Holly Lynch Portrait

Holly Lynch

Labour - Halifax

Shadow Minister (Home Office)

(since April 2020)
Home Affairs Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Shadow Minister (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) (Flooding and Coastal Communities)
3rd Jul 2017 - 30th Jul 2018
Women and Equalities Committee
28th Feb 2017 - 3rd May 2017
Procedure Committee
1st Feb 2016 - 28th Feb 2017
Opposition Whip (Commons)
18th Sep 2015 - 9th Oct 2016
Environmental Audit Committee
20th Jul 2015 - 26th Oct 2015


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 21st September 2021
09:25
Nationality and Borders Bill - Oral evidence
Subject: To consider the Bill
21 Sep 2021, 9:25 a.m. View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 21st September 2021
14:00
Nationality and Borders Bill - Oral evidence
Subject: Further to consider the Bill
21 Sep 2021, 2 p.m. View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 23rd September 2021
11:30
Nationality and Borders Bill - Oral evidence
Subject: Further to consider the Bill
23 Sep 2021, 11:30 a.m. View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 23rd September 2021
14:00
Nationality and Borders Bill - Oral evidence
Subject: Further to consider the Bill
23 Sep 2021, 2 p.m. View calendar
Department Event
Monday 18th October 2021
14:30
Home Office
Oral questions - Main Chamber
18 Oct 2021, 2:30 p.m.
Home Office (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Protecting the Public and Justice for Victims
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 193 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 0
Speeches
Wednesday 15th September 2021
Universal Credit and Working Tax Credits

As we have heard, the Government’s plan to scrap the £20 UC uplift is causing a great deal of worry …

Written Answers
Wednesday 15th September 2021
Asylum
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many caseworkers are responsible for processing asylum claims; and …
Early Day Motions
Monday 20th January 2020
Children and mental health legislation
That this House welcomes the announcement in the Queen’s Speech that the Mental Health Act will be reformed; agrees that …
Bills
Wednesday 24th February 2021
High Performance Vehicle Renting (Regulation) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to regulate the renting of high performance road vehicles; and for connected purposes.
MP Financial Interests
Saturday 11th January 2020
2. (a) Support linked to an MP but received by a local party organisation or indirectly via a central party organisation
Name of donor: Lord Matthew Oakeshott
Address of donor: private
Amount of donation or nature and value if donation in …
EDM signed
Monday 19th April 2021
Public Health
That the Health Protection (Coronavirus, International Travel) (England) (Amendment) (No. 7) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 150), dated 12 February …
Supported Legislation
Representation of the People (Young People's Enfranchisement) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Holly Lynch has voted in 268 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Holly Lynch Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Kevin Foster (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
(48 debate interactions)
Stuart C McDonald (Scottish National Party)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Home Affairs)
(28 debate interactions)
Chris Philp (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
(16 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(101 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(5 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(4 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Holly Lynch's debates

Halifax Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Halifax signature proportion
Petitions with most Halifax signatures
Holly Lynch has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Holly Lynch

19th April 2021
Holly Lynch signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 19th April 2021

Public Health

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That the Health Protection (Coronavirus, International Travel) (England) (Amendment) (No. 7) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 150), dated 12 February 2021, a copy of which was laid before this House on 12 February 2021, be revoked.
10 signatures
(Most recent: 19 Apr 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Green Party: 1
24th March 2021
Holly Lynch signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 24th March 2021

Immigration

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Immigration (Guidance on Detention of Vulnerable Persons) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 184), dated 23 February 2021, a copy of which was laid before this House on 25 February 2021, be annulled.
82 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Apr 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 40
Scottish National Party: 24
Liberal Democrat: 8
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alba Party: 2
Alliance: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Holly Lynch's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Holly Lynch, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Holly Lynch has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Holly Lynch has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by Holly Lynch


A Bill to regulate the renting of high performance road vehicles; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Wednesday 24th February 2021
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to grant the Environment Agency additional powers to require water companies to manage reservoirs to mitigate flood risk; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 17th July 2019
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to extend the National Living Wage to people aged 18 to 24.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 19th July 2017
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

A Bill to make certain offences including malicious wounding, grievous or actual bodily harm and common assault aggravated when perpetrated against a constable, firefighter, doctor, paramedic or nurse in the execution of his or her duty or against a person assisting these persons in the execution of their duty; to make provision to require those suspected of certain assaults that may pose a health risk, including spitting, to be required to undergo blood tests and to make it an offence, without reasonable excuse, to refuse to undergo such tests; to make provision about the sentences for those convicted of the offences; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 7th February 2017
(Read Debate)

90 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what his expected timetable is for publication of the final report of the Infected Blood Inquiry.

The timetable for the Infected Blood Inquiry is a matter for Sir Brian Langstaff, the Chair of the independent statutory Inquiry. Sir Brian has said that the work of the Inquiry will be completed as quickly as reasonable thoroughness permits - recognising that those infected and affected are still suffering today.

The Inquiry is continuing to work at pace, and will hear evidence and presentations between now and December 2021. Further details on progress can be found on the Infected Blood Inquiry website - https://www.infectedbloodinquiry.org.uk/.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to support farmers and workers in the UK’s global agricultural supply chains to help (a) decarbonise production systems and (b) absorb the costs of more sustainable methods of farming.

The UK Government is committed to tackling deforestation and greening agricultural supply chains. We are supporting a broad package of measures to support the transition to sustainable global supply chains and to protect forests and other ecosystems.

We are working with developing country governments to identify how public policies and support to agriculture can be developed or reformed to leverage private investment into more sustainable agriculture; and to support farmers to shift from environmentally harmful practices to more sustainable ones. Together with the Just Rural Transition initiative launched in 2019, and in partnership with the World Bank, we are assisting interested developing countries to analyse their policy options for helping farmers to make this transition. Through the COP26 Sustainable Agriculture campaign, we are mobilising further support to help those countries to develop, test and pilot sustainable approaches. This includes re-orienting investment in research, development and innovation to help farmers access and scale up sustainable technologies and practices.

We are also supporting multilateral organisations to improve climate outcomes in their agricultural programming. This includes providing £150 million to the International Fund for Agricultural Development’s flagship ‘Adaptation for Smallholder Adaptation Programme’ and mainstreaming climate work into the Global Agriculture and Food Security Programme.

We are introducing world-leading due diligence legislation through the Environment Bill to tackle illegal deforestation in UK supply chains, and have convened the Forest, Agriculture and Commodity Trade (FACT) Dialogue as part of our COP 26 Presidency. Through the FACT dialogue we are working with other producer and consumer governments to develop a shared roadmap of actions to protect forests and other ecosystems while promoting sustainable development and trade.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps have been taken to end the requirement for people with guide dogs to produce an animal health certificate when travelling to Northern Ireland.

The health and documentary requirements for pet travel to the EU are set out under the EU Pet Travel Regulations. Under the Northern Ireland Protocol, EU rules also apply to the non-commercial movements of pets into Northern Ireland from Great Britain. There are no derogations for assistance dogs under the legal framework of the EU Pet Travel Regulations.

We will continue to press the European Commission in relation to securing Part 1 listed status, recognising that achieving this would alleviate some of the new requirements for pet owners and assistance dog users travelling to the EU and to Northern Ireland. We are clear that we meet all the animal health requirements for this, and we have one of the most rigorous pet checking regimes in Europe to protect our biosecurity.

The Government is engaging with the Northern Ireland Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) to explore means to streamline pet travel between Great Britain and Northern Ireland recognising the high standards of animal health that we share. The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster has also written to the European Vice-President seeking to ensure that an agreement can be made to address the barriers imposed on pet travel between Great Britain, Northern Ireland and Ireland.

We are proactively engaging with the assistance dog community and relevant stakeholders on the impacts on dog movements from Great Britain to the EU and to Northern Ireland. We will continue to work closely with assistance dog organisations to share the latest advice and guidance (in accessible formats) with their members on pet travel requirements.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits making flood resilience grants available throughout the year.

Risk Management Authorities can develop local Property Flood Resilience (PFR) grant schemes and apply to Regional Flood and Coastal Committees for a contribution towards their cost through Local-Levy or Grant-in-Aid.

As set out in our Policy Statement, we want to encourage a faster transition to a market place for PFR, including advice, products and service delivery. We also want to ensure the right incentives and financial products are available to encourage property flood resilience installation. This winter, we will be publishing a Call for Evidence on PFR policy.

In addition, we are investing £200m in an innovative resilience programme to drive and test innovation at a local level to improve resilience to flooding and coastal erosion. This includes an action on PFR. We will be inviting expressions of interest later this year.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans the Government has to incentivise the installation of flood (a) resistant and (b) resilient measures to help improve protections for properties from future flooding.

The Government launched a Policy Statement in July 2020 setting out how we want to boost uptake of Property Flood Resilience (PFR) in homes and businesses across the country. We want to encourage a faster transition to a market place for property flood resilience, including advice, service provision, products, and incentives.

We want the right incentives and financial products in place to encourage uptake of property flood resilience. We are considering options to remove barriers through the operation of the Flood Re scheme. This will include encouraging insurers to price policies in ways that reflect risk reductions as a result of PFR and enable the scheme to support insurance pay-outs covering the additional cost of recoverable repairs. This winter, we will be consulting on these changes and publishing a Call for Evidence on PFR policy.

£2.9 million funding from the 2018 budget is already supporting 3 pathfinder projects up to September 2021 in Yorkshire, the South West and South Midlands. The funding is creating demonstration centres, engaging with suppliers and developing advice portals to promote uptake of PFR by homes and businesses. These innovative schemes will provide useful learning for other local authorities.

In addition, we are investing £200m to drive and test innovation at a local level to improve resilience to flooding and coastal erosion. There will be a PFR action as part of this. We will be inviting expressions of interest later this year.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government on updating building regulations to include resilience standards that must be met when properties that have been flooded are being reinstated.

Defra and the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (MHCLG) are in regular contact.

MHCLG keeps Building-Regulations under review. Approved Document C includes a reference to potential damage from flooding and states that buildings should be designed to mitigate this flood risk. Defra worked with MHCLG in 2015 on the development of a British Standard (BS85500:2015) on flood resilient construction for new buildings and retrofits for existing buildings, which complements building regulations.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps the DVLA is taking to improve response times for renewing driving licences when there is a medical consideration.

The DVLA has reconfigured its accommodation to safely maximise the number of staff on site and is working hard to process applications as quickly as possible.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) has been working with fewer operational staff on site to allow for social distancing, in line with Welsh Government requirements. This, along with ongoing industrial action by the Public and Commercial Services union and an increased demand for DVLA services, has caused delays. Drivers with a medical condition may experience further delays as the DVLA is often reliant on receiving information from medical professionals to ensure drivers can meet the required medical standards.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to publish the findings and recommendations of the William's Rail Review.

The government is committed to bringing forward vital sector-wide reforms and commissioned Keith Williams to carry out the first root and branch review of the rail industry in a generation.

The Williams Review was in its final stages at the outbreak of Covid-19.

The reforms are as important as ever and the government intends on publishing a White Paper with details of its plans for rail reform when the course of the pandemic becomes clearer.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent discussions she has had with her counterparts in (a) Canada, (b) Australia and (c) other governments on the uprating of the UK state pension overseas.

The Secretary of State has had no recent discussions on the up-rating of the UK State Pension overseas with her counterparts in Canada, Australia, and governments of other countries where up-ratings are not paid. Up-ratings are paid where there is a legal requirement to do so. This is a longstanding policy and the Government has no plans to change it.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the Government’s frozen pensions policy on members of the Windrush generation.

The policy on up-rating UK state pensions overseas is a long-standing one of successive post-war Governments. The UK State Pension is payable worldwide and is up-rated where there is a legal requirement to do so. There are no plans to change this.

No assessment has been made.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the Government has plans to form new reciprocal agreements to uprate the state pensions of British pensioners overseas.

The Government has no plans for new reciprocal agreements on pensions uprating with countries where pensions are not currently uprated.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Written Statement of 11 January 2021, HCWS692, Update on the Government’s response to the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review, whether he plans to support a redress scheme for the families affected by sodium valproate.

The Government published its response to the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review on 21st July 2021. In this response the Government did not accept the recommendation to establish separate redress schemes for the three interventions discussed in the report, including sodium valproate. Our primary focus is on improving future medicines and medical devices safety and it is therefore crucial that we focus Government funds on initiatives that directly improve future safety (including specialist mesh centres and support for families affected by medicines in pregnancy). For this reason, redress schemes will not be established in response to the recommendation in the report.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that people who have received two covid-19 vaccinations, including Oxford AstraZeneca batch numbers (a) 4120Z001, (b) 4120Z002 and (c) 4120Z003, are able to travel to EU countries.

The European Union has recently published a list of vaccines it sees as equivalent to those authorised by the European Medicines Agency, for travel purposes which is at the following link:

https://reopen.europa.eu/en

The list includes all vaccines administered in the United Kingdom, including all batches of AstraZeneca vaccine administered in the UK known commercially as Vaxzevria. This also includes batches 4120Z001, 4120Z002 and 4120Z003. Decisions on which vaccines EU Member States will accept at their borders is for those countries to decide. We are not aware that any have decided not to accept UK vaccines.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many women under the age of 30 have received the Oxford/AstraZeneca covid-19 vaccination to date.

The information is not currently held centrally held in the format requested.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve access to NHS dentists in (a) Calderdale and (b) England.

Contractual arrangements for the first six months of the 2021/22 financial year have been communicated to dental practices by NHS England and NHS Improvement. National Health Service dentists have been asked to maximise safe throughput to meet as many prioritised needs as possible. A revised unit of dental activity threshold has been set at 60% for full payment of NHS contractual value, based on data that indicates practices have capacity to safely achieve more dental activity than in the final quarter of 2020/21. It is expected that this increased threshold will improve access to NHS dentistry. Arrangements will continue to be monitored and at current are expected to be in place for six months in order to provide increased stability for dental practices.

Calder Valley, received additional funding as part of the access scheme. This has been extended until the end of September 2021 and NHS England and NHS Improvement are currently considering the most effective way to support practices to improve access for patients. In circumstances where patients are unable to access an urgent dental appointment directly through a NHS dental practice, they are advised to call NHS 111 who will assist in booking an appointment at one of over 100 designated urgent care centres, which continue to stay open across Yorkshire.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the procurement process for the provision of healthcare services for the new Hassockfield Immigration Removal Centre has been completed.

The procurement process has not yet been completed.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS health and social care workers of non-British nationality were working in the UK as of 20 January 2021; and what proportion of those people had indefinite leave to remain as of that date.

As at September 2020 there were 176,965 NHS staff with a non-UK nationality. Information on the proportion of staff who had indefinite leave to remain as at September 2020 is not held centrally.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to support the resumption of endoscopy service provision during the covid-19 outbreak.

The National Health Service has continued to provide urgent and emergency services throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. To ensure patient safety and continuation of service, local systems and Cancer Alliances are providing diagnostic and surgical provision through cancer hubs and contracted independent sector hospitals.

Diagnostics and treatment are actively being brought back up to pre-pandemic levels and referrals into services are being encouraged through campaigns such as the ‘Open for Business’ media campaign to encourage people with potentially serious health issues, such as cancer, to continue to seek medical advice and attend essential appointments.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how long on average a caseworker responsible for processing asylum claims is in post for.

The Home Office is unable to report how long on average a caseworker responsible for processing asylum claims is in post for or the number of staff who are responsible for processing asylum claims across each of the last five years, as this information is not recorded and held in a reportable format. To obtain this information would require detailed reporting against multiple cost centres and could only be obtained at disproportionate costs.

However, the Home Office can provide the number of asylum case working staff for each of the last five years. This data can be found in ASY_04 of the published Transparency data:

Immigration and protection data: Q2 2021 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

In support of increasing the number of initial asylum decisions, the Home Office has recruitment strategies in place to increase staffing to more appropriate levels. We are working to almost double the number of decision makers to c.1000 by March 2022.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many caseworkers are responsible for processing asylum claims; and how many have been responsible in each of the last five years.

The Home Office is unable to report how long on average a caseworker responsible for processing asylum claims is in post for or the number of staff who are responsible for processing asylum claims across each of the last five years, as this information is not recorded and held in a reportable format. To obtain this information would require detailed reporting against multiple cost centres and could only be obtained at disproportionate costs.

However, the Home Office can provide the number of asylum case working staff for each of the last five years. This data can be found in ASY_04 of the published Transparency data:

Immigration and protection data: Q2 2021 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

In support of increasing the number of initial asylum decisions, the Home Office has recruitment strategies in place to increase staffing to more appropriate levels. We are working to almost double the number of decision makers to c.1000 by March 2022.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the longest time recorded is for an individual to receive (a) a Reasonable Grounds decision and (b) a Conclusive Grounds decision.

Figures on the First Responder organisations making referrals into the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), the nationality of potential victims being referred, the gender of potential victims can be found in the published statistics.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

The Home Office publishes quarterly and annual statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM). These include the average time taken to make a Country Guidance Decision. The latest published NRM statistics can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

As outlined in the Modern Slavery: Statutory Guidance for England and Wales (under s49 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015) and Non-Statutory Guidance for Scotland and Northern Ireland, the expectation is that the Single Competent Authority (SCA) will make a Reasonable Grounds decision within five working days, where possible, of the NRM referral being received. Modern Slavery: Statutory Guidance for England and Wales (publishing.service.gov.uk).

Following a positive Reasonable Grounds decision, and the minimum recovery and reflection period, the Single Competent Authority makes the Conclusive Grounds decision as soon as possible and only once there is sufficient information to do so. The Home Office publishes quarterly and annual statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM). These include the average time taken to make a Conclusive Grounds decision. The latest published NRM statistics can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

A First Responder Organisation is an authority that is authorised to refer a potential victim of modern slavery into the National Referral Mechanism. The list of First Responder Organisations can be found in the Modern Slavery Statutory Guidance for England and Wales (under s49 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015) and Non-Statutory Guidance for Scotland and Northern Ireland, which also sets out their roles and responsibilities.

The SCA is currently recruiting a large number of new decision makers across the UK to increase capacity for NRM decision-making and reduce decision making timescales; this brings additional resource pressures initially (for training and upskilling) but will have substantial long-term benefits for decision making timescales.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which agencies are making referrals to the National Referral Mechanism.

Figures on the First Responder organisations making referrals into the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), the nationality of potential victims being referred, the gender of potential victims can be found in the published statistics.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

The Home Office publishes quarterly and annual statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM). These include the average time taken to make a Country Guidance Decision. The latest published NRM statistics can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

As outlined in the Modern Slavery: Statutory Guidance for England and Wales (under s49 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015) and Non-Statutory Guidance for Scotland and Northern Ireland, the expectation is that the Single Competent Authority (SCA) will make a Reasonable Grounds decision within five working days, where possible, of the NRM referral being received. Modern Slavery: Statutory Guidance for England and Wales (publishing.service.gov.uk).

Following a positive Reasonable Grounds decision, and the minimum recovery and reflection period, the Single Competent Authority makes the Conclusive Grounds decision as soon as possible and only once there is sufficient information to do so. The Home Office publishes quarterly and annual statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM). These include the average time taken to make a Conclusive Grounds decision. The latest published NRM statistics can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

A First Responder Organisation is an authority that is authorised to refer a potential victim of modern slavery into the National Referral Mechanism. The list of First Responder Organisations can be found in the Modern Slavery Statutory Guidance for England and Wales (under s49 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015) and Non-Statutory Guidance for Scotland and Northern Ireland, which also sets out their roles and responsibilities.

The SCA is currently recruiting a large number of new decision makers across the UK to increase capacity for NRM decision-making and reduce decision making timescales; this brings additional resource pressures initially (for training and upskilling) but will have substantial long-term benefits for decision making timescales.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UK citizens are in the National Referral Mechanism; and what proportion of those people are female.

Figures on the First Responder organisations making referrals into the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), the nationality of potential victims being referred, the gender of potential victims can be found in the published statistics.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

The Home Office publishes quarterly and annual statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM). These include the average time taken to make a Country Guidance Decision. The latest published NRM statistics can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

As outlined in the Modern Slavery: Statutory Guidance for England and Wales (under s49 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015) and Non-Statutory Guidance for Scotland and Northern Ireland, the expectation is that the Single Competent Authority (SCA) will make a Reasonable Grounds decision within five working days, where possible, of the NRM referral being received. Modern Slavery: Statutory Guidance for England and Wales (publishing.service.gov.uk).

Following a positive Reasonable Grounds decision, and the minimum recovery and reflection period, the Single Competent Authority makes the Conclusive Grounds decision as soon as possible and only once there is sufficient information to do so. The Home Office publishes quarterly and annual statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM). These include the average time taken to make a Conclusive Grounds decision. The latest published NRM statistics can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

A First Responder Organisation is an authority that is authorised to refer a potential victim of modern slavery into the National Referral Mechanism. The list of First Responder Organisations can be found in the Modern Slavery Statutory Guidance for England and Wales (under s49 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015) and Non-Statutory Guidance for Scotland and Northern Ireland, which also sets out their roles and responsibilities.

The SCA is currently recruiting a large number of new decision makers across the UK to increase capacity for NRM decision-making and reduce decision making timescales; this brings additional resource pressures initially (for training and upskilling) but will have substantial long-term benefits for decision making timescales.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether one of the people due to be deported on the charter flight to Vietnam scheduled for 21 April 2021 has made a legal submission on the grounds of being a potential victim of trafficking; and what the outcome was of that legal submission.

Every week we remove people who have no right to be here from the UK to different countries. During the Covid-19 pandemic, we have continued to return and deport foreign national offenders and other immigration offenders where flight routes have been available to us, both on scheduled flights and charter flights.

The Government is committed to tackling the heinous crime of modern slavery and ensuring that victims are provided with the support they need to rebuilt their lives.

Each and every person on the flight had the appropriate opportunity to raise any representations which were carefully considered and responded to in accordance with published policy. All individuals on a charter flight have opportunities for legal advice and the UK only ever returns those who both the Home Office and, where appropriate, the courts are satisfied do not need our protection and have no legal basis to remain in the UK.

This Government’s priority is keeping the people of this country safe, and we make no apology for seeking to remove dangerous foreign criminals and other immigration offenders.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to ensure that people set to be deported on the charter flight to Vietnam scheduled for 21 April 2021 have received appropriate legal advice.

Every week we remove people who have no right to be here from the UK to different countries. During the Covid-19 pandemic, we have continued to return and deport foreign national offenders and other immigration offenders where flight routes have been available to us, both on scheduled flights and charter flights.

The Government is committed to tackling the heinous crime of modern slavery and ensuring that victims are provided with the support they need to rebuilt their lives.

Each and every person on the flight had the appropriate opportunity to raise any representations which were carefully considered and responded to in accordance with published policy. All individuals on a charter flight have opportunities for legal advice and the UK only ever returns those who both the Home Office and, where appropriate, the courts are satisfied do not need our protection and have no legal basis to remain in the UK.

This Government’s priority is keeping the people of this country safe, and we make no apology for seeking to remove dangerous foreign criminals and other immigration offenders.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to ensure that none of the people set to be deported via the charter flight to Vietnam scheduled for 21 April 2021 have been subjected to exploitation in the UK and have a right to remain in the UK.

Every week we remove people who have no right to be here from the UK to different countries. During the Covid-19 pandemic, we have continued to return and deport foreign national offenders and other immigration offenders where flight routes have been available to us, both on scheduled flights and charter flights.

The Government is committed to tackling the heinous crime of modern slavery and ensuring that victims are provided with the support they need to rebuilt their lives.

Each and every person on the flight had the appropriate opportunity to raise any representations which were carefully considered and responded to in accordance with published policy. All individuals on a charter flight have opportunities for legal advice and the UK only ever returns those who both the Home Office and, where appropriate, the courts are satisfied do not need our protection and have no legal basis to remain in the UK.

This Government’s priority is keeping the people of this country safe, and we make no apology for seeking to remove dangerous foreign criminals and other immigration offenders.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any of the people onboard the deportation flight to Vietnam scheduled for 21 April 2021 have been through the National Referral Mechanism.

Every week we remove people who have no right to be here from the UK to different countries. During the Covid-19 pandemic, we have continued to return and deport foreign national offenders and other immigration offenders where flight routes have been available to us, both on scheduled flights and charter flights.

The Government is committed to tackling the heinous crime of modern slavery and ensuring that victims are provided with the support they need to rebuilt their lives.

Each and every person on the flight had the appropriate opportunity to raise any representations which were carefully considered and responded to in accordance with published policy. All individuals on a charter flight have opportunities for legal advice and the UK only ever returns those who both the Home Office and, where appropriate, the courts are satisfied do not need our protection and have no legal basis to remain in the UK.

This Government’s priority is keeping the people of this country safe, and we make no apology for seeking to remove dangerous foreign criminals and other immigration offenders.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people are set to be deported via the charter flight to Vietnam scheduled for 21 April 2021.

Every week we remove people who have no right to be here from the UK to different countries. During the Covid-19 pandemic, we have continued to return and deport foreign national offenders and other immigration offenders where flight routes have been available to us, both on scheduled flights and charter flights.

The Government is committed to tackling the heinous crime of modern slavery and ensuring that victims are provided with the support they need to rebuilt their lives.

Each and every person on the flight had the appropriate opportunity to raise any representations which were carefully considered and responded to in accordance with published policy. All individuals on a charter flight have opportunities for legal advice and the UK only ever returns those who both the Home Office and, where appropriate, the courts are satisfied do not need our protection and have no legal basis to remain in the UK.

This Government’s priority is keeping the people of this country safe, and we make no apology for seeking to remove dangerous foreign criminals and other immigration offenders.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of dispersal asylum properties that are required to end the use of hotels as asylum accommodation; and what the timeframe is for contractors to acquire those properties.

We currently have c8100 people in hotels, although the exact number will change daily.

Our providers are working to procure sufficient accommodation to exit contingency accommodation and maintain a business as usual operation thereafter.

We require providers to work at pace, but at the same time have directed them to procure accommodation which is safe and secure for asylum seekers and the communities in which they live. This is the principle we continue to follow, so where there is substantive and reliable evidence which raise doubts in such regard, we will work with local authorities, Police and providers to resolve them.

We remain committed to working in partnership with Local Authorities, through the use the Strategic Migration Partnerships to ensure the views of Local Authorities are included when forward planning

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Questions 167900 and 167901 answered on 12 March 2021, who the members are of (a) the Illegal Migration Strategy Board and (b) Clandestine Threat Board.

I refer the Hon Member to the answer given on 12th March 2021 to UIN 167900 and 167901. As was the case with previous administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 23 March 2021 to Question 169893, whether the Equality Impact Assessment carried out by her Department will be published after completion.

The Home Office plan to supplement the opening of a new immigration removal centre (IRC) for women, in County Durham, by continuing to provide some detention capacity for women at Colnbrook, Dungavel and Yarl’s Wood IRCs.

An Equality Impact Assessment (EIA) will be completed for the change to predominantly male accommodation at Yarl’s Wood IRC. The Home Office will publish the EIA in due course.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to open a short-term immigration holding facility for men and women at Morton Hall in Lincolnshire.

The immigration removal estate is kept under ongoing review, to ensure that the Home Office has sufficient capacity and provides value for money.

The Home Office is developing plans for a new small residential short-term holding facility on part of the site of the current Morton Hall immigration removal centre, which will open later this year.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the report into Home Office official Mick Cain's conduct undertaken by her Department's anti-fraud and criminal investigations unit in 2016.

We expect the highest levels of professional conduct from our civil servants, and, in 2016, the Department acted decisively in this case. You will be aware the Home Office has obligations under data protection legislation and in law generally, and I regret disclosing information relating to an individual would run contrary to those principals.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the details of (a) additional earnings, (b) gifts and (c) hospitality received by civil servants in her Department from law firms.

There is no mechanism for capturing additional earnings. It is possible for Civil Servants to have other sources of income over and above their civil service salary, where those present no, or no perceived, conflict of interest.

However those arrangements are between the parties and do not involve the Home Office. Staff are required to report these arrangements to their manager and no central record is maintained.

Gifts and hospitality offered and received are recorded and reported internally. The Home Office publishes details of permanent secretaries’ external meetings and senior officials’ business expenses and hospitality on a quarterly basis.

The most recent publication of data can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-senior-officials-business-expenses-and-meetings-july-to-september-2020

In order to ascertain whether the gift or hospitality was offered to or received from a law firm, we would need to scrutinise every entry on the register individually and this would represent a disproportionate cost.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the guidance on what her Department's officials are required to declare in terms of (a) additional earnings, (b) gifts and (c) hospitality provided to them by law firms.

Per the Civil Service Code, Civil Servants must not accept gifts or hospitality or receive other benefits from anyone which might reasonably be seen to compromise their personal judgement or integrity.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/civil-service-code/the-civil-service-code

The Home Office policy on Gifts and Hospitality is in line with Cabinet Office guidance.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum claims have been deemed inadmissible since the most recent Immigration Rule changes came into effect.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum applications in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of asylum applications are published in Table Asy_D01 and data on the number and type of asylum initial decisions are published in table Asy_D02 of the Asylum and Resettlement datasets.

Figures on the number of asylum application decisions made in the first quarter of 2021 are due to be published on 27 May 2021. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. We are working to bring inadmissibility decisions in line with current reporting and hope to publish that information in the same timeframe.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 3 March 2021 to Question 162658, on Detention Centres: Females, whether her Department has plans to undertake an equality impact assessment on the practice of detaining women at immigration removal centres that predominantly hold men.

The Home Office has acquired the former Hassockfield Secure Training Centre in County Durham and will open it as an immigration removal centre (IRC) for around 80 women by the autumn. We plan to supplement the new Hassockfield IRC by continuing to provide some detention capacity for women at Colnbrook, Dungavel and Yarl’s Wood IRCs.

The operational capacity for women under normal operating conditions is 18 at Colnbrook IRC, 12 at Dungavel IRC and 304 at Yarl’s Wood IRC. Yarl’s Wood has additional capacity of 68 for adult families more than half of whom could be women.

An Equality Impact Assessment will be completed for the change to predominantly male accommodation at Yarl’s Wood IRC.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 3 March 2021 to Question 162658, what the current operational capacity is of the units for women at (a) Colnbrook, (b) Dungavel and (c) Yarl’s Wood immigration removal centres.

The Home Office has acquired the former Hassockfield Secure Training Centre in County Durham and will open it as an immigration removal centre (IRC) for around 80 women by the autumn. We plan to supplement the new Hassockfield IRC by continuing to provide some detention capacity for women at Colnbrook, Dungavel and Yarl’s Wood IRCs.

The operational capacity for women under normal operating conditions is 18 at Colnbrook IRC, 12 at Dungavel IRC and 304 at Yarl’s Wood IRC. Yarl’s Wood has additional capacity of 68 for adult families more than half of whom could be women.

An Equality Impact Assessment will be completed for the change to predominantly male accommodation at Yarl’s Wood IRC.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what ratio of male to female staff members will be put in place at the new Hassockfield Immigration Removal Centre in response to its planned use to detain only women.

Our Detention Centre Rules are designed to ensure the rights and safety of those in detention are our foremost priority and we expect the highest standards from our contractors in this regard. This includes mandatory gender-specific training for those working with women in detention.

The workforce requirements for the new Hassockfield immigration removal centre (IRC) will reflect the lessons learned from detaining women at Yarl’s Wood IRC and will include a ratio of female to male custodial staff that is appropriate for the specifics needs of women in detention.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's response to the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration's Report on modern slavery published 4 March 2021, what the proposed timescale is for the review accepted in Recommendation One; and when its findings will be published.

The UK is regarded as a world-leader for its response to modern slavery.

The UK response is underpinned by the Modern Slavery Strategy 2014 and the Modern Slavery Act 2015, the first legislation of its kind in the world. The Government remains committed to tackling this crime.

We are currently considering how to take forward the review of roles and responsibilities of operational partners in Border Force, IE, UKVI and NCA. Findings will be shared with the BICS Board and Home Office ExCo, before being shared with partner agencies and communicated as appropriate.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to recommendation two of her Department's response to the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration's Report on modern slavery published 4 March 2021, what the proposed timescale is for delivering new BICS specific guidance on the identification, reporting and pursuit of perpetrators of modern slavery and human trafficking.

The BICs guidance on the identification, reporting and pursuit of perpetrators of modern slavery and human trafficking is being drafted.

The guidance will be shared with the BICS Board and Home Office ExCo, before being shared with partner agencies, and communicated as appropriate in due course.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to recommendation four in her Department's response to the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration's Report on modern slavery published 4 March 2021, what the proposed timescale is for providing details of key findings, clarifying roles and responsibilities and streamlining governance on organised immigration crime; and when details of the new streamlined governance will be published.

The 4 March 2021 ICIBI report on modern slavery and human trafficking refers, in a Note to Section 4.1, to Recommendation 1 of the March 2020 ICIBI report on in-country clandestine arrivals and irregular migrants arriving via "small boats”. This recommendation proposed a “fundamental review of the Borders, Immigration and Citizenship System’s criminal investigation and prosecution capabilities and capacity”.

The Government response, published in November 2020, partially accepted the recommendation, and undertook to take the findings of the March 2020 ICIBI inspection fully into account alongside the findings of the Independent Review of Serious and Organised Crime (IRSOC), led by Sir Craig Mackey QPM, when working with partners, including the National Crime Agency.

Significant changes in the governance and delivery of organised immigration crime have already been implemented. The November 2020 Government response noted both the Illegal Migration Strategy Board and the Clandestine Threat Board have been established since the ICIBI March 2020 report was issued, with the Clandestine Channel Threat Command now in place.

The Government undertaking to provide “details of key findings” relates to the IRSOC. The Government published the key findings of the IRSOC on 16th March, alongside the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy. The Integrated Review sets out our priorities for strengthening our response to serious and organised crime following the IRSOC.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, who sits on the Clandestine Threat Board; and when it plans to publish reports on its activities.

The Illegal Migration Strategy Board and the Clandestine Threat Board direct the Home Office’s strategic and operational response to illegal migration. The groups are accountable to the Home Secretary and form part of the overall governance arrangements within the department. Home Office Ministers have regular meetings as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, who sits on the Illegal Migration Strategy Board; and when it plans to publish reports of its activities.

The Illegal Migration Strategy Board and the Clandestine Threat Board direct the Home Office’s strategic and operational response to illegal migration. The groups are accountable to the Home Secretary and form part of the overall governance arrangements within the department. Home Office Ministers have regular meetings as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what training will be provided to staff at the new Hassockfield Immigration Removal Centre in response to its planned use to detain only women.

The Home Office has acquired the former Hassockfield Secure Training Centre in County Durham and will open it as an immigration removal centre (IRC) for around 80 women by the autumn. Initial discussions with the planning authority at Durham Country Council have taken place and given the site’s previous history as a custody facility, planning designation for the site does not need to change in order to operate as an IRC.

People who are detained must be advised of their right to legal representation and of how they can obtain such representation, within 24 hours of their arrival at an IRC. The Home Office recognise the importance of ensuring that such legal advice can be easily obtained by those in detention and we will be working closely with the Legal Aid Agency to ensure appropriate legal provision at the site.

The rights of all detained individuals, including women, are safeguarded by the Detention Centre Rules, published Operating Standards for IRCs and individuals under escort and Detention Services Orders (DSO).

The training requirements for Home Office, custodial service provider and healthcare staff at Hassockfield IRC will be equivalent to those for Yarl’s Wood IRC. As set out in published DSO 06/2016 ‘women in the detention estate’, all staff working with women must receive appropriate gender specific training (such as the protocol for entry to bedrooms), in addition to any generic training they receive when they undergo initial training. Appropriate refresher training should be undertaken, to include equality and diversity, human trafficking and modern slavery.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of detainees’ ability to access appropriate legal advice in the area surrounding the new Hassockfield Immigration Removal Centre.

The Home Office has acquired the former Hassockfield Secure Training Centre in County Durham and will open it as an immigration removal centre (IRC) for around 80 women by the autumn. Initial discussions with the planning authority at Durham Country Council have taken place and given the site’s previous history as a custody facility, planning designation for the site does not need to change in order to operate as an IRC.

People who are detained must be advised of their right to legal representation and of how they can obtain such representation, within 24 hours of their arrival at an IRC. The Home Office recognise the importance of ensuring that such legal advice can be easily obtained by those in detention and we will be working closely with the Legal Aid Agency to ensure appropriate legal provision at the site.

The rights of all detained individuals, including women, are safeguarded by the Detention Centre Rules, published Operating Standards for IRCs and individuals under escort and Detention Services Orders (DSO).

The training requirements for Home Office, custodial service provider and healthcare staff at Hassockfield IRC will be equivalent to those for Yarl’s Wood IRC. As set out in published DSO 06/2016 ‘women in the detention estate’, all staff working with women must receive appropriate gender specific training (such as the protocol for entry to bedrooms), in addition to any generic training they receive when they undergo initial training. Appropriate refresher training should be undertaken, to include equality and diversity, human trafficking and modern slavery.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what planning permissions are required in relation to the new Hassockfield Immigration Removal Centre; and whether those permissions have been obtained.

The Home Office has acquired the former Hassockfield Secure Training Centre in County Durham and will open it as an immigration removal centre (IRC) for around 80 women by the autumn. Initial discussions with the planning authority at Durham Country Council have taken place and given the site’s previous history as a custody facility, planning designation for the site does not need to change in order to operate as an IRC.

People who are detained must be advised of their right to legal representation and of how they can obtain such representation, within 24 hours of their arrival at an IRC. The Home Office recognise the importance of ensuring that such legal advice can be easily obtained by those in detention and we will be working closely with the Legal Aid Agency to ensure appropriate legal provision at the site.

The rights of all detained individuals, including women, are safeguarded by the Detention Centre Rules, published Operating Standards for IRCs and individuals under escort and Detention Services Orders (DSO).

The training requirements for Home Office, custodial service provider and healthcare staff at Hassockfield IRC will be equivalent to those for Yarl’s Wood IRC. As set out in published DSO 06/2016 ‘women in the detention estate’, all staff working with women must receive appropriate gender specific training (such as the protocol for entry to bedrooms), in addition to any generic training they receive when they undergo initial training. Appropriate refresher training should be undertaken, to include equality and diversity, human trafficking and modern slavery.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to establish smaller capacity immigration detention units for women located in existing male detention facilities.

There are no plans to expand immigration detention capacity for women.

The Home Office has acquired the former Hassockfield Secure Training Centre in County Durham and will open it as an immigration removal centre (IRC) for around 80 women by the autumn. We plan to supplement the new Hassockfield IRC by continuing to provide some detention capacity for women at Colnbrook, Dungavel and Yarl’s Wood IRCs, in order to provide flexibility in placement and shorter escorting journeys for those in detention.

The immigration removal estate is kept under ongoing review, to ensure that the Home Office has sufficient capacity for men and women it proves necessary to detain for the purposes of removal, and to protect the public; and to provide value for money.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the pilot on reducing the time period for automatic referrals for immigration bail hearings from four to two months has concluded.

The pilot for making an automatic referral for consideration of immigration bail for non-FNOs at two months, as opposed to four months at present, has concluded and the department is in the process of evaluating the findings. Automatic bail referrals are an additional safeguard and do not affect the rights of detainees to apply for bail at any time, regardless of the timeframe for automatic referrals.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the pilot for reducing the time period of auto-bail hearings from four to two months has concluded.

The pilot for making an automatic referral for consideration of immigration bail for non-FNOs at two months, as opposed to four months at present, has concluded and the department is in the process of evaluating the findings. Automatic bail referrals are an additional safeguard and do not affect the rights of detainees to apply for bail at any time, regardless of the timeframe for automatic referrals.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to open a new immigration removal centre for women on the former site of the Hassockfield Secure Training Centre in County Durham.

The immigration removal estate is kept under ongoing review to ensure that the Home Office has sufficient capacity, in the right places and that it provides value for money.

The Home Office has acquired the former Hassockfield Secure Training Centre in County Durham and will open it as an immigration removal centre for women by the autumn. Initial discussions with the planning authority have taken place and work has commenced at the site. An Equality Impact Assessment will be completed as part of this programme of work.

In order to meet operational needs and demands we will continue to operate the immigration removal estate in a flexible manner.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether asylum seekers from red-list countries will be denied entry to the UK in accordance with the new travel regulations announced by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on 9 February 2021.

Asylum seekers are not going to be denied entry to the UK from red-list countries and their asylum claims will be processed as usual. The UK has a proud record of providing protection for asylum seekers fleeing persecution, and every asylum claim is considered carefully, sensitively and on its individual merits by caseworkers who receive extensive training. Those asylum seekers who arrive in UK through illegal means are treated the same as every other arrival and must quarantine for 10 days – this is in line with Public Health England guidance. They are transported to designated accommodation where providers will monitor their isolation period and as would be expected if they break restrictions, we expect the police to take enforcement action.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications to the EU Settlement Scheme are being processed each week on average; and what the average waiting time is for applicants submitting an application to that scheme.

The latest published information shows the total number of concluded applications to the EU Settlement scheme was 4.68 million up to 31 January 2021.

The latest figures can be found on the Home Office’s ‘EU Settlement Scheme statistics’ web page available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/eu-settlement-scheme-statistics.

Applications concluded by month and decision type are published in the detailed quarterly release – ‘EU Settlement Scheme quarterly statistics, September 2020’. The statistics for October to December 2020 will be released on 25 February 2021.

Our aim is to process all applications to the EU Settlement Scheme as expeditiously as possible. Complete applications are usually processed in around five working days.

More information about processing times for applications under the scheme is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-settlement-scheme-application-processing-times/eu-settlement-scheme-pilot-current-expected-processing-times-for-applications

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the outcome was of Kent and Medway Clinical Commissioning Group's recent infection control assessment of Napier Barracks.

We take the wellbeing of asylum seekers extremely seriously. We provide them with safe, suitable, Covid-secure accommodation where they receive three meals a day, all paid for by the taxpayer.

We have been following public health advice at all times and the accommodation at Napier remains safe, suitable and Covid-secure. This has included putting in place a range of infection control measures and configuring the site so that social distancing can be maintained.

Despite our best efforts and the robust measures in place at our sites, a number of asylum seekers accommodated at Napier recently tested positive for coronavirus.

It was also incredibly disappointing that a number of individuals refused coronavirus tests and had refused to self-isolate or follow social distancing rules, despite repeated requests to do so.

In line with advice from Public Health England and as part of our outbreak management plan, the Home Office moved a number asylum seekers out of the site who had not tested positive for coronavirus. The purpose of this move was to allow others at Napier to self-isolate more easily and facilitate a deep clean of the site.

An independent rapid review was also recently conducted to assure ourselves of the extensive COVID-19 protocols in place to safeguard the health and safety of asylum seekers during the pandemic. The Home Office is currently reviewing and acting upon the recommendations of the review and, as previously stated, will seek to publish a summary of the recommendations in due course. We will also hold round tables with stakeholders to discuss the recommendations, actions taken and proposed next steps.

We continue to work closely with our provider and partners to identify opportunities for enhancement, as we do across our entire accommodation estate.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been moved out of Napier Barracks after testing negative for covid-19.

We take the wellbeing of asylum seekers extremely seriously. We provide them with safe, suitable, Covid-secure accommodation where they receive three meals a day, all paid for by the taxpayer.

We have been following public health advice at all times and the accommodation at Napier remains safe, suitable and Covid-secure. This has included putting in place a range of infection control measures and configuring the site so that social distancing can be maintained.

Despite our best efforts and the robust measures in place at our sites, a number of asylum seekers accommodated at Napier recently tested positive for coronavirus.

It was also incredibly disappointing that a number of individuals refused coronavirus tests and had refused to self-isolate or follow social distancing rules, despite repeated requests to do so.

In line with advice from Public Health England and as part of our outbreak management plan, the Home Office moved a number asylum seekers out of the site who had not tested positive for coronavirus. The purpose of this move was to allow others at Napier to self-isolate more easily and facilitate a deep clean of the site.

An independent rapid review was also recently conducted to assure ourselves of the extensive COVID-19 protocols in place to safeguard the health and safety of asylum seekers during the pandemic. The Home Office is currently reviewing and acting upon the recommendations of the review and, as previously stated, will seek to publish a summary of the recommendations in due course. We will also hold round tables with stakeholders to discuss the recommendations, actions taken and proposed next steps.

We continue to work closely with our provider and partners to identify opportunities for enhancement, as we do across our entire accommodation estate.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the recent fire at Napier Barracks.

A number of asylum seekers at Napier Barracks previously tested positive for coronavirus. In line with advice from Public Health England, over the last week the Home Office moved a number of asylum seekers from the site.

The purpose of this was to allow others at Napier to self-isolate more easily and conduct a site-wide deep cleaning exercise.

On Friday, 29 January, a number of asylum seekers who remained at Napier objected to not being moved off site. They became aggressive toward staff on site, turned violent and set about destroying the barracks, putting lives in danger.

An accommodation block was set on fire resulting in a kitchen and canteen being badly damaged. The fire-damaged block has been secured and cordoned off and other blocks remain in use. Meals continue to be provided to those accommodated at the site.

Kent Police and Fire & Rescue Service attended the site to maintain order and extinguish the fire. The situation is now under control: a number of arrests have been made and an investigation is ongoing. We are aware of one person with minor injuries, from which they are expected to make a full recovery.

We are clear that this type of action will not be tolerated, and the Home Office will support the police to take robust action against those vandalising property, threatening staff and putting lives at risk.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what damage was caused by the fire at Napier barracks; and how that fire has affected its ability to be used as asylum accommodation.

A number of asylum seekers at Napier Barracks previously tested positive for coronavirus. In line with advice from Public Health England, over the last week the Home Office moved a number of asylum seekers from the site.

The purpose of this was to allow others at Napier to self-isolate more easily and conduct a site-wide deep cleaning exercise.

On Friday, 29 January, a number of asylum seekers who remained at Napier objected to not being moved off site. They became aggressive toward staff on site, turned violent and set about destroying the barracks, putting lives in danger.

An accommodation block was set on fire resulting in a kitchen and canteen being badly damaged. The fire-damaged block has been secured and cordoned off and other blocks remain in use. Meals continue to be provided to those accommodated at the site.

Kent Police and Fire & Rescue Service attended the site to maintain order and extinguish the fire. The situation is now under control: a number of arrests have been made and an investigation is ongoing. We are aware of one person with minor injuries, from which they are expected to make a full recovery.

We are clear that this type of action will not be tolerated, and the Home Office will support the police to take robust action against those vandalising property, threatening staff and putting lives at risk.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any (a) asylum seekers and (b) staff sustained injuries as a result of the fire at Napier Barracks.

A number of asylum seekers at Napier Barracks previously tested positive for coronavirus. In line with advice from Public Health England, over the last week the Home Office moved a number of asylum seekers from the site.

The purpose of this was to allow others at Napier to self-isolate more easily and conduct a site-wide deep cleaning exercise.

On Friday, 29 January, a number of asylum seekers who remained at Napier objected to not being moved off site. They became aggressive toward staff on site, turned violent and set about destroying the barracks, putting lives in danger.

An accommodation block was set on fire resulting in a kitchen and canteen being badly damaged. The fire-damaged block has been secured and cordoned off and other blocks remain in use. Meals continue to be provided to those accommodated at the site.

Kent Police and Fire & Rescue Service attended the site to maintain order and extinguish the fire. The situation is now under control: a number of arrests have been made and an investigation is ongoing. We are aware of one person with minor injuries, from which they are expected to make a full recovery.

We are clear that this type of action will not be tolerated, and the Home Office will support the police to take robust action against those vandalising property, threatening staff and putting lives at risk.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how applicants taking the Life in the UK citizenship test are able to find out the (a) number of incorrect answers and (b) correct answers to those questions.

Customers who fail the Life in the UK test are not informed of the number of questions they answered incorrectly, and they are not given the correct answers. They are told they have failed the test and are advised which subject areas of the official handbook they need to study.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure Life in the UK citizenship test centres (a) correctly inform applicants of their results and (b) receive unannounced inspections from her Department.

The Life in the UK (LitUK) test is a computer delivered test and automatically marked, which mitigates against any potential incorrect results. We are not aware of any cases where a customer has been given an incorrect result.

The Home Office undertakes a schedule of unannounced inspections of all LitUK test centres. This has been impacted as a result of Covid-19 during 2020/21, but will recommence when it is appropriate to do so.

In addition to the inspections undertaken by the Home Office, the test provider is required to undertake audits of each of the test centres. Each centre will receive a combination of both an in-person audit and remote audit undertaken via CCTV monitoring.

Also, the test provider is required to facilitate independent third-party mystery shopping events for each test centre assessing the security arrangements at the centre.

The results of both the audits and mystery shopping events are provided to the Home Office officials for review and monitoring purposes. These audits and mystery shopping events and Home Office review thereof have continued during 2020/21.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of Life in the UK citizenship tests taken have been passed by nationality annually since 2010 in (a) English, (b) Welsh and (c) Scots Gaelic.

Since 2010 there has been one test taken in Welsh by a Brazilian national and one test taken in Scots Gaelic by a German national.

Table 1 shows the number of tests taken by nationality. Table 2 shows the proportion of LitUK tests that have been passed by nationality.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the most number of times is that someone has taken the Life in the UK citizenship test before passing from the most recent data available.

The highest number of times an individual has taken the Life in the UK test is 118 times in 2015 and 2016. This is a unique case and the vast majority of customers pass by their 3rd attempt.

Whilst the test provider does not disclose which answers they got wrong if they fail they are advised which parts of the handbook they need to study in more depth to help them pass future tests.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what data her Department holds on the number of asylum seekers currently housed at Napier barracks who have tested positive for covid-19.

Asylum seekers at the barracks, in common with the rest of the population, must self-isolate if they test positive or have been exposed to someone who has. We are working closely with the local health authority and Public Health England and additional support staff, as well as on site medical staff, to ensure that all individuals who have to self-isolate can do so and are following all medical advice. Some individuals have not agreed to be tested.

We do not publish data on the numbers of asylum seekers who have tested positive for covid-19.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the ratio is of bathrooms to residents at Napier Barracks.

There are currently 381 asylum seekers accommodated at Napier Barracks, Kent.

We take the welfare of those in our care seriously and we have robust measures in place to deal with any cases of Covid-19. Our accommodation provider Clearsprings have an outbreak management plan which is enacted if there are positive Covid-19 tests and the Home Office is following national guidance in relation to testing.

Despite our best efforts a number of those accommodated at the site have tested positive for coronavirus and are self-isolating. Asylum seekers at the barracks must self-isolate if they test positive or have been exposed to someone who has.

We are working closely with the local health authority and Public Health England and additional support staff, as well as on site medical staff, are there to ensure that all individuals who have to self-isolate can do so and are following all medical advice.

The accommodation at Napier has been arranged to allow for social distancing and Covid safety in line with public health advice. This includes limiting occupancy of each dormitory to a maximum of 14 persons, with each dormitory effectively operating as a separate household on site.

There is a ratio of 1:5 showers, these are separate showers inside and in portable units. There is also a ratio of 1:5 toilets and additional urinals inside the blocks and separate toilet cubicles inside portable units.

The Home Office does not publish information on the number of telephone calls made to Migrant Help from asylum seekers. This not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are currently being housed at Napier Barracks; and how many of those people have tested positive for covid-19 in the most recent period for which figures are available.

There are currently 381 asylum seekers accommodated at Napier Barracks, Kent.

We take the welfare of those in our care seriously and we have robust measures in place to deal with any cases of Covid-19. Our accommodation provider Clearsprings have an outbreak management plan which is enacted if there are positive Covid-19 tests and the Home Office is following national guidance in relation to testing.

Despite our best efforts a number of those accommodated at the site have tested positive for coronavirus and are self-isolating. Asylum seekers at the barracks must self-isolate if they test positive or have been exposed to someone who has.

We are working closely with the local health authority and Public Health England and additional support staff, as well as on site medical staff, are there to ensure that all individuals who have to self-isolate can do so and are following all medical advice.

The accommodation at Napier has been arranged to allow for social distancing and Covid safety in line with public health advice. This includes limiting occupancy of each dormitory to a maximum of 14 persons, with each dormitory effectively operating as a separate household on site.

There is a ratio of 1:5 showers, these are separate showers inside and in portable units. There is also a ratio of 1:5 toilets and additional urinals inside the blocks and separate toilet cubicles inside portable units.

The Home Office does not publish information on the number of telephone calls made to Migrant Help from asylum seekers. This not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department holds on how many calls have been made to Migrant Help from residents at Napier Barracks since it started being used as asylum accommodation.

There are currently 381 asylum seekers accommodated at Napier Barracks, Kent.

We take the welfare of those in our care seriously and we have robust measures in place to deal with any cases of Covid-19. Our accommodation provider Clearsprings have an outbreak management plan which is enacted if there are positive Covid-19 tests and the Home Office is following national guidance in relation to testing.

Despite our best efforts a number of those accommodated at the site have tested positive for coronavirus and are self-isolating. Asylum seekers at the barracks must self-isolate if they test positive or have been exposed to someone who has.

We are working closely with the local health authority and Public Health England and additional support staff, as well as on site medical staff, are there to ensure that all individuals who have to self-isolate can do so and are following all medical advice.

The accommodation at Napier has been arranged to allow for social distancing and Covid safety in line with public health advice. This includes limiting occupancy of each dormitory to a maximum of 14 persons, with each dormitory effectively operating as a separate household on site.

There is a ratio of 1:5 showers, these are separate showers inside and in portable units. There is also a ratio of 1:5 toilets and additional urinals inside the blocks and separate toilet cubicles inside portable units.

The Home Office does not publish information on the number of telephone calls made to Migrant Help from asylum seekers. This not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether people with no recourse to public funds are eligible for test and trace support payments.

To qualify for the Test and Trace Support Payment scheme, individuals must be employed or self-employed, unable to work from home, will lose income as a result of self-isolating, and be in receipt of certain ‘public funds’ benefits. Therefore, people with no recourse to public funds are not eligible for test and trace support payment.

However, a discretionary fund akin to the Test and Trace Support Payment scheme, in the form of a £500 discretionary payment, paid by local authorities is available to those with no recourse to public funds, provided they meet the criteria set by the local authority for discretionary payments in their area. Further information on this scheme can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/test-and-trace-support-payment-scheme-claiming-financial-support/claiming-financial-support-under-the-test-and-trace-support-payment-scheme

The Government remains committed to protecting vulnerable people and has acted decisively to ensure that we support everyone through this pandemic.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the information her Department holds on covid-19 safety in establishments being used as asylum accommodation; and if she will commission a review on that matter.

The Home Office is currently reviewing the recommendations of the rapid review and, as previously stated, will seek to publish a summary of the recommendations.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the Government's planned timeframe is for the (a) consultation on and (b) publication of the proposed sovereign borders Bill.

The Home Secretary has set out the Government’s ambition to overhaul our approach to asylum and illegal migration, delivering a firm but fair system, including bringing forward new legislation this year.

Any consultation that may take place will do so in line with established principles as well as taking into account any other relevant statutory duties.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of people detained in immigration removal centres are women.

The Home Office publishes statistics on people in detention on the last day of each quarter in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on people in detention under immigration powers, are published in Table Det_03a of the ‘Detention summary tables

The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

Further breakdowns by gender can be found in the Immigration detention detailed datasets

Figures on people in detention at the end of December 2020 will be published on 25 February 2021.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many deportation flights have been carried out by her Department in the last twelve months; and what the departure and arrival locations were for these flights.

In the last twelve months, 49 charter deportation flights have left the UK to a range of destinations globally.

Every week we remove people who have no right to be here from the UK to different countries. During the Covid-19 pandemic, we have continued to return and deport foreign national offenders and other immigration offenders where flight routes have been available to us, both on scheduled flights and charter flights.

This Government’s priority is keeping the people of this country safe, and we make no apology for seeking to remove dangerous foreign criminals and other immigration offenders.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what effect the accidental loss of 150,000 arrest records has had on visa processing.

The Home Office temporarily suspended processing those visa applications which might have been impacted.

Once we were satisfied those applications could be processed without adverse impact on the decision-making process, visa operations resumed.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passports issued by HM Passport Office have failed to be successfully delivered by courier since the 23 March 2020.

Her Majesty’s Passport Office can confirm that no passports have failed to be successfully delivered by a UK courier since 23 March 2020. For international deliveries by courier there are nine confirmed losses, which resulted in these passports being cancelled on the system and reissued and successfully delivered.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to Her Majesty’s Passport Office's update on passport applications published on 24 July 2020, how many passport applications are currently being processed by HM Passport Office.

Due to COVID-19, Her Majesty’s Passport Office continues to operate at reduced staffing levels so that its people can continue to socially distance, and it is therefore taking longer than usual to process passport applications. As part of its contingency arrangements, HM Passport Office is rapidly increasing its capacity for processing passport applications, in line with public health guidance, that will help to ensure that it continues to meet the travel needs of its customers.

As at 31 August 2020, passport applications work in progress is approximately 239.1k. There are a further 134,414k applications that will need to be worked through in the coming weeks once initial documentation has been received and allocated.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many data breaches have been reported by HM Passport Office’s security team since the 23 March 2020.

From 23 March to 31 August 2020 inclusive, Her Majesty’s Passport Office submitted 279 Data Incident Reports and 277 were assessed as constituting Personal Data Breaches. From 23 March to 30 June HM Passport Office received 545,806 passport applications.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's news story of 31 March 2020, NHS frontline workers visas extended so they can focus on fighting coronavirus, how many healthcare workers’ biometric residence permit renewals her Department (a) is currently processing and (b) has processed; and what the (i) average and (ii) longest length of time her Department has spent on processing such a renewal.

Published statistics pertaining to the number of NHS visas extended as of June 2020, can be found via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-year-ending-june-2020

Updated statistics regarding those extended after this date will be published in future.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the immigration status is of migrant healthcare workers who are currently without Biometric Residence Permits.

All migrants granted leave receive written notification of their immigration status and are issued with a biometric residence permit (BRP) as evidence of their immigration status. Migrants who are waiting for a decision on their in-time immigration application are entitled to remain in the country on their current conditions until their application is resolved.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many women and girls with an FGM protection order have applied for asylum in the UK as at July 2020.

The Home Office are unable to state how many women and girls with an FGM protection order have applied for asylum and have been refused asylum in the UK as at July 2020 as this information is not held in a reportable format and easily aggregated.

The Home Office can state how many people have applied for asylum and have been refused asylum in the UK and can be found in the published immigration statistics March 2020 at Asy_D01 and Asy_D02 and can be broken down by gender:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-march-2020/list-of-tables#asylum-and-resettlement

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many women and girls with an FGM protection order have been refused asylum in the UK as at July 2020.

The Home Office are unable to state how many women and girls with an FGM protection order have applied for asylum and have been refused asylum in the UK as at July 2020 as this information is not held in a reportable format and easily aggregated.

The Home Office can state how many people have applied for asylum and have been refused asylum in the UK and can be found in the published immigration statistics March 2020 at Asy_D01 and Asy_D02 and can be broken down by gender:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-march-2020/list-of-tables#asylum-and-resettlement

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many under 18 year olds are detained in immigration detention centres; and if she will publish a breakdown of the ages of people detained that are under 28 years old as at 21 April 2020.

The Home Office publishes data on people in detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Data on the number of people detained under immigration powers, broken down by nationality, age, and length of detention are published in table Det_D02 of the immigration detention detailed datasets. https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/returns-and-detention-datasets#immigration-detention

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending March 2020. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the 'summary tables'. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

A statistical report Statistics relating to Covid-19 and the immigration system, May 2020, https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-relating-to-covid-19-and-the-immigration-system-may-2020released on 28 May 2020 provides further high-level information relating to detention and Covid-19 up to the end of April.

Figures covering the second quarter of 2020 will be released on 27 August 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=release-date-oldest

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the nationalities of people as at 21 April 2020 detained in immigration detention centres.

The Home Office publishes data on people in detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Data on the number of people detained under immigration powers, broken down by nationality, age, and length of detention are published in table Det_D02 of the immigration detention detailed datasets. https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/returns-and-detention-datasets#immigration-detention

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending March 2020. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the 'summary tables'. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

A statistical report Statistics relating to Covid-19 and the immigration system, May 2020, https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-relating-to-covid-19-and-the-immigration-system-may-2020released on 28 May 2020 provides further high-level information relating to detention and Covid-19 up to the end of April.

Figures covering the second quarter of 2020 will be released on 27 August 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=release-date-oldest

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of people detained in immigration detention centres are foreign national offenders as at 21 April 2020.

The Home Office publishes data on people in detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Data on the number of people detained under immigration powers, broken down by nationality, age, and length of detention are published in table Det_D02 of the immigration detention detailed datasets. https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/returns-and-detention-datasets#immigration-detention

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending March 2020. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the 'summary tables'. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

A statistical report Statistics relating to Covid-19 and the immigration system, May 2020, https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-relating-to-covid-19-and-the-immigration-system-may-2020released on 28 May 2020 provides further high-level information relating to detention and Covid-19 up to the end of April.

Figures covering the second quarter of 2020 will be released on 27 August 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=release-date-oldest

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of people detained in immigration detention centres have been held for longer than 28 days in the latest period for which figures are available.

The Home Office publishes data on people in detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Data on the number of people detained under immigration powers, broken down by nationality, age, and length of detention are published in table Det_D02 of the immigration detention detailed datasets. https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/returns-and-detention-datasets#immigration-detention

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending March 2020. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the 'summary tables'. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

A statistical report Statistics relating to Covid-19 and the immigration system, May 2020, https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-relating-to-covid-19-and-the-immigration-system-may-2020released on 28 May 2020 provides further high-level information relating to detention and Covid-19 up to the end of April.

Figures covering the second quarter of 2020 will be released on 27 August 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=release-date-oldest

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people are as at 21 April 2020 detained in immigration detention centres.

The Home Office publishes data on people in detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Data on the number of people detained under immigration powers, broken down by nationality, age, and length of detention are published in table Det_D02 of the immigration detention detailed datasets. https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/returns-and-detention-datasets#immigration-detention

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending March 2020. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the 'summary tables'. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

A statistical report Statistics relating to Covid-19 and the immigration system, May 2020, https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-relating-to-covid-19-and-the-immigration-system-may-2020released on 28 May 2020 provides further high-level information relating to detention and Covid-19 up to the end of April.

Figures covering the second quarter of 2020 will be released on 27 August 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=release-date-oldest

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, on what date organisations will be able to make applications to the Community Ownership Fund.

The Community Ownership Fund bidding prospectus, assessment guidance notes and application form was published on 15 July. Eligible community organisations will be able to submit their application by 30 July.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the March 2020 Budget, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of including places of worship as a sector in the Changing Places Fund to build accessible toilet facilities in existing buildings.

The Government is determined to see greater provision of Changing Places toilet facilities in new and existing buildings. We will work with the Changing Places Consortium and others to identify those sectors where we most need to accelerate the provision of such facilities and will set out the criteria for funding in due course.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women and girls in the UK have an FGM protection order in place as at July 2020.

The Ministry of Justice collates information on the number of applications and the number of FGM protection orders granted. There is no mandatory requirement to collate statistics on the duration of orders and whether they remain in place at any point in time. The quality of available data can only, therefore, be verified at disproportionate cost. However, following their introduction in July 2015, 584 FGM protection orders have been granted up to 31 March 2020, the latest period for which information is available.

Similarly, data relating to the age of the person to be protected by an FGM protection order granted by the court is not collated and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost. Data relating to age is collated, however, on a person or persons named in any application for a FGM protection order. Following their introduction in July 2015, 405 applicants, aged 17 or under, had been the subject of an application for an FGM protection order up to 31 March 2020, the latest period for which statistics are available.

Statistics to the end of June 2020 are scheduled for publication in late September, and statistics for July are scheduled for publication in late December.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many girls under the age of 18 in the UK have an FGM protection order in place as at July 2020.

The Ministry of Justice collates information on the number of applications and the number of FGM protection orders granted. There is no mandatory requirement to collate statistics on the duration of orders and whether they remain in place at any point in time. The quality of available data can only, therefore, be verified at disproportionate cost. However, following their introduction in July 2015, 584 FGM protection orders have been granted up to 31 March 2020, the latest period for which information is available.

Similarly, data relating to the age of the person to be protected by an FGM protection order granted by the court is not collated and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost. Data relating to age is collated, however, on a person or persons named in any application for a FGM protection order. Following their introduction in July 2015, 405 applicants, aged 17 or under, had been the subject of an application for an FGM protection order up to 31 March 2020, the latest period for which statistics are available.

Statistics to the end of June 2020 are scheduled for publication in late September, and statistics for July are scheduled for publication in late December.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)