disadvantage gap in the phonics screening check has decreased from 17% in 2012, to 14% in 2019.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of a change from a competence-based curriculum to a knowledge-rich curriculum on the education attainment of white working class boys.

In 2014, the Department introduced a more knowledge-rich curriculum with associated reforms to GCSEs to make them more rigorous. These changes were in part driven by a desire to ensure all children, whatever their background, receive a high-quality education.

We have made no specific assessment of the impact of curriculum change alone on attainment of white working-class boys. However, against a background of rising standards, disadvantaged pupils are catching up with their peers. The attainment gap index shows the gap at the end of primary school has narrowed by 13% since 2011, and by 9% at the end of secondary school. This means better prospects for a secure adult life for disadvantaged pupils. Our reforms, and the focus provided by the pupil premium, have supported this improvement.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to strengthen the powers of teachers to deal with unruly pupils.

Good behaviour in school is crucial if children are to learn and reach their full potential. As well as delivering excellent teaching, schools should be calm, safe and disciplined environments free from the low-level disruption that prevents pupils from learning.

The Government is committed to backing heads and teachers to enforce discipline, and we have given teachers a range of powers to promote good behaviour and discipline misbehaviour, including how they deal with unruly pupils.

All schools are required by law to have a behaviour policy which outlines measures to encourage good behaviour, and the sanctions that will be imposed for misbehaviour. This should be communicated to all pupils, school staff and parents. To help schools develop effective strategies, the Department has produced advice for schools which covers what should be included in the behaviour policy. This advice can be viewed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/behaviour-and-discipline-in-schools.

The Government is also committed to ensuring all teachers are equipped with the skills to tackle both the serious behaviour issues that compromise the safety and wellbeing of pupils and school staff, as well as the low-level disruption that too often gets in the way of effective learning. To help support staff, we are reforming training through the Early Career Framework so that all new teachers will be shown how to effectively manage behaviour in their first two years in the profession.

In February 2020, the Department announced its next steps for implementing the £10 million behaviour hubs programme, which aims to equip senior leaders in schools with the tools to improve their approach to behaviour management through facilitated peer-training, matching them up to exemplary lead schools and multi-academy trusts for bespoke support. Further information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/behaviour-hubs.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department takes account of attainment outcomes at (a) secondary and (b) further education level the development of the curriculum for key stages 1 and 2.

The Department introduced a more ambitious, knowledge-rich national curriculum in England in 2014, as well as more rigorous GCSEs from 2015, putting us in line with the highest-performing education systems in the world.

By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study. In developing the curriculum for each key stage, the knowledge and skills to be taught for each subject were carefully sequenced, to ensure a coherent approach that takes account of prior knowledge. This allows teachers to plan the school curriculum for each subject so their pupils are equipped for successful transition to the next phase of education, whether this is in the move from primary to secondary, or the move from secondary to further education.

In the case of primary English, mathematics and science, the programmes of study were sequenced in more detail on a year-by-year or two-year basis. The GCSE content requirements for each national curriculum subject were also carefully sequenced to build on key stage 3 and align with key stage 4 programmes of study. The independent regulator, Ofqual, has put processes in place to ensure that it is no harder for a student to obtain a grade 7, 4 or 1 in the new GCSEs than it was to achieve a grade A, C or G in the unreformed versions.

2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to help schools improve the cultural literacy of pupils aged four and five.

The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) statutory framework sets out the learning and development requirements which all early years settings and schools are required to follow. This ensures all children from birth to five are supported throughout the EYFS and attain a good level of development - at the end of reception- ready to begin Year 1. This provides a firm basis for cultural literacy through the seven areas of learning: communication and language; physical development; personal, social and emotional development; literacy; mathematics; understanding the world; and expressive arts and design.

The Department’s proposed reforms to the EYFS, including revisions to the curriculum activities and assessment goals under the seven areas of learning, are intended to improve early language and literacy outcomes for all children - particularly those from a disadvantaged background. The reforms provide opportunities for teachers to support children’s cultural literacy through reading from a range of fiction and non-fiction books, singing rhymes and poems and visits to parks, museums and libraries. Strengthening teaching practice in these areas can enable all children to flourish as they move through school and beyond.

2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of synthetic phonics lessons on children's reading outcomes since the introduction of the Phonics Partnership Grant programme in 2015.

The Government is committed to continuing to raise literacy standards by ensuring all children, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds, can read fluently and with understanding.

Evidence has shown that phonics is a highly effective component in the development of early reading skills, particularly for children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Our phonics performance is improving. In 2019, 82% of pupils in Year 1 met the expected standard in the phonics screening check, compared to just 58% when the check was introduced in 2012. The disadvantage gap in the phonics screening check has decreased from 17% in 2012, to 14% in 2019. The gender gap in the phonics screening check has fallen from 8% in 2012 to 7% in 2019.

England achieved its highest ever score in reading in 2016, moving from joint 10th to joint 8th in the Progress in International Reading Literacy Stud (PIRLS) rankings. This follows a greater focus on reading in the primary curriculum, and a particular focus on phonics. The average improvement of England’s pupils in 2016 is largely attributable to two changes:

  • In 2016, boys have significantly improved in their average performance compared to previous cycles; and
  • England’s lowest performing pupils have substantially improved compared to previous PIRLS cycles, which has narrowed the gap between the higher and lower-performing pupils.

Building on the success of our phonics partnerships and phonics roadshows programmes, in 2018, the Department launched a £26.3 million English Hubs Programme. We have appointed 34 primary schools across England as English Hubs. The English Hubs programme is supporting nearly 3000 schools across England to improve their teaching of reading through systematic synthetic phonics, early language development, and reading for pleasure. The English Hubs are focused on improving educational outcomes for the most disadvantaged pupils in Reception and Year 1.

2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of teaching synthetic phonics on the attainment gap between (a) advantaged and disadvantaged students and (b) boys and girls.

The Government is committed to continuing to raise literacy standards by ensuring all children, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds, can read fluently and with understanding.

Evidence has shown that phonics is a highly effective component in the development of early reading skills, particularly for children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Our phonics performance is improving. In 2019, 82% of pupils in Year 1 met the expected standard in the phonics screening check, compared to just 58% when the check was introduced in 2012. The disadvantage gap in the phonics screening check has decreased from 17% in 2012, to 14% in 2019. The gender gap in the phonics screening check has fallen from 8% in 2012 to 7% in 2019.

England achieved its highest ever score in reading in 2016, moving from joint 10th to joint 8th in the Progress in International Reading Literacy Stud (PIRLS) rankings. This follows a greater focus on reading in the primary curriculum, and a particular focus on phonics. The average improvement of England’s pupils in 2016 is largely attributable to two changes:

  • In 2016, boys have significantly improved in their average performance compared to previous cycles; and
  • England’s lowest performing pupils have substantially improved compared to previous PIRLS cycles, which has narrowed the gap between the higher and lower-performing pupils.

Building on the success of our phonics partnerships and phonics roadshows programmes, in 2018, the Department launched a £26.3 million English Hubs Programme. We have appointed 34 primary schools across England as English Hubs. The English Hubs programme is supporting nearly 3000 schools across England to improve their teaching of reading through systematic synthetic phonics, early language development, and reading for pleasure. The English Hubs are focused on improving educational outcomes for the most disadvantaged pupils in Reception and Year 1.

25th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what plans the Government has to improve workplace support for women experiencing the menopause.

The Government is committed to supporting working women at all stages of their lives and enabling them to reach their potential.

We have worked with businesses and academics to highlight the role employers can play in supporting women going through menopause transition. This includes setting out practical actions employers can take. This also sits alongside other policies and programmes, such as flexible working, which can help everyone remain economically active as long as they choose to.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the frequency of public land being used for illegal fox hunting under the guise of trail hunting; and what steps the Government is taking to ensure the effective enforcement of the prohibition on fox-hunting on public land.

The Hunting Act 2004 makes it an offence to hunt a wild mammal with dogs except where it is carried out in accordance with the exemptions in the Act.

Those found guilty under the Act are subject to the full force of the law. As enforcement of the Hunting Act is an operational matter for the police, Defra has not assessed the frequency of offences against the Hunting Act committed on public land.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has plans to adopt the Whole Grain Initiative’s definition of whole grain foods for food package labelling.

Defra committed to reviewing the Bread and Flour Regulations 1998, as they apply in England, following the end of the transition period. The planned review is being scoped now but it will focus on ensuring alignment with retained laws in other overlapping areas, as well as considering requests from industry for additional measures and exemptions. The review will also need to consider any DHSC decisions around folic acid. As part of the review, we will hold a public consultation on policy options. Many of the issues raised by stakeholders to date are technically complex and we expect this review will need sufficient time to consider responses and agree the best way forward.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to Answer of 21 July 2020 to Question 75425, what steps she has taken to progress work with the industry to ensure that the supply of chemicals and materials that are essential for water and wastewater treatment processes is not adversely affected following the end of the transition period.

Prior to the end of the transition period, the department worked with water companies, the regulators and the wider sector to prepare for a range of potential outcomes. Water companies undertook extensive preparations to ensure continuity of supply and these have ensured that thus far, there has not been an impact on water supply. Water companies are continuing to monitor their supply chains and have increased their on-site stocks of chemicals. The sector has well-rehearsed contingency plans to respond to incidents that might arise.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans the Government has to ensure that the supply of (a) chemicals and (b) materials for the treatment of (i) drinking water and (ii) sewage will not be (A) interrupted and (B) adversely affected in the event that a UK/EU relationship has not been reached by the end of the transition period.

As part of the Government’s preparations for leaving the EU, Defra worked closely with water companies and with the industry trade association to deliver comprehensive sectoral contingency plans with arrangements that would protect supply chains in the event that a UK/EU relationship was not reached prior to the UK leaving the EU. This work has significantly bolstered the resilience of the sector and its supply chains. Defra will continue to work with the industry to ensure that the supply of chemicals and materials that are essential for water and wastewater treatment processes is not adversely affected following the end of the transition period.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 4 May 2020 to Question 40742, on Dogs: Animal Breeding, whether a puppy bred by a person that is licensed to sell a puppy in England can be sold in the UK if it was bred by that person outside the UK.

A person who is licensed in England as a seller of pet animals may sell a puppy in England as long as they can satisfy the local authority that they bred the puppy concerned. The ban on commercial third party sales in England is about ensuring the person selling the puppy has actually bred the pet animal. The law on the breeding and selling of dogs is a devolved matter and therefore differs in the rest of the United Kingdom.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the proposed ban on third party sales of puppies will prohibit breeders that breed dogs outside England from selling those dogs in England.

It will be for the local authority responsible for licensing a business to be satisfied that a licence holder has bred the animals they are selling. Defra has updated the statutory guidance on pet selling, and this also covers how to be assured that someone offering a puppy for sale has bred it themselves. The law does not explicitly prohibit sales by someone who is licensed to sell a puppy in England having bred that puppy outside of England. However Defra’s recently launched Petfished campaign provides further guidance for the public on how to source puppies responsibly and this includes signposting to reputable suppliers (like Kennel Club Assured Breeders or licensed breeders) and advising that prospective buyers should always ask to see the puppy interacting with its mother and siblings where it was bred prior to making any purchasing decisions.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has has to support the expansion of the FareShare network during the covid-19 outbreak.

We are working closely with FareShare and other food aid organisations to identify the impacts COVID-19 is having on front-line charities that provide food, and to ensure that those who are financially vulnerable have access to food and essential supplies.

We have worked with FareShare to quantify the current and forecast supply and demand of food to food aid charities, including the hundreds of charities who have asked for FareShare’s support since COVID-19. We welcome the efforts of the food industry to support food aid organisations, including the FareShare network, through pledges of donations of food and funds.

We are working through the Food and Essential Supplies to the Vulnerable Ministerial Task Force to identify where Government can best support front-line food charities, in the context of the gap between supply and demand, and the support already shown by the food industry.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to provide financial support to (a) workers and (b) farmers in the Global South that supply goods to the UK and other countries affected by covid-19.

We are engaging with businesses in the UK and in developing countries to understand the challenges they face with respect to protecting incomes and livelihoods in their supply chains. As a leading shareholder and donor to the Multilateral Development Banks, we have been working them to ensure that they are providing much needed working capital to the small businesses and supply chains that workers and farmers depend on in developing countries. We are exploring how DFID’s private sector development finance programmes can respond and complement this support. For example, CDC, the UK’s development finance institution, continues to invest in businesses across Africa and South Asia to support jobs. The UK also currently supports social protection programmes to assist the most vulnerable in more than 25 countries. In response to COVID-19 we are providing expert advice to governments and international partners to assess how and where social protection could be best used to support an efficient, coordinated response.

25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the capacity of the healthcare system in Yemen to (a) help prevent and (b) respond to the spread of covid-19 in that country.

Following the confirmation that Covid-19 is now present in Yemen, we are extremely concerned by the capacity of the healthcare system in Yemen to prevent and respond to a severe outbreak of COVID-19. Only half of Yemen’s health facilities are currently functioning and almost 20 million people lack access to basic healthcare.

In response to concerns about the healthcare system’s capacity, the World Health Organisation (WHO) and United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) are providing vital equipment across the country, including testing supplies, personal protective equipment and ventilators. Last year, the UK provided £240 million in response to the humanitarian crisis in Yemen, with over £42 million supporting the UNICEF. We also recently announced an extra £10 million to the WHO globally, to help prevent the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak in developing countries and we will consider providing additional COVID-19 support to Yemen should further funding be required.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions she has had with the IMF on supporting developing countries experiencing the economic effect of the covid-19 outbreak.

The department is working closely with HM Treasury to ensure that the IMF continues to play its critical role at the centre of the global financial safety net, including supporting the poorest and most vulnerable countries to respond to the economic costs of the COVID19 pandemic.

The UK has been pressing for improvements to the IMF’s existing toolkit, such as increasing the access limits on the IMF’s emergency financing instruments, which was agreed by the IMF Board on 7 April. The details of this can be found here: https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/Policy-Papers/Issues/2020/04/09/Enhancing-the-Emergency-Financing-Toolkit-Responding-To-The-COVID-19-Pandemic-49320?cid=em-COM-123-41385

DFID is providing up to £150 million as the UK contribution to the IMF Catastrophe Containment and Relief Trust, to support the poorest developing countries with debt relief to support public finances during this crisis. The IMF recently announced the first tranche of support through this Trust will be disbursed to 25 countries. We will continue to engage with the IMF to ensure that it can effectively support vulnerable countries during this unprecedented global health and economic crisis, and has adequate resources to meet the needs of developing countries. The Chancellor has announced an additional GBP 2.2 billion of UK loan resources for the IMF Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust, which provides concessional lending to developing countries.

25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment her Department made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on (a) employment, (b) wages, and (c) farmer income in the global south.

DFID is working together with international organisations and other partners to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the economies of developing countries, including on the most vulnerable workers, including farmers. We are drawing on modelling by the International Labour Organisation and our knowledge of prior crises.

25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment her Department has made of the (a) availability and (b) adequacy of (i) medical and (ii) sanitation supplies required in response to an outbreak of covid-19 in Gaza.

The UK is providing vital support to help respond to COVID-19 in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Our $1 million funding contribution will enable the World Health Organisation and UNICEF to purchase and co-ordinate the delivery of medical equipment, treat critical care patients, train frontline public health personnel and scale up laboratory testing capacity.

The UN assesses that although the current number of detected cases remains relatively low, the capacity of the Palestinian health system to cope with an expected increase in COVID-19 cases is poor. The situation is particularly severe in Gaza, where the health system has shortages in specialised staff, drugs and equipment. We continue to monitor the situation and are working closely with the UN and the international community to ensure a co-ordinated response.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, with reference to the covid-19 pandemic, what discussions he is having with his G20 counterparts on agreeing a global deal for (a) affordable health care for people affected by covid-19, (b) collaborating on a vaccination for that disease and (c) ensuring that jobs are protected.

The UK is engaging with the World Health Organisation and other international partners, including G20 counterparts, to contain COVID-19 and mitigate secondary health and socio-economic impacts.

We have committed up to £744 million of UK aid to combat COVID-19 and to reinforce the global effort to find a vaccine. This includes helping developing countries manage the crisis by supporting the operations of the UN, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, as well as the provision of expert advice; supporting the International Monetary Fund to relieve debt servicing pressures on countries struggling with the virus; and supporting international scientific efforts to develop diagnosis tests and vaccines.

G7 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors recently collectively committed to do whatever is needed to restore confidence and economic growth and to protect jobs, businesses, and the resilience of the financial system.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to help strengthen the capacity of the health care system in Yemen to respond to the spread of covid-19 in that country.

The UK has been supporting the health system in Yemen during the five-year conflict and has funded over 4.7 million medical consultations and 2.6 million vaccines since 2017. Last year, the UK provided £240 million in response to the humanitarian crisis in Yemen, with over £42 million supporting United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).

We continue to engage closely with the World Health Organisation (WHO) and UNICEF who are providing vital equipment across the country, including testing supplies, personal protective equipment and ventilators. The UK also recently announced an extra £10 million to the WHO globally, to help prevent the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak in developing countries and we will consider additional COVID-19 support to Yemen should further funding be required.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of the covid-19 pandemic on levels of health in Palestinian refugee camps (a) in Lebanon and (b) throughout the Middle East.

The UK recognises the United Nations Relief and Works Agency’s (UNRWA) unique mandate to provide protection and core services to Palestinian refugees in Gaza, the West Bank, Lebanon Jordan and Syria. In 2019/20 the UK has committed £65.5 million to UNRWA, matching our 2018 contribution. Overcrowded living conditions, physical and mental stress and years of protracted conflict make the population of over 5.6 million Palestine refugees across the Middle East particularly vulnerable. UNRWA is supporting the delivery of national pandemic response plans and has put in place a range of measures to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and to treat patients with symptoms, working in cooperation with WHO and other partners.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment her Department has made of the capacity of the Palestinian health sector to respond to the covid-19 pandemic.

The UK is providing vital support to help respond to COVID-19 in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Our $1 million funding contribution will enable the World Health Organisation and UNICEF to purchase and co-ordinate the delivery of medical equipment, treat critical care patients, train frontline public health personnel and scale up laboratory testing capacity.

The UN assesses that although the current number of detected cases remains relatively low, the capacity of the Palestinian health system to cope with an expected increase in COVID-19 cases is poor. The situation is particularly severe in Gaza, where the health system has shortages in specialised staff, drugs and equipment. We continue to monitor the situation and are working closely with the UN and the international community to ensure a co-ordinated response

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether her Department plans to respond to the UN Relief and Works Agency’s flash appeal for an emergency response to the covid-19 outbreak.

The UK is a long-term supporter of the UN Relief and Works Agency (UNWRA), committing £65.5 million in 2019/20. Our funding contributes to UNRWA’s provision of health services for more than 3 million Palestinian refugees across the region. These services will play a key role in helping contain and address the spread of COVID-19. We continue to monitor the situation closely and are working closely with UNRWA and the international community to ensure a co-ordinated response to COVID-19.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to the Answer of 27 January 2020 to Question 6789 on Developing Countries: Nutrition, what the timescale is for his Department's adoption of the OECD policy marker for nutrition into its reporting systems.

DFID is already taking steps to report using the nutrition policy marker. This includes ensuring there is guidance on how it should be used and to ensure it is applied consistently. DFID will start to report on the nutrition policy marker through the OECD DAC Creditor Reporting System for 2020 aid spending onwards.

3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to the Answer of 27 January 2020 to Question 6788 on Developing Countries: Nutrition, what steps his Department is taking to maximise the impact of its investments in (a) agriculture, (b) social protection and (c) climate adaptation on people’s health and nutrition.

DFID invests in regular reviews and evaluations of its programmes and we use this information – as well as evidence generated by others – to inform the design and evolution of our investments.

This approach is being used to ensure new programmes in areas such as agriculture, social protection and climate adaptation have a positive impact on nutrition and health.

We are also continuing to invest in research – particularly in relation to agriculture and food production – to build evidence on the most effective approaches.

22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps he is taking to incorporate the OECD policy marker for nutrition into his Department’s reporting systems.

The UK worked with other Governments to support the adoption of the nutrition policy marker by the OECD. We also led efforts to develop guidance on how it should be applied. The new policy marker will significantly improve our ability to track aid spending on nutrition. We are taking steps to ensure we use this policy marker to best effect in our reporting systems.

22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether it is his Department's policy to make a financial commitment at the Tokyo Nutrition for Growth 2020 summit.

DFID officials are working closely with the Government of Japan to prepare for the 2020 Nutrition for Growth Summit. This will be an important opportunity to secure new commitments to nutrition, to set the world on a better track to achieve the Global Goals and to help achieve our ambition of ending preventable deaths by 2030.

We are in the process of identifying the most appropriate and impactful commitment the UK Government can make as part of the 2020 Summit.

22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people at risk of (a) malnutrition and (b) food scarcity as a result of climate change.

Climate change is expected to increase the risk of malnutrition and hunger by increasing the frequency of extreme weather events and disease outbreaks. It will also reduce the quality, quantity and affordability of nutritious diets.

Countries that do not plan effectively for climate adaption are likely to see a reversal of previous improvements in nutrition and food security. Climate modelling has estimated that 2°C warming will result in there being an additional 540 to 590 million undernourished people by 2050. By 2050 there will also be an estimated 10 million more children who will be undernourished as a result of climate change.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps he is taking with his international counterparts to help enforce of the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes.

DFID supports implementation of the International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes in the countries where we work. Evidence shows that inappropriate marketing of breast milk substitutes undermines breastfeeding and that infants in developing countries who are not breastfed are more likely to get sick and to die.

We are concerned that manufacturers of breast milk substitutes continue to contravene the Code. Our position is not to partner with those companies that are uncompliant with the Code.

We provide technical assistance to partner governments to develop and strengthen their own national nutrition policies. Breastfeeding support and promotion are also components of our health and nutrition programmes in countries such as Bangladesh and Nigeria.

22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps he is taking to include nutrition objectives in his Department’s investments in (a) health, (b) social protection, (c) agriculture and (d) climate change adaptation.

The UK is committed to addressing malnutrition as part of our pledge to end preventable deaths of mothers, newborns and children by 2030.

High-impact nutrition services are an essential part of health services and coverage. We are integrating nutrition into our health programmes in countries such as the DRC and Somalia and will continue with this approach.

People also need to have access nutritious and sustainable diets. We are supporting the roll out of climate-resilient crops and helping to ensure nutritious foods – including fruits and vegetables – are more affordable. We will continue to look for ways to maximise the impact of our investments in areas such as agriculture, social protection and climate adaptation on people’s health and nutrition.

13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent discussions she has had with stakeholders on her obligations under the Trade Act 2021 to undertake health assessments of trade deals; who will carry out those assessments; and when the health assessment for the UK-Australia free trade deal will be carried out.

There are no obligations under the Trade Act 2021 to carry out health assessments of our trade agreements. However, under section 42 of the Agriculture Act 2020, my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade must prepare a report explaining whether, or to what extent, measures in a free trade agreement (FTA) applicable to trade in agricultural products are consistent with the maintenance of UK levels of statutory protection in relation to:

(a) human, animal or plant life or health,

(b) animal welfare, and

(c) the environment.

This report must be laid before Part 2 of the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010 - which must precede ratification of the FTA - can commence.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of enabling holders of licences for passenger carrying vehicles to drive large goods vehicles of a similar size, including after completing an additional module.

The regulations require drivers of heavy goods vehicle (HGV) to pass the relevant theory and practical tests applicable to that type of vehicle. Whilst there are some similarities in driving passenger carrying vehicles, it is an important part of maintaining road safety standards that HGV drivers have undergone the appropriate training and passed the different tests to drive safely.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether rail operators plan to extend railcards due to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department recognises that Railcard holders have been unable to use their cards while travel restrictions were in place in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. We are considering a range of options for all Railcard holders, and continue to work closely with the Rail Delivery Group and the wider industry to consider how best to support passengers in light of the COVID-19 related travel restrictions and returning to the railway

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to extend driving licence validity for people who need to submit paper applications due to not holding a UK passport, during the covid-19 pandemic while the DVLA are unable to process paper applications for people who are not essential workers.

The administrative validity period of all photocard driving licences expiring between 1 February and 31 August 2020 has been extended by seven months from the date of expiry. Drivers do not need to take any action as this extension is granted automatically.

Drivers who need to renew their entitlement to drive and cannot use the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency’s online service should submit a paper application in the normal way. However, these will take longer to process in the current circumstances.

The Department is urgently exploring further ways of mitigating difficulties people are facing if they cannot transact online.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps the Government has taken to encourage employers to support women in the workplace that are experiencing menopause by (a) training staff to provide support, (b) raising awareness and (c) providing transition-related advice.

The Government is committed to supporting working women at all stages of their lives and enabling them to reach their potential.

We have worked with businesses and academics to highlight the role employers can play in supporting women going through menopause transition, including setting out practical actions employers can take. This work also sits alongside other policies and programmes, such as flexible working, which can help everyone remain economically active as long as they choose to.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effect of Storm Ciara on public transport in (a) Nottingham and (b) the UK.

Storm Ciara impacted all modes of transport, both in Nottingham and across the UK, and I extend my sympathies to all those affected. Operators and highway authorities implemented contingency arrangements and resumed services as quickly and safely as possible, whilst keeping the travelling public informed.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the work to electrify the Midland Mainline will commence.

Electrification works between Bedford and Kettering, as part of the Midland Main Line enhancement programme, are underway. Electric services on this route are planned to commence from December 2020.

The Midland Main Line enhancements programme will support better journeys from 2020, including faster journeys in the peak and more seats, with further improvements from 2022 with a fleet of brand new bi-mode trains.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of the part-payment of winter fuel payment being available to those who have narrowly missed the age cut-off.

There are no plans to change the legislation relating to the qualifying week as this would add unnecessary cost and complexity.

We will continue to pay £200 to those households with someone of state pension age and under 80 and £300 to those households with someone aged 80 or over.

Other help with energy costs is available to those eligible through the warm home discount scheme and cold weather payments. Further details can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/the-warm-home-discount-scheme

https://www.gov.uk/cold-weather-payment

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department has taken to ensure that people with special dietary requirements are able to access appropriate emergency food support from their local authority.

Local Authorities in England have powers to run Local Welfare Assistance Schemes at their discretion, which may include emergency support. It is for Local Authorities to assess need in their area and to determine the design of any such scheme, including eligibility, access and nature of provision, giving due consideration to their duties under the Equality Act and other relevant legislation. No assessment has been made by DWP of the suitability of local authority-run emergency food support schemes for people with special dietary requirements.

Since 1 December 2020, DWP has allocated funding to upper tier Local Authorities in England, through the Covid Winter Grant Scheme and the Covid Local Support Grant, to provide additional support to families and individuals who may be struggling with the cost of food and essential utility bills due to the pandemic. We have now extended this temporary scheme for a final time with an additional £160 million in funding between 21 June and 30 September, taking total funding under the scheme to £429 million. This brings the end date for this scheme past the lifting of restrictions, supporting families who might need additional help to get back on their feet as the vaccine rollout continues and our economy recovers. This scheme recognises that Local Authorities are best placed to understand needs in their area.

This year, we are also investing up to £220m in the Holiday Activities and Food programme which has been expanded to every Local Authority across England. Participating children will benefit from a range of support, including a healthy and nutritious meal that takes into account dietary needs as well as fun and engaging activities and it is for the Local Authority who delivers the programme in their area to give due consideration to their duties under the Equality Act and other relevant legislation.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the suitability of local authority-run emergency food support schemes for people with special dietary requirements.

Local Authorities in England have powers to run Local Welfare Assistance Schemes at their discretion, which may include emergency support. It is for Local Authorities to assess need in their area and to determine the design of any such scheme, including eligibility, access and nature of provision, giving due consideration to their duties under the Equality Act and other relevant legislation. No assessment has been made by DWP of the suitability of local authority-run emergency food support schemes for people with special dietary requirements.

Since 1 December 2020, DWP has allocated funding to upper tier Local Authorities in England, through the Covid Winter Grant Scheme and the Covid Local Support Grant, to provide additional support to families and individuals who may be struggling with the cost of food and essential utility bills due to the pandemic. We have now extended this temporary scheme for a final time with an additional £160 million in funding between 21 June and 30 September, taking total funding under the scheme to £429 million. This brings the end date for this scheme past the lifting of restrictions, supporting families who might need additional help to get back on their feet as the vaccine rollout continues and our economy recovers. This scheme recognises that Local Authorities are best placed to understand needs in their area.

This year, we are also investing up to £220m in the Holiday Activities and Food programme which has been expanded to every Local Authority across England. Participating children will benefit from a range of support, including a healthy and nutritious meal that takes into account dietary needs as well as fun and engaging activities and it is for the Local Authority who delivers the programme in their area to give due consideration to their duties under the Equality Act and other relevant legislation.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of (a) the potential merits of excluding mandatory travel to work expenditure from income for universal credit purposes and (b) the effect of the inclusion of that expenditure as income for universal credit purposes on the ability of claimants to seek further employment.

No such assessment has been done.

Universal Credit provides support for everyday living expenses. Any earnings an employee receives would normally be expected to cover the costs of travel to and from work, irrespective of whether or not the employee was also claiming Universal Credit.

To keep Universal Credit as simple as possible, the definition of earnings aligns very closely to the rules in tax legislation (Income Tax (Earnings and Pensions) Act 2003 (ITEPA)), so that rules across tax and benefits are aligned where possible. Any allowable expenses which are wholly, necessarily and exclusively incurred as part of the duties of employment are not counted as employed earnings and would be excluded from the calculation of a Universal Credit Award. Travel from home to a permanent workplace is not an allowable expense for tax purposes.

The Flexible Support Fund is a discretionary fund and can be used by staff to remove barriers when a claimant is starting work for example it can cover the first 3 months travel costs. Where there are difficulties with public transport work coaches can consider funding for pedal cycles and e bikes to allow people to get to their place of employment. Discussion s should be held with their work coach in the first instance around this type of support.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of mandating a specific workplace risk assessment for clinically extremely vulnerable employees.

Employers’ health and safety responsibilities include taking reasonable steps to protect all workers and others from the risk of transmission of coronavirus in connection with their work activities. The Covid-19 Risk Assessment identifies the control measures employers have identified that they need to take to manage the risk of transmission of coronavirus in the workplace.

As these control measures are comprehensive and apply to all workers, additional control measures for Clinically Extremely Vulnerable (CEV) workers are not required.

However, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) advises employers to have individual discussions with their CEV employees in order to understand and resolve any workplace concerns. There is specific guidance on the HSE website to help employers protect people who are at higher risk: https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/working-safely/protect-people.htm Anyone who does not feel that adequate protections are in place can contact HSE either online using their working safely enquiry form or by telephone: 0300 790 6787 lines are open Monday to Friday 8:30am to 5pm.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many complaints the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has received on workplaces not being covid-secure since August 2020; and how long it took HSE to respond to each of those complaints.

Between 1 August 2020 and 26 November 2020 HSE received a total of 7487 COVID concerns. As of 26 November, 5139 had been completed. 3998 of those resolved were dealt with by our Concerns and Advice Team, taking on average 3.35 days. The remaining 1141 completed cases were investigated by regulatory inspectors and visiting officers, taking an average of 21.8 days to be closed out, meaning that all actions relating to the intervention had been completed. It is standard practice for the notifier to be contacted by HSE during the early stages of the investigation and again at its conclusion. HSE isn’t able to provide details of the average period of time before initial contact is made because this data is not collected.

Notes:

(i) Investigations by inspectors and visiting officers are ‘closed out’ once all actions relating to the intervention are complete. This happens when HSE has evaluated the dutyholder’s covid-secure control measures, taken any necessary enforcement action or provided advice, confirmed that sufficient action has been taken by the dutyholder to address any shortfalls and associated records completed on HSE’s live operational database.

(ii) Figures were extracted from HSE’s live operational database and provide the picture on the date of extraction (26 November 2020) and are subject to change.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of allocating additional funding to support to patients experiencing prolonged covid-19 symptoms.

The Government has been clear with its commitment to support those affected in these difficult times and we have made a number of changes to the welfare system to ensure people are receiving the support they need. These changes include:

  • making it easier to access benefits. Those applying for Contributory Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) who may have coronavirus, are self-isolating, or caring for a child (or qualifying young person) who falls into either of those categories, or individuals who have been advised to ’shield’ because they are at high risk of severe illness, will be entitled from day 1 of their claim – as opposed to day 8 - and we have removed the need for face-to-face assessments. Both Universal Credit (UC) and ESA can now be claimed online or by phone;
  • increasing the standard allowance of UC by up to £1,040 this year;
  • temporarily relaxing the application of the Minimum Income Floor for all self-employed claimants affected by COVID-19 to ensure that the self-employed can access UC at a more generous rate;
  • making Statutory Sick Pay available from day 1 – as opposed to day 4 - where an eligible individual is sick or self-isolating; and
  • increasing the Local Housing Allowance rates for UC and Housing Benefit claimants so that it covers the lowest 30% of local market rents – which is on average £600 in people’s pockets.

These steps form part of a wider package of measures which represent an investment of over £6.5 billion into the welfare system following the outbreak of COVID-19. These measures, along with the other job and business support programmes announced by the Chancellor, represent one of the most comprehensive packages of support by an advanced economy.

We know that circumstances can change rapidly, and that was particularly true at the beginning of the outbreak of COVID-19, which is why the Government will continue to keep the adequacy of its welfare response under review.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of an additional fuel payment to pensioners following Government advice for them to stay at home.

There are no plans to extend the winter fuel allowance scheme.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has, however, published a series of measures designed to help those affected by the coronavirus outbreak with the cost of their energy bills.

Further information on the measures is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-agrees-measures-with-energy-industry-to-support-vulnerable-people-through-covid-19

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans her Department has to improve the benefits claim process by (a) sharing assessment data between benefits and (b) making the criteria for claiming different benefits consistent.

DWP are developing a single, integrated service which will simplify the assessment process for millions of people claiming health related benefits. This includes, with individuals’ consent, better information sharing and re-using relevant information already held within DWP. Also by gathering better evidence earlier in the claim to enable a decision to be made without meeting face-to-face, will help reduce the number of face-to-face assessments.

The criteria, entitlement and purpose of Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) and Personal Independence Payment (PIP) are different as the benefits are paid for different reasons. ESA is an income replacement benefit for working age people, with entitlement based on an assessment of the functional impact of a claimant’s health condition or disability on their capability for work. PIP looks at the needs arising from a claimant’s health condition or disability and is intended to act as a contribution towards meeting extra costs associated with a long-term health condition or disability.

6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment, whether her Department plans to make exempt people with long-term health problems from assessments to include people assessed before 2017.

Since 29 September 2017, those placed in ESA’s Support Group and the UC equivalent who have the most severe and lifelong health conditions or disabilities, whose level of function would always mean that they would have Limited Capability for Work and Work-Related Activity, and be unlikely ever to be able to move into work, will no longer be routinely reassessed.

These criteria are applied at either the initial Work Capability Assessment or for existing claimants at their next assessment. We need to ensure that we have the right and most up to date information to apply the criteria fairly and make sure we identify everyone who should benefit from it. The people who best understand how their health problem or disability affects them are the individuals themselves, and so it is only right that we ask them for their information. However, we will do this in the least intrusive way possible – the vast majority of people who will fall into this category, will be assessed on paper and will not need to attend a face-to-face assessment.

24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances to facilitate product innovation and patient choice.

The Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances (ACBS) application process has a specified route for innovative products seeking listing in Part XV of the Drug Tariff. This route is for new formulations where there is robust evidence of advantages in terms of nutritional composition and tolerance and acceptability for patients. Products approved and recommended by the ACBS are listed in Part XV of the Drug Tariff. The ACBS list in the Drug Tariff offers some patient choice where the relevant products are available and meet the quality criteria.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will increase (a) its policy focus on and (b) the funding allocated to tackling malnutrition in Integrated Care Systems.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will produce guidance on how Integrated Care Partnerships can improve services for people at risk of malnutrition through improved partnerships, joint working, and improved planning of services.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to publicise the ongoing risk of covid-19 to immunocompromised groups to (a) patients with those conditions and (b) the wider public.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the report entitled Diagnostics: Recovery and Renewal: Report of the Independent Review of Diagnostic Services for NHS England, published on 27 November 2020, what progress his Department has made in moving the urological outpatient workload to community diagnostic hubs.

The Department has provided £325m to support the National Health Service to roll out 40 Community Diagnostic Centres (CDCs) across England this year. The centres will start providing services over the next 6 months, with the aim to be fully operational by March 2022. Some centres have already been set up as Early Adopters, providing services to their local community. A further £2.3bn to support the roll out of a further 60 CDCs by 2024/2025 was announced at the 2021 Spending Review.

CDCs will offer some urology diagnostics, including urine testing and urodynamics, but the level of urology services provided will be decided locally based on population need. This will determine how much of the outpatient urology workload can move into CDCs.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, (a) what role the Office for Health Promotion will have in dementia risk reduction and (b) which Directorate will be responsible for delivery of that initiative.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities (OHID) is a key stakeholder in the development of the new dementia strategy, which will include a focus on prevention and risk reduction. The OHID’s Early Years, Children and Families Directorate is co-ordinating and delivering work relating to dementia risk reduction. This includes producing the Productive Healthy Ageing profile, which contains data for local areas on the risk factors for dementia and working with voluntary sector partners to raise awareness of dementia risk reduction messages. The OHID’s Prevention Services Directorate has responsibility for national oversight of the NHS Health Check programme, which aims to prevent some forms of dementia.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Lancet Commission on Dementia prevention, intervention, and care: 2020 report on the modifiable risk factors responsible for dementia, published on 20 July 2017, what steps his Department is taking to ensure there is joint action across Directorates on dementia prevention policy.

We will be setting out our future plans on dementia prevention policy for England in due course. The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities (OHID) is contributing to the development of the new strategy including a focus on prevention and risk reduction, such as the modifiable risk factors. Officials have engaged with a range of stakeholders on the new strategy, including members of the Dementia Programme Board and other Government departments.

The Healthy Ageing team within the OHID’s Early Years, Children and Families Directorate is co-ordinating and delivering work relating to dementia risk reduction. This is in collaboration with other directorates within the OHID, other Government departments, national and local stakeholders, voluntary sector organisations and academics.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that private health corporations and their subsidiaries do not move personal health data outside of the UK.

All organisations providing services to patients in the United Kingdom, whether in the National Health Service or privately, must abide by UK data protection legislation - the Data Protection Act 2018, the UK General Data Protection Regulation and the common law duty of confidentiality. These place strict conditions on how identifiable patient data can be used and shared.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support clinically extremely vulnerable people will receive in the event that covid-19 restrictions are reintroduced.

The shielding programme in England has now ended. Those who were previously considered clinically extremely vulnerable will not be advised to shield in the future or asked to follow specific national guidance. They are advised to follow the same general guidance as everyone else, in addition to any condition-specific advice that may have been provided by their specialist. The NHS Volunteer Responders programme and a range of other support services continue to be available and information on these has been provided to those previously considered to be clinically extremely vulnerable.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of Novavax trial volunteers who remain unable to access a covid-19 pass.

All clinical trial participants should now be able to access their NHS COVID Pass via the NHS app or NHS.uk for domestic use in England. The majority of Novavax trial participants in England can now also access their NHS COVID Pass for travel.

Access is subject to data being received from clinical trial sites and participants should confirm that their data has been transferred if they cannot yet access their NHS COVID Pass for domestic or travel purposes.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the King's Fund report Tackling obesity: the role of the NHS in a whole-system approach, published on 4 July 2021, what (a) assessment his Department has made of the implications for his policy of the findings of that report on the comparative rates of hospital admission due to obesity in the most and least deprived areas; and (b) steps he is taking to tackle the discrepancy of hospital admissions due to obesity between the most and least deprived areas.

‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ sets out a range of measures to reduce the prevalence of obesity, improve diets and promote healthier lifestyle behaviours, including addressing inactivity and preventing ill-health.

To target areas with higher levels of deprivation and obesity prevalence, we have introduced a £30.5 million grant for local authorities in England to commission adult behavioural weight management services in 2021/22, with funding allocated based on population size, obesity prevalence and deprivation. An additional £4.3 million has also been allocated based on need to 11 local authorities to support the expansion of child weight management services in 2021/22.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) the budget was for Public Health England in (i) 2017, (ii) 2018 and (ii) 2019; and (b) assessment his Department has made of the effect of those budgets on the funding of women's health services not including maternity services; and if he will make a statement.

The following table shows the operating budget for Public Health England in the financial years requested.

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

£292 million

£287 million

£287 million

Source: Public Health England Annual Report and Accounts.

The Department has made no assessment of the effects of these budgets on the funding of women’s health services.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department plans to take steps to grant GPs formal approval to administer the third dose of the covid-19 vaccine to severely immunosuppressed people.

If a person is eligible, they will usually be vaccinated at their hospital or a local service such as their general practitioner surgery. As such, practices offering COVID-19 vaccines are already capable of administering third doses of a COVID-19 vaccine to severely immunosuppressed people.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to invest in alternative covid-19 treatments for immunocompromised people.

Immunocompromised individuals are a priority cohort for research into therapeutic and prophylaxis treatments such as monoclonal antibody therapies, novel antivirals, and repurposed compounds. In August, Ronapreve, a novel monoclonal antibody, was approved by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Ronapreve is being administered through the National Health Service to treat the most vulnerable, including immunocompromised patients.

The Antivirals Taskforce has secured two antiviral treatments. Molnupiravir has already received approval by the MHRA and will be deployed this winter to protect those at high-risk from COVID-19. The second antiviral will be deployed should it receive approval. The Taskforce is working with partners across the United Kingdom to ensure antivirals are deployed to protect the clinically vulnerable. The Therapeutics Taskforce and Antivirals Taskforce continue to monitor treatments of interest to identify any further promising compounds and ensure that UK patients can access them if they are safe and effective against COVID-19.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether (a) his Department plans to introduce a cross-government approach to dementia risk reduction and (b) dementia risk reduction will be covered by the new cross-government ministerial board on prevention.

We will set out our future plans on dementia for England in due course. Officials have engaged with a range of stakeholders, including members of the Dementia Programme Board and other Government departments. The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities is contributing to the development of the strategy which will include a focus on prevention and risk reduction.

The new Health Promotion Taskforce has been established to support prevention and improve the nation’s health. The Taskforce will focus on where the evidence shows there is the greatest impact on health and where the biggest opportunities lie for cross-Government action.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the impact of the Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access on improving patient access to new medicines; and if he will make a statement on the relevance to patients of changing the discount rate used by NICE from 3.5 per cent to 1.5 per cent.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and is currently reviewing the methods and processes it uses in its health technology assessments, including considering changes to the discount rate applied to costs and benefits.

NICE has recently consulted publicly on a set of proposals for changes to its methods and processes and is considering the comments received. NICE’s consultation stated that there is an evidence-based case for changing the discount rate to 1.5%. However, it acknowledged the wider policy and fiscal implications and proposed to maintain the existing rate while further data is collected on the likely effects of a change. NICE also proposed to maintain a non-reference case discount rate of 1.5% for use in exceptional circumstances.

The Department supports NICE’s proposal, which is in line with the expectations for the review as set out in the Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access (VPAS) agreed with industry. The VPAS has driven significant improvements in patient access to clinically and cost-effective medicines, whilst ensuring sustainable and predictable spend growth for the National Health Service and industry. Aided by the new commercial flexibilities provided by VPAS and the NHS Commercial Framework, NICE now recommends the vast majority of new medicines it appraises, with 100% recommended in 2020/21.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the NICE methods and process review, what steps he is taking to tackle the policy and system barriers NICE has identified as preventing the implementation of the discount rate.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and is currently reviewing the methods and processes it uses in its health technology assessments, including considering changes to the discount rate applied to costs and benefits.

NICE has recently consulted publicly on a set of proposals for changes to its methods and processes and is considering the comments received. NICE’s consultation stated that there is an evidence-based case for changing the discount rate to 1.5%. However, it acknowledged the wider policy and fiscal implications and proposed to maintain the existing rate while further data is collected on the likely effects of a change. NICE also proposed to maintain a non-reference case discount rate of 1.5% for use in exceptional circumstances.

The Department supports NICE’s proposal, which is in line with the expectations for the review as set out in the Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access (VPAS) agreed with industry. The VPAS has driven significant improvements in patient access to clinically and cost-effective medicines, whilst ensuring sustainable and predictable spend growth for the National Health Service and industry. Aided by the new commercial flexibilities provided by VPAS and the NHS Commercial Framework, NICE now recommends the vast majority of new medicines it appraises, with 100% recommended in 2020/21.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to make an assessment of the potential merits of changing the NICE discount rate to align with the latest evidence base and guidance in the Treasury Green book.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and is currently reviewing the methods and processes it uses in its health technology assessments, including considering changes to the discount rate applied to costs and benefits.

NICE has recently consulted publicly on a set of proposals for changes to its methods and processes and is considering the comments received. NICE’s consultation stated that there is an evidence-based case for changing the discount rate to 1.5%. However, it acknowledged the wider policy and fiscal implications and proposed to maintain the existing rate while further data is collected on the likely effects of a change. NICE also proposed to maintain a non-reference case discount rate of 1.5% for use in exceptional circumstances.

The Department supports NICE’s proposal, which is in line with the expectations for the review as set out in the Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access (VPAS) agreed with industry. The VPAS has driven significant improvements in patient access to clinically and cost-effective medicines, whilst ensuring sustainable and predictable spend growth for the National Health Service and industry. Aided by the new commercial flexibilities provided by VPAS and the NHS Commercial Framework, NICE now recommends the vast majority of new medicines it appraises, with 100% recommended in 2020/21.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 19 July 2021 to Question 7914 on Kidney Cancer, what steps he is taking to involve the urology clinical nurse specialist workforce in the development of the common and consistent competencies for clinical nurse specialists.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 18 October 2021 to Question PQ53330.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, following publication of Diagnostics: Recovery and Renewal: Report by the Independent Review of Diagnostic Services for NHS England, what progress has been made on moving the urological outpatient workload to community diagnostic hubs.

The National Health Service is planning to establish 40 community diagnostic centres (CDCs) across England this year. Centres will begin to provide services over the next six months, with all being fully operational by March 2022.

Regions are working with local trusts and systems, diagnostic networks and primary care services to determine the location and configuration of services, based on the needs of the local population. These services will take on appropriate urological outpatient workload, including urine testing, with some CDCs potentially offering additional services, such as urodynamics.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish an update on the rollout of a third primary dose of covid-19 vaccination for people with severe immunosuppression.

Vaccination of individuals with severe immunosuppression with a third primary dose commenced on 13 September 2021. Approximately 400,000 people have been identified as eligible for a third primary dose and NHS England is contacting these individuals by text and letter so they can discuss their vaccination options with their clinician.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 19 July 2021 to Question 7914 on Kidney Cancer, what steps he is taking to involve the urology clinical nurse specialist workforce in the development of the common and consistent competencies for clinical nurse specialists.

A standard competency framework for clinical nurse specialists in the field of kidney cancer is currently under development and being piloted in the National Health Service in the North West of England. The framework is being developed with input from a range of stakeholders including cancer nurse specialists. The findings will further inform the development of the national competency framework which is due to be launched across the NHS in England in 2022/23.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 19 July 2021 to Question 7914 on Kidney Cancer, when he plans to publish the common and consistent competencies for clinical nurse specialists.

A standard competency framework for clinical nurse specialists in the field of kidney cancer is currently under development and being piloted in the National Health Service in the North West of England. The framework is being developed with input from a range of stakeholders including cancer nurse specialists. The findings will further inform the development of the national competency framework which is due to be launched across the NHS in England in 2022/23.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, in the context of the shielding programme having ended, what support his Department plans to provide clinically extremely vulnerable people in the event that some covid-19 public health restrictions are required to be reintroduced.

Based on the success of the vaccine programme and new treatments becoming available, we do not anticipate shielding being required in the future. We are advising those previously considered as clinically extremely vulnerable consider their own risk, supported by their National Health Service clinician where necessary.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 7 June 2021 to Question 7915 on Kidney Cancer, what guidance his Department plans to provide to community diagnostics hubs to help ensure that they have adequate equipment to be able to diagnose kidney cancer within an appropriate timeframe.

Community diagnostic hubs (CDHs) will be equipped with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scanners and biopsy facilities, which are used for the detection of kidney cancer. Full guidance on the diagnostic testing required within CDHs will be published in due course.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2021 to Question 12276 on Cancer: Mental Health Services, what assessment his Department has made of the extent to which patients’ psychosocial support needs are being addressed twice in their first year after diagnosis, as is required by the 2021-22 Quality and Outcomes Framework cancer requirements since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

No data is yet available on the proportion of practices meeting Quality and Outcomes Framework requirements in 2021/22.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have established a task and finish group to review psychosocial support for people affected by cancer. The NHS Long Term Plan states that where appropriate every person diagnosed with cancer should receive a Personalised Care and Support Plan based on holistic needs assessment, end of treatment summaries and health and wellbeing information and support, including for mental health needs.

Those with long term conditions, such as cancer, have been identified as priority patients for accessing Improving Access to Psychological Therapies services, which are being integrated with physical health services, to better align psychological therapies within primary and secondary care pathways.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish an impact assessment for the Health and Care Bill.

The Health and Care Bill impact assessments have been reviewed by the Regulatory Policy Committee and will be published imminently.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to help ensure that Hepatitis C elimination is prioritised as part of integrated care systems' plans from April 2022 in support of the national Hepatitis C elimination programme.

The hepatitis C elimination programme is currently managed by a specialist team at NHS England and NHS Improvement. Policy, interventions, and funding are developed and delivered through 22 nationally commissioned local clinical teams or Operational Delivery Networks. The national team work collaboratively with both regional teams and local systems to ensure the delivery and oversight of diagnostic and treatment pathways at a local level. As integrated care systems become operational, subject to the passage of legislation, the programme will work with them to ensure that all opportunities to identify and support patients are realised.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much Government funding has been provided to ME research in each of the last three years.

The following table shows the funding for research into myalgic encephalomyelitis through the National Institute for Health Research and UK Research and Innovation in the last three years.

Financial Year

£

2018-19

£862,212

2019-20

£691,516

2020-21

£907,848

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how the Government plans to work with relevant stakeholders towards achieving Hepatitis C elimination following the abolition of Public Health England.

The national hepatitis C elimination team at NHS England continues to work with a full range of partners to eliminate hepatitis C in England by the World Health Organization’s target of 2030. The new UK Health Security Agency and Office for Health Promotion. Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service, clinicians, pharmaceutical industry partners, other Government Departments, the third sector and those with lived experience are participating in this programme.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to eliminate Hepatitis C in by 2025 in line with the elimination goals of the World Health Organisation.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have announced a programme to eliminate hepatitis C in England by 2025 and meet the World Health Organization’s target of 2030.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the cost to the NHS of malnutrition in the last five years; and what steps his Department is taking to tackle those costs.

The Department has not made a specific estimate.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the outcomes of the Innovative Medicines Fund and NICE Methods Review will align due to the fact that the timescale for the consultation processes will complete at a similar time.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and NHS England and NHS Improvement are developing proposals for the Innovative Medicines Fund. NHS England and NHS Improvement announced the size of the fund on 21 July and an engagement exercise with stakeholders on detailed proposals is expected in the coming weeks.

NICE also expects to consult on proposed changes to its programme manual in the summer as part of its ongoing methods and process review. NICE, NHS England and NHS Improvement will ensure that the outcomes of these processes support early patient access to the most promising new treatments.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will revise the cancer ambitions in NHS England’s Long Term Plan to account for the cancer backlog and increasing cancer prevalence as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 7 July to Question 25916.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Taskforce on Innovation, Growth and Regulatory Reform independent report, published May 2021, what assessment he has made of how the (a) work of the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances and (b) the Medical Nutrition Industry were taken into account in that report.

We have not made such an assessment.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that the (a) schedules of meetings, (b) meeting agendas and (c) meeting minutes of the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances are published on time.

The dates of Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances (ACBS) meetings are published on time on the Government website. The agendas of ACBS meetings are themselves not published and we are not taking steps to publish them.

However, agendas are included in the minutes of each meeting, and the minutes of ACBS meetings are published on time at the following link:

https://m.box.com/shared_item/https%3A%2F%2Fapp.box.com%2Fs%2Fk8a2gxf6b8emexz6neekq134yx9vi35y

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will ensure that the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances has adequate (a) structures and (b) processes to support innovation and growth in the specialist medical nutrition industry in the UK.

The Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances (ACBS) and the Department are working with the British Specialist Nutrition Association, the trade body for the medical nutrition industry and its members to update the ACBS’ processes, its application form, and guidance.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will set a target for improving access to cancer medicines to support NHS England’s Long Term Plan ambition of improving cancer survival by 2028.

There are no plans to introduce a specific target for improving access to cancer medicines. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is responsible for making evidence-based recommendations on whether new medicines represent an effective use of National Health Service resources. NICE is also able to recommend cancer medicines for use through the Cancer Drugs Fund which has helped over 64,000 patients to benefit from the most promising cancer medicines where there is uncertainty about their effectiveness. NICE now appraises all new medicines and significant licence extensions and it has recommended 92% of cancer medicines it appraised in 2020-21.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to increase the number of patients recruited to clinical trials in the NHS.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 29 June to Question 22008.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the progress of the five National Patient Recruitment Centres against their objectives in their first year of operation.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 15 July Question 25117.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to consult on the use of powers to improve the regulatory environment for clinical trials granted by the Medicines and Medical Devices Act 2021.

The Medicines and Medical Devices Act 2021 provides targeted delegated powers which enable us to update the regulatory regime for clinical trials. Work is ongoing to develop legislative proposals to design a regulatory environment for clinical trials which will support the development of innovative medicines. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency intend to consult on proposals later this year.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to make a statement to the House following the publication of the NICE Methods Review programme manual; and if he will include in the statement his assessment on whether the outcome of the Review can support access to personalised cancer treatments.

There are no current plans to do so. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and is responsible for its own methods and processes. NICE currently expects to consult stakeholders on proposed changes to its methods and processes in the summer.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of the regulatory systems for (a) hand sanitiser and (b) disinfectant products in (i) Australia and (ii) the US; whether his Department plans to implement similar regimes; and what steps his Department is taking to protect consumers from (A) misleading and (B) inaccurate statements on the efficacy of those products.

We have made no such assessment.

Hand sanitisers and surface disinfectants are biocidal products. They are regulated by the Health and Safety Executive under the Biocidal Products Regulation (BPR). The BPR establishes a process for the in-depth assessment of both the safety and efficacy of biocidal products, which mirrors the system used across the European Union. Some products for use as antibacterial or antiviral products for use on people’s hands may instead be regulated under the cosmetics or medicines legislation, depending on the products’ intended use, function, composition or how they are described. The Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 also apply across all sectors and prohibit misleading and deceptive commercial practices by traders who sell goods, including hand sanitisers and disinfectant, to consumers.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when Public Health England’s investigation into menthol cigarettes will conclude; whether the testing of those products has commenced; and if he will make a statement.

Public Health England’s testing of tobacco products, as part of the Department’s investigation of possible breaches of the prohibition of menthol cigarettes, is ongoing. We expect this work to be completed by the end of the year.

We expect the tobacco industry to comply with the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations in regard to the menthol cigarette ban that was introduced in May 2020. HM Revenue and Customs is able to apply a number of sanctions against retailers found selling illicit menthol tobacco.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the proposed Innovative Medicines Fund on personalised cancer treatments.

NHS England and NHS Improvement and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence are currently developing proposals for the Innovative Medicines Fund (IMF) and expect to lead a public engagement exercise later this year. The IMF will build on and extend the successful Cancer Drugs Fund which has provided access to the most promising cancer medicines to over 64,000 National Health Service patients. The IMF will continue to support patient access to personalised cancer medicines where appropriate.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to prevent menthol cigarettes from being sold unlawfully.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will commit to a target for improving access to cancer medicines to support the ambition in the NHS Long Term Plan of improving cancer survival by 2028.

There are no plans to introduce a specific target for improving access to cancer medicines. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is responsible for making evidence-based recommendations on whether new medicines represent an effective use of National Health Service resources. NICE is also now able to recommend cancer medicines for use through the Cancer Drugs Fund which has helped over 64,000 patients to benefit from the most promising cancer medicines where there is uncertainty about their effectiveness. NICE now appraises all new medicines and significant licence extensions and it has recommended 92% of cancer medicines it appraised in 2020-21.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to help ensure that the outcomes of the (a) Innovative Medicines Fund and (b) NICE Methods Review will align as their consultation processes are due to complete at similar times.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and NHS England and NHS Improvement are working together to develop proposals for the Innovative Medicines Fund (IMF). A public engagement exercise on the IMF is expected later this year and a detailed timescale for this will be confirmed in due course.

NICE also expects to consult on proposed changes to its programme manual in the summer as part of its ongoing methods and process review. NICE and NHS England and NHS Improvement will ensure the resulting approach to managed access, as part of a NICE appraisal, supports early patient access to the most promising new treatments.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of whether the outcomes of the NICE Methods Review support access to personalised cancer treatments; and if he will make a statement.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) now appraises all new cancer medicines and significant licence extensions and aims to publish draft guidance on new cancer drugs around the time of licensing wherever possible.

NICE’s review of its methods and processes is ongoing. The purpose of the review is to ensure that NICE’s methods and processes remain cutting edge and support the ambition of the National Health Service to provide high quality care that offers good value to patients and to the NHS. NICE expects to consult on the draft programme manual in the summer, with implementation of the changes from early 2022.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the impact of the proposed Innovative Medicines Fund on personalised cancer treatments.

The Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) has provided access to over 64,000 National Health Service patients to the most promising cancer medicines. The Innovative Medicines Fund (IMF) will build on and extend the successful CDF. NHS England and NHS Improvement and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence expect to carry out an engagement exercise on detailed proposals for the IMF later this year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will commit to reviewing the cancer ambitions in the NHS Long Term Plan in the context of the backlog of cancer treatment, increasing cancer prevalence and impact of the covid-19 outbreak on cancer patients.

The Department’s cancer strategy is incorporated as part of the NHS Long Term Plan and the National Health Service remains committed to delivering on the Plan.

In March 2021, NHS England and NHS Improvement published the 2021/22 Priorities and Operational Planning Guidance. This sets out the priorities for the NHS, including the backlog of cancer treatment, increasing early diagnosis of and the impact of the outbreak on cancer patients.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the progress of the five National Patient Recruitment Centres against their objectives in their first year of operation.

The five national Patient Recruitment Centres (PRCs) were launched by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) in May 2020 following an open competitive process. The progress of each PRC is monitored through defined contractual management arrangements in place through the NIHR. The PRCs are currently submitting their annual reports which will include their activities, performance and progress against their objectives in the last year.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to expand the number of National Patient Recruitment Centres.

No decisions on expanding the number of Patient Recruitment Centres has yet been made.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Life Sciences Sector Deal 2, what recent progress the Government has made on strengthening the UK environment for clinical trials.

We have established five national Patient Recruitment Centres dedicated to the delivery of late-phase commercial research and launched the Innovative Licensing and Access Pathway to support all stages of trial design development and approval, enhanced capability to deliver innovative trials and improved approvals and set-up times for studies.

In March 2021, the Government published ‘The Future of UK Clinical Research Delivery’, setting out a vision to build a patient-centred, pro-innovation and digitally-enabled clinical research environment. This was followed by an implementation plan for 2021/2022.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how he plans to monitor the performance of National Patient Recruitment Centres across the NHS.

Progress of each Patient Recruitment Centre (PRC) is monitored through defined contractual management arrangements through the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR). The NIHR reviews progress against defined metrics on performance, which are specified and monitored by the PRC Programme Office. PRCs also provide regular operational reports to the Programme Office as well as producing an annual report and a formal contract review.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government plans to take to ensure that the regulation of clinical trials is not weakened as the UK leaves the European Medicines Agency system.

The Medicines and Medical Devices Act 2021 provides targeted delegated powers which enable the regulatory regime for clinical trials to be updated. Using these powers we can design and strengthen a regulatory environment for clinical trials that will support the development of innovative medicines and e ensure that the regulation of trials is not weakened following the exit from the European Union.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to increase wholegrain consumption in England.

There is no agreed definition for the term wholegrain. ‘Wholegrain’ is generally used to describe products which contain a higher fibre content. The Government’s dietary advice, as depicted by the Eatwell Guide, is that we should choose wholegrain or higher fibre versions of starchy carbohydrates wherever possible.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to increase the number of patients recruited to clinical trials in the NHS.

On 23 March 2021 the Government published its vision for the future of clinical research delivery in the United Kingdom. This aims to create a research system where all patients have the opportunity to take part. An implementation plan and strategy setting out how we will begin to deliver the vision in 2021/22 was published on 23 June.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what responsibility Integrated Care Systems will have for (a) maternity and (b) other women's health services; and if he will make a statement.

Clinical commissioning group (CCG) functions and duties will transfer to integrated care boards when they are established, along with all CCG assets and liabilities, commissioning responsibilities and contracts. This includes functions, duties and responsibilities associated with maternity and other women’s health services.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the announcement in March 2021 of £70 million to support the expansion of weight management services, what proportion of that funding will be allocated to the expansion of specialist multidisciplinary weight management services (Tier 3) for children.

The NHS Long Term Plan and ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ support the drive to reduce obesity, including investment in specialist services for children and adults and plans are in development for this expansion. Of the £70 million announced in March 2021 to support the expansion of weight management services, £4 million has been allocated to tier 3 and 4 adult specialist weight management services in 2021/22. NHS England is working with regional teams and integrated care systems to develop a recovery plan for specialist weight management services and bariatric surgeries as required by the Mandate. The NHS Long Term Plan has allocated funding for the expansion of children specialist weight management services.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the NHS Digital Weight Management Programme will be available for all patients who require additional support.

The Digital Weight Management Programme is now available for adults with a diagnosis of diabetes and/or hypertension with a Body Mass Index of more than 30.

It is designed to complement and expand the existing range of weight management services already commissioned through both the National Health Service and local authorities. A digital approach will not be preferable or appropriate for all patients seeking support to lose weight.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the announcement in March 2021 of £70 million to support the expansion of weight management services, when further information will be provided on the proportion of funding to be allocate to NHS specialist multidisciplinary weight management services (Tier 3) for (a) adults and (b) children.

The NHS Long Term Plan and ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ support the drive to reduce obesity, including investment in specialist services for children and adults and plans are in development for this expansion. Of the £70 million announced in March 2021 to support the expansion of weight management services, £4 million has been allocated to tier 3 and 4 adult specialist weight management services in 2021/22. NHS England is working with regional teams and integrated care systems to develop a recovery plan for specialist weight management services and bariatric surgeries as required by the Mandate. The NHS Long Term Plan has allocated funding for the expansion of children specialist weight management services.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which third parties his Department worked with to develop the NHS Digital Weight Management Programme.

NHS England have developed the NHS Digital Weight Management Programme with senior expert and clinical input including the NHS England and NHS Improvement National Clinical Director for Diabetes and Obesity, academic research organisations, primary care practitioners and National Health Service partner organisations including Public Health England and the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the delays caused by the covid-19 outbreak to NICE appraisals for medicines for clinically extremely vulnerable (CEV) groups, particularly those medicines which have the potential to better control a patient’s condition and remove them from CEV classification.

The 2019 Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access commits the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to publishing draft recommendations on all newly licensed treatments around the time of licensing, with final guidance within 90 days of marketing authorisation wherever possible. NICE may not always be able to meet this timescale for individual topics for a range of reasons, including where companies request a longer appraisal timescale.

During the first wave of COVID-19, NICE prioritised its work programme and only published guidance between March to June 2020 that was either therapeutically critical or related to addressing diagnostic or therapeutic interventions for COVID-19. Topics related to treatments for patients who were considered highly vulnerable were classed as therapeutically critical and were prioritised. Since June 2020, NICE has aimed to publish guidance in line with its standard timescales. Of the topics delayed during March to June 2020, all have been restarted where possible.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his Department is doing to ensure that medicines which have the potential to make patients less vulnerable to covid-19 by removing them from NHS Digital’s high risk shielded patient list identification, including biologics for severe asthma, are appraised by NICE in a timely manner.

The 2019 Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access commits the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to publishing draft recommendations on all newly licensed treatments around the time of licensing, with final guidance within 90 days of marketing authorisation wherever possible. NICE may not always be able to meet this timescale for individual topics for a range of reasons, including where companies request a longer appraisal timescale.

During the first wave of COVID-19, NICE prioritised its work programme and only published guidance between March to June 2020 that was either therapeutically critical or related to addressing diagnostic or therapeutic interventions for COVID-19. Topics related to treatments for patients who were considered highly vulnerable were classed as therapeutically critical and were prioritised. Since June 2020, NICE has aimed to publish guidance in line with its standard timescales. Of the topics delayed during March to June 2020, all have been restarted where possible.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether hand hygiene, surface cleaning and disinfection will remain in public to help manager the risk of transmissible viruses and illness.

Public Health England are currently reviewing the evidence base on surface transmission of COVID-19 in non-healthcare settings to develop general principles for cleaning and hand hygiene which can be applied to future guidance and the provision of advice.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the recommendations of All.Can UK's report of December 2020 entitled, Placing the psychological wellbeing of people with cancer on equal footing to physical health, if his Department will take steps to (a) raise awareness within the oncology workforce of the psycho-social support services that the third sector offers for cancer patients and (b) ensure that patients are signposted to those services.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have established a task and finish group to look at psychosocial support for people affected by cancer. Part of this work will involve examining signposting to psychosocial support from any provider including the third sector.

The revised Cancer Care Review requirements for general practitioner practices mean patients’ psychosocial support needs will be addressed twice in their first year after diagnosis. Patients should be signposted via Primary Care Network link workers to non-cancer specific support such as local authority health and wellbeing activities.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of expanding the NHS Mental Health Dashboard to include data on cancer and mental health.

We have no plans to do so.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to (a) protect and (b) improve the wellbeing of staff working in oncology departments during the covid-19 outbreak.

From the outset of the pandemic we have put together a comprehensive psychological and emotional support package that remains in place for all National Health Service staff, including oncology professionals. This includes a dedicated support line available for staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week, specialist bereavement support and free access to mental health and wellbeing apps.  This support has been accessed by over 900,000 staff and many more have also accessed offers locally.

We are in the process of setting up 40 dedicated mental health and wellbeing hubs across the country, of which 35 have now been established and are providing proactive outreach and assessment services, ensuring staff receive rapid access to evidence-based mental health services. In addition to £15 million spent on establishing the hubs in 2020/21, we have invested a further £37 million to ensure this offer continues to improve staff mental health throughout 2021/22. These hubs will focus on staff with more complex needs and will proactively identify at-risk groups.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the impact of obesity on (a) people's health and wellbeing and (b) the NHS.

We published ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ in July 2020. The strategy demonstrates an overarching campaign to reduce obesity, takes forward actions from previous chapters of the childhood obesity plan and sets out measures to get the nation fit and healthy, protect against COVID-19 and protect the National Health Service.

Actions include restricting the advertising of high fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) products being shown on TV and online, restricting promotions of HFSS products by location and price, calorie labelling in restaurants, expanding weight management services and making conversations about weight in primary care the norm.

In July 2020, Public Health England launched the Better Health Campaign which promotes evidence-based tools and advice to help people look after their mental and physical health. The campaign shows adults the simple steps they can take to eat more healthily, increase their physical activity, care for their mental wellbeing and quit smoking. Change4Life and Start4Life programmes support families to eat well and move more with resources to motivate and encourage behaviour change including simple healthy eating messages, recipes and more.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department plans to provide to the proposed new Integrated Care Systems to increase access to tier 3 weight management services.

The proposed Health and Care Bill will establish statutory integrated care systems (ICS), made up of an integrated care board and integrated care partnership, together referred to as the ICS. The integrated care board will take on the commissioning functions of the clinical commissioning group, including those that relate to tier 3 weight management services.

The NHS Long Term Plan and the ‘Tackling Obesity’ strategy have a number of different actions to support the drive to reduce obesity, including investment in tier 3 services for children and adults and plans are in development for this expansion.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the extent to which there are regional variations in access to mental health support for patients with cancer.

The NHS Long Term Plan states that, by 2021, where appropriate every person diagnosed with cancer should receive a Personalised Care and Support Plan based on holistic needs assessment, end of treatment summaries and health and wellbeing information and support, including for mental health needs. All patients will have access to the right expertise and support.

Adults experiencing cancer can also access Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) mental health services, which provide evidence based psychological therapies for people with anxiety disorders and depression, implementing the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines. The implementation of IAPT long term condition pathways has been identified as a priority to support integration of mental health and physical health services for people with co-morbid long term conditions, such as cancer. No assessment has been made of regional variations in access to mental health support for patients with cancer. However, the extent and nature of IAPT outreach work will be determined at a local level.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the findings of the April 2018 study by the Mental Health Foundation that one in three people with cancer will experience a mental health problem such as depression or anxiety before, during or after treatment, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the mental health needs of people diagnosed with cancer are assessed in a timely manner.

The NHS Long Term Plan states that, by 2021, where appropriate every person diagnosed with cancer should receive a Personalised Care and Support Plan based on holistic needs assessment, end of treatment summaries and health and wellbeing information and support, including for mental health needs. All patients will have access to the right expertise and support.

Adults experiencing cancer can also access Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) mental health services, which provide evidence based psychological therapies for people with anxiety disorders and depression, implementing the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines. The implementation of IAPT long term condition pathways has been identified as a priority to support integration of mental health and physical health services for people with co-morbid long term conditions, such as cancer. No assessment has been made of regional variations in access to mental health support for patients with cancer. However, the extent and nature of IAPT outreach work will be determined at a local level.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has plans to launch a public health campaign on increasing fibre and whole grain consumption.

Public Health England (PHE) has no plans to launch any campaigns specifically on fibre.

However, PHE’s Better Health, Change4Life and Start4Life campaigns encourage fibre consumption through advice to eat at least five portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables each day and to choose wholegrain foods where possible. This information is available on the NHS weight loss plan app and the Better Health Website, and can be found at the following link: https://www.nhs.uk/better-health/

It is also available on the Change4Life website at the following link: https://www.nhs.uk/change4life, and the Start4Life website at the following link: https://www.nhs.uk/start4life. These websites which provide healthy recipes and ideas for swaps.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions his Department has had with the Danish Whole Grain Partnership on increasing whole grain intakes.

Public Health England has had no discussions with the Danish Whole Grain Partnership on increasing whole grain intake.

There is no agreed definition for the term wholegrain. Therefore, Government dietary guidelines do not give specific advice for wholegrain intake.

Government dietary advice, as depicted by the Eatwell Guide, is that people should choose whole grain or higher fibre versions of starchy carbohydrates wherever possible. The Eatwell guide can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-eatwell-guide

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the average daily consumption of wholegrains in (a) adults, (b) teenagers and (c) children.

Public Health England has not made an assessment of average daily consumption of wholegrains. There is no agreed definition for the term wholegrain and no specific recommendation for wholegrain consumption in the United Kingdom.

Government dietary advice, as depicted by the Eatwell Guide, is that people should choose whole grain or higher fibre versions of starchy carbohydrates wherever possible.

Fibre intake is assessed by the National Diet and Nutrition Survey. Latest data for the period 2016/17 to 2018/19 shows that mean fibre intakes were below recommendations in all age groups. Nine percent of adults, four percent of children aged 11 to 18 years and 14% of children aged 4 to 10 years met the recommendation for fibre intake.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the benefits for health of wholegrain consumption.

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition’s (SACN’s) Carbohydrates and Health report (2015) included an assessment of the relationship between dietary fibre and whole grains intake and cardio-metabolic, colorectal and oral health outcomes.

SACN found that there was strong evidence from prospective cohort studies that increased intakes of total dietary fibre, and particularly cereal fibre and wholegrain, are associated with a lower risk of cardio-metabolic disease and colorectal cancer.

Based on SACN’s findings government recommends that adults consume 30 grams of dietary fibre each day and that this should be achieved through a variety of food sources.

The SACN Carbohydrates and Health report is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/445503/SACN_Carbohydrates_and_Health.pdf

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has plans to introduce a quantitative recommendation for the daily intake of whole grains.

Public Health England has no plans to recommend government introduces a quantitative recommendation for the daily intake of wholegrains.

This is because there is no agreed definition for the term ‘wholegrain’. Therefore, government dietary guidelines do not give specific quantitative advice for wholegrain intake.

There are however specific government recommendations for dietary fibre based on recommendations from the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition, as set out in its Carbohydrates and Health report, which can be found at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sacn-carbohydrates-and-health-report.

Fibre is found in a range of foods and is not exclusive to wholegrain foods. Government dietary advice, as depicted by the Eatwell Guide, is that we should choose wholegrain or higher fibre versions of starchy carbohydrates wherever possible.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has plans to mark International Whole Grain Day.

The Department has no current plans to mark International Whole Grain Day. However, we are aware of the evidence around the role that whole grains can play in contributing to healthier diets and the importance of more sustainable food systems. We are committed through “Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives” to empowering people to make healthier choices about the food they eat.

The Government is developing a Food Strategy White Paper, containing responses to recommendations from Henry Dimbleby’s independent review into the food system, which will set out our ambition and direction for food system transformation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many qualified non-medical practitioners are working as part of the NHS Prostate Cancer Workforce in England as at 26 May 2021; and how does that figure compare to the average number of those practitioners in 2019.

The Department does not hold the data requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what responsibilities Integrated Care Systems will have for the delivery of obesity services; and if he will make a statement.

Local authorities and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are currently responsible for commissioning weight management services. The proposed Health and Care Bill will establish statutory Integrated Care Systems (ICS), made up of an Integrated Care Board and Integrated Care Partnership (together referred to as the ICS). The Integrated Care Board will take on the commissioning functions of the CCGs, including those that relate to tier 3 and tier 4 weight management services.

ICSs will strengthen partnerships between the National Health Service and local authorities, and with local partners, including groups representing the public and patient perspective, the voluntary sector, and wider public service provision. This will enable more joined up planning and provision, both within the NHS and with local authorities, enhancing the weight management services people receive.

We have engaged with a wide range of stakeholders on the proposals contained in the Integration and Innovation White Paper. This has been invaluable in informing our policy development and we will continue with this engagement as we finalise the legislation. An impact assessment for the Health and Care Bill will be published in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of development of Integrated Care Systems on obesity services; and if he will make a statement.

Local authorities and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are currently responsible for commissioning weight management services. The proposed Health and Care Bill will establish statutory Integrated Care Systems (ICS), made up of an Integrated Care Board and Integrated Care Partnership (together referred to as the ICS). The Integrated Care Board will take on the commissioning functions of the CCGs, including those that relate to tier 3 and tier 4 weight management services.

ICSs will strengthen partnerships between the National Health Service and local authorities, and with local partners, including groups representing the public and patient perspective, the voluntary sector, and wider public service provision. This will enable more joined up planning and provision, both within the NHS and with local authorities, enhancing the weight management services people receive.

We have engaged with a wide range of stakeholders on the proposals contained in the Integration and Innovation White Paper. This has been invaluable in informing our policy development and we will continue with this engagement as we finalise the legislation. An impact assessment for the Health and Care Bill will be published in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what responsibilities Integrated Care Systems will have for the delivery of (a) Tier 3 weight management services and (b) Tier 4 weight management services; and if he will make a statement.

Local authorities and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are currently responsible for commissioning weight management services. The proposed Health and Care Bill will establish statutory Integrated Care Systems (ICS), made up of an Integrated Care Board and Integrated Care Partnership (together referred to as the ICS). The Integrated Care Board will take on the commissioning functions of the CCGs, including those that relate to tier 3 and tier 4 weight management services.

ICSs will strengthen partnerships between the National Health Service and local authorities, and with local partners, including groups representing the public and patient perspective, the voluntary sector, and wider public service provision. This will enable more joined up planning and provision, both within the NHS and with local authorities, enhancing the weight management services people receive.

We have engaged with a wide range of stakeholders on the proposals contained in the Integration and Innovation White Paper. This has been invaluable in informing our policy development and we will continue with this engagement as we finalise the legislation. An impact assessment for the Health and Care Bill will be published in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions his Department has had with relevant stakeholders on improving patient access to obesity services through the development of Integrated Care Systems; and if he will make a statement.

Local authorities and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are currently responsible for commissioning weight management services. The proposed Health and Care Bill will establish statutory Integrated Care Systems (ICS), made up of an Integrated Care Board and Integrated Care Partnership (together referred to as the ICS). The Integrated Care Board will take on the commissioning functions of the CCGs, including those that relate to tier 3 and tier 4 weight management services.

ICSs will strengthen partnerships between the National Health Service and local authorities, and with local partners, including groups representing the public and patient perspective, the voluntary sector, and wider public service provision. This will enable more joined up planning and provision, both within the NHS and with local authorities, enhancing the weight management services people receive.

We have engaged with a wide range of stakeholders on the proposals contained in the Integration and Innovation White Paper. This has been invaluable in informing our policy development and we will continue with this engagement as we finalise the legislation. An impact assessment for the Health and Care Bill will be published in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to help improve the (a) availability of and (b) access to innovative treatments for sickle cell disease.

On 9th January 2021, the Government published the United Kingdom Rare Diseases Framework, outlining four key priorities to improve the lives of those living with rare diseases such as sickle cell disease. Improving access to specialist care, treatment and drugs is listed as one of these priorities, alongside helping patients get a final diagnosis faster, increasing awareness of rare diseases among healthcare professionals, and better coordination of care. The Framework will be followed by nation-specific action plans, detailing how each nation of the UK will meet the shared priorities of the Framework.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment his Department has made of the (a) availability of and (b) access to innovative treatments for sickle cell disease in the NHS.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is currently developing guidance on the use of crizanlizumab for preventing sickle cell crises in sickle cell disease and expects to publish its final recommendation in September 2021. In addition, NICE’s appraisal of voxelotor for treating sickle cell disease is anticipated to begin in September 2021, with an expected publication date of August 2022.

The Government published the UK Rare Diseases Framework in January 2021, outlining four key priorities to improve the lives of those living with rare diseases, such as sickle cell disease. One of these priorities is improving access to specialist care, treatment and drugs. The Framework will be followed by nation-specific action plans, detailing how each nation of the United Kingdom will meet the shared priorities of the Framework.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to tackle health inequalities through NICE’s ongoing review of its methods and processes; and if he will make a statement.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and is currently reviewing its methods and processes for health technology assessment.

NICE consulted on the case for changes to its methods in late 2020 and proposed that there may be a case for introducing a modifier that addresses health inequalities.

NICE is now considering the responses it received to the consultation and the impacts of the proposals. It is too soon to comment on what changes might be implemented, however, NICE intends to consult on the proposed changes to its methods and processes in the summer.

Departmental officials are represented on the committees that NICE has set up as part of the review and have had a number of discussions with NICE and NHS England about the review, including about the introduction of a health inequalities modifier.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of the proposed introduction of a health inequalities modifier for patients with (a) sickle cell disease, (b) haemoglobinopathies and (c) conditions with high levels of clinical unmet need in NICE’s ongoing review of its methods and processes.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and is currently reviewing its methods and processes for health technology assessment.

NICE consulted on the case for changes to its methods in late 2020 and proposed that there may be a case for introducing a modifier that addresses health inequalities.

NICE is now considering the responses it received to the consultation and the impacts of the proposals. It is too soon to comment on what changes might be implemented, however, NICE intends to consult on the proposed changes to its methods and processes in the summer.

Departmental officials are represented on the committees that NICE has set up as part of the review and have had a number of discussions with NICE and NHS England about the review, including about the introduction of a health inequalities modifier.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions officials in his Department have had with representatives from (a) NICE and (b) NHS England on the proposed introduction of a health inequalities modifier as part of NICE’s ongoing review of its methods and processes.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and is currently reviewing its methods and processes for health technology assessment.

NICE consulted on the case for changes to its methods in late 2020 and proposed that there may be a case for introducing a modifier that addresses health inequalities.

NICE is now considering the responses it received to the consultation and the impacts of the proposals. It is too soon to comment on what changes might be implemented, however, NICE intends to consult on the proposed changes to its methods and processes in the summer.

Departmental officials are represented on the committees that NICE has set up as part of the review and have had a number of discussions with NICE and NHS England about the review, including about the introduction of a health inequalities modifier.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the (a) access to and (b) quality of menstrual health services; what plans his Department has to further improve menstrual health services in the health system beyond the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will make a statement.

Menstrual health services are predominantly provided by general practitioners (GPs). GP practices have remained open throughout the pandemic, offering face to face appointments to those who need them as well as telephone and online consultations. To help expand general practice capacity, an additional £270 million of funding was made available from November 2020 until September 2021 to ensure GPs and their teams can continue to support all patients.

No assessment has been made on the quality of menstrual health services during the covid-19 outbreak, as this information is not held centrally by NHS England.

The Government are embarking on the first Women’s Health Strategy for England. To ensure the Women’s Health Strategy reflects what women identify as priorities, the government launched a 14 week call for evidence which will run until 13 June 2021 to gather women’s experiences and views regarding their health and care. All evidence regarding menstrual health services will be carefully considered as part of this ongoing work.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the wide scope of issues covered by the Women’s Health Strategy on the effectiveness of that strategy; and if he will make a statement.

No assessment has been made on the potential effect of the wide scope of issues covered by the Women’s Health Strategy on the effectiveness of that strategy.

To ensure the strategy reflects what women identify as priorities, the Government launched a Call for Evidence on 8 March, which will run until 13 June.

The evidence gathered through the call for evidence will inform the priorities, content and actions for the strategy.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking as part of the NHS covid-19 recovery plans to (a) reduce health inequalities and (b) support patients with sickle cell disease.

COVID-19 has exerted an unprecedented strain on the National Health Service, however the NHS is working incredibly hard to keep services going throughout this pandemic for all patients, including those with sickle cell disease. To help kickstart recovery, the Government is providing £1 billion to incentivise providers to address backlogs and tackle long waiting lists; this is accessible through the Elective Recovery Fund. In May, NHS England also launched a £160 million initiative to tackle waiting lists. The Department will continue to support the NHS to deliver the maximum amount of elective activity possible. The Minister for Equalities is leading work to take forward the response to tackle COVID-19 disparities experienced by individuals from an ethnic minority background, including people with sickle cell disease, and recently published her third report to the Prime Minister.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the announcement of £325 million for diagnostic equipment announced in the Spending Review 2020, how much and what proportion of that funding will be allocated to pathology and radiology services to improve the diagnosis of kidney cancer.

The funding is to be used for the purchase of new diagnostic machines and the funding of Community Diagnostic Hubs. As such it cannot be determined how much will be spent specifically on improving the diagnosis of kidney cancer.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data his Department holds on the number of patients with sickle cell disease who access emergency care services during a vaso-occlusive crisis.

The information is not available in the format requested. Accident and emergency codes do not record sickle cell disease.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of clinical guidance for the (a) diagnosis, (b) treatment and (c) management of kidney cancer.

No recent assessment has been made.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) clinical guidance on diagnosis, treatment and management of kidney cancer was developed through standard process, by independent committees made up of health and care professionals, people who use services, and carers.

The clinical guidance for kidney (Renal) cancer is available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng12/chapter/1-Recommendations-organised-by-site-of-cancer#urological-cancers

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the impact of increases in incidence of kidney cancer on the demand for urology cancer nurse specialists.

Specialist clinical nursing workforce working in kidney cancer is a post registration qualification and it is the responsibility of individual employers to ensure they have the staff available to provide clinical services.

The Spending Review 2020 provides £260 million to continue to grow our National Health Service workforce and support commitments made in the NHS Long Term Plan, including continuing to take forward the Cancer Workforce Plan Phase One commitment to expand education and training to increase the number of Clinical Nurse Specialists and develop common and consistent competencies, including for urological cancers.

Full details on funding allocations towards NHS workforce budgets, including Health Education England, in 2021-22 will be published in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many rapid diagnostic pathways are in operation for prostate cancer in the NHS in England.

There are currently 11 urology or prostate rapid diagnostic centre pathways operational or in development, some of which cover multiple hospital sites.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding he has allocated to support the roll out of rapid diagnostic pathways in prostate cancer across England in 2021.

The information is not held in the format requested.

In 2020/21, £121 million has been allocated in funding for cancer and £198 million in 2021/2022, including for the development of rapid diagnostic centres.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what funding and training opportunities are available in England to support healthcare professionals seeking to pursue non-medical practitioner qualifications in Oncology.

There are a number of clinicians who make up a multi-professional team within oncology. This includes nurses, therapeutic radiographers, healthcare scientists such as medical physicists, pharmacists, speech and language therapists and dieticians. Health Education England supports the education and training of these clinicians through clinical placements and the promotion of priority professions and routes into training. Where courses are eligible, prospective students can access funding through the Student Loans Company for their tuition fees and maintenance loan to support their studies whilst at university. In addition, for a range of courses a non-repayable grant of up to £8,000 per year is available with all students receiving a minimum of £5,000.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS healthcare professionals have undertaken training to qualify as a Non-Medical Practitioner in Oncology in England in each of the last five years.

The Department does not hold the information requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many qualified non-medical practitioners there are in the NHS Prostate Cancer Workforce in England; and how many there were in 2019.

The Department does not hold the data requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many urgent courses of treatment were delivered by NHS General Dental Services contract holders in England in each of the last 6 months.

Data on NHS dental activity for the last six months is not currently available.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what number and proportion of NHS General Dental Services contract holders in England delivered less than 45% of their contracted activity in the last quarter of 2020-21 financial year.

Finalised data on the delivery of contracted activity in the last quarter of the 2020-21 financial year is not yet available.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what number and proportion of NHS General Dental Services contract holders in England delivered less than 36% of their contracted activity in the last quarter of 2020/2021 financial year.

Finalised data on the delivery of contracted activity in the last quarter of the 2020-21 financial year is not yet available.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS General Dental Services contract holders in England are currently working through their contractual notice period before ceasing to provide NHS services.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS General Dental Services contract holders in England handed back their NHS contract in each of the last 6 months.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of using (a) bingo halls and (b) other currently unoccupied venues for the administration of the covid-19 vaccine.

No specific assessment has been made.

In support of the deployment programme, National Health Service regional teams worked with local commissioners to identify sites potentially suitable for use as vaccination centres, including those that were unoccupied. Those sites deemed to suitable were then assessed by NHS England and NHS Improvement in order to make the final selection.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how long the contract with Serco for NHS Test and Trace has been extended beyond the initial 14-week period.

The Department has two contracts with Serco in relation to COVID-19. The first is for the provision of facilities management services to support the operation of testing sites. The contract was let in March 2020 for an initial term of six months to September 2020. The final cost was £47.9 million. It was extended from 1 October 2020 to 30 April 2021 for an expanded service with a final outturn against the budget of £208 million of £209.3 million. This was as a result of additional support required such as testing at Dover. A contract extension was agreed to ensure service continuity of the facilities management service until 23 July 2021 whilst a new procurement exercise was undertaken. The value of this extension is £97 million.

Following a competition on the Crown Commercial Services Framework for Facilities Management, Serco was awarded a contract on 25 June to continue providing these services with a value of up to £322 million for a 12 month period with an option to extend for six months. Given the number of site transitions this involves, we are currently finalising a further contract extension of 24 days to ensure that all sites will be fully transitioned and mobilised under the new contracts by 16 August.

The second contract is for the National Health Service call handling service to support the tracing initiative. The contract had a maximum value of £410 million to cover the initial period and any and all extension periods undertaken up to a period of 12 months. The contract was extended for its full term to the end of May 2021. The actual outturn expenditure on this contract was £358 million. The contract has been extended for a period of six months from 1 June to the end of November for a maximum value of £66 million.

The contract has been extended for a limited period so that there would not be a gap in the tracing service during a crucial time in the pandemic.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the cost to the public purse is of the contract with Serco for NHS Test and Trace for the (a) initial 14-week period and (b) subsequent extensions of that contract.

The Department has two contracts with Serco in relation to COVID-19. The first is for the provision of facilities management services to support the operation of testing sites. The contract was let in March 2020 for an initial term of six months to September 2020. The final cost was £47.9 million. It was extended from 1 October 2020 to 30 April 2021 for an expanded service with a final outturn against the budget of £208 million of £209.3 million. This was as a result of additional support required such as testing at Dover. A contract extension was agreed to ensure service continuity of the facilities management service until 23 July 2021 whilst a new procurement exercise was undertaken. The value of this extension is £97 million.

Following a competition on the Crown Commercial Services Framework for Facilities Management, Serco was awarded a contract on 25 June to continue providing these services with a value of up to £322 million for a 12 month period with an option to extend for six months. Given the number of site transitions this involves, we are currently finalising a further contract extension of 24 days to ensure that all sites will be fully transitioned and mobilised under the new contracts by 16 August.

The second contract is for the National Health Service call handling service to support the tracing initiative. The contract had a maximum value of £410 million to cover the initial period and any and all extension periods undertaken up to a period of 12 months. The contract was extended for its full term to the end of May 2021. The actual outturn expenditure on this contract was £358 million. The contract has been extended for a period of six months from 1 June to the end of November for a maximum value of £66 million.

The contract has been extended for a limited period so that there would not be a gap in the tracing service during a crucial time in the pandemic.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to further extend the contract with Serco for NHS Test and Trace; and whether a further extension would breach the maximum value as stated in the original contract.

The Department has two contracts with Serco in relation to COVID-19. The first is for the provision of facilities management services to support the operation of testing sites. The contract was let in March 2020 for an initial term of six months to September 2020. The final cost was £47.9 million. It was extended from 1 October 2020 to 30 April 2021 for an expanded service with a final outturn against the budget of £208 million of £209.3 million. This was as a result of additional support required such as testing at Dover. A contract extension was agreed to ensure service continuity of the facilities management service until 23 July 2021 whilst a new procurement exercise was undertaken. The value of this extension is £97 million.

Following a competition on the Crown Commercial Services Framework for Facilities Management, Serco was awarded a contract on 25 June to continue providing these services with a value of up to £322 million for a 12 month period with an option to extend for six months. Given the number of site transitions this involves, we are currently finalising a further contract extension of 24 days to ensure that all sites will be fully transitioned and mobilised under the new contracts by 16 August.

The second contract is for the National Health Service call handling service to support the tracing initiative. The contract had a maximum value of £410 million to cover the initial period and any and all extension periods undertaken up to a period of 12 months. The contract was extended for its full term to the end of May 2021. The actual outturn expenditure on this contract was £358 million. The contract has been extended for a period of six months from 1 June to the end of November for a maximum value of £66 million.

The contract has been extended for a limited period so that there would not be a gap in the tracing service during a crucial time in the pandemic.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to further extend the contract with Serco for NHS test and trace; and whether a further extension will breach the maximum value as stated in the original contract.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the cost to the public purse is of the contract with Serco for NHS test and trade for the (a) initial 14-week period and (b) all subsequent extensions of that contract.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how long the contract with Serco for NHS test and trace has been extended beyond the initial 14-week period.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.
Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to publish data on the roll-out of the covid-19 vaccine to adult household members of immunocompromised clinically extremely vulnerable groups.

We do not yet have a specific timeline for publishing this data. Information on the vaccination programme is regularly reviewed and new datasets are added as available.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his Department's timeframe is for introducing digital cards to replace paper Healthy Start Vouchers.

The NHS Business Services Authority are leading the work to digitise the Healthy Start scheme on behalf of the Department, to facilitate families to apply for, receive and use Healthy Start benefits. The NHS Business Services Authority will provide all new users applying to the digital scheme and all existing users every opportunity to transition to pre-paid cards by 31 October 2021.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that all GPs are aware of the update to JCVI guidance on prioritisation of adults for the covid-19 living with immunocompromised clinically extremely vulnerable people.

The National Health Service has written to all general practitioner practices setting out how vaccines will be offered to this group and how eligible individuals are to be identified. A separate ‘Operational Guide’ has been created setting out more details and how the NHS plans to maximise uptake in this group. The NHS has also written to all Medical Directors setting out the steps needed to identify immunosuppressed individuals in secondary care.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions officials in his Department have had with their counterparts in the Scottish Government on the use of digital cards to replace paper Healthy Start Vouchers.

Departmental officials and colleagues in the NHS Business Services Authority, who are leading the work to digitise the Healthy Start scheme on behalf of the Department, continue to engage with the devolved administrations as the current scheme becomes digitised.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total value of claimed Healthy Start Vouchers was in each of the last 12 months for which data is available.

The information is not held in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of how much the Government has paid to consultants at firms in connection with the development of a digital card scheme to replace paper Healthy Start Vouchers.

The Department spent £1,909,149 (excluding VAT) on external consultants in developing a digital card scheme to replace paper Healthy Start Vouchers.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will take steps to ensure that the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016 are used to remove any products found to contain menthol immediately from the market following the results of the Public Health England investigation into the illegal sale of these products.

We await the outcome of Public Health England’s testing of tobacco products as part of the Department’s investigation of possible breaches of the prohibition of menthol at a level that gives the product a characterising flavour. If any products are tested and found to be in breach of the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016, action will be taken to remove these products from the market.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 16 December 2020 to Question 127034 on Pharmacy: Rother Valley, on what basis the Government has determined that £370 million has been made in advance payments to support pharmacies; what assessment he has made of how those advanced payments have been spent; when he estimates those advanced payments will be repaid; what assessment he has made of the effect on community pharmacies of repaying those advanced payments; and if he will make a statement.

The latest data available from the NHS Business Services Authority show that there were 74 net pharmacy closures, reflecting openings and closures, from June 2017-18; 82 net closures in 2018-19; and 126 net closures in 2019-20. The data for the year 2020-21 is not yet available. We have not estimated the number of community pharmacies that might close in 2021-22 but we continue to monitor the market.

Discussions are ongoing with the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee (PSNC) about additional funding for costs incurred during the COVID-19 pandemic. As part of its assessment of COVID-19 costs incurred by the sector the Government will take account of the £370 million increased advance payments paid to community pharmacies. The COVID-19 support package for community pharmacy also included general COVID-19 business financial support, funding for Bank Holiday openings, social distancing measures and the medicine delivery service to shielded patients and free personal protective equipment, as well as non-monetary support including the removal of some administrative tasks, flexibility in opening hours and the delayed introduction of new services.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the cashflows of community pharmacies; what estimate he has made if the number of community pharmacies that (a) have closed in each of the last three financial years and (b) will close in the financial year 2021-22; and if he will make a statement.

The latest data available from the NHS Business Services Authority show that there were 74 net pharmacy closures, reflecting openings and closures, from June 2017-18; 82 net closures in 2018-19; and 126 net closures in 2019-20. The data for the year 2020-21 is not yet available. We have not estimated the number of community pharmacies that might close in 2021-22 but we continue to monitor the market.

Discussions are ongoing with the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee (PSNC) about additional funding for costs incurred during the COVID-19 pandemic. As part of its assessment of COVID-19 costs incurred by the sector the Government will take account of the £370 million increased advance payments paid to community pharmacies. The COVID-19 support package for community pharmacy also included general COVID-19 business financial support, funding for Bank Holiday openings, social distancing measures and the medicine delivery service to shielded patients and free personal protective equipment, as well as non-monetary support including the removal of some administrative tasks, flexibility in opening hours and the delayed introduction of new services.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the study published on 11 March 2021 by Kings College London and the Crick Institute on vaccine efficacy among people with cancer.

Early findings from the King’s College London and the Francis Crick Institute study, which seeks to measure the immune response generated by the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at three and five weeks post vaccination, indicated a lower antibody response in people with certain types of cancer.

The findings of the study, which has not yet been published or peer-reviewed, should be used cautiously. They are indicative and do not provide suitable data to infer directly the level of clinical protection.

The independent Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation, which advises the Government on vaccine use and prioritisation, regularly reviews data and evidence on vaccine efficacy and effectiveness.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent progress the Government has made on funding (a) research and (b) trials on long-term vaccine efficacy for the immunocompromised after (a) first and (b) second dose.

As part of the National Core Studies Immunity Programme, UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) has provided initial funding of £1.8 million towards the OCTAVE study looking at COVID-19 vaccine responses in groups of immune suppressed individuals. UKRI is also supporting the Data and Connectivity National Core Studies programme with an investment of up to £8.2 million to date to enable the evaluation of vaccine uptake and efficacy across all populations.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the NHS spend was on occupational health services and occupational health and wellbeing support to NHS staff (a) from 2015 to 2019 and (b) in 2020.

Information on the amount of money invested in occupational health across the National Health Service is not collected centrally.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which obesity patient and professional organisations his Department consulted with on the proposals on obesity in the Health and Care White Paper.

We have consulted extensively on the policies across our healthy weight strategy and received thousands of responses from a range of stakeholders including individuals, professional bodies and experts including organisations with a particular interest in obesity. These include the Obesity Health Alliance and its members, such as the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, British Heart Foundation, British Dietetic Association and Cancer Research UK. We also meet these organisations regularly and will continue this dialogue going forwards.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to Answer of 30 November 2020 to Question 116622 on Health: Coronavirus, whether his Department plans to assess the effect of long covid on patients with obesity; and if he will make a statement.

COVID-19 is a new disease and therefore it is not yet clear what the physical, psychological and rehabilitation needs will be for those experiencing long-term effects of the virus. There is some evidence to suggest that ‘long’ COVID-19 may be more prevalent as body mass index increases but further research is needed.

The National Institute for Health Research and UK Research and Innovation have invested £8.4 million in the Post-HOSPitalisation COVID-19 study and have awarded an additional £18.5 million funding across four new research studies to help better understand the causes, symptoms and treatment options for ‘long’ COVID-19 in non-hospitalised patients.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's policy paper Tackling obesity: government strategy, published in July 2020, what meetings with relevant stakeholders has Public Health England held to help develop the healthy weight coaches training programme.

Public Health England has established a steering group that meets regularly, which includes relevant stakeholders. Additional stakeholders and representatives from key organisations will be involved in reviewing the training programme.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the 2020 Obesity Strategy, when Public Health England plans to launch the healthy weight coaches training programme.

This training programme is currently under development and more information will be launched later in the year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on access to Tier 3 and Tier 4 NHS weight management services; and what progress he is making to resume those services.

We are aware of the impact of COVID-19 on tier 3 and tier 4 weight management services and are working closely with NHS England on our approach. As part of delivering the commitments set out in ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’, the Government announced £100 million extra funding for healthy weight programmes including specialist clinical support.

Decisions about the provision of tier 3 and 4 weight management services, along with other elective activity, will be made at a local level reflecting varying pressures on local health systems and availability of capacity, including use of the independent sector, and taking into account of the rate of recovery of elective services following the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that hospital boards do not hold back from apologising to patients out of fear of consequences relating to their liability, as recommended by the Report of the Independent Inquiry into the Issues raised by Paterson, HC 31, published in February 2020.

We will be providing the Government’s initial response to the Paterson Inquiry shortly, which will update on progress in our consideration of the Report’s recommendations.

We have been in regular communication with Spire Healthcare to monitor the progress of its recall. By December 2020 Spire Healthcare had contacted approximately 5,500 known living patients of Ian Paterson for whom they have addresses. Spire Healthcare is currently ensuring that the care of those patients has been fully reviewed, that the outcome of the reviews has been fully communicated to them and that, if required, they are getting the support and care that they need. Additionally, several hundred people have contacted Spire as a result of the letters sent out last year. A proportion of these are having their care reviewed by an independent consultant surgeon and some have been referred for counselling, follow up support or, where clinically appropriate, treatment. Spire Healthcare will continue their review of patients’ care during 2021.

The Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 introduced a statutory duty of candour. Providers must ensure that they have processes in place to ensure staff are supported to deliver the duty of candour and have a system in place to identify and deal with possible breaches by registered staff. The Care Quality Commission published updated guidance on the duty of candour on 11 March 2021 which has been informed by the recommendation of the Paterson Inquiry about apologising to patients when things go wrong. The updated guidance is available at the following link:

https://www.cqc.org.uk/news/stories/updated-guidance-meeting-duty-candour

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that patients treated by Ian Paterson at the hospitals operated by Spire Healthcare have been given ongoing treatment plans appropriate to their health needs, as recommended by the Report of the Independent Inquiry into the Issues raised by Paterson, HC 31, published in February 2020.

We will be providing the Government’s initial response to the Paterson Inquiry shortly, which will update on progress in our consideration of the Report’s recommendations.

We have been in regular communication with Spire Healthcare to monitor the progress of its recall. By December 2020 Spire Healthcare had contacted approximately 5,500 known living patients of Ian Paterson for whom they have addresses. Spire Healthcare is currently ensuring that the care of those patients has been fully reviewed, that the outcome of the reviews has been fully communicated to them and that, if required, they are getting the support and care that they need. Additionally, several hundred people have contacted Spire as a result of the letters sent out last year. A proportion of these are having their care reviewed by an independent consultant surgeon and some have been referred for counselling, follow up support or, where clinically appropriate, treatment. Spire Healthcare will continue their review of patients’ care during 2021.

The Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 introduced a statutory duty of candour. Providers must ensure that they have processes in place to ensure staff are supported to deliver the duty of candour and have a system in place to identify and deal with possible breaches by registered staff. The Care Quality Commission published updated guidance on the duty of candour on 11 March 2021 which has been informed by the recommendation of the Paterson Inquiry about apologising to patients when things go wrong. The updated guidance is available at the following link:

https://www.cqc.org.uk/news/stories/updated-guidance-meeting-duty-candour

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 29 September 2020 to Question 93695 on the Paterson Inquiry, when his Department plans to publish the formal Government response to the Report of the Independent Inquiry into the Issues raised by Paterson, HC 31, published in February 2020.

We will be providing the Government’s initial response to the Paterson Inquiry shortly, which will update on progress in our consideration of the Report’s recommendations.

We have been in regular communication with Spire Healthcare to monitor the progress of its recall. By December 2020 Spire Healthcare had contacted approximately 5,500 known living patients of Ian Paterson for whom they have addresses. Spire Healthcare is currently ensuring that the care of those patients has been fully reviewed, that the outcome of the reviews has been fully communicated to them and that, if required, they are getting the support and care that they need. Additionally, several hundred people have contacted Spire as a result of the letters sent out last year. A proportion of these are having their care reviewed by an independent consultant surgeon and some have been referred for counselling, follow up support or, where clinically appropriate, treatment. Spire Healthcare will continue their review of patients’ care during 2021.

The Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 introduced a statutory duty of candour. Providers must ensure that they have processes in place to ensure staff are supported to deliver the duty of candour and have a system in place to identify and deal with possible breaches by registered staff. The Care Quality Commission published updated guidance on the duty of candour on 11 March 2021 which has been informed by the recommendation of the Paterson Inquiry about apologising to patients when things go wrong. The updated guidance is available at the following link:

https://www.cqc.org.uk/news/stories/updated-guidance-meeting-duty-candour

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of establishing fluoroquinolone toxicity as a diagnosis in response to the negative side effects attributed to fluoroquinolone usage by some patients.

Serious side effects of fluoroquinolone antibiotics can be varied, potentially affecting several different parts of the body. The review of the safety of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) focussed on the potential for serious side effects and did not specifically assess the potential advantages or disadvantages of using a specific definition for fluoroquinolone toxicity. Regulatory actions taken as a result of this review have focussed on giving healthcare professionals and patients the information they need to identify any potential side effects for appropriate action and on encouraging the reporting of any suspected side effects to the Yellow Card Scheme. A specific diagnosis is not required.

On 21 March 2019 the MHRA published a Drug Safety Update (DSU) bulletin on the potential serious side effects of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which may be potentially long-lasting or irreversible. The DSU also emphasised the restrictions and precautions for use of these medicines that were introduced after the review of their safety by the EMA and the MHRA. The DSU bulletin includes a link to a patient sheet designed to help healthcare professionals and patients discuss potential side effects, patients’ questions about these medicines and what patients should do if they experience a suspected side effect. The DSU also includes a link to guidance for managing common infections from Public Health England and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to ensure that healthcare professionals are fully aware of (a) the potentially serious side effects experienced by some patients as a result of fluoroquinolone usage and (b) the recommended restriction of fluoroquinolone usage in response to the reviews of that usage by the European Medicines Agency and Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency.

Serious side effects of fluoroquinolone antibiotics can be varied, potentially affecting several different parts of the body. The review of the safety of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) focussed on the potential for serious side effects and did not specifically assess the potential advantages or disadvantages of using a specific definition for fluoroquinolone toxicity. Regulatory actions taken as a result of this review have focussed on giving healthcare professionals and patients the information they need to identify any potential side effects for appropriate action and on encouraging the reporting of any suspected side effects to the Yellow Card Scheme. A specific diagnosis is not required.

On 21 March 2019 the MHRA published a Drug Safety Update (DSU) bulletin on the potential serious side effects of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which may be potentially long-lasting or irreversible. The DSU also emphasised the restrictions and precautions for use of these medicines that were introduced after the review of their safety by the EMA and the MHRA. The DSU bulletin includes a link to a patient sheet designed to help healthcare professionals and patients discuss potential side effects, patients’ questions about these medicines and what patients should do if they experience a suspected side effect. The DSU also includes a link to guidance for managing common infections from Public Health England and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when an assessment will have concluded on the effectiveness of the covid-19 vaccine for immunocompromised clinically extremely vulnerable people; and what steps he will take to ensure that those people are not expected to return to work after 31 March 2021 in the event that there is no data on efficacy by that date.

Exact efficacy data for those who are immunocompromised is currently emerging and many unknowns remain. The Government is exploring all avenues available to ensure immunocompromised clinically extremely vulnerable people can be successfully protected against COVID-19.

The Government is currently advising everyone considered clinically extremely vulnerable to shield until 31 March. Any decision to extend or end shielding measures will be decided upon by the United Kingdom’s Chief Medical Officers and will be based on the latest scientific evidence. Further information will be provided in the coming weeks to all clinically extremely vulnerable people outlining the guidance that they should follow beyond 31 March.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether any dental contract which misses NHS England’s activity targets of 45 per cent as a result of shielding, self isolation or other covid-19 related exceptional circumstances will still receive 100 per cent of their payment for the fourth quarter of the 2020-21 financial year and that they will not be required to make up that activity in the 2021-22 financial year.

Contractual arrangements for quarter four have been introduced by NHS England and NHS Improvement requiring dental practices to deliver 45% of contracted units of dental activity from 1 January to 31 March 2021 to be deemed to have delivered the full contractual volume.

National Health Service commissioners have the discretion to make exceptions, for instance in cases where a dental practice has been impacted by staff being required to self-isolate and the reinstatement of shielding during the national lockdown. Cases will be considered on an individual basis and could include a decision by the commissioner to waive its rights to recover any portion of the financial clawback. The ability for contractors to make up the shortfall of activity preceding or following the exceptional circumstances would have been considered and ruled out prior to approving the exceptional circumstances. Commissioners will follow the Policy Book for Primary Dental Services when making these decisions.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment has he made of the risk that patients with latex allergies face from the administration of the covid-19 vaccine.

Anyone who has ever had a serious allergic reaction should tell their healthcare professional before they are vaccinated. Serious allergic reactions are rare. If people do have a reaction to the vaccine, it usually happens in minutes. Staff giving the vaccine are trained to deal with allergic reactions and all locations providing vaccinations are required to have anaphylaxis packs on-site, allowed staff to treat them immediately.

As with other vaccination programmes and advised by the World Health Organisation (WHO), gloves are not recommended when administering a vaccine unless persons administering vaccinations have open lesions on their hands or are likely to encounter a patient’s body fluids. Plastic syringes do not contain latex and nor do needles.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether a dental contract which misses NHS England’s activity targets of 45 per cent due to exceptional circumstances, such as shielding or self-isolation, as a result of the covid-19 outbreak will (a) receive 100 per cent of their payment for the fourth quarter of 2021 and (b) not be required to make up that activity in the financial year 2021-22.

Contractual arrangements for quarter four have been introduced by NHS England and NHS Improvement requiring dental practices to deliver 45% of contracted units of dental activity from 1 January to 31 March 2021 to be deemed to have delivered the full contractual volume.

National Health Service commissioners have the discretion to make exceptions, for instance in cases where a dental practice has been impacted by staff being required to self-isolate and the reinstatement of shielding during the national lockdown. Cases will be considered on an individual basis and could include a decision by the commissioner to waive its rights to recover any portion of the financial clawback. The ability for contractors to make up the shortfall of activity preceding or following the exceptional circumstances would have been considered and ruled out prior to approving the exceptional circumstances. Commissioners will follow the Policy Book for Primary Dental Services when making these decisions.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has made on the creation of guidelines for the diagnosis and maintenance of pernicious anaemia.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence is in the early stages of developing a guideline on pernicious anaemia and expects to publish its final guidance in March 2023.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether (a) latex-free syringes and (b) anaphylaxis packs are available in covid-19 vaccine rollout locations.

Anaphylaxis packs are a requirement in all locations providing vaccination. Neither plastic syringes or needles contain latex.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that clinicians are not subject to (a) legal and (b) regulatory action for work outside their usual area of expertise during the covid-19 outbreak.

In April 2020, the Department wrote to National Health Service staff to reassure them that state indemnity for clinical negligence is in place to cover their work on the COVID-19 response. The Department has also worked with the NHS, healthcare regulatory bodies and the Ministry of Justice to ensure that complaints processes, investigations and legal claims do not place an undue burden on staff or detract from responding to the pandemic.

In March 2020, the healthcare regulatory bodies issued a joint statement recognising that professionals may need to depart from established procedures in order to care for patients and people using health and social care services. This made clear that they would take into account COVID-19 factors when assessing concerns about professionals. These principles were re-affirmed in a further joint statement issued in January 2021.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 5 February 2021 to Question 147020, what discussions he has had with (a) medical defence organisations and (b) other professional bodies on the long-term impact the fear of litigation has had on doctors during the covid-19 outbreak.

In April 2020, the Department wrote to National Health Service staff to reassure them that state indemnity for clinical negligence is in place to cover their work on the COVID-19 response even where services are reorganised. To enable this, in March 2020 the Government secured new indemnity powers in the Coronavirus Act 2020, to cover any parts of the response not in scope of the existing state indemnity schemes administered by NHS Resolution.

Also in March 2020, the regulators of health and care professionals, including the General Medical Council, issued a joint statement. This made clear that any concerns about registered professionals will always be considered on the specific facts of the case, taking into account the environment in which the professional is working, including the challenging circumstances brought about by COVID-19.

There have been no specific discussions between the Department and medical defence organisations and other professional bodies on this issue.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 5 February 2021 to Question 147020, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that doctors do not face excessive litigation as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

In April 2020, the Department wrote to National Health Service staff to reassure them that state indemnity for clinical negligence is in place to cover their work on the COVID-19 response even where services are reorganised. To enable this, in March 2020 the Government secured new indemnity powers in the Coronavirus Act 2020, to cover any parts of the response not in scope of the existing state indemnity schemes administered by NHS Resolution.

Also in March 2020, the regulators of health and care professionals, including the General Medical Council, issued a joint statement. This made clear that any concerns about registered professionals will always be considered on the specific facts of the case, taking into account the environment in which the professional is working, including the challenging circumstances brought about by COVID-19.

There have been no specific discussions between the Department and medical defence organisations and other professional bodies on this issue.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to Answer of 9 February 2021 to Question 147019, how many wellbeing guardians have been appointed by health boards in England; where those wellbeing guardians are employed; and what steps he is taking to measure the effect of those appointments on the wellbeing of frontline healthcare workers.

The Wellbeing Guardian (WBG) is a new board level or equivalent senior leadership role designed to champion the wellbeing of their National Health Service organisational workforce. NHS England and NHS Improvement held an event on 28 February 2021 to formally launch the role with all NHS organisations. Initial data indicating prevalence of WBG role uptake in large acute, community, provider organisations and clinical commissioning groups, based on attendees at the launch event shows 208 NHS organisations across the country were represented, 37 or 18% had a wellbeing guardian in place, 29 or 14% had a wellbeing guardian starting in the role soon and 142 or 68% were seeking advice on how to implement the role.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 5 February 2021 to Question 147020, what discussions he has had with (a) medical defence organisations and (b) other professional bodies to make an assessment of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on GPs’ mental health as a result of increased workload; and what steps he plans to take to improve GP retention rates after the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department regularly meets with stakeholders to discuss issues relating to the general practice workforce. To support wellbeing during the pandemic, NHS England and NHS Improvement, in collaboration with the Royal College of General Practitioners, has launched the Looking After You Too and Looking After Your Team coaching support services. These services provide access to mental health services to all National Health Service primary care workers and aim to encourage psychological wellbeing and resilience in teams.

In addition, the NHS Practitioner Health service is available for doctors and dentists across England who have mental health concerns, in particular where these might affect their work. In early March 2021, NHS England and NHS Improvement held a listening and collaboration event on Supporting Staff Wellbeing in Primary Care with staff from a wide range of roles across primary care, representatives of Local Medical Committees and the National Association of Primary Care.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2021 to Question 147019, if he will publish the analysis of how many NHS staff have accessed the government-funded mental health and wellbeing package; how many staff have accessed that service through the (a) dedicated app, (b) website and (c) telephone and text helplines; and if he will publish the total number of staff who have accessed those services.

A comprehensive national offer of support has been in place since the pandemic began. This has been accessed on over 750,000 occasions.

There have been almost 185,000 downloads of self-help apps and over 570,000 views of the website which signposts further resources to support staff wellbeing. In addition to this, there have been over 9,000 contacts with the National Helpline that is provided in partnership with the Samaritans and over 4,000 conversations with the 24 hour text support line run in partnership with SHOUT.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 27 January 2021 to Question 131418 on Obesity: Health Services, what discussions his Department has had on timelines for the announcement and implementation of further measures to expand weight management services as part of the Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives strategy, and if he will make a statement.

Further details about the expansion of weight management services announced as part of ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ will be available shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 27 January 2021 to Question 130818 on Obesity: Health Services, whether future expansions to weight management services will include expansions to (a) tier 3 and (b) tier 4 weight management services; and if he will make a statement.

Further details about the expansion of weight management services announced as part of ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ will be available shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the level of industry compliance with the Public Health England investigation into the sale of potentially illegal menthol cigarettes; and when he plans to publish the results of that investigation.

The Department has asked Public Health England to conduct testing analysis of cigarettes as part of its investigation into possible breaches of the prohibition of characterising flavours in tobacco products. This work should conclude in the summer. There are currently no plans to publish the results of the investigation. We understand that industry is complying with the investigation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the tobacco products that are under investigation for possibly breaching the prohibition on characterising menthol flavours will be taken off the market until that investigation has concluded.

The Department has asked Public Health England to conduct testing analysis of cigarettes as part of its investigation into possible breaches of the prohibition of characterising flavours in tobacco products. This work should conclude in the summer. There are currently no plans to publish the results of the investigation. We understand that industry is complying with the investigation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies of the Medical and Dental Defence Union of Scotland’s survey finding that more than half of healthcare professionals are contemplating leaving the NHS or retiring early due to pressures faced during the covid-19 pandemic; and what steps he is taking to ensure the adequate provision of expertise in the NHS.

The Government is committed to supporting the National Health Service workforce and has committed to deliver 50,000 more nurses, to increase the general practice workforce by 6,000 doctors and to enrol 26,000 other primary care professionals. Through increased education funding we are now seeing a record high intake for medical students and historically high numbers of people entering nursing degrees. Our new healthcare visa means we are cutting application decision times, removing the immigration surcharge and in turn ensuring the supply of international healthcare workers remains strong. Finally, the NHS People Plan is helping us retain staff through an enhanced wellbeing offer to help mitigate stress and a diversity and inclusion programme to ensure all staff feel valued.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his provision of mental health support for frontline healthcare workers of findings of the Medical and Dental Defence Union of Scotland that more than four in 10 people working in all health professions are more stressed and anxious in the second wave of covid-19 wave compared with the first.

The Department is aware of and takes seriously the high levels of stress and anxiety amongst frontline healthcare workers during the current crisis. The NHS People Plan published last July is helping us support National Health Service staff wellbeing through the winter. It included appointing a new wellbeing guardian role to boards of individual trusts and a combined £30 million in enhanced mental and occupational health support. Our analysis shows staff are accessing the package on offer in large numbers, whether through our dedicated app, website, or telephone and text helplines. Feedback has also been positive with satisfaction scores consistently over 90%.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies of the findings of the Medical and Dental Defence Union of Scotland’s recent survey of its doctor and dentist members.

The Department is aware of and takes seriously the high levels of stress and anxiety amongst frontline healthcare workers during the current crisis. The NHS People Plan published last July is helping us support National Health Service staff wellbeing through the winter. It included appointing a new wellbeing guardian role to boards of individual trusts and a combined £30 million in enhanced mental and occupational health support. Our analysis shows staff are accessing the package on offer in large numbers, whether through our dedicated app, website, or telephone and text helplines. Feedback has also been positive with satisfaction scores consistently over 90%.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the support available for patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; and what plans his Department has to (a) prevent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and (b) increase support for patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

No such assessment has been made.

The prevention of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and support for patients with this condition to reduce their risk falls under the Government’s strategy to reduce obesity, which is a risk factor for liver disease. To help prevent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the Government is working to expand weight management services available through the National Health Service, so more people get the support they need to lose weight.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data his Department holds on the number of (a) premature deaths due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in each of the past five years, by local authority, and (b) covid-19 deaths of patients with diagnosed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Public Health England does not hold data on premature deaths due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the format requested. PHE publishes data on the number of hospitals admissions and deaths from liver disease, alcohol-related liver disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease for local authorities in England.

PHE does not hold data on COVID-19 deaths of patients with diagnosed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PHE has published an assessment of excess mortality from liver disease during the COVID-19 pandemic in England from 21 March 2020 to 8 January 2021 and estimated that there were 692 excess deaths from liver disease.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to review the costs to the NHS associated with (a) liver disease, (b) alcohol-related liver disease, and (c) non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Due to the way budgeting data is collected, it is not possible to disaggregate expenditure to show solely liver disease.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve the early diagnosis of liver disease.

The NHS Health Check and NHS Standard Contract support early diagnosis of liver disease by assessing the alcohol consumption of service users using a validated tool such as the alcohol use disorders identification test and where appropriate, offering brief advice or interventions.

Alcohol care teams in the areas with the highest rates of alcohol dependence-related admissions have been set up to improve the care pathway, including the use of appropriate diagnostics, for patients and their families who have issues with alcohol dependence. NHS England is supporting a programme to identify people with hepatitis C infection at an early stage to avoid subsequent liver disease.

In 2019 to 2020, Public Health England awarded £6 million capital funding to 23 local authorities to support nine areas to purchase Fibroscan machines to increase early detection of fibrosis/cirrhosis and access to treatment for those with alcohol-related liver disease.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment his Department has made of the support available to liver disease patients (a) prior to and (b) during the covid-19 outbreak; and what support his Department plans to provide those patients after the covid-19 outbreak.

No comparative assessment has been made.

During the COVID-19 outbreak, specialty guidance for patient management was published by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to support National Health Service trusts to maintain an Alcohol Care Team (ACT) service. Guidance will be updated as necessary and is available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/Media/Default/About/COVID-19/Specialty-guides/Specialty-guide-Alcohol-Dependence-and-coronavirus.pdf

The NHS Long Term Plan sets out the commitment to optimise ACTs in the hospitals with the highest rates of alcohol dependence related harm. To support patients with all types of liver disease, the NHS RightCare Where to Look packs include a liver disease pathway to help commissioners explore potential opportunities for improvement.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data his Department holds on the number of patients diagnosed with (a) liver disease, (b) alcohol-related liver disease and (c) non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in each local authority area in each of the last five years.

Public Health England (PHE) does not hold data on liver disease in the format requested. PHE publishes data on the number of hospitals admissions and deaths from liver disease, alcohol-related liver disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, rather than diagnoses.

In 2020, PHE published a comparison of liver disease to other causes of death, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/liver-disease-applying-all-our-health/liver-disease-applying-all-our-health

PHE has not made an estimate of the number of people with undiagnosed liver disease.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment his Department has made of the number of deaths due to liver disease and other major diseases; and if he will make a statement.

Public Health England (PHE) does not hold data on liver disease in the format requested. PHE publishes data on the number of hospitals admissions and deaths from liver disease, alcohol-related liver disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, rather than diagnoses.

In 2020, PHE published a comparison of liver disease to other causes of death, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/liver-disease-applying-all-our-health/liver-disease-applying-all-our-health

PHE has not made an estimate of the number of people with undiagnosed liver disease.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people with undiagnosed liver disease.

Public Health England (PHE) does not hold data on liver disease in the format requested. PHE publishes data on the number of hospitals admissions and deaths from liver disease, alcohol-related liver disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, rather than diagnoses.

In 2020, PHE published a comparison of liver disease to other causes of death, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/liver-disease-applying-all-our-health/liver-disease-applying-all-our-health

PHE has not made an estimate of the number of people with undiagnosed liver disease.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that covid-19 vaccines are accessible for people with mental health issues.

The National Health Service, alongside local health and social care partners have been working to ensure that the entire population has fair and equitable access to the COVID-19 vaccine, including those with mental health issues.

To enable this, three delivery models are currently in operation across the United Kingdom to allow people to visit a site most appropriate to their needs. They include hospital hubs, local vaccination services and vaccination centres. This flexibility ensures an accessible model for all. Local Vaccination Services for example are well placed to support the specific needs of our highest risk patients in the community and can tailor support to an individual’s needs.

This links closely with a key element set out in the COVID-19 Vaccination Uptake plan - to build trust. To help build trust NHS England and NHS Improvement and Public Health England have been working with Rethink Mental Illness to understand barriers, and common causes of concern faced by people living with severe mental illnesses. They are using these insights to develop and promote targeted communications materials to help respond to and reassure these communities. Top tips for vaccinators have also been developed to support people living with learning disabilities and autism to access COVID-19 vaccinations when it is their turn.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department plans to take to ensure that all (a) homecare workers working for (i) registered and (ii) unregistered organisations, (b) live-in carers and (c) personal assistant care workers receive an invitation for a covid-19 vaccination at the correct time according to the Government's priorities for the administration of those vaccines.

All frontline healthcare staff who are eligible for seasonal influenza vaccination should be offered COVID-19 vaccination. This includes those working in independent, voluntary and non-standard healthcare settings such as hospices and community-based mental health or addiction services. Care home staff, personal assistants to personal budget holders, domiciliary support workers and day centre workers are included in the definition of social care workers. Also included are those non-clinical ancillary staff at care homes who may have social contact with patients but are not directly involved in patient care.

In order of priority, most people already resident in the United Kingdom will be contacted by their general practitioner to book their vaccine via an online or telephone system. Those in the initial priority groups can also arrange their vaccination appointment by calling 119 or through the national booking system at the following link:

www.nhs.uk/covid-vaccination

General practitioners are also able to add any additional patients who they feel should have been included in cohorts one to nine to the register for vaccination.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to extend regular covid-19 testing to all (a) homecare workers working for (i) registered and (ii) unregistered organisations, (b) live-in carers and (c) personal assistant care workers working in adult social care settings.

On 23 November 2020, we began offering Care Quality Commission registered domiciliary care organisations access to regular, weekly COVID-19 testing for their carers looking after people in their own homes.

We will be expanding testing further to all other homecare workers, including live-in carers and personal assistants in a phased roll-out. We will provide further details in due course about how these groups access testing. We will continue to review our social care testing strategy for adult social care in light of the latest evidence and available capacity.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the viability of allowing changes to childcare bubbles at shorter notice than the expiry of the minimum period in emergency situations.

If a household decides to change their childcare bubble, they should treat their previous bubble as a separate household for at least 10 days before forming a new bubble. This means following the general rules on meeting people from other households. The households should not provide childcare as if they are in a bubble during this period.

The 10 day minimum period is based on corresponding self-isolation guidance and the underlying scientific evidence and must be adhered to in order to mitigate the transmission risks associated with changing a childcare bubble.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government plans to adapt the roll-out of the covid-19 vaccine programme to allow more local communities to receive the vaccine from their community pharmacy.

Community pharmacies play an important role in the COVID-19 vaccination programme. Since 11 January 2021, some community pharmacies have started to offer the COVID-19 vaccination service, with more pharmacies joining the service over the coming weeks.

Some pharmacists and members of their team have been working with general practitioners to deliver the vaccine in many areas of the country as part of the Primary Care Network service.

The Department, NHS England and NHS Improvement, and the community pharmacy representative bodies will be working together to establish how community pharmacies’ role could be expanded further in the vaccination programme.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department's modelling of the covid-19 vaccination program is based on uptake of 75 per cent outside of (a) care homes, (b) prisons and (c) other settings.

Based on our previous vaccination programmes, specifically seasonal flu, we expected the uptake for the COVID-19 vaccine to be 75% across all cohorts in England. These estimates vary by priority groups, with greater estimated take up rates in higher priority groups. Seasonal flu estimates take into account different settings including prisons and care homes, to determine overall uptake. This fed into our initial estimate of 75% uptake across all cohorts. According to the recent evidence gathered by the Office for National Statistics, the current rate of COVID-19 take-up is 85% of adults across all cohorts.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on the risk of covid-19 transmission for patients with in-centre haemodialysis of those patients being in priority group four for the covid-19 vaccine.

Of the factors associated with COVID-19 mortality, age is the most strongly associated factor and applies across all other risk factors, including underlying health conditions. There is currently no conclusive evidence to indicate whether COVID-19 vaccines will have an impact on transmission.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has reviewed data on the risk of mortality from COVID-19 in-patients receiving in-centre haemodialysis (ICHD). In the ICHD cohort, 30% of all COVID-19 deaths up to 30 June 2020 occurred in persons aged over 80 years old. Those aged over 80 had a mortality risk of about 4.2 times more than those aged 18 to 59 years. Further information is available here: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0241263

The JCVI has recognised that persons on ICHD attend healthcare facilities regularly, and that this is an opportunity for vaccination. The JCVI therefore agreed that implementation teams should take advantage of this setting to vaccinate eligible individuals.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of moving patients with in-centre haemodialysis higher up the priority list for the covid-19 vaccine.

Of the factors associated with COVID-19 mortality, age is the most strongly associated factor and applies across all other risk factors, including underlying health conditions. There is currently no conclusive evidence to indicate whether COVID-19 vaccines will have an impact on transmission.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has reviewed data on the risk of mortality from COVID-19 in-patients receiving in-centre haemodialysis (ICHD). In the ICHD cohort, 30% of all COVID-19 deaths up to 30 June 2020 occurred in persons aged over 80 years old. Those aged over 80 had a mortality risk of about 4.2 times more than those aged 18 to 59 years. Further information is available here: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0241263

The JCVI has recognised that persons on ICHD attend healthcare facilities regularly, and that this is an opportunity for vaccination. The JCVI therefore agreed that implementation teams should take advantage of this setting to vaccinate eligible individuals.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 9 December 2020 to Question 95733 on Dietetics, which recognised nutrition experts and expert bodies his Department has consulted to inform (a) the obesity strategy and (b) wider nutrition policy.

Our policies on obesity and nutrition are informed by the latest research and emerging evidence, including from debates in Parliament and various reports from key stakeholders. For example, Public Health England’s 2015 review ‘Sugar reduction: the evidence for action’ identified areas for action to reduce sugar intakes, a number of which have been taken forward by Government. Further research and evidence are referenced in the obesity strategy, three chapters of the childhood obesity plan, public consultations and supporting documents.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reasons Public Health England has not acted on reports of sales of cigarettes containing menthol.

The investigation into the selling of cigarette products that have a characterising menthol flavour is currently going through the process in accordance with the European Union (EU) Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2016/779.

The Government committed to comply with the EU’s Tobacco Products Directive until the United Kingdom and the EU’s transition period ended.

Public Health England (PHE) has been preparing to begin testing products of interest now the transition period is complete.

In the meantime, PHE has communicated with manufacturers to alert them of its concerns that certain tobacco products that may have a characterising menthol flavour are still being sold.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to progress the Government’s commitment to expanding NHS weight management services in England in the July 2020 obesity strategy; and if he will make a statement.

Through ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ we are delivering a range of measures on weight management, including expanding weight management services to help more people get the support they need and making conversations about weight in primary care the norm. Further details about these measures will be available shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to resume (a) tier 3 obesity services and (b) tier 4 obesity services that have been disrupted by the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will make a statement.

Decisions regarding current provision of tier 3 and 4 weight management services, along with other elective activity, are made at a local level, reflecting varying pressures on local health systems and availability of capacity, including use of the independent sector. Additional waiting list data has been made available to systems and hospitals to support restoration of services, including weight loss surgery. NHS England and NHS Improvement have facilitated access for the National Health Service to independent sector provision to maximise capacity for displaced elective cases.

Through ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ we are delivering a range of measures on weight management, including expanding weight management services to help more people get the support they need and making conversations about weight in primary care the norm. Further details about these measures will be available shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that people with obesity are given timely access to the covid-19 vaccine; and if he will make a statement.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) consists of independent experts who advise the Government on which vaccine/s the United Kingdom should use, including prioritisation at a population level. For the first phase, the JVCI has advised that the vaccine be given to care home residents and staff, as well as frontline health and social care workers, then to the rest of the population in order of age and clinical risk factors.

Included are those with underlying health conditions, which put them at higher risk of serious disease and mortality. Individuals who are morbidly obese are included in the clinical risk groups aged 16 years old and over, identified by the JCVI.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will ask the Food Standards Agency to conduct a detailed examination of the safety of aspartame, following research done by Professor Millstone and Dr Dawson.

As an independent Government department, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) keeps under review the evolving body of credible scientific evidence on the safety of all food additives including aspartame and advises the Government if any action is needed.

The FSA is aware of both the paper written by Professor Millstone and Dr Dawson criticising the European Food Safety Authority’s (EFSA) assessment of the safety of aspartame, and the response issued by EFSA. The FSA does not consider that any action in relation to the safety of aspartame is needed at the present time.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Spending Review 2020 and OBR Forecast statement on 25 November 2020, what plans the Government has to provide funding to expand access to weight management services; and if he will make a statement.

Through ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ we are delivering a range of measures on weight management, including expanding weight management services to help more people get the support they need and making conversations about weight in primary care the norm. Further details about these measures will be available shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when weight management services will be delivered in more locations; and if he will make a statement.

Through ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ we are delivering a range of measures on weight management, including expanding weight management services to help more people get the support they need and making conversations about weight in primary care the norm. Further details about these measures will be available shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will allocate funding to the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances to ensure its effectiveness and efficiency in reviewing applications.

The Department allocates funding in line with the Government’s overall priorities to ensure that the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances can carry out its business effectively and efficiently.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the level of patient involvement in the NICE process for evaluating and approving new medicines and treatment; and whether there are plans under the ongoing Methods Review to adjust that level of involvement.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and is therefore responsible for its own methods and processes for evaluations and approving new medicines and treatments. Consultee organisations for NICE’s technology appraisals include national groups representing patients and carers.

NICE has had patient involvement throughout its methods and process review, including a specific workstream led by patient representatives and senior NICE staff. Patient groups are also represented on its Methods Review Working Group.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the take-up of winter flu vaccinations was in (a) 2018, (b) 2019 and (c) 2020 to date.

The following tables show the vaccine uptake data for 2018/19 and 2019/20 flu seasons in eligible groups and in children by school year.

Patient group

2018-2019

2019-2020

Patients aged 65 years or older

72.0

72.4

Patients aged six months to under 65 years in risk groups

48.0

44.9

Pregnant women

45.2

43.7

Patients aged two years old

43.8

43.4

Patients aged three years old

45.9

44.2

Healthcare workers

70.3

74.3

Source: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/895233/Surveillance_Influenza_and_other_respiratory_viruses_in_the_UK_2019_to_2020_FINAL.pdf

School year

2018 - 2019

2019 - 2020

Influenza vaccine uptake (%)

Influenza vaccine uptake (%)

Reception

64.3

64.3

1

63.6

63.6

2

61.5

62.6

3

60.4

60.6

4

58.3

59.6

5

56.5

57.2

6

-

55.0

Total

60.8

60.4

Source: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/894772/Childhood_flu_annual_report_2019_20.pdf

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many flu vaccinations are (a) required and (b) have been ordered in the 2020-21 flu season.

Overall, there is sufficient vaccine for more than 30 million people to be vaccinated in England this winter.

General practitioners (GPs) and pharmacists are directly responsible for ordering flu vaccine from suppliers which are used to deliver the national flu programme to adults. In addition, the Department has procured over eight million additional doses of seasonal flu vaccine for the United Kingdom to ensure more flu vaccines are available this winter. GPs, trusts and community pharmacies who have exhausted their own supply are now able to order more flu vaccines from the central stock procured by the Government and these stocks have already begun arriving across the country.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of the general population is required to take up a covid-19 vaccination to ensure the effectiveness of that vaccination programme.

It has not yet been determined what proportion of the general population is required to take up a COVID-19 vaccination.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) advised that the first priorities for any COVID-19 vaccination programme should be the prevention of COVID-19 mortality and the protection of health and social care staff and systems. The JCVI recently published advice to facilitate the development of policy on COVID-19 vaccination in the United Kingdom with the priority list for COVID-19 vaccination. It is estimated that taken together, these groups represent around 99% of preventable mortality from COVID-19.

As the first phase of the programme is rolled out in the UK, additional data will become available on the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines and whether they can prevent infection and onward transmission in the population.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of using (a) bingo halls and (b) other currently unoccupied venues for the administration of the covid-19 vaccine.

The National Health Service is grateful for the support that businesses have offered and is in the process of establishing vaccination centres across the country that can manage the logistical challenge of needing to store the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine at an appropriate temperature. Our approach, with three delivery models – community teams, vaccination sites, and hospital hubs – has been devised to be flexible and reach all parts of the country. The phased vaccination programme - which began on 8 December 2020 with hospital hubs - will be expanded over the coming weeks and months to include local vaccination services and largescale vaccination centres across the country. More than 730 vaccination sites have already been established across the UK and hundreds more are opening this week to take the running total to over 1,000.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ensure the hierarchy of medicines is enforced in relation to cannabis-based medicinal products.

NHS England has disseminated resources to support clinicians and guidance on the prescribing process for cannabis-based products for medicinal use (CBPMs).

The vast majority of CBPMs are unlicensed medicines, which have not been assessed by the medicines regulator. As such these are not first line treatments and specialist doctors must take into consideration the clinical evidence base, and the guidance from the General Medical Council (GMC) on licensed, off label and unlicensed medicines and local National Health Service governance systems when making a decision to prescribe.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average time taken is for the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances to respond to applications for review.

This data is not routinely collected.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will review the transparency of decision making by the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances to ensure fairness and equity in their approvals process.

A review began in 2019 to improve the processes of the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances. To date, three meetings have been held with industry representatives to take this forward and we are seeking further meetings with them to complete the work.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the pricing policy of the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances in relation to nutritional borderline substances.

The pricing policy of the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances is published on GOV.UK at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidelines-on-the-pricing-of-acbs-products/information-on-the-pricing-of-acbs-products

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Food Standards Agency on the steps it is taking to educate consumers on the safety of unauthorised products containing CBD.

CBD products currently on the market is contrary to the requirements of the Novel Foods Regulations. A proportionate approach to enforcement has been taken in the short term but manufacturers must apply to the Food Standards Agency (FSA) by the end of March 2021 to begin the authorisation process. From that time, only products with validated applications in the pipeline will be allowed on the market.

In the meantime, on the basis of advice from the independent United Kingdom Committee on Toxicity, the FSA has publicly advised that an average adult should not consume more than 70 milligrams per day and vulnerable groups should not consume these products.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to maintain the regulatory system for pharmaceutical medicines at the end of the transition period.

At the end of the transition period, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) will be the United Kingdom’s medicines regulator while acknowledging the special provisions that will apply in Northern Ireland for as long as the Northern Ireland Protocol is in force.

On 27 October 2020 the MHRA published guidance on the licensing regulatory system for pharmaceutical medicines that will apply after the transition period. A statutory instrument, setting out the regulatory environment for medicines from 1 January 2020, is currently before Parliament.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on the pharmaceutical industry of a mutual recognition agreement on (a) good manufacturing practice and (b) batch certification not being agreed by EU and the UK.

Both the European Union and the United Kingdom are committed to agreeing a future partnership by the end of 2020 and are working to achieve this.

In the event of an agreement not being reached with the EU, the UK will continue to recognise certification issued from European Economic Area (EEA) countries confirming compliance with the standards of good manufacturing practice and also accept batch testing done from EEA countries for a period of two years after the end of the transition period, until 1 January 2023. This will provide time for industry to adapt supply chains to future UK regulatory requirements.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 10 November 2020 to Question 97688, how many times enforcement action for non-compliance with the requirements of the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016 has taken place.

Enforcement of the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations (TRPR) 2016 is carried out by local trading standards. The Department will be undertaking a post implementation review of TRPR shortly.

The Department has funded the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI) to provide annual tobacco control surveys on trading standards activities relating to tobacco control legislation enforcement. The latest CTSI survey for 2019-20 is available at the following link:

https://www.tradingstandards.uk/media/documents/news--policy/tobacco-control/ctsi-tobacco-report-2019-20.pdf

It is too early to assess the level of compliance with the ban on menthol cigarettes which was introduced in May this year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation's updated interim advice on priority groups for COVID-19 vaccination, published on 25 September 2020, for what reason all people, regardless of age, considered clinically extremely vulnerable are not categorised as a stand-alone group; what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of people who share a home with people who are clinically extremely vulnerable being considered a higher priority group than the general population; and what plans the Government has to decide which health and social care staff should take priority.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) are the independent experts who advise the Government on which vaccine/s the United Kingdom should use and provide advice on prioritisation at a population level. The JCVI has advised that the first priorities for any COVID-19 vaccination programme should be the prevention of COVID-19 mortality and the protection of health and social care staff and systems. Therefore, in line with the recommendations of the JCVI, the vaccine will be initially rolled out to the priority groups including care home residents and staff, people over 80 years old and health and care workers, then to the rest of the population in order of age and risk, including those who are clinically extremely vulnerable and individuals aged 16 to 64 years old with certain underlying health conditions. Those conditions are set out in the advice of the JCVI published on 30 December at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/priority-groups-for-coronavirus-covid-19-vaccination-advice-from-the-jcvi-30-december-2020/joint-committee-on-vaccination-and-immunisation-advice-on-priority-groups-for-covid-19-vaccination-30-december-2020

Consideration has been given to vaccination of household contacts of immunosuppressed individuals. However, at this time there is no data on the size of the effect of COVID-19 vaccines on transmission. Evidence is expected to accrue during the course of the vaccine programme, and until that time the committee is not in a position to advise vaccination solely on the basis of indirect protection.

By 15 February we aim to have offered a first vaccine dose to everyone in the top four priority groups identified by the JCVI:

- all residents in a care home for older adults and their carers;

- all those 80 years of age and over and frontline health and social care workers;

- all those 75 years of age and over; and

- all those 70 years of age and over and clinically extremely vulnerable individuals.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's strategy entitled, Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives, published on 27 July 2020, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on plans to reduce obesity amongst adolescents, as a distinct group compared to adults or children.

My Rt hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, has regular discussions with Cabinet colleagues on improving the health and wellbeing of all age groups including adolescents.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to assess the effect of covid-19 on patients living with (a) obesity and (b) other long term health conditions; and if he will make a statement.

There is consistent evidence that people who are overweight or living with obesity who contract COVID-19 are more likely to be admitted to hospital, admitted to an intensive care unit and to die from COVID-19 compared to those of a healthy body weight status. We published ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ in July. Our strategy demonstrates an overarching campaign to reduce obesity, takes forward actions from previous chapters of the childhood obesity plan and sets out measures to get the nation fit and healthy, protect against COVID-19 and protect the National Health Service.

There has been no specific assessment of COVID-19 and long-term conditions. Many organisations have produced advice for people to manage their condition during the pandemic, and NHS England and NHS Improvement have supported efforts in this area.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether funding will be provided to expand programmes to tackle obesity and support weight management services in the forthcoming spending review.

Funding decisions for the next financial year, including obesity programmes, are being considered as part of the ongoing Spending Review. The conclusion of the Spending Review will be announced on 25 November.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether (a) private general dental practitioners, (b) general dental practitioners offering a mix of NHS and private treatment, (c) NHS general dental practitioners and (d) community dentists employed by non-NHS organisations are considered essential workers during the November 2020 covid-19 restrictions for the purposes of (i) attending work and (ii) accessing covid-19 testing.

All health and social care front line staff, including dentists and their staff, are considered essential workers for the purpose of attending work and accessing testing. This has applied since the first COVID-19 restrictions and continues to apply to date. This includes those providing private dental treatment as well as those providing National Health Service care.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the Government will announce further details of its water fluoridation plans.

Improving oral health is a priority for the Government. The scientific evidence suggests that water fluoridation is effective in reducing levels of tooth decay. Water fluoridation as a key initiative is set out in the prevention Green Paper: ‘Advancing our health: Prevention in the 2020s’, published in July 2019. Further details of proposed next steps will be announced in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made on implementing the obesity strategy published in July 2020; what support will be made available through that strategy to help people with obesity maintain weight loss; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 12 October 2020 to Question 94726.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the Department has to improve healthcare services dedicated to adolescents with obesity.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 12 October 2020 to Question 94726.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to support long-term weight loss; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 12 October 2020 to Question 94726.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to help ensure resumption of (a) Tier 3 and (b) Tier 4 weight management services continue during the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 12 October 2020 to Question 94726.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answers of 22 October to Questions 100521 and 100519, whether (a) private General Dental Practitioners, (b) General Dental Practitioners offering NHS and private treatment, (c) NHS General Dental Practitioners, and (d) Community dentists employed by non-NHS organisations are defined as healthcare workers for the purposes of priority access to a covid-19 vaccine.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has published interim advice on prioritisation for COVID-19 vaccination. This advice includes vaccination of all health and social care workers, which would include all dental practitioners. The JCVI’s interim advice is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/priority-groups-for-coronavirus-covid-19-vaccination-advice-from-the-jcvi-25-september-2020

The advice provided is to support the Government in development of a vaccine strategy for the delivery of a vaccination programme to the population. The JCVI’s advice will be updated as more information on developmental vaccines become available.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to ensure that UK regulations for tobacco and related products are not weaker than the EU Tobacco Products Directive.

Our commitment to tough tobacco control will continue post 1 January 2021, and we laid the Tobacco Products and Nicotine Inhaling Products (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 on the 28 September 2020 to reaffirm that commitment.

Post-transition period, Great Britain will no longer have to comply with the European Union’s Tobacco Products Directive and there will be opportunity to consider, in the future, regulatory changes that help people quit smoking and address the harms from tobacco. Any changes to do so will be based on robust evidence and in the interests of public health.

The Department will be carrying out a post implementation review of the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016 and Standardised Packaging of Tobacco Products by 20 May 2021 to see if the regulations have both met their objectives. Part of this review process will involve a public consultation to start before the end of the year for people to submit their views and evidence.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the timeframe is for his Department to undertake a review of the tobacco and related product regulations after the transition period; and whether (a) tobacco free nicotine pouches and (b) other novel nicotine products are planned to be covered by that review.

Our commitment to tough tobacco control will continue post 1 January 2021, and we laid the Tobacco Products and Nicotine Inhaling Products (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 on the 28 September 2020 to reaffirm that commitment.

Post-transition period, Great Britain will no longer have to comply with the European Union’s Tobacco Products Directive and there will be opportunity to consider, in the future, regulatory changes that help people quit smoking and address the harms from tobacco. Any changes to do so will be based on robust evidence and in the interests of public health.

The Department will be carrying out a post implementation review of the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016 and Standardised Packaging of Tobacco Products by 20 May 2021 to see if the regulations have both met their objectives. Part of this review process will involve a public consultation to start before the end of the year for people to submit their views and evidence.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 9 October 2020 to Questions 91703 and 91704 on Influenza: Vaccination, when new models of delivery and blueprints which have been shared with regional commissioning teams will be published; and if he will make a statement.

NHS England and NHS Improvement shared the information regarding possible models of implementation with all regional commissioning teams earlier in the flu season. In addition, best practice evidence from provider models is being shared to allow others to learn from successful projects. There are no plans to publish this.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 9 October 2020 to Questions 91703 and 91704 on Influenza: Vaccination, by what date will new mass vaccination delivery models be conceived and implemented.

It is the role of regional NHS England and NHS Improvement public health commissioning teams to decide how best to implement new delivery models for flu, following consideration of the local provider landscape, the situation locally and intelligence on uptake. NHS England and NHS Improvement have advised that in some areas, large scale vaccination models, such as drive in models, are already in place and vaccinating individuals at scale.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to Answer of 9 October 2020 to Questions 91703 and 91704 on Influenza: Vaccination, how many additional trained workforce personnel are being made available to local providers (a) across England and (b) by provider.

36,390 additional trained workforce personnel are being made available to local providers across England, through regional commissioners. The additional workforce is available through the National Health Service ‘bring back scheme’ with around 34,000 health professionals available nationally; general practitioner returners with 1,490 available nationally; and foundation dentists, with 900 available nationally. These individuals are not made available on a provider by provider basis so data by provider is not available.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for International Trade on including UK health priorities in future trade negotiations.

The Department of Health and Social Care and the Department for International Trade have worked together at all levels to ensure that United Kingdom health priorities are represented in the UK’s trade policy.

The Government has been consistently clear that protecting the National Health Service is a fundamental principle of our trade policy. The NHS, the price it pays for drugs and its services are not for sale. Indeed, our published objectives for negotiations with the United States and other new trade partners make it clear that we will not agree measures which undermine the Government’s ability to deliver on these commitments.

The Government has been clear that it will uphold the UK’s high levels of public, animal, and plant health. As such, public health issues are being actively considered as part of the Government’s trade policy development.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Government’s strategy, Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives, published on 27 July 2020, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of future trade deals on the implementation of that strategy.

Public health issues such as obesity are being actively considered by the Department as part of trade policy development. It is our ambition that trade deals will help to improve the accessibility and affordability of healthier foods.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with NICE on the removal of Priadel.

Essential Pharma informed the Department in April 2020 of their intention to discontinue Priadel (lithium carbonate) 200mg and 400mg tablets from the United Kingdom.

The Department engaged with Essential Pharma to reconsider its decision and encourage them to continue supply within the UK. While they did extend the discontinuation date, they were unwilling to continue to supply the UK beyond April 2021.

Following the opening of the Competition and Markets Authority’s investigation, Essential Pharma have taken the decision to reverse their discontinuation of Priadel tablets and continue to supply Priadel to patients across the UK, whilst we work to agree a fair and appropriate price for this medicine.

Officials continue to work closely with the supplier and wholesalers to maintain the availability of Priadel and alternative lithium carbonate brands to ensure supplies remain available for patients.

No discussions have taken place with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with Essential Pharma on the removal of Priadel.

Essential Pharma informed the Department in April 2020 of their intention to discontinue Priadel (lithium carbonate) 200mg and 400mg tablets from the United Kingdom.

The Department engaged with Essential Pharma to reconsider its decision and encourage them to continue supply within the UK. While they did extend the discontinuation date, they were unwilling to continue to supply the UK beyond April 2021.

Following the opening of the Competition and Markets Authority’s investigation, Essential Pharma have taken the decision to reverse their discontinuation of Priadel tablets and continue to supply Priadel to patients across the UK, whilst we work to agree a fair and appropriate price for this medicine.

Officials continue to work closely with the supplier and wholesalers to maintain the availability of Priadel and alternative lithium carbonate brands to ensure supplies remain available for patients.

No discussions have taken place with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the level of access to Priadel in (a) 2020 and (b) 2021 and beyond.

Supplies of Priadel (lithium carbonate) are available.

Ensuring patients have access to the medicines they need is vital. We have established procedures to deal with medicine shortages if and when they arise.

The Department brought the discontinuation of Priadel to the attention of the Competition and Markets Authority, who have now opened an investigation.

Essential Pharma have taken the decision to reverse their discontinuation of Priadel tablets and continue to supply Priadel to patients across the United Kingdom, whilst we work to agree a fair and appropriate price for this medicine.

Officials continue to work closely with the supplier and wholesalers to maintain the availability of Priadel and alternative lithium carbonate brands to ensure supplies remain available for patients. We are aware that Essential Pharma have quotas in place with wholesalers to reduce the risk of stockpiling, but we have confirmed that ordering mechanisms are in place to ensure all prescriptions for Priadel can obtain supplies. We continue to communicate this information with the National Health Service.

We have also added lithium carbonate to the parallel export restriction list of 8 September 2020 to ensure supplies remain available for the UK.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he made of the level of access to lithium carbonate in (a) 2020 and (b) 2021 and beyond.

Supplies of Priadel (lithium carbonate) are available.

Ensuring patients have access to the medicines they need is vital. We have established procedures to deal with medicine shortages if and when they arise.

The Department brought the discontinuation of Priadel to the attention of the Competition and Markets Authority, who have now opened an investigation.

Essential Pharma have taken the decision to reverse their discontinuation of Priadel tablets and continue to supply Priadel to patients across the United Kingdom, whilst we work to agree a fair and appropriate price for this medicine.

Officials continue to work closely with the supplier and wholesalers to maintain the availability of Priadel and alternative lithium carbonate brands to ensure supplies remain available for patients. We are aware that Essential Pharma have quotas in place with wholesalers to reduce the risk of stockpiling, but we have confirmed that ordering mechanisms are in place to ensure all prescriptions for Priadel can obtain supplies. We continue to communicate this information with the National Health Service.

We have also added lithium carbonate to the parallel export restriction list of 8 September 2020 to ensure supplies remain available for the UK.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of clinically extremely vulnerable people who will be unable to return to work on 1 November 2020 because their workplace is not covid-secure.

The information is not available in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps his Department has taken to implement the Government’s commitment to double dementia research funding to over £160 million a year.

The Government remains strongly committed to supporting research into dementia and the United Kingdom research community is playing a significant role in the global effort to find a cure or a major disease-modifying treatment by 2025.

The Government’s 2020 Challenge contained the commitment to spend £300 million on dementia research over the five years to March 2020. This commitment was delivered a year early with £341 million spent on dementia research over the four years to 31 March 2019. We are currently working on ways to boost significantly further research on dementia at all stages on the translation pathway including medical and care interventions.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ensure that NHS (a) dentists and (b) dental staff are able to access free NHS flu vaccines for winter 2020-21.

Responsibility for offering a free flu vaccination to frontline health care workers rests with their employers, as part of their occupational health responsibility. It is recommended that National Health Service independent contractors, which include dentists, offer vaccination to their employed staff, and responsibility for this lies with employers.

Dentists, and dental staff who are in a ‘at-risk’ group will be eligible for a free flu vaccine under the flu programme.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy that private dentists will have priority access to receive a covid-19 vaccination alongside other health and social care professionals.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) are the independent experts who advise Government on which vaccine/s the United Kingdom should use and provide advice on prioritisation at a population level. The JCVI published interim advice on 25 September 2020 stating the vaccine should first be given to care home residents and staff, followed by people over 80 and health and social workers, then to the rest of the population in order of age and risk. The JCVI has prioritised healthcare workers and care workers, which would include dentists, in the initial recommendations. The final recommendations will be based on a detailed analysis of benefit-risk and may further refine these recommendations taking into account the different levels of exposure and other factors such as age and clinical risk.

We will consider the Committee’s advice carefully as we continue to plan for a vaccination campaign.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy that NHS (a) dentists and (b) other dental staff will have priority access to receive a covid-19 vaccination.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) are the independent experts who advise Government on which vaccine/s the United Kingdom should use and provide advice on prioritisation at a population level. The JCVI published interim advice on 25 September 2020 stating the vaccine should first be given to care home residents and staff, followed by people over 80 and health and social workers, then to the rest of the population in order of age and risk. The JCVI has prioritised healthcare workers and care workers, which would include dentists, in the initial recommendations. The final recommendations will be based on a detailed analysis of benefit-risk and may further refine these recommendations taking into account the different levels of exposure and other factors such as age and clinical risk.

We will consider the Committee’s advice carefully as we continue to plan for a vaccination campaign.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that NHS (a) dentists and (b) other dental staff will be eligible to receive a covid-19 vaccination.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) are the independent experts who advise Government on which vaccine/s the United Kingdom should use and provide advice on prioritisation at a population level. The JCVI published interim advice on 25 September 2020 stating the vaccine should first be given to care home residents and staff, followed by people over 80 and health and social workers, then to the rest of the population in order of age and risk. The JCVI has prioritised healthcare workers and care workers, which would include dentists, in the initial recommendations. The final recommendations will be based on a detailed analysis of benefit-risk and may further refine these recommendations taking into account the different levels of exposure and other factors such as age and clinical risk.

We will consider the Committee’s advice carefully as we continue to plan for a vaccination campaign.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of levels of compliance with the ban on menthol cigarettes; and what steps the Government is taking to remove illegal products from the market.

No assessment has been made regarding levels of compliance with the ban on menthol cigarettes since its introduction in May earlier this year. We expect the tobacco industry to comply with the requirements of The Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016. A breach of the regulations could result in enforcement action being taken.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with registered dieticians to inform (a) the obesity strategy and (b) wider nutrition policy.

My Rt hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, has not had any discussions with dietitians to inform the obesity strategy and wider nutrition policy.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of cross-departmental collaboration on the obesity strategy.

Government departments work very closely on reducing obesity and share responsibility for delivering the measures set out in ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’.

Areas of collaboration include the Department working with:

- HM Treasury on fiscal measures including the soft drink industry levy;

- the Department for Education on early years, school food and sports in schools;

- the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on advertising restrictions, the Nutrient Profiling Model, and broader sport and physical activity policy;

- the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government on planning;

- the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on food labelling including the marketing and labelling of infant foods, the National Food Strategy and the Government Buying Standards for Food and Catering Services;

- the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on regulatory measures impacting businesses;

- the Department for Transport on promoting active travel and the living streets project;

- the Department for Work and Pensions on food poverty; and

- the Department for International Trade on front-of-pack nutrition labelling.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the obesity strategy provides (a) appropriate services and (b) support for at-risk children who are overweight or obese.

Local authorities and clinical commissioning groups are responsible for commissioning weight management services. Public Health England (PHE) has a responsibility to support the local delivery of evidence-based, effective and sustainable weight management services as recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence which adults, children and families can access if they are living above a healthy weight.

PHE has published a collection of evidence-based guides and resources to support the commissioning and delivery of tier two weight management services for adults and children and their families. The collection includes a guide to support healthcare professionals to start the conversation with families, research to some of the barriers and facilitators that some families may face.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that every child in England requiring a tier two or three weight management service has access to it.

Local authorities and clinical commissioning groups are responsible for commissioning weight management services. Public Health England (PHE) has a responsibility to support the local delivery of evidence-based, effective and sustainable weight management services as recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence which adults, children and families can access if they are living above a healthy weight.

PHE has published a collection of evidence-based guides and resources to support the commissioning and delivery of tier two weight management services for adults and children and their families. The collection includes a guide to support healthcare professionals to start the conversation with families, research to some of the barriers and facilitators that some families may face.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to (a) support the aims of the obesity strategy and (b) ensure that local authorities have sufficient (i) funding and (ii) resources to deliver obesity prevention initiatives.

‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ demonstrates an overarching campaign to reduce obesity, takes forward actions from previous chapters of the childhood obesity plan and sets out measures to get the nation fit and healthy, protect against COVID-19 and protect the National Health Service.

We have invested £3.279 billion in local authority public health services through the Public Health Grant in 2020/21, in addition to what the NHS spent on preventative interventions such as our world-class immunisation and screening programmes.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, on what date his Department plans to publish a high-level options paper on future system and arrangements for prevention, health improvement and public health care services and Public Health England’s health improvement functions.

We plan to publish and engage on options later in the autumn.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to reduce the diagnosis time for endometriosis; and if he will make a statement.

Endometriosis manifests itself in a variety of ways and shares symptoms with other conditions. As a consequence, diagnosis can be difficult and is sometimes delayed.

There are currently no plans to reduce the diagnosis time for an endometriosis.

Given the highly invasive nature of the diagnostic procedure and the varying degree to which women experience symptoms, it can be more appropriate to treat mild symptoms on clinical grounds and reserve a laparoscopy with its inherent risks for women with more significant symptoms.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, on what date his Department plans to conduct stakeholder engagement on initial options for strengthening national and local health improvement and prevention arrangements.

We plan to undertake this engagement later in the autumn.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of improvement in diagnosis and management of endometriosis in women since the publication of the 2018 NICE quality standards.

There has been no assessment of improvement in the diagnosis and management of endometriosis since the publication of the 2018 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence quality standards.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the capacity of NHS endometriosis specialist centres.

There has been no assessment of the adequacy of the capacity of National Health Service endometriosis specialist centres.

NHS England leads on commissioning specialised services and has developed a service specification for severe endometriosis, but it does not record the number of specialist centres currently available. NHS England expects all NHS centres treating women with severe endometriosis to provide care that meets the standards laid out in the specification.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the availability of flu vaccine doses for winter 2020-21.

We have sufficient vaccine for up to 30 million people to be vaccinated in England this winter.

General practitioners and pharmacists are directly responsible for ordering flu vaccine from suppliers which are used to deliver the national flu programme to adults. In addition, the Department has procured additional doses of seasonal flu vaccine to ensure more flu vaccines are available this winter.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to reduce the effect of covid-19 on flu vaccination programmes ahead of winter 2020-21.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with local areas to ensure that regional teams have plans in place to deliver the flu vaccination programme this winter. Additional trained workforce is being made available to local providers to help them vaccinate more eligible people.

New models of delivery have been developed and blueprints shared with regional commissioning teams to encourage innovative thinking such as mobile, and mass vaccination models to allow for increases in uptake safely whilst observing social distancing and personal protective equipment requirements.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the administering capacity of flu vaccine doses for winter 2020-21.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with local areas to ensure that regional teams have plans in place to deliver the flu vaccination programme this winter. Additional trained workforce is being made available to local providers to help them vaccinate more eligible people.

New models of delivery have been developed and blueprints shared with regional commissioning teams to encourage innovative thinking such as mobile, and mass vaccination models to allow for increases in uptake safely whilst observing social distancing and personal protective equipment requirements.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's report, Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives, published on 27 July 2020, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of that strategy on the number of people with (a) non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and (b) liver cirrhosis.

The NHS Long Term Plan recognised that alcohol and obesity are risk factors of liver disease. ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’, published on 27 July, demonstrates an overarching campaign to reduce obesity, takes forward actions from previous chapters of the childhood obesity plan and sets out measures to get the nation fit and healthy, protect against COVID-19 and protect the National Health Service.

The obesity strategy also includes a commitment to consult on our intention to make companies provide calorie labelling on alcohol. An impact assessment will be published alongside the consultation later this year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data his Department holds on the number of people with severe and complex obesity who used (a) Tier 3 weight management services and (b) Tier 4 weight management services by local authority in each of the last five years.

NHS Digital holds data on severe obesity in children in Reception and Year 6 by local authority for school years 2017-18 and 2018-19 through the National Child Measurement Programme. This information is attached. The programme did not collect data on severe obesity prior to 2017-18.

The latest report from the National Child Measurement Programme can be viewed at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/national-child-measurement-programme/2018-19-school-year

NHS Digital has advised that it does not hold any further information on the number of people with severe and complex obesity by local authority or information on the number of people who used Tier 3 or Tier 4 weight management services by local authority.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data his Department holds on the number of people with severe and complex obesity by local authority in each of the last five years.

NHS Digital holds data on severe obesity in children in Reception and Year 6 by local authority for school years 2017-18 and 2018-19 through the National Child Measurement Programme. This information is attached. The programme did not collect data on severe obesity prior to 2017-18.

The latest report from the National Child Measurement Programme can be viewed at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/national-child-measurement-programme/2018-19-school-year

NHS Digital has advised that it does not hold any further information on the number of people with severe and complex obesity by local authority or information on the number of people who used Tier 3 or Tier 4 weight management services by local authority.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's report, Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives, published on 27 July 2020, what assessment his Department has made of the potential cost savings to the public purse of (a) specialist weight management clinicals provided by multidisciplinary teams and (b) bariatric surgery for patients with severe and complex obesity being routinely introduced; and if he will make a statement.

‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ demonstrates an overarching campaign to reduce obesity, takes forward actions from previous chapters of the childhood obesity plan and sets our measures to get the nation fit and healthy, protect against COVID-19 and protect the National Health Service.

Through the strategy we are delivering a range of measures on weight management, including expanding weight management services, to help more people get the support they need and making conversations about weight in primary care the norm. Further details about these measures will be available later in the year and we will engage stakeholders throughout this process.

It is for clinical commissioning groups to commission complex obesity services for adults based on the needs of their local population, which includes all bariatric surgical procedures and the associated care.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's report, Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives, published on 27 July 2020, what plans his Department has to support general practitioners to refer patients with severe and complex obesity to (a) Tier 3 weight management services and (b) Tier 4 weight management services.

‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ demonstrates an overarching campaign to reduce obesity, takes forward actions from previous chapters of the childhood obesity plan and sets our measures to get the nation fit and healthy, protect against COVID-19 and protect the National Health Service.

Through the strategy we are delivering a range of measures on weight management, including expanding weight management services, to help more people get the support they need and making conversations about weight in primary care the norm. Further details about these measures will be available later in the year and we will engage stakeholders throughout this process.

It is for clinical commissioning groups to commission complex obesity services for adults based on the needs of their local population, which includes all bariatric surgical procedures and the associated care.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish a response to the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Review report published in July 2020.

The recommendations of the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review are being considered carefully.

We do not consider it appropriate to commit to a specific timeframe for a response while these recommendations are being considered. While this report was published on 8 July, it took over two years to compile and we therefore consider it vitally important that it is given full consideration.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's policy paper, Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives, published on 27 July 2020, what plans his Department has to introduce (a) specialist weight management clinics provided by multidisciplinary teams and (b) greater access to bariatric surgery for patients with severe and complex obesity.

Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for commissioning complex obesity services for adults, which include all bariatric surgical procedures and the associated care. To help practitioners deliver the best possible care and give people the most effective treatments, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has produced a suite of guidance on reducing obesity including ‘Obesity: identification, assessment and management’. This includes recommendations on when to consider bariatric surgery for people who are obese.

Through the new obesity strategy we are delivering a range of measures on weight management including a National Health Service 12-week weight loss plan app, expanding weight management services to help more people get the support they need, accelerating the expansion of the NHS diabetes prevention programme and making conversations about weight in primary care the norm. Further details about these measures will be available later in the year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many FP17 forms detailing dental activity were submitted in each of the last six months.

The data is not held in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and social Care, pursuant to the answer of 1 September 2020 to Question 78839, what his timetable is for the resumption of patient transport services for patients with ophthalmology appointments.

On 27 March the National Health Service released guidance to reflect changes in patient transport services during the COVID-19 response. As the NHS returns to a business as usual position further amendments to the guidance have been made and are due to be published shortly. NHS trusts and clinical commissioning groups will implement this guidance locally to provide appropriate levels of service going forward.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much of the £750 million package of support for charities has been allocated to ophthalmology charities.

We recognise that many charities are facing difficult decisions at the exact time their services are needed most and, on 8 April 2020 the Chancellor announced £750 million to support for the charity sector in response to COVID-19. This includes up to £200 million for hospices and £22 million for health and social care charities. The £22 million includes:

- £4.2 million to support mental health charities and charities within the National Bereavement Alliance;

- Up to £6.8 million to support St John Ambulance;

- £6 million to support Air Ambulances;

- £6 million to support various charities, including those working with people with learning disabilities, autism and complex needs, those working to support people with cancer and stroke and dementia charities, and those that support the adult social care system; and

- This funding will also go to charities supporting pregnant women, babies in neonatal intensive care and those affected by stillbirth and neonatal deaths and support for specialist addiction and recovery charities.

To this date there has been no funding agreed for ophthalmology charities.

There is still an opportunity for charities to apply directly for funding from the National Lottery’s £200 million Coronavirus Community Support Fund. This fund is supporting charities working with vulnerable people. The criteria for this fund are set out at the following link:

https://www.tnlcommunityfund.org.uk/

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to allocate funding to ensure that ophthalmology charities can continue to run their services.

We recognise that many charities are facing difficult decisions at the exact time their services are needed most and, on 8 April 2020 the Chancellor announced £750 million to support for the charity sector in response to COVID-19. This includes up to £200 million for hospices and £22 million for health and social care charities. The £22 million includes:

- £4.2 million to support mental health charities and charities within the National Bereavement Alliance;

- Up to £6.8 million to support St John Ambulance;

- £6 million to support Air Ambulances;

- £6 million to support various charities, including those working with people with learning disabilities, autism and complex needs, those working to support people with cancer and stroke and dementia charities, and those that support the adult social care system; and

- This funding will also go to charities supporting pregnant women, babies in neonatal intensive care and those affected by stillbirth and neonatal deaths and support for specialist addiction and recovery charities.

To this date there has been no funding agreed for ophthalmology charities.

There is still an opportunity for charities to apply directly for funding from the National Lottery’s £200 million Coronavirus Community Support Fund. This fund is supporting charities working with vulnerable people. The criteria for this fund are set out at the following link:

https://www.tnlcommunityfund.org.uk/

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to allow patient transport services that enable people to attend ophthalmology appointments to resume.

On 27 March the National Health Service released guidance to reflect changes in patient transport services (PTS) during the COVID-19 response. As a result, PTS was redeployed to support critical services and ensure transport was available for those who needed it most.

As hospital services are reintroduced, PTS should be available to support patients to attend their appointments, including ophthalmology patients. We are in the process of replacing the earlier guidance to reflect that the eligibility criteria that was temporarily withdrawn can now be reinstated.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) advice he has received on and (b) assessment he has made of the effect of restrictions resulting from the covid-19 outbreak on clinical outcomes for people in need of regular hospital treatment for eye conditions; and what steps he is taking to restart regular hospital ophthalmology treatment.

Whilst routine hospital treatments were suspended to provide capacity to treat COVID-19 patients, we are now working closely with the National Health Service and other partners to restart these in a safe way. Guidance has been issued to local NHS providers and commissioning trusts on the restart of non-COVID-19 services, starting with the most clinically urgent cases and ensuring this is done safely with appropriate infection control.

The treatment of patients, including ophthalmology, will be based on clinical judgement, with patient and staff safety as the highest priority.

The Government is also providing an additional £3 billion to the NHS, which includes funding for continued access to the independent sector to carry out routine treatments and procedures as well as provide additional capacity for COVID-19 patients if needed.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to promote musculoskeletal health during the covid-19 outbreak.

Public Health England (PHE) is working with key partners including NHS England and NHS Improvement, the British Society of Rheumatology, the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy and other professional bodies and third sector parties such as Versus Arthritis and Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance to promote musculoskeletal (MSK) health during COVID-19. This has included the ‘We are Undefeatable campaign’ for people with long term health conditions and a partnership with the BBC to promote Couch to 5K. Further information can be accessed at the following links:

https://weareundefeatable.co.uk/

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise/couch-to-5k-week-by-week

In May 2020, PHE hosted a webinar on the Impact of COVID-19 on Musculoskeletal Health and Mental Wellbeing, with participants attending from a range of organisations including local authorities, private businesses and academia.

In April 2020, PHE re-issued advice on vitamin D supplementation as recommended by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition; whilst stay at home measures were in place it was recommended that everyone take a daily vitamin D supplement to keep bones and muscles healthy. This advice was not about preventing COVID-19 or mitigating its effects.

The Every Mind Matters online resource provides some simple advice and support on physical and mental wellbeing for people who are working from home during the COVID-19 outbreak at the following link:

https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/every-mind-matters/7-simple-tips-to-tackle-working-from-home/

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 30 January 2020 to Question 8394 on Ophthalmic Services and with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, what the timelines are for the development and publication of the National Ophthalmology Plan.

Further to the answer given on 30 January, NHS England and NHS Improvement’s national outpatient transformation programme has already begun, although there will not be a formally published National Ophthalmology Plan.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are currently developing guidance and support to improve ophthalmology outpatient services and avoid the need for physical attendances where possible. This includes already appointed dedicated clinical leadership, pathway design and practical resources to be shared with local health systems to both support restoration of ophthalmology outpatient services post-COVID-19 and enable future transformation.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working closely with the Royal College of Ophthalmologists, the College of Optometrists and other key stakeholders.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 8 July 2020 to Question for 67749 on Pain: Health Services, what steps his Department is taking to increase access to the online version of the Escape-pain programme.

In the NHS Long Term Plan, published 7 January 2019, NHS England set out the expansion of online access to support for people with musculoskeletal problems. This included programmes such as a digital version of the well-established face-to-face ESCAPE-pain group programme, which enables self-management and coping with arthritic pain through exercise.

The online version of the ESCAPE-pain programme is currently freely available in both a web-based form, which can be accessed by a computer or a variety of mobile devices, and an application available on Android smartphones. The ESCAPE-pain website is available at the following link:

www.escape-pain.org/

Outcome data on user engagement the ESCAPE-Pain programme is expected in August, which will enable an assessment of usage.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the proposed deductions to be applied to NHSE payments to dental providers for (a) April, (b) May and (c) until 8 June 2020.

NHS England published a letter on 13 July, setting out that a deduction of 16.75% will be applied to National Health Service dental practices (those that were not operating as urgent dental centre sites) for the period 1 April to 7 June, to take account of lower consumables (laboratory and material) and other variable practice costs during the period. Local urgent dental care centres will not have any deductions applied for the period they have been operational. A copy of the letter can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2020/03/C0603-Dental-preparedness-letter_July-2020.pdf

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason NHS England made the decision to impose retrospective deductions to payments for Local Urgent Dental Care sites.

NHS England published a letter on 13 July, setting out that a deduction of 16.75% will be applied to National Health Service dental practices (those that were not operating as urgent dental centre sites) for the period 1 April to 7 June, to take account of lower consumables (laboratory and material) and other variable practice costs during the period. Local urgent dental care centres will not have any deductions applied for the period they have been operational. A copy of the letter can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2020/03/C0603-Dental-preparedness-letter_July-2020.pdf

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of school closures as a result of the covid-19 outbreak on levels of dental decay among children.

No assessment has been made of the effect of school closures as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak on levels of dental decay among children. School and nursery based oral health improvement programmes stopped with school closures. Public Health England is working with the Department for Education and partners, on restarting these programmes safely in the autumn term.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of children whose planned dental GA admission to hospital was (a) suspended and (b) cancelled during the covid-19 lockdown restrictions.

No such estimate has been made. Guidance was issued on 17 March to National Health Service trusts asking them to postpone non-urgent related elective operations in order to prepare the system to respond to COVID-19 pressures.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what information he holds on the number of people employed by (a) the NHS, (b) police forces, (c) fire brigades and (d) (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools who have been required to shield from covid-19.

This information requested is not collected centrally as part of the shielding patients list.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of health insurance providers to reimburse the costs of dialysis treatment for people with kidney disease who need to travel in the EU in the event that there is no agreement on reciprocal provision of temporary healthcare cover for (a) tourists, (b) short-term business visitors and (c) service providers after the end of the transition period.

The Withdrawal Agreement between the United Kingdom Government and the European Union ensures that there will be no changes to reciprocal healthcare access for state pensioners, workers, students, tourists and other visitors, the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) scheme, or planned treatment during the Transition Period (until 31 December 2020).

This includes the EHIC which can support UK residents with long-term health conditions travelling to the EU who may require needs arising treatment.

The future of reciprocal healthcare arrangements between the UK and EU are subject to negotiations, which are currently ongoing. As part of its published approach to the negotiations with the EU, the UK has indicated that it is open to working with the EU to establish arrangements that provide healthcare cover for tourists, short-term business visitors and service providers. The UK’s published approach to negotiations, ‘The Future Relationship with the EU’ and the draft legal text of an agreement covering social security coordination (including reciprocal healthcare) can be found online at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/our-approach-to-the-future-relationship-with-the-eu

The UK Government is advising people with pre-existing or long-term medical conditions to also check the Money and Pensions Advice Service which has information on their website for people about their options for purchasing travel insurance. Further information is available at the following link:

www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/travel-insurance-for-over-65s-and-medical-conditions

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the availability of (a) radioligand therapy and (b) short shelf-life medicines after the end of the transition period.

The United Kingdom’s published approach sets out how we want to facilitate trade in medicinal products, including radioligand therapy and short shelf-life medicines, to support high levels of patient safety.

We will continue to work closely with the pharmaceutical industry, the National Health Service and others in the supply chain to help ensure patients can access the medicines they need, and that precautions are in place to reduce the likelihood of future shortages.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to work with (a) the life sciences industry and (b) experts in radioligand therapy in relation to the development of secondary legislation to enact the provisions of the Medicines and Medical Devices Bill.

The Department has held a number of engagement events with over 150 representatives from the life sciences industry on the Medicines and Medical Devices Bill and we will continue to work collaboratively with the sector when making secondary legislation. The powers in the Medicines and Medical Devices Bill are subject to a duty to consult and therefore before making any regulations, the Department will consult with those considered appropriate. This will include the life sciences industry and expert stakeholders if they were to be affected by the proposed change.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of effectiveness of the Health Infrastructure Plan to update and improve the capability of the NHS to deliver nuclear medicine; and if he will make it his policy to increase the number of centres that are equipped to offer nuclear medicine.

No assessment has been made.

Not all nuclear medicine services are commissioned at a national level; some are commissioned by clinical commissioning groups.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that the Your Covid Recovery service is accessible to all those who need it.

The new ‘Your COVID Recovery’ service, forms part of National Health Service plans to expand access to COVID-19 rehabilitation treatments for those who have survived the virus but still have problems with breathing, mental health problems or other complications.

Phase one is already live at the following link:

https://www.yourcovidrecovery.nhs.uk/

Phase two, where people who need it will be able to access personalised support packages, is expected to launch later this summer.

The online portal will help ensure that people get the support they need to recover from the effects of the virus. Where patients do not already have access to a suitable device to use the online platform, printed materials will be made depending upon demand to ensure the service is accessible to all.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when each stage of the Your Covid Recovery service will be made accessible; and if he will make statement.

The new ‘Your COVID Recovery’ service, forms part of National Health Service plans to expand access to COVID-19 rehabilitation treatments for those who have survived the virus but still have problems with breathing, mental health problems or other complications.

Phase one is already live at the following link:

https://www.yourcovidrecovery.nhs.uk/

Phase two, where people who need it will be able to access personalised support packages, is expected to launch later this summer.

The online portal will help ensure that people get the support they need to recover from the effects of the virus. Where patients do not already have access to a suitable device to use the online platform, printed materials will be made depending upon demand to ensure the service is accessible to all.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps Public Health England is taking to enforce the ban on menthol cigarettes.

The ban on characterising flavours such as menthol in cigarettes came into force on 20 May 2020. In advance of the ban, several tobacco companies launched new brands marketed at menthol smokers.

Public Health England is the Competent Authority under the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016 responsible for testing and receiving notifications of tobacco products.

If any products are tested and found to be in breach of the United Kingdom regulations, then they will be removed from the list of notified products for sale.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 1 July 2020 to Question 58066 on Contraceptives, what data his Department holds on prescribing rates for long-acting reversible contraception for each year since 2013-14.

NHS Digital hold the sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services data. The data primarily covers contraceptive activity taking place at dedicated SRH services in England, as recorded in the sexual and reproductive activity dataset (SHRAD). The primary focus of the SHRAD collection is contraception.

The data on prescribing rates for long-acting reversible contraception for each year since 2013-14 are published in ‘NHS Digital’s sexual and reproductive health services (contraception) – England: data tables’. Information on women using sexual and reproductive health services for contraception, by main method of contraception and age and contraceptive prescriptions dispensed in the community is attached.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 1 July 2020 to Question 58066 on Contraceptives, with which organisations his Department plans to consult on the development of the Sexual and Reproductive Health Strategy; and what format he plans to use for that consultation.

Work on developing the national sexual health and reproductive health strategy was paused during the COVID-19 pandemic. Now that we are moving forward with the Government’s COVID-19 recovery strategy, work on the national sexual health and reproductive health strategy will be restarting shortly. Information on plans and the timeframe for engaging with stakeholders, as well as plans for publication, will be announced in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 01 July 2020 to Question 58066 on Contraceptives, what the timeframe is for (a) consulting on and (b) publishing the Sexual and Reproductive Health Strategy.

Work on developing the national sexual health and reproductive health strategy was paused during the COVID-19 pandemic. Now that we are moving forward with the Government’s COVID-19 recovery strategy, work on the national sexual health and reproductive health strategy will be restarting shortly. Information on plans and the timeframe for engaging with stakeholders, as well as plans for publication, will be announced in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to consult on guidance for commissioning community rehabilitation services in England.

Cross-sector work has already commenced to inform a refresh of the Rehabilitation Commissioning Guidance published 2016. This included engagement with professional bodies’ clinicians, alongside many other stakeholders, societies and third sector organisations who represent the patient voice.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many times he has met with representatives Vertex Pharmaceuticals to discuss (a) cystic fibrosis treatment and (b) other treatments in the last 12 months.

Ministers meet a range of stakeholders, details of which are published quarterly. Details for October – December 2019, the most recently published information, is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/876059/Q3_Ministers_MEETINGS.csv/preview

The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care met with representatives of Vertex Pharmaceuticals on 8 October 2019 to discuss the availability of cystic fibrosis treatments in England.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to publish a response to the consultation, Health is Everyone’s Business: proposals to reduce ill health-related job loss, which closed on 7 October 2019.

We plan to publish the response to the consultation ‘Health is everyone’s business: proposals to reduce ill health-related job loss’ later this year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to promote musculoskeletal health during the covid-19 outbreak.

Improving musculoskeletal health is a key priority for this Government and we made specific commitments to tackle musculoskeletal (MSK) ill-health last year in ‘Advancing our health: Prevention in the 2020s’. Public Health England and NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with professional bodies and third sector stakeholders to promote MSK health. They are providing evidence-based interventions and resources to support people with MSK conditions and preventative strategies to those at risk of developing MSK conditions during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve access to the online version of the Escape-pain programme.

In the NHS Long Term plan, published on 7 January 2019, NHS England set out the expansion of online access to support for people with musculoskeletal problems. This included programmes such as a digital version of the well-established face-to-face ESCAPE-pain group programme, which enables self-management and coping with arthritic pain through exercise.

The online version of the ESCAPE-pain programme is currently freely available in both a web-based form, which can be accessed by a computer or a variety of mobile devices, and an application available on Android smartphones. The ESCAPE-pain website is at the following link:

www.escape-pain.org/

Outcome data on user engagement the ESCAPE-Pain programme is expected in August.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to support dental laboratories during the covid-19 outbreak.

Dentists holding contracts with NHS England and NHS Improvement have continued to receive their full contract value, paid as usual in monthly equal instalments, throughout the pandemic period. The contract value includes expenses. Dentists contract separately with dental suppliers, including laboratories, for the materials and other supplies they need. Paying for supplies provided is a matter for the individual practice, and if there is failure to pay, the same legal recourse as with any other unpaid debt.

The National Health Service has no standing contractual relationship with laboratories or other dental suppliers and support for the industry throughout the pandemic has come, as with other businesses, through the wide range of financial schemes and help offered by the HM Treasury. Dental laboratories have the same access to this support as other businesses do.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will issue guidance to dental practices to settle dental laboratory accounts on receipt of NHS contract payments.

Dentists holding contracts with NHS England and NHS Improvement have continued to receive their full contract value, paid as usual in monthly equal instalments, throughout the pandemic period. The contract value includes expenses. Dentists contract separately with dental suppliers, including laboratories, for the materials and other supplies they need. Paying for supplies provided is a matter for the individual practice, and if there is failure to pay, the same legal recourse as with any other unpaid debt.

The National Health Service has no standing contractual relationship with laboratories or other dental suppliers and support for the industry throughout the pandemic has come, as with other businesses, through the wide range of financial schemes and help offered by the HM Treasury. Dental laboratories have the same access to this support as other businesses do.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's press release of 5 June 2020 stating that all staff in hospitals in England will be provided with surgical masks which they will be expected to wear from 15 June 2020, whether his Department has (a) made an assessment of the potential merits of applying that policy to the pharmacy sector (b) plans to extend that policy to include community pharmacy teams.

The Government has detailed clear policy on the kind of personal protective equipment (PPE) to be used in the pharmacy sector, including community pharmacy teams. The latest PPE guidance from Public Health England recommends sessional use of fluid resistant surgical masks (FRSM) in a pharmacy setting only where social distancing of two metres from patients cannot be maintained. If required, further supplies of FRSM can be ordered through their usual wholesalers and distributor networks that supply to community pharmacies. If these wholesaler routes are unable to provide enough PPE, community pharmacies should turn to their Local Resilience Forums (LRFs), who can provide supplies to respond to local spikes in need. LRFs will continue to receive enough PPE stock to support other sectors, including community pharmacies.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions his Department has held with representatives of the pharmacy sector on that sector's role in the next phase of the response to covid-19; and what recent assessment he has made of how pharmacies can support medicines safety and reduce avoidable hospital admissions.

Health Ministers, the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement have been in continued dialogue with representatives of the pharmacy sector throughout the pandemic. Discussions are now focused on what we can learn from the changes made, especially in primary care and the wider system, during the pandemic and which of those changes we might want to embed.

The Government’s ambition on using community pharmacy to support urgent care and medicine safety was set out in the five-year deal. We will continue to prioritise and negotiate the services outlined in that agreement with the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee in the light of the additional demands placed on the health service by COVID-19.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to ensure the financial sustainability of pharmacies.

The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care has a duty to ensure access, in England, to National Health Service pharmaceutical services. These are commissioned from community pharmacies who are private businesses. £2.592 billion a year was committed to the sector in the five-year deal from 2019/20 to 2023/24 for the NHS pharmaceutical services they provide, a total of nearly £13 billion. To maintain access in areas where there are fewer pharmacies or higher health needs, additional payments, from within that funding, are made under the Pharmacy Access Scheme to eligible pharmacies.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, £350 million in extra advance payments have been made to address cash flow, and support pharmacies in maintaining medicine supplies and providing health advice. Additional payments above the £2.592 billion for 2020/21 have been made to support additional opening hours on Bank Holidays and for a medicine delivery service to shielded patients. We continue to work with the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee to assess any additional COVID-19 related costs that it may be necessary to cover.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the effectiveness of the community pharmacy sector to help reduce the demand on (a) primary and (b) secondary care.

The funding for National Health Service pharmaceutical services provided by community pharmacies in England was set at £2.592 million a year until 2023/24 through the five-year deal; a total of nearly £13 billion. The deal contains an annual review to ensure that the services commissioned under the community pharmacy contractual framework (CPCF) remain within that financial envelope.

The five-year deal, published by the Department in July 2019, sets out an expanded role for community pharmacy across prevention, urgent care and medicine safety. It will provide accessible and convenient healthcare, allowing people to quickly access a much wider range of services and health advice, in the heart of their community, relieving pressure on general practitioner (GP) practices and other parts of the health service, including secondary care.

In October 2019, we launched the Community Pharmacist Consultation Service, which refers people with minor illness and urgent medicine needs direct from NHS 111 to community pharmacy as the first port of call. Pilots are currently running on expanding this successful service to include referrals from GP practices. We will evaluate these pilots and, if positive, negotiate new service specifications into both the CPCF and the GP contract.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government plans to increase the level of long-term funding allocated to community pharmacies in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

The funding for National Health Service pharmaceutical services provided by community pharmacies in England was set at £2.592 million a year until 2023/24 through the five-year deal; a total of nearly £13 billion. The deal contains an annual review to ensure that the services commissioned under the community pharmacy contractual framework (CPCF) remain within that financial envelope.

The five-year deal, published by the Department in July 2019, sets out an expanded role for community pharmacy across prevention, urgent care and medicine safety. It will provide accessible and convenient healthcare, allowing people to quickly access a much wider range of services and health advice, in the heart of their community, relieving pressure on general practitioner (GP) practices and other parts of the health service, including secondary care.

In October 2019, we launched the Community Pharmacist Consultation Service, which refers people with minor illness and urgent medicine needs direct from NHS 111 to community pharmacy as the first port of call. Pilots are currently running on expanding this successful service to include referrals from GP practices. We will evaluate these pilots and, if positive, negotiate new service specifications into both the CPCF and the GP contract.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of patients experiencing prolonged covid-19 symptoms on decisions to ease the covid-19 lockdown restrictions.

Each amendment to lockdown regulations has represented a cautious step in easing restrictions, whilst continuing to limit the risk of transmission.

At each review point of the Regulations, we have considered the necessity and proportionality of existing measures based on the most up to date evidence available at the time, including on rate of transmission, infection and death rate, and current intensive care unit capacity. Where restrictions are no longer considered proportionate or necessary at that point in time they have been eased or removed, however we remain ready to put the brakes on and increase lockdown measures either at a national or local level if necessary.

The UK Research and Innovation-National Institute for Health Research Rapid Response Rolling Call has funded a large post-hospitalisation study. The study, announced in July, will establish a national consortium and a research platform embedded within clinical care to better understand and improve long-term outcomes for survivors following hospitalisation with COVID-19. It will also help to ensure future treatment can be tailored as much as possible to the person.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he has made an assessment of the prevalence of patients experiencing covid-19 symptoms for longer than three weeks.

Public Health England has made no assessment of the prevalence of patients experiencing COVID-19 symptoms for longer than three weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 free cancer hubs have been established; what (a) procedures and (b) services those hubs provide; and how many of those hubs provide (i) chemotherapy and (ii) systemic therapies.

Covid-19 protected cancer hubs have been set up in 21 Cancer Alliances across England to provide cancer surgery and to keep patients safe. Cancer Alliances lead delivery and improvement of cancer care across England, working with and on behalf of local hospitals and services.

The hubs have been established primarily to ensure that urgent and essential cancer surgery can continue and to support the recovery of cancer services. Certain Cancer Alliances may also choose to use the hub model to support the delivery of other types of treatment, which may include chemotherapy and systemic therapies. Information on how many is not held centrally.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether NICE will make an assessment of the potential merits of changing the cost-effectiveness thresholds f