Tracy Brabin Portrait

Tracy Brabin

Labour (Co-op) - Former Member for Batley and Spen

Shadow Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
7th Jan 2020 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Minister (Education)
3rd Jul 2017 - 7th Jan 2020
Women and Equalities Committee
5th Dec 2016 - 3rd May 2017


Division Voting information

Tracy Brabin has voted in 692 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Nadhim Zahawi (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(25 debate interactions)
Theresa May (Conservative)
(21 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(19 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Education
(58 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(49 debate contributions)
Home Office
(30 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Tracy Brabin's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Tracy Brabin

30th December 2020
Tracy Brabin signed this EDM on Wednesday 27th January 2021

Holocaust Memorial Day 2021

Tabled by: Bob Blackman (Conservative - Harrow East)
That this House notes that on 27 January 2021 the UK will observe Holocaust Memorial Day marking the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, where an estimated 1.1 million people were murdered; commemorates the six million victims of the Holocaust; further notes that the theme for Holocaust Memorial Day 2021 …
97 signatures
(Most recent: 11 May 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 45
Scottish National Party: 31
Conservative: 7
Liberal Democrat: 4
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
27th January 2021
Tracy Brabin signed this EDM on Wednesday 27th January 2021

Visas for musicians in the EU

Tabled by: Harriet Harman (Labour - Camberwell and Peckham)
That this House applauds the over 100 musicians who wrote to The Times on 20 January 2021 and agrees that the UK Government must immediately seek supplementary agreement with the EU to secure the ability of all creative workers including musicians, performers, their equipment and others such as technicians to …
81 signatures
(Most recent: 11 May 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 45
Scottish National Party: 15
Liberal Democrat: 10
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Alba Party: 2
Conservative: 1
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
View All Tracy Brabin's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Tracy Brabin, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


3 Urgent Questions tabled by Tracy Brabin

Thursday 6th February 2020
Wednesday 6th September 2017

Tracy Brabin has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Tracy Brabin


A Bill to require the Government to undertake an assessment of any gaps in financial support provided to individuals, businesses and industries over the course of the Covid-19 pandemic; to require the Government to report to Parliament on steps it intends to take in connection with any such gaps; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Wednesday 13th January 2021
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to prohibit smoking on National Health Service premises; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 29th January 2019
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision about shared parental leave and pay for workers, including those that are self-employed; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 21st February 2018
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

729 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
5 Other Department Questions
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, how many West Yorkshire based organisations he has met in the last 12 months.

As Prime Minister I meet individuals and organisations from across the United Kingdom. Details of my meetings are published on gov.uk. I most recently visited West Yorkshire in February when I went to the vaccination centre in the Al Hikmah centre in Batley where I was personally able to thank all the members of staff for their vital role in rolling out the coronavirus vaccination programme.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
6th Nov 2017
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what childcare facilities her Department makes available for its staff; how much her Department spent (a) overall and (b) per child on those facilities in the last 12 months; and how many of her Department's staff use those facilities.

The department has no childcare facilities on its estate. There are two schemes in place, salary sacrifice and salary plus, which assist staff with childcare costs. Many staff will also be eligible for the 30 hours’ free childcare offer for three and four year olds.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, how many staff are seconded to the Government Equalities Office; and how many such staff are seconded from which companies and organisations.

The Government Equalities Office currently has one member of staff on secondment. They are on secondment from the Big Lottery Fund, a Non-Departmental Public Body of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Mar 2017
To ask the Prime Minister, on what occasions she has visited Yorkshire since she assumed office.

I visit all parts of the United Kingdom regularly. Details of my visits within the United Kingdom are published on the gov.uk website.

2nd Mar 2017
To ask the Prime Minister, what plans she has to visit Yorkshire.

I visit all parts of the United Kingdom regularly. Details of my visits within the United Kingdom are published on the gov.uk website.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Attorney General, how many West Yorkshire based organisations he has met in the last 12 months.

The Attorney General has not visited any West Yorkshire based organisations in the last 12 months.

Michael Ellis
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
20th Feb 2019
To ask the Attorney General, what proportion of staff employed by his Department are apprentices.

The Attorney General’s Office does not directly employ apprentices. The Attorney General’s Office has around 50 staff, the majority of whom are on two year loans to the Office. One such staff member is an apprentice, employed by the Government Legal Department and loaned to the Attorney General’s Office. The Law Officer Departments, (Attorney General’s Office, Government Legal Department, Crown Prosecution Service, Serious Fraud Office and HM Inspectorate of Crown Prosecution Service) compile and submit quarterly apprenticeship returns to the Cabinet Office and these are published on www.Gov.uk . Apprentices located within HM Inspectorate of Crown Prosecution Service and the Attorney General’s Office are reported to Cabinet Office within the total figures for the Government Legal Department.

Robert Buckland
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Attorney General, how many times he has referred to an international treaty or convention and its guidance on interpretation and implementation when assessing whether to grant consent to prosecute for a criminal provision that derives from or implements that treaty or convention in the last five years.

The Law Officers consider each consent case on its merits and take in to account international treaties, conventions and associated guidance on their interpretation and implementation where necessary.

Data on what information was considered in each case can only be provided at disproportionate cost.

22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Attorney General, which international treaties and associated guidance he referred to when granting consent to prosecute; and what the offences were to which those treaties and guidance applied in each of the last five years.

The Law Officers consider each consent case on its merits and take in to account international treaties, conventions and associated guidance on their interpretation and implementation where necessary.

Data on what information was considered in each case can only be provided at disproportionate cost.

5th Mar 2018
To ask the Attorney General, how many and what proportion of the staff employed by his Department are apprentices.

The Crown Prosecution Service currently employs 183 apprentices, which equates to 3.3% of the workforce. As at 28 February 2018 the Government Legal Department had 19 apprentices representing 0.84% of the workforce. Whilst the SFO currently does not have any apprentices it does remain committed to offering apprenticeships as a means of bringing through talent and has been employing apprentices since 2011/12. There are currently no apprentices in either the Attorney General’s Office or Her Majesty’s Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate.

Robert Buckland
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many West Yorkshire based organisations he has met in the last 12 months.

I refer the hon. Member to the relevant transparency publications on GOV.UK for Cabinet Office Ministers’ meetings with external organisations.

Julia Lopez
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
20th Feb 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion of staff employed by in No. 10 Downing Street are apprentices.

The Cabinet Office currently employs 90 apprentices who are actively completing an apprenticeship, this equates to 1.31% of our workforce.

As set out in the Civil Service apprenticeship strategy, the Civil Service has pledged to achieve 30,000 apprenticeship starts in England by 2020, annually delivering 2.3% of our workforce in England as apprenticeship starts.

Work is underway to produce detailed plans, at business unit level, to identify how they will meet their target in 2019/20

Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
5th Mar 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of the staff employed in the Prime Minister's Office are apprentices.

As set out in the Civil Service apprenticeship strategy, the Civil Service has pledged to achieve 30,000 apprenticeship starts in England by 2020, annually delivering 2.3% of our workforce in England as apprenticeship starts.

Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
3rd Nov 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what childcare facilities 10 Downing Street makes available for its staff; how much 10 Downing Street spent (a) overall and (b) per child on those facilities in the last 12 months; and how many of 10 Downing Street's staff use those facilities.

No10 do support the provision of childcare facilities for employees. If staff are based in London, they can apply for a place on the Westminster Holiday Playscheme which is provided by a third party. Children aged 4 years 9 months to 12 years are eligible to attend the playscheme, which runs during school holidays. If staff are based outside London and use a playscheme close to their home, the department will help with the cost of using the playscheme as long as the supplier is registered to provide childcare services. The cost of the playscheme is shared between the department and the parent.

  1. Overall expenditure on the playscheme facilities for last financial year 2016/17 totalled £2,828.00

  1. The department contributed an average of £78.56 per child during financial year 16/17, with a total of 27 staff using the facilities.
31st Oct 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what childcare facilities his Department makes available for staff; how much his Department spent (a) overall and (b) per child on those childcare facilities in the last year; and how many staff members use those childcare facilities.

The Cabinet Office do support the provision of childcare facilities for employees. If staff are based in London, they can apply for a place on the Westminster Holiday Playscheme which is provided by a third party. Children aged 4 years 9 months to 12 years are eligible to attend the playscheme, which runs during school holidays. If staff are based outside London and use a playscheme close to their home, the department will help with the cost of using the playscheme as long as the supplier is registered to provide childcare services. The cost of the playscheme is shared between the department and the parent.

  1. Overall expenditure on the playscheme facilities for last financial year 2016/17 totalled £2,828.00
  2. The department contributed an average of £78.56 per child during financial year 16/17, with a total of 27 staff using the facilities.

5th Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the estimated cost to the public purse of the 2018 boundary review will be.

The estimated cost of the current boundary review, comprising expenditure from 2015-7 and projected expenditure from 2017-19, is approximately £8 million. This includes the usual costs such as staffing and accommodation, and other activities necessary for the boundary review for the boundary commissions for Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff are employed by 10 Downing Street on a seconded basis; and how many such staff are seconded from which companies and organisations.

The Prime Minister’s Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office and is included in this reply.

As March 2017, Cabinet Office had 36 staff seconded in from outside of the Civil Service. Full details of the companies and organisations that staff are seconded from are not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff are seconded to his Department; and how many such staff and from which companies and organisations those staff are seconded.

The Prime Minister’s Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office and is included in this reply.

As March 2017, Cabinet Office had 36 staff seconded in from outside of the Civil Service. Full details of the companies and organisations that staff are seconded from are not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many West Yorkshire based organisations he has met in the last 12 months.

Departments publish quarterly details of Ministers’ meetings with external organisations on GOV.UK. Details for the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/beis-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings.

The latest published data covers July to September 2020. Data for October to December 2020 will be published in due course.

Amanda Solloway
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the financial support required by the wedding industry to support its re-opening when it is safe to do so during the covid-19 outbreak.

I meet regularly with the industry-led Weddings Taskforce to understand the impact of COVID-19 on businesses and jobs in the sector.

Over the course of the pandemic, the Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support to businesses, including those in the wedding sector, which we keep under regular review.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the wedding sector and its supply chain on sector re-opening timelines during the covid-19 outbreak.

I meet regularly with the industry-led Weddings Taskforce to understand the impact of COVID-19 on wedding businesses and jobs in the sector.

As my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister has said, we intend to publish our plan for taking the country out of lockdown in the last week of February.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of the £4.6 billion in new lockdown grants he announced on 5 January 2021 will be made available to (a) Kirklees and (b) the local authorities of West Yorkshire.

The Department is currently calculating the individual local authority and these will be shared with local authorities week commencing 11 January 2021.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support he is providing for (a) companies and (b) people working in the wedding industry during the covid-19 outbreak.

As part of wider support for businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic, wedding companies have been able to access a range of government-backed loans and grants. Employers have been able to use the Job Retention Scheme to furlough staff until 31 October. There are a number of self-employed people working in the wedding industry, and they have been able to benefit from the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for the inclusion of a national copyright exhaustion regime in free trade agreements of the effect of that framework on (a) the publishing sector and (b) other creative industries.

The Government considers the issue of exhaustion of rights to be primarily a domestic issue. As free trade agreements do not typically restrict the freedom of countries to choose their own exhaustion regime, we will make full use of our autonomy to choose a permanent exhaustion regime now we have left the European Union.

Amanda Solloway
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when covid-19 restrictions will be lifted to allow beauty salons to carry out facial procedures.

In my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s announcement on 17 July, close contact services including treatments to the face are allowed to resume as of 1 August, as long as they operate in a COVID-secure way.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to provide support to the aesthetic industry.

Our approach to allowing businesses to resume activity is guided by the scientific and medical advice, and every step is weighed against the evidence, remembering that the more we open-up the more vigilant we will need to be. Making any changes depends on us continuing to meet the five tests, and the fifth test is informed by the Chief Scientific Adviser and Chief Medical Officer’s opinion.

Where a business such as those in the aesthetic industries provides a mix of services, only those services that do not involve work in the highest risk zone – around the face – should be made available to clients. There is a much higher risk of transmission of the virus face-to-face and in very close proximity, such as facial treatments and make up services.

The Government has introduced an unprecedented package of support for businesses which are facing difficulty as a result of the pandemic, including loan schemes, grant funding and wage packages. Businesses from most sectors including the aesthetic industry are able to access this support, provided they meet the eligibility criteria for the schemes for which they are applying.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department conducts equality impact assessments when making decisions on reopening sections of the economy as covid-19 restrictions are eased.

Our work continues to be led by the science, so we do not put lives at risk.

The Department has considered how decisions on reopening sections of the economy may affect people who are protected under the Equality Act, in fulfilment of its duty under the Public Sector Equality Duty.

Our guidance emphasises that employers have a duty under UK law to protect the health and safety of their employees and other people who might be affected by their business. This includes considering the risks that COVID-19 represents. Nothing in this guidance affects employers’ existing responsibilities under employment and equalities legislation.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to protect copyright and intellectual property for the creative industries in future trade negotiations.

The Government recognises the significant contribution that creative industries make to the UK economy and have consulted with industry stakeholders on intellectual property and trade.

Our intellectual property regime is consistently rated as one of the best in the world. Any future trade agreement must achieve a balanced outcome for creators, producers, performers, users, and consumers, in line with international standards.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of regulating casting websites for performers to ensure that advertised roles comply with (a) the national minimum wage and (b) the Employment Agencies Act 1973 and the Conduct of Employment Agencies and Employment Businesses Regulations 2003.

The Government is committed to creating a labour market that works for everyone. Effective enforcement is a key element of the Good Work Plan, which sets out the biggest upgrade to workers’ rights in a generation.

Casting websites in the acting sector can already meet the definition of an employment agency, as set out in the Employment Agencies Act 1973. If they meet the definition, they need to comply with the current legislation, which includes specific regulations that cover acting and background extras agencies.

The Conduct of Employment Agencies and Employment Businesses Regulations 2003 includes certain requirements in relation to advertising by employment agencies and such requirements are enforced by the Employment Agency Standards (EAS) Inspectorate.

EAS work with other enforcement partners, such as HMRC who enforce National Minimum Wage legislation. EAS share information with HMRC where there is information to suggest non-compliance with National Minimum Wage legislation, as well as with other enforcement partners to protect vulnerable workers in the labour market.

14th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the review of shared parental leave is planned for completion; and at what stage of that review stakeholders will be called to give evidence.

We expect to complete the evaluation of the Shared Parental Leave and Pay scheme later this year.

To date we have prioritised collecting empirical data from a variety of sources, including a large-scale survey of nearly 4,500 parents. We plan to hold meetings with interested parties during the later stages of the evaluation.

29th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing a medal for women who worked in munitions factories during the world wars.

The Government recognises the hard work of the Munitions workers and is extremely grateful for their input and sacrifices made during both world wars often working in harsh conditions, to ensure that our soldiers were well equipped during the war effort.

There are no plans to introduce a medal for munitions workers who served during the world wars. A commemorative badge is available thanks to the support of the BAE Systems Heritage Department and the efforts of the Munitions Workers Association. This is similar to those badges given to those who worked in the mines during the second world war – the so-called Bevan Boys. Surviving munitions workers and their families can approach the Munitions Workers Association to receive this commemorative badge.

22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential effect on the operations of bed manufacturers in (a) West Yorkshire and (b) the rest of the UK of leaving the EU; and if he will make a statement.

BEIS engages regularly with UK based businesses and trade associations across a range of sectors including consumer goods. We understand the concerns of these businesses about retaining frictionless trade and want all manufacturers across the UK, including in West Yorkshire, to thrive now and in the future.

To help us engage effectively, we have set up sector-specific EU Exit panels. The first consumer goods panel will be taking place in early November and all consumer goods activity in the UK, including furniture manufacturing, is represented.

The Government has been clear that the best outcome is for the UK to leave the EU with a deal and why, following months of intensive work and detailed discussions, we proposed a third option for our future economic relationship, based on the frictionless trade in goods.

At March European Council, the UK and EU agreed that during the implementation period, the UK would be treated as a Member State for the purposes of international agreements, including trade agreements.

This provides certainty and confidence for business that there will be no disruption to existing relationships underpinned by international agreements as we move into the Implementation Period.

10th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department provides to people who have had renewable energy systems fitted by businesses fraudulently claiming to be MCS accredited and are therefore unable to receive the grants from Ofgem.

Certification of the products and the installation by the Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) is a key eligibility requirement for two government incentives, the Renewable Heat Incentive and the Feed-in Tariff. The Department works closely with MCS and Consumer Codes operating in this sector to ensure that consumers using an MCS certified contractor for a renewable energy installation are protected.

Where an installer fraudulently claims to be MCS certified, the consumer can contact their local trading standards office https://www.gov.uk/find-local-trading-standards-office.

Where the Department receives individual correspondence regarding such cases, officials work closely with Ofgem and MCS to ensure best possible outcomes can be achieved for the consumer.

8th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reasons statutory adoption pay is not available for people undertaking guardianship orders.

Statutory Adoption Pay is paid to eligible employees who are adopting a child to enable them to take time off work to settle the child into their new home. Unlike adoptive parents, the majority of special guardians already have an established relationship with the child. They are often relatives or family friends, and the child has often been living with them for an extended period before applying for a Special Guardianship Order.

Local authorities have a duty to provide for special guardianship support services: including financial support where necessary. Provision of support is discretionary and is based on an assessment of the guardian’s support needs. Where the child was looked after immediately prior to the making of the special guardianship order, funding from the Adoption Support Fund is available to pay for therapeutic services where they need help to recover from their previous experiences and bond with their new family.

31st Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what childcare facilities his Department makes available for staff; how much his Department spent (a) overall and (b) per child on those childcare facilities in the last year; and how many staff members use those childcare facilities.

The Department organises the Westminster Holiday Play Scheme. This is a childcare facility that takes place during school holidays. It is open to children from the age of 4 years and 9 months up to 15 years’ old. It is run on behalf of a consortium of departments through a contract led and administered by BEIS. It currently operates at 4 London locations. There is a cost of £35 per day per child. The Department meets £18 of this cost for its members of staff with parents/guardians paying the remaining £17.

Between September 2016 and August 2017 (inclusive) BEIS spent £10,244 on the play scheme. The Department does not have details on the number of individual staff members who made use of the scheme or on the amounts spent per child.

30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 27 June 2017, Official Report, columns 457-8W, on workers' rights, what powers the Government has made available to HM Revenue and Customs to sanction companies withholding employees' paid holiday allowance; and on how many occasions such powers have been used.

HM Revenue and Customs has no powers to sanction companies for withholding holiday pay.

However, HM Revenue and Customs plays a vital role in enforcing the National Minimum Wage and the Government has continued to strengthen enforcement action in this area.

More broadly, the Government has asked Matthew Taylor to consider new forms of work such as the ‘gig economy’ and self-employment, and their implications on employee rights and responsibilities, employer freedoms and obligations, and the existing regulatory framework surrounding employment.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many staff are seconded to his Department; and how many such staff are seconded from which companies and organisations.

There are currently 40 staff seconded to the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The table below shows the organisations that secondees are from and the number of secondees from each organisation:

Organisation

No.

Organisation

No.

Organisation

No.

National Grid

2

Irish Government

1

New Economy Manchester

1

Brighton & Hove City Council

1

NHS Trust Development Authority

1

Royal Society

1

City & County of Swansea

1

Imperial College London

1

National Physical Laboratory

1

University of Liverpool

1

Innovate UK

1

Oxford University

1

BMWi - Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, Germany

1

British Business Bank

1

West Yorkshire combined Authority

1

QAA (Quality assurance agency for higher education)

3

UK Petroleum Industry Association Ltd

1

Southend on Sea Borough Council

1

Research Councils UK

2

City of Bradford MDC

1

Science & Technology Facilities Council

1

Chartered trading standards institute

1

Jisc

2

UK Atomic Energy Authority

1

University of Sheffield

1

Financial Conduct Authority

1

Natural Environment Research Council

1

Jacobs

1

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

1

The Financial Reporting Council Ltd

1

HEFCE (Higher Education Funding Council for England)

1

Environment Agency

1

British Standards Institute

1

Shell

1

Deloittes

1

23rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the effect of changes in the level of Government funding for the Citizens Advice Service in (a) England, (b) West Yorkshire and (c) Kirklees in the last three years.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy provides funding to Citizen Advice (CitA), the umbrella body for the Citizen Advice Service in England and Wales through an annual grant to support their core function and to deliver consumer advocacy and advice. Funding over the last three years is set out in the table below.

Year

BIS Core Funding

Consumer advice, information & advocacy

Total Funding

2016-17

£18,900,000

£19,974,300

£38,874,300

2015-16

£18,900,000

£19,313,300

£38,213,300

2014-15

£18,900,000

£18,940,300

£37,840,300

Central Government does not provide funding directly to local individual Citizen Advice offices, core funding for which is usually provided by the local authority in which they are located.

23rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of applying equivalent maternity rights for women in permanent employment to women in casual, fixed-term or zero-hours employment contracts.

Entitlement to statutory employment rights, including family related statutory leave and pay, is determined by the individual’s employment status and not the type of contract that they have. This means that many women on casual, fixed-term or zero-hours contracts will already enjoy the same maternity benefits as women in full-time, permanent employment.

The wide ranging independent review of Modern Employment Practices is looking at the impact of non-standard forms of employment on security, pay and rights

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many West Yorkshire based organisations he has met in the last 12 months.

Ministers routinely meet with a range of organisations. Details of Ministerial meetings are published on a quarterly basis on Gov.uk

Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking in response to allegations of racism in cricket.

The government is clear that racism has no place in cricket, sport, or society at large. The sport and physical activity strategy ‘Sporting Future: A New Strategy for an Active Nation’ has diversity and inclusion at its heart. However, it is ultimately for individual sports to decide on the appropriate initiatives for their circumstances.

The Government welcomes the steps taken by the English Cricket Board (ECB) in recent years to increase diversity in cricket, including the most recent establishment of the Independent Commission for Equity in Cricket, chaired by Cindy Butts. This body looks to examine all issues relating to race and equity in cricket. It will play an important role in ensuring inclusivity, and that cricket is a game for everyone, at all levels.

There is still more to do, however, and we will continue to liaise with the ECB to ensure this issue is tackled effectively.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has made an assessment of the recent representations made to his Department on establishing a UK Creators Council as a mechanism to improve communication between the Government and representatives from the creative workforce.

The Government engages regularly with a wide range of leading industry experts in the creative industries, including through the Creative Industries Council (CIC), a forum for Government and industry to convene and share information, and discuss concerns and opportunities. The CIC is formed of a broad range of representative bodies across the sub-sectors of the creative industries.

In January, we received a joint letter from a range of representative bodies including the Design and Artists Copyright Society, the Association of Authors’ Agents and the Writer’s Guild of Great Britain among others. The letter called for the creation of a UK Creators’ Council and highlighted their concern that the issues faced by the UK’s creative industries workforce were not being heard, in particular during this Covid crisis.

We would like to reaffirm that the Government and DCMS are keenly aware of the significant challenges faced by the UK creative workforce. These issues have been repeatedly discussed in both CIC meetings and in ongoing conversations with sector bodies across the creative industries. And it is partly as a result of these conversations that the Government announced the expansion of the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme scheme to cover over 600,000 newly eligible self-employed individuals, and extended the Culture Recovery Fund with £300m additional funding for 21/22, to continue to support key cultural organisations.

Considering this, we believe that the interests of the creative workforce are well-represented across Government and the benefits of creating a new entity would need to be carefully weighed up against the risks of duplicating the work of existing organisations such as the CIC. However, I would be happy to discuss further ideas to ensure the creative workforce are strongly represented in Government.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the reading habits of (a) adults and (b) children.

DCMS has not undertaken an assessment of adults’ or children’s reading habits during the Covid-19 pandemic. We are aware the publishing industry has reported that, while sales of fiction and digital formats rose over the first six months of 2020, total book sales across the industry fell by 11% in that period.

The Government recognises the importance of English skills both in work and everyday life. Whilst we do not track the reading habits of adults, the Government does provide full funding for learners who do not have a level 2 qualification in English who need to improve their literacy skills.

The Government is also committed to continuing to raise literacy standards – ensuring all children, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds, can read fluently and with understanding. Recognising the importance of reading during the disruption to education caused by Covid-19, a Reading Together Day was held on 16 July 2020 to celebrate the benefits of reading.

Understanding the impact of the Covid-19 disruption on students is a priority for the Government, and the Department for Education has commissioned an independent research and assessment agency to provide a baseline assessment of catch up needs for pupils in schools in England and monitor progress over the course of the year. The Department for Education will publish interim findings prior to the final research report being published in October 2021.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what proportion of the recipients of the Cultural Recovery Fund are located in West Yorkshire; and what proportion of that fund has been spent in West Yorkshire.

Last year the government announced the unprecedented £1.57 billion support package for the culture sector, of which over £1 billion has now been allocated to over 3,000 arts and culture organisations across the country. This Culture Recovery Fund is supporting the arts and culture sector to survive the pandemic and continue operating.

According to the latest figures, 4% of CRF recipients are located in West Yorkshire and just under 5% of the Culture Recovery Fund has been spent in West Yorkshire.



Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to support the economic recovery of (a) UK publishing industry exports and (b) other creative exports.

We appreciate that the Covid-19 pandemic presents a significant challenge to many of DCMS’ creative sectors including the publishing industry. Through regular ministerial-led roundtables, working groups and contact with DCMS officials, we will continue to work with the publishing sector to assess and understand the difficulties it faces in these challenging times and through recovery.

The Government has provided unprecedented support for business and workers to protect them against the current economic emergency. The Government’s response has been one of the most generous and comprehensive in the world, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme and the Bounceback Loan Scheme and business rates reliefs.

The publishing sector has also benefited from the government's introduction of a zero rate of VAT to e-publications, which was brought forward to 1st May this year. It ensures e-publications are entitled to the same VAT treatment as their physical counterparts.

We are continuing to meet with creative industries stakeholders to provide support and guidance for the sector during this time.


Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department to taking to support (a) SME publishing businesses and (b) other creative SMEs who were either not eligible for or did not receive funding from the Culture Recovery Fund.

Through regular ministerial-led roundtables, working groups and contact with DCMS officials, we will continue to work with the publishing sector to assess and understand the difficulties businesses across the creative industries, including SME publishing businesses, face in these challenging times and through recovery.

Regarding other creative SMEs, the CRF complements wider measures to support businesses. Cultural organisations have benefited from, and should continue to explore, the wide variety of additional funding made available by Government beyond the CRF, including the Job Retention Scheme; a reduction in VAT from 20% to 5% for tourism and hospitality firms for six months; and the Bounce Back Loans scheme. The publishing sector has also benefited specifically from the government's introduction of a zero rate of VAT to e-publications, which will make it clear e-publications are entitled to the same VAT treatment as their physical counterparts.

The CRF has not been fully allocated and DCMS and the Culture Recovery Board will take decisions in the coming weeks on how best to allocate the remaining funds to best support the sector.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what funding he has made available to support Platinum Jubilee celebrations.

The UK Government expects funding for the Platinum Jubilee celebrations in 2022 to come from a range of sources. Every effort will be made to ensure that any activities and programmes for the Jubilee do not impose an unnecessary burden on the taxpayer.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans he has to allocate the remaining funds in the Culture Recovery Fund.

The majority of the CRF funding is now being deployed with over £500 million allocated so far across both capital and recovery grants. A further £188 million has been allocated to the devolved administrations as part of the Barnett formula and £100 million has been directly allocated to national cultural institutions and English Heritage Trust.

Repayable finance awards (which made up £270m of the Fund) are currently under negotiation, with outcomes expected to be announced in the coming weeks, and part of the £120m capital funding is still to be allocated.

Additionally, DCMS has held back a substantial amount of CRF funding with a view to offering critical support when needed - we do not know what will happen next with this pandemic, and this government wants to support these sectors over the long term.

DCMS and its Arms Length Bodies are working closely to identify the ongoing needs of these sectors, and will make decisions as soon as possible about how best to use the contingency funding left within the CRF to provide further support to the sector.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether organisations in receipt of Government grants under the Cultural Recovery Fund grants programme are able to access the (a) provisions for re-hiring staff and (b) all other elements of the coronavirus job retention scheme; and if he will make a statement.

Organisations in receipt of Culture Recovery grant funding are still able to access other Government support schemes, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. However recipients should not claim support for the same staff costs from multiple government schemes, and should rehire staff if it is right for them.

Where organisations have questions about the interaction between the culture recovery fund and the job retention scheme, they should speak to their relevant arms length body - Arts Council England, National Lottery Heritage Fund, Historic England or the British Film Institute.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to improve internet infrastructure in (a) Batley and Spen constituency and (b) Kirklees local authority area.

Good progress has been made in the Batley and Spen constituency, with over 98% of premises able to access superfast broadband according to Thinkbroadband - up from 41% in January 2012. Furthermore, over 68% of premises have access to ultrafast services (greater than 100Mbps) and over 21% have access to gigabit services (1,000Mbps). Virgin Media are currently upgrading their network and the department estimates that over 67% of the constituency will have access to gigabit speeds by the end of 2021.

In the Kirklees metropolitan area, over 98% of premises have access to superfast broadband, which is up from 59% in January 2012. Furthermore, over 72% have access to ultrafast services (greater than 100Mbps) and over 23% have access to gigabit services (1,000Mbps). Virgin Media are currently upgrading their network and the department estimates that over 65% of Kirklees will have access to gigabit speeds by the end of 2021.

For those rural premises in Batley and Spen and wider Kirklees that are still suffering from slow speeds, DCMS runs the Gigabit Broadband Voucher Scheme (GBVS) that can be used by rural communities across the UK to reduce the cost of installing gigabit-capable connectivity. This provides a voucher worth up to £3,500 for eligible small businesses and vouchers worth up to £1,500 for residents. More details are available here: https://gigabitvoucher.culture.gov.uk/. To date across West Yorkshire, homes and small businesses have requested 1,133 vouchers totaling £2.8 million, including 30 from constituents in Batley and Spen.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of Tier 2 covid-19 restrictions on (a) choirs, (b) singing groups, (c) acting groups and (d) other amateur creative organisations.

In Medium Local Covid Alert Level areas (Tier 1) it is against the law to gather in groups of more than 6, unless everyone is from the same household and support bubble. In High (Tier 2) and Very High (Tier 3) areas, it is against the law to gather indoors in groups which do not consist only of the same household and support bubble. A number of exemptions apply. For example, some activities - such as those organised for under-18s including education or training supervised activities provided for children, including wraparound care, youth groups and activities - are exempt.

In addition, in a COVID-secure venue or public outdoor place, non-professional performing arts activity, including choirs, orchestras or drama groups can continue to rehearse or perform together where this is planned activity in line with the performing arts guidance and if they can do so in a way that ensures that there is no interaction between separate and distinct groups of no more than 6 (In Medium areas and outdoors) or individual households (in High and Very High areas) at any time (depending on Local Covid Alert Level restrictions). If an amateur group is not able to ensure that no mingling takes place between these sub-groups (depending on Local Covid Alert Level restrictions) - including when arriving at or leaving activity or in any breaks or socialising - then such non-professional activity should not take place. Local Covid Alert Level guidance (Medium, High, Very High) provides details on group size.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of Tier 3 covid-19 restrictions on (a) choirs, (b) singing groups, (c) acting groups and (d) other amateur creative organisations.

In Medium Local Covid Alert Level areas (Tier 1) it is against the law to gather in groups of more than 6, unless everyone is from the same household and support bubble. In High (Tier 2) and Very High (Tier 3) areas, it is against the law to gather indoors in groups which do not consist only of the same household and support bubble. A number of exemptions apply. For example, some activities - such as those organised for under-18s including education or training supervised activities provided for children, including wraparound care, youth groups and activities - are exempt.

In addition, in a COVID-secure venue or public outdoor place, non-professional performing arts activity, including choirs, orchestras or drama groups can continue to rehearse or perform together where this is planned activity in line with the performing arts guidance and if they can do so in a way that ensures that there is no interaction between separate and distinct groups of no more than 6 (In Medium areas and outdoors) or individual households (in High and Very High areas) at any time (depending on Local Covid Alert Level restrictions). If an amateur group is not able to ensure that no mingling takes place between these sub-groups (depending on Local Covid Alert Level restrictions) - including when arriving at or leaving activity or in any breaks or socialising - then such non-professional activity should not take place. Local Covid Alert Level guidance (Medium, High, Very High) provides details on group size.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, on what date applicants to the Arts Council England administered Cultural Recovery Fund who applied for less than £250,000 in support will receive detailed explanation for the reasons that their application was unsuccessful.

Each arms length body, in this case Arts Council England, has the delegated authority over allocating grant funding.

Their decision-making processes have been designed to balance limited resource with the urgent need to award funds, and process a very high number of applications, as soon as possible. This means that they do not have the resources to provide tailored feedback to applicants who applied for grants of under £250k. These applications were assessed and considered within area-based panel meetings, with recommendations passed on to a National Investment Panel for final decision.

We know that some applicants will be disappointed with the outcome and both the Arts Council and DCMS will continue to do all we can to support creativity and culture in England. Arts Council have published resources on their website both for organisations and individuals which include alternative sources of support and wellbeing resources.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many independent cinemas have made applications to the Cultural Recovery Fund; and how many and what proportion of those applications have been (a) successful and (b) unsuccessful.

On July 5 the Government announced the Culture Recovery Fund, a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them preserve their local cultural offer and rescue organisations that are at risk of insolvency this financial year. This is the biggest ever one-off investment in UK culture. Within this, the British Film Institute (BFI) is allocating up to £30 million in grants on behalf of my department to support independent cinemas in England.

As of Friday 2 October 2020, the Culture Recovery Fund for Independent Cinemas has received 72 applications from 109 individual cinema sites (one application can be made on behalf of a small cinema chain), amounting to grant requests of just over £4.5million. From this, 28 grants worth over £650,000 have been awarded to 42 cinema sites across England. This means almost 40% of applications received have been successfully awarded funding so far. The fund is being awarded on a rolling basis and will continue to assess and accept applications through to 30th October. For those organisations which have not yet had decisions, BFI are continuing to assess the evidence provided in line with the eligibility criteria and are working with them to explore their needs.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much financial support independent cinemas applied for through the Cultural Recovery Fund; and how much of that funding was granted.

On July 5 the Government announced the Culture Recovery Fund, a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them preserve their local cultural offer and rescue organisations that are at risk of insolvency this financial year. This is the biggest ever one-off investment in UK culture. Within this, the British Film Institute (BFI) is allocating up to £30 million in grants on behalf of my department to support independent cinemas in England.

As of Friday 2 October 2020, the Culture Recovery Fund for Independent Cinemas has received 72 applications from 109 individual cinema sites (one application can be made on behalf of a small cinema chain), amounting to grant requests of just over £4.5million. From this, 28 grants worth over £650,000 have been awarded to 42 cinema sites across England. This means almost 40% of applications received have been successfully awarded funding so far. The fund is being awarded on a rolling basis and will continue to assess and accept applications through to 30th October. For those organisations which have not yet had decisions, BFI are continuing to assess the evidence provided in line with the eligibility criteria and are working with them to explore their needs.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many applications have been received for the Emergency Grassroot Music Venues Fund; and how many of those applications were unsuccessful.

236 eligible applications from grassroots music venues were submitted for the Emergency Grassroot Music Venues Fund. £3.36M was distributed to 136 successful applicants and 100 venues that applied did not receive funding.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing a scheme to support theatres similar to the Film and TV Production Restart Scheme.

We are working closely with the sector to understand any issues they may have on reopening and looking at ways to address these, including the issue of insurance cover. Socially distanced indoor performances can now take place and we encourage people to support venues that are opening up by booking tickets and visiting our wonderful theatres once again.

The government’s £1.57 billion Cultural Recovery Fund – the largest ever one-off investment in culture – will help our arts institutions and organisations through these challenging times.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the ending of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme on levels of employment in the (a) digital, (b) culture, (c) media and (d) sport sectors.

DCMS has undertaken a survey and review of the impact of coronavirus on businesses and organisations. The second round of findings on this was published on 23rd September. This review found that the proportion of organisations with over 50% of employees furloughed is 38% for digital, 24% for culture, 25% for media and 28% for sport.

46% of respondents to the DCMS business survey said they have furloughed at least one employee in response to the Coronavirus outbreak. 42% of respondents with at least one employee currently furloughed reported that they expected to make further redundancies once the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) ends.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of recent changes to covid-19 restrictions on youth theatres.

A number of exemptions to the Rule of Six have been published and the exceptions where groups can be larger than 6 people include: registered childcare, education or training supervised activities provided for children, including wraparound care, youth groups and activities, and children’s playgroups

Venues such as theatres, concert halls and other entertainment venues that are already able to host larger numbers, and are Covid secure in line with the relevant guidance, will continue to be able to do so - as long as groups of more than one household are limited to six and do not mix with one another.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many workers in the digital, culture, media and sport sectors have been recipients of support from the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

It is estimated that the number of workers furloughed across DCMS sectors (including tourism) peaked at 1.5 million on 31st May 2020. This represented 37% of the total DCMS workforce. The estimated number of furloughed workers in these sectors has since declined to 812,000, or 20% of the workforce, as of 9th August.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate the Government has made of the number of job losses in digital, culture, media and sport sectors since April 2020.

The latest ONS Business Impacts of Coronavirus Survey data, recorded from 27th July to 9th August, suggests that 1.9% of Accommodation and Food Services Activities workers have been made redundant as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, along with 1.0% of Arts, Entertainment and Recreation workers. Across the UK economy as a whole, the figure stands at 1.1%.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when he plans to publish further information on the allocation of the remaining £258 million in funding from the Cultural Renewal Fund.

The Culture Recovery Fund will provide targeted support to critical cultural, arts and heritage organisations to help them survive and recover through the coronavirus pandemic. In the first round of funding, £622 million will be distributed, the remaining £258 million has been reserved for funding later in the financial year. The distribution of this £258 million will be dependent on the outcome of the first round of funding so that it can best meet the developing needs of organisations.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
3rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to monitor the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the number of people employed in the creative industries.

DCMS conducted a business impact survey earlier this year with results published in June and the next set of results are due later in the Autumn. Since the start of the crisis, the department has engaged extensively with stakeholders across the Creative Industries and we are aware of the difficulties organisations and individuals face.

We appreciate that the Covid-19 pandemic presents a significant challenge to the creative industries which is why the Government announced an unprecedented £1.57 billion support package specifically for the cultural sector to help them through this crisis. This funding will provide targeted support to many organisations in the Creative Industries, to stay open and continue operating. This substantial sector-specific package is in addition to economic wide measures such as the furlough scheme, and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, both of which were designed to protect as many jobs as possible.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
3rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, on what date he plans to announce the names of organisations receiving support from the Cultural Recovery Fund.

Our priority is to ensure that organisations get the funding they need as swiftly as possible. Our Arms Length Bodies made emergency funding available in the spring and this package builds on that. We expect funding to start flowing to organisations in September with further details to be announced after that.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress has been made under the Creative Industries Sector Deal rights holder and online marketplaces roundtables in achieving their objective of reducing online infringement; whether the Government made an assessment of the potential merits of legislation after a code of practice was not agreed by December 2018; and what the timetable is for the conclusion of those roundtables.

Government has committed to overseeing discussions between rights holders and platforms as part of the online marketplaces roundtables. Progress has been steady with more time requested by all parties for bilateral discussions as each platform operates differently. Consequently, substantive progress has been made with a Memorandum of Understanding currently in draft phase. Throughout these discussions platforms have addressed some of the concerns raised by rights holders and the expectation is for a signed MoU this Autumn.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when the Competition and Markets Authority plans to report on the findings of the digital markets taskforce; and what plans he has to ensure the equity of markets online for creators and consumers.

The Government is committed to ensuring that it takes an effective, pro-innovation approach to governing digital technologies.

That is why we established the Digital Markets Taskforce to advise on the potential design and implementation of pro-competitive measures in digital platform markets. The Taskforce will support the Government’s objective to ensure that digital markets work for all: to enable disruptors to challenge incumbents, to empower consumers through choice and control, to support quality services and content online, and to provide industry, especially SMEs, with fair access to digital markets to be able to grow their businesses. It will deliver its advice by the end of the year.


Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2020 to Question 71842 on Culture: Coronavirus, if he will publish the further detailed guidance before the summer parliamentary recess.

Further guidance on applications to the £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations will be published by our partner organisations - Arts Council England, BFI, Historic England and the National Lottery Heritage Fund - later in July.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, on what date organisations will be able to apply for support from the £1.57 billion cultural industries support package.

On 5 July, DCMS announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of sectors, including performing arts and theatres, museums and galleries, heritage sites, live music venues and independent cinema.

We want this package, which will be delivered through Arts Council England, Historic England, National Lottery Heritage Fund, and the British Film Institute, to support organisations across the cultural, heritage and creative sectors. We will publish further detailed guidance - including eligibility and application processes - as soon as possible in July.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what proportion of the £1.57 billion cultural support package he plans to allocate to each region of England.

On 5 July, DCMS announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of sectors, including performing arts and theatres, museums and galleries, heritage sites, live music venues and independent cinema.

We want this package, which will be delivered through Arts Council England, Historic England, National Lottery Heritage Fund, and the British Film Institute, to support organisations across the cultural, heritage and creative sectors. We will publish further detailed guidance - including eligibility and application processes - as soon as possible in July.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, on what date he plans to announce the delivery partners for the £1.57 billion cultural support package.

On 5 July, DCMS announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of sectors, including performing arts and theatres, museums and galleries, heritage sites, live music venues and independent cinema.

We want this package, which will be delivered through Arts Council England, Historic England, National Lottery Heritage Fund, and the British Film Institute, to support organisations across the cultural, heritage and creative sectors. We will publish further detailed guidance - including eligibility and application processes - as soon as possible in July.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish the submission that Arts Council England made to his Department requesting support for the cultural industries.

In line with its hugely important role in supporting and developing England’s arts and culture, DCMS has worked closely with Arts Council England during the Covid-19 crisis to deliver tailored support packages at speed, and to develop the major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations.

DCMS will continue to work closely with the Arts Council as the landscape develops, but has no plans to publish any specific submissions.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing theatres and live performance venues with a date before which they will not be able to reopen.

We appreciate that this is an incredibly challenging time and that there are many cultural organisations and professionals who are currently facing difficult and uncertain circumstances. We are very alert to this issue and it is a priority of my department to work with the arts and cultural sectors to address the challenges of reopening, as and when it will be possible to do so.

From the information we have been receiving from various organisations and professionals, we know that the picture is nuanced across the country, with different organisations facing different challenges when it comes to the question of reopening.

The Secretary of State recently revealed a five stage roadmap that the government will work through to get the performing arts sectors back up and running as soon as possible:

  • Stage One - Rehearsal and training (no audiences)

  • Stage Two - Performances for broadcast and recording purposes

  • Stage Three - Performances outdoors with an audience and pilots for indoor performances with a limited socially-distanced audience

  • Stage Four - Performances allowed indoors and outdoors (but with a limited socially-distanced audience indoors)

  • Stage Five - Performances allowed indoors / outdoors (with a fuller audience indoors)

From the 11th July, we will move to Stage Three. This means that performances outdoors with a socially distanced audience can take place in line with this guidance. DCMS will work with sector representative bodies to select a number of pilots for indoor performances with a socially distanced audience.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish in full the findings of his Department's Coronavirus Impact Business Survey.

The purpose of the DCMS Coronavirus Business Survey is to assess the impact of Covid 19 on DCMS sectors and the extent to which they have accessed government support packages. DCMS has published selected headline findings, and we will publish the detailed results in due course.

The survey was launched on 23rd April 2020 and closed on 22nd May 2020. The survey was run simultaneously through DCMS stakeholder engagement channels and via a YouGov panel. A total of 3,936 responses were received from DCMS stakeholder engagement channels (2,369) and via YouGov (1,567).

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what proportion of participants of the Cultural Renewal Taskforce's working groups are from a (a) BAME, (b) disability and (c) other under-represented background.

The Cultural Renewal Taskforce, and the Working Groups which support it, include a wide range of relevant organisations and membership bodies to represent relevant sectors. We have strived to ensure they are made up of a diverse variety of different organisations that vary not only by size and scale, but which also represent a broad range of views and backgrounds from across the country.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what tasks the Cultural Renewal Taskforce is currently undertaking.

The Cultural Renewal Taskforce has been working to support the renewal of DCMS sectors and to help develop new COVID-19 secure guidelines for the reopening of public places and businesses in these sectors, where and when it is safe to do so. The focus of the Taskforce’s work is on:

  • ensuring that COVID-19 secure guidelines are developed in line with the phasing ambitions and public health directions, building on the existing guidance and providing intelligence and sector-specific expert input;

  • developing creative solutions, to drive the return of sectors whilst maintaining consistency with the medical advice;

  • agreeing and ensuring alignment of relevant sectoral guidance; and

  • providing key sector stakeholders with a forum to support government work on cultural renewal.

The Cultural Renewal Taskforce has met seven times between 22 May and 1 July, and will continue to meet over the summer to support the progress towards the reopening and recovery of DCMS sectors.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Government guidance on working safely during coronavirus, published on 24 June, and earlier guidance on working safely in homes published on 11 May; whether these guidelines apply to private music teachers; and whether private music teachers can resume face-to-face teaching in their homes provided they adhere to those guidelines.

The Department for Education (DfE) has published guidance for providers of community activities, holiday and after-school clubs as well as other out-of-school provision for children over the age of five, which sets out the protective measures that need to be in place to ensure that such settings can open as safely as possible, this guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak/protective-measures-for-out-of-school-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

Further more detailed DfE guidance on music will be published shortly.


The government has also published specific guidance for people working out of the home, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/homes.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many workers in the creative industries are not eligible to apply to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme or Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

No estimates have been made. However, we appreciate that the Covid-19 pandemic presents a significant challenge to many of DCMS’ sectors including the creative industries which is why the Government has announced unprecedented support for businesses and workers to protect them against the current economic emergency.

DCMS is engaging with a range of departments to support the economic response to Covid-19, and ensuring that the needs of its sectors, and those who work in them, are fully understood.

To ensure we are assisting all our sectors as effectively as possible, regular ministerially-chaired roundtables are held with business representative organisations and trade associations from across the creative industries. In addition, officials are in regular contact with stakeholders from these sectors, and we continue to speak with HM Treasury colleagues to ensure that the full spectrum of government support reaches the UK's world-leading creative industries. DCMS will continue to work with these valuable sectors to understand the difficulties they face and help them access support through these challenging times and through recovery.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the recommendation that premises should ensure that steps are taken to avoid people unduly raising their voices in the Government guidance on working safely during coronavirus, published on 24 June, what assessment the Government has made of whether singing carries an increased risk of transmission of covid-19; and what scientific evidence was used in that assessment.

Current Public Health England assessment is that singing carries a potential higher risk of transmission and that participation in this activity requires particular attention to the risk involved. Based on this, Government guidance proposes a precautionary risk-based approach to certain activities and aims to develop the ways activities can be carried out as the evidence base is better understood.

To help support the development of the evidence base in regards to singing, DCMS is engaged in a number of scientific activities focusing on the need to understand the different risks associated with singing, brass and woodwind. DCMS is working closely with SAGE and a number of specialists in aerosol transmission and ventilation, who will focus on a number of critical research questions. These groups will be examining existing and emerging evidence to provide advice to guide the future development of policy and guidelines.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the scientific basis is for not allowing choirs and singing activities to resume as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Current Public Health England assessment is that singing carries a potential higher risk of transmission and that participation in this activity requires particular attention to the risk involved. Based on this, Government guidance proposes a precautionary risk-based approach to certain activities and aims to develop the ways activities can be carried out as the evidence base is better understood.

To help support the development of the evidence base in regards to singing, DCMS is engaged in a number of scientific activities focusing on the need to understand the different risks associated with singing, brass and woodwind. DCMS is working closely with SAGE and a number of specialists in aerosol transmission and ventilation, who will focus on a number of critical research questions. These groups will be examining existing and emerging evidence to provide advice to guide the future development of policy and guidelines.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to support cultural venues that have announced plans to make a large proportion of their employees redundant.

Current Public Health England assessment is that singing carries a potential higher risk of transmission and that participation in this activity requires particular attention to the risk involved. Based on this, Government guidance proposes a precautionary risk-based approach to certain activities and aims to develop the ways activities can be carried out as the evidence base is better understood.

To help support the development of the evidence base in regards to singing, DCMS is engaged in a number of scientific activities focusing on the need to understand the different risks associated with singing, brass and woodwind. DCMS is working closely with SAGE and a number of specialists in aerosol transmission and ventilation, who will focus on a number of critical research questions. These groups will be examining existing and emerging evidence to provide advice to guide the future development of policy and guidelines.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when he plans to provide further information on his Department's proposed sector deal for the arts in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

We recognise that these are incredibly challenging times for arts and culture organisations, and the Government will continue to support the sector through the unprecedented financial measures we have announced. DCMS has worked closely with its arm’s-length bodies to deliver tailored support packages at speed, including the £160m Emergency Funding Package announced by Arts Council England, made possible by Government funding.

Alongside this, DCMS continues to engage with the sector extensively to best understand the challenges faced. We are working closely with the Arts Council to consider the additional support that may be needed to support the long-term recovery of the sector.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the extent to which his Department's plans for responding to the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the arts align with the Government's so-called levelling up agenda.

We recognise that these are incredibly challenging times for arts and culture organisations, and the Government will continue to support the sector through the unprecedented financial measures we have announced. DCMS has worked closely with its arm’s-length bodies to deliver tailored support packages at speed, including the £160m Emergency Funding Package announced by Arts Council England, made possible by Government funding.

Alongside this, DCMS continues to engage with the sector extensively to best understand the challenges faced. We are working closely with the Arts Council to consider the additional support that may be needed to support the long-term recovery of the sector.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what Government support is available to freelancers in the creative industries who are not eligible to apply for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme or Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

We know that freelancers and individual artists across the creative industries are facing enormous difficulties as a result of the Covid-19 outbreak. The Government’s response has been one of the most generous and comprehensive in the world, including the Self Employment Support Scheme and Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. In addition, the Government has adapted the welfare system so that the self-employed can access Universal Credit in full, to help people get quicker and more generous support when they need it most.

To ensure we are assisting all our sectors as effectively as possible, regular ministerially-chaired roundtables are held with business representative organisations and trade associations from across the creative industries. In addition, officials are in regular contact with stakeholders from these sectors, and we continue to speak with HM Treasury colleagues to ensure that the full spectrum of government support reaches the UK's world-leading creative industries.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent estimate he has made of the number of jobs that will be lost in 2020 within the arts, heritage and libraries sub-sector as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

In order to support the sustainability of the Arts sector, DCMS has worked closely with Arts Council England (ACE) to provide a tailored package of financial support. In March, ACE announced a £160m emergency response package to complement the financial measures already announced by the Government and to ensure immediate resilience of this vital sector.

This package includes £140 million of support for artistic organisations and £20 million for individuals, so they can better sustain themselves, and their work, in the coming months. More than 9000 individuals and organisations have been successful in applying for this emergency funding. Additionally, the National Lottery Heritage Fund launched the £50 million Heritage Emergency Fund, and Historic England has launched two £2 million Emergency Funds.

The Secretary of State, myself and officials continue to consult the Art and Heritage sectors extensively to ensure we fully understand the impacts of Covid-19 and remain well placed to respond as it develops.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential effect on the music sector of the scheduled reduction in Government contributions to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

The Chancellor has been clear that getting people back to work will be introduced in a measured way, avoiding a cliff edge. Therefore, from August 2020, the level of the grant for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) will be slowly tapered to reflect that people will be returning to work.

The CJRS must be temporary and we must ensure that people can get back to work when it is safe to do so and get the UK economy up and running again.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what account his Department took of (a) regional representation, (b) diversity representation and (c) representation of smaller arts organisations and community voices in the establishment of the membership of the Cultural Renewal Taskforce.

We have strived to ensure the taskforce is made up of diverse individuals and organisations from across the sectors represented by DCMS, presenting a broad range of views and backgrounds. The organisations sitting on the taskforce vary not only by size and scale, but also represent a broad range of smaller organisations from across the country to ensure we consider the needs of organisations across the country.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish the minutes of the (a) Cultural Renewal Taskforce and (b) the Taskforce's working groups.

The Department of Digital, Culture, Media, and Sport currently has no plans to publish the minutes of respective Taskforce and working group meetings, but is considering ways to communicate summaries of the Taskforce’s work.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the (a) current status is and (b) priorities are of the Creative Industries Council.

The Creative Industries Council is a joint forum between government and industry. Council members are leading figures drawn from across the creative and digital industries including TV, computer games, fashion, music, arts, publishing and film.

Secretary of State Oliver Dowden co-chairs the Creative Industries Council and we have been in continual dialogue with the Council through the Covid-19 crisis at both ministerial and official level. The next full meeting of the Council is in early July at which we expect the Council to confirm their priorities for 2020-21.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many FTE staff in his Department have been allocated to support the work of the Cultural Renewal Taskforce; and what other resources his Department has allocated to that Taskforce.

We recognise that these are challenging and unprecedented times, which demand the right affirmative action, and this is why my department has prioritised our handling of COVID-19 to support our citizens, sectors, and public bodies. We temporarily reorganised the department and redeployed staff as necessary to support the Cultural Renewal Taskforce and effectively address the challenges our sectors and stakeholders are facing. 4 FTE members of staff are working directly on the running of the Taskforce.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Answer of 5 February 2020 to Question 10754 on Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Staff, whether the 111 FTE Civil Servants remain allocated to work in relation to culture; and whether there has been changes to the level of staff working on the cultural industries as a result of covid-19.

As of 31 May 2020, 114.1 FTE Civil Servants are deployed in DCMS Culture teams. Of these, 11 Civil Servants (10.8 FTE) have been allocated to Covid-19 priority work, including work to support the cultural sector at this time.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish the membership of (a)the Cultural Renewal Taskforce and (b) the Taskforce's working groups.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish the remit, terms of reference and objectives of the Cultural Renewal Taskforce and the Commissioner for Cultural Recovery.

The Cultural Renewal Taskforce has been established to support the renewal of DCMS sectors and to help develop new COVID-19 secure guidelines for the reopening of public places and businesses in these sectors, where and when it is safe to do so. The focus of the Taskforce’s work is on:

  • ensuring that COVID-19 secure guidelines are developed in line with the phasing ambitions and public health directions, building on the existing (work settings) guidance and providing intelligence and sector-specific expert input;

  • developing creative solutions, including digital solutions, to drive the return of sectors whilst maintaining consistency with the medical advice;

  • agreeing and ensuring alignment of all relevant sectoral guidance; and

  • providing key sector stakeholders direct access to ministers.

The role of Commissioner for Cultural Recovery and Renewal has been established to provide the Government with an expert and independent voice on the cultural sectors, and to advise on how culture and heritage in the United Kingdom can begin the road to recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Further information about the Taskforce, including its purpose can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/culture-secretary-announces-cultural-renewal-taskforce.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how often the Cultural Renewal Taskforce will meet.

As part of the Government’s roadmap for recovery from Covid-19, DCMS has launched the Cultural Renewal taskforce which will support plans for reopening across DCMS sectors.

The Taskforce meets weekly and is supported by eight sector-specific Working Groups.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps the Government is taking to provide financial support for freelance creative professionals with portfolio careers who are unable to access the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, Self-Employment Income Support Scheme and universal credit.

We appreciate that the Covid-19 pandemic presents a significant challenge to many of DCMS’ sectors including the creative industries, which is why the Government has announced unprecedented support for business and workers to protect them against the current economic emergency.

DCMS is engaging with a range of departments to support the economic response, and ensuring that the needs of its sectors, and those who work in them, are fully understood. DCMS will continue to work with these valuable sectors to understand the difficulties they face and help them access support through these challenging times and through recovery.

To ensure we are assisting all our sectors as effectively as possible, regular ministerially-chaired roundtables are held with business representative organisations as well as trade associations from across the Creative Industries. In addition, officials are in regular contact with stakeholders from these sectors, and we continue to speak with HM Treasury colleagues to ensure that the full spectrum of government support reaches the UK's world-leading media and Creative Industries.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much his Department has spent on advertising with public service broadcasters in each of the last three years.

DCMS have not purchased advertising with public service broadcasters in the last three years.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many and what proportion of organisations in the creative industries that are using the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme top up their employees' salaries to 100 per cent.

Applications for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) opened on Monday 20th April. As of midnight on 23 April, HMRC had over half a million claims with a total value of around £4.5bn. CJRS, tax deferral of VAT payments due to coronavirus, deferral of Self-Assessment payments due to coronavirus and Statutory Sick Pay rebate are new schemes and HMRC are currently working through the analysis they will be able to provide based on the data available. HMRC will make the timescales for publication and the types of data available in due course.

As of 22 April, over £2.8bn worth of loans have been issued under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme across all sectors, to over 16,600 businesses. At this time, the Government cannot provide a breakdown of funding by sector, as lenders have been given a temporary dispensation from uploading their data to the British Business Bank’s system in order to let lenders focus on issuing new loans. This is a pragmatic step that reflects the urgency of getting loans issued.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many workers in the creative industries are beneficiaries of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Applications for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) opened on Monday 20th April. As of midnight on 23 April, HMRC had over half a million claims with a total value of around £4.5bn. CJRS, tax deferral of VAT payments due to coronavirus, deferral of Self-Assessment payments due to coronavirus and Statutory Sick Pay rebate are new schemes and HMRC are currently working through the analysis they will be able to provide based on the data available. HMRC will make the timescales for publication and the types of data available in due course.

As of 22 April, over £2.8bn worth of loans have been issued under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme across all sectors, to over 16,600 businesses. At this time, the Government cannot provide a breakdown of funding by sector, as lenders have been given a temporary dispensation from uploading their data to the British Business Bank’s system in order to let lenders focus on issuing new loans. This is a pragmatic step that reflects the urgency of getting loans issued.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many companies in the creative industries have claimed support through the (a) Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (b) Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (c) VAT payment deferral (e) PAYE self-assessment payment deferral and (f) Statutory Sick Pay rebate; the amounts supplied through each; and if he will publish this information on a regular basis.

Applications for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) opened on Monday 20th April. As of midnight on 23 April, HMRC had over half a million claims with a total value of around £4.5bn. CJRS, tax deferral of VAT payments due to coronavirus, deferral of Self-Assessment payments due to coronavirus and Statutory Sick Pay rebate are new schemes and HMRC are currently working through the analysis they will be able to provide based on the data available. HMRC will make the timescales for publication and the types of data available in due course.

As of 22 April, over £2.8bn worth of loans have been issued under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme across all sectors, to over 16,600 businesses. At this time, the Government cannot provide a breakdown of funding by sector, as lenders have been given a temporary dispensation from uploading their data to the British Business Bank’s system in order to let lenders focus on issuing new loans. This is a pragmatic step that reflects the urgency of getting loans issued.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish his Department's Ministerial responsibilities.

The Department's Ministerial responsibilities were published on February 17th.

Details can be found on GOV.UK.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of including the six nations rugby union tournament in the Ofcom Code on Sports and Other Listed and Designated Events.

The Rugby Six Nations tournament has been a group B event on the listed events regime since 1998. As a group B event, live coverage may be provided by a subscription television service providing that delayed coverage or extended highlights are provided by a qualifying free to air channel.

The Government is clear that the existing list works well, and strikes the right balance between retaining free-to-air sports events for the public and allowing rights holders to negotiate agreements in the best interests of their sport. The Government therefore has no intention of undertaking a review of the list, or of moving the Six Nations from the category B list to the category A list.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many people are employed in communications roles in his Department.

41 people were employed in communications roles in DCMS on 1st March 2020.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has plans to undertake a review of the funding allocated to Sport England.

In 2020 a full Spending Review will be held, reviewing public spending in the round and setting multi-year budgets. This will include individual government departments and arm's length bodies such as Sport England.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions he has held with representatives of the BBC on the future of the licence fee; and if he will make a statement.

The Secretary of State for DCMS recently met with the Chairman of the BBC Board and the Director-General of the BBC to discuss a range of matters relating to the BBC.

The government has committed to maintain the licence fee funding model for the duration of this 11 year Charter period, until 2027.

The current licence fee settlement is agreed until April 2022. This includes the licence fee rising by inflation each year. Negotiations for the next licence fee settlement period, from April 2022, will take place in due course.

The government is committed to ensuring that the BBC and all public service broadcasters adapt to a fast changing market, and keeping them at the heart of our world class TV sector.

Ahead of the next Charter Review process, the Government will undertake a detailed look at the future of the TV licence model itself.

And we have recently launched a consultation on whether TV licence evasion should be decriminalised. We believe that it is right to look again at whether the criminal sanction remains appropriate for TV licence fee evasion given ongoing concerns about whether the criminal sanction is unfair and disproportionate.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding her Department has allocated to to UK Anti-Doping in each of the last three years.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has provided the following Grant-in-Aid funding to UK Anti-Doping over the past three years:

FY2016/17: £6.096m

FY2017/18: £5.996m

FY2018/19: £7.998m

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of UK anti-doping procedures in preventing athletes who have failed drug tests from partaking in combat sports.

The UK’s national anti-doping organisation, UK Anti-Doping (UKAD), an arm’s length body of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, acts according to the remit laid out in the UK’s National Anti-Doping Policy, and implements the UK’s National Anti-Doping Rules: https://www.ukad.org.uk/anti-doping-rules.

These Rules ensure the requirements of the World Anti-Doping Code are met in the UK. The Rules make no distinction between individual sports in terms of sanctions.

Decisions around any athlete ban from sport (if contested) are made by the independent National Anti-Doping Panel (NADP). This is independent of UKAD and is run on behalf of DCMS. The NADP’s procedural rules are available on their website: https://www.sportresolutions.co.uk/images/uploads/files/D_1_-_2019_NADP_Rules.pdf

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to support World Book Day 2020.

DCMS has no Departmental plans to celebrate World Book Day in 2020 directly. However, over 90% of local authority public library services in England have expressed interest in participating in World Book Day activities. World Book Day has also put a message in the fifteen £1 books taking part in the World Book day campaign to encourage children and young people to join their local library.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many free museum visits have there been in each region and constituent part of the UK in each of the last three years.

The government is committed to maintaining free entry to the permanent collections of national museums, as outlined in the 2019 manifesto.

As culture is a devolved matter, information would not be held by my department on a UK basis. We do not hold complete information on all museums in England. However, we do hold this information for the fifteen DCMS sponsored museum groups, which encompass 40 museums and galleries. Six groups are either partly or wholly based outside of London (National Museums Liverpool, Royal Armouries, Natural History Museum, Tate, Science Museum Group, Imperial War Museums), encompassing half the total number of sponsored museum sites. Visitor numbers for these museum groups are published online: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/sponsored-museums-and-galleries-annual-performance-indicators-201819

As the national development agency for museums, Arts Council England collects some information about museums and their visitors. It directly funds a number of regional museums through the National Portfolio and publishes data about their visitors figures. National Portfolio museums (and, pre-2018, Major Partner Museums) have a mix of operating models with some free to enter, some charging, and some charging for special exhibitions. Many charging museums also offer free or concessionary entry to local residents. https://www.artscouncil.org.uk/our-investment/national-portfolio-2018-22

Furthermore, the government supports free entry to regional museums through tax incentives like the VAT 33A relief scheme, and is committed to expanding access to museums across England.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to close the gender pay gap in his Department.

The DCMS mean and median gender pay gaps have reduced since 2018. The mean gender pay gap is 5.6%, down from 7.5% and the median gender pay is 16.6%, down from 22.9%. We have introduced actions recommended by the Government Equalities Office to support further reductions including:

  1. Improving the diversity of our talent pools through analysing gendered language in our job descriptions and adverts to ensure no-one is deterred by masculine or feminine framing.

  2. Improving the transparency of pay, reward and promotion processes to empower individuals to manage their careers and achieve goals.

  3. Promoting the uptake of Shared Parental Leave, using our Senior Civil Servants as rode models and our Diversity and Inclusion Ambassadors as champions.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to support digital innovation in the publishing sector.

The UK publishing sector is one of the UKs oldest, most respected and successful industries. We recognise the importance of the publishing sector, economically and culturally, as well as the need to support digital innovation as consumption trends broaden beyond physical products.

In particular, the Government is committed to supporting the sustainability of the news publishing industry as it transitions online. Last week we responded to the Cairncross Review into a sustainable future of journalism in the UK, by setting out support for the majority of its recommendations.

The Government has already started to take forward some of the interventions proposed in the Review. We have worked with Nesta to develop a £2million pilot innovation fund, which launched in October 2019, and seeks to invest in new technological prototypes, start-ups and innovative business models to explore new ways of sustaining the industry in this changing landscape. The government will evaluate this pilot to inform decisions on the full innovation fund ahead of the next Spending Review.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
31st Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to prevent underaged children accessing dating applications.

The Online Harms White Paper sets out our plans for world-leading legislation to make the UK the safest place in the world to be online. We intend to establish in law a new duty of care on companies towards their users, overseen by an independent regulator. The duty of care will ensure companies have appropriate systems and processes in place to keep their users safe. Companies will be required to take robust action when there is evidence that children are accessing inappropriate content, which includes underage access to dating applications.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, for what reasons the People's Postcode Lottery is not subject to the same regulations as the National Lottery.

The People’s Postcode Lottery is an ‘umbrella’ lottery scheme, under which draws held by different societies are promoted under a single brand.

Society lotteries pre date the National Lottery, which has its own founding legislation. They are permitted as fundraising tools for charities, community groups, sports clubs and other non-commercial organisations. Unlike the National Lottery they have limits on ticket sales and prizes, must return a minimum amount to good causes, and do not have to pay Lottery Duty. The distinction between society lotteries and the National Lottery ensures that the two are not in direct competition. This is an important principle to maintain, as direct competition between the two sectors risks reducing the level of sales overall, and therefore reducing the amount available for good causes.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 27 January 2020 to Question 6790 on Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Overseas Trade, if she will publish the membership of each committee.

The government intends to publish the membership of each committee in due course.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when her Department plans to respond to the consultation on including the women's equivalent to men's sporting events in Category A of the list of sporting and other events of national interest maintained under section 97(1) of the Broadcasting Act 1996.

In July 2019 the government consulted on whether to add women’s equivalents of men’s events currently on the list to both group A and group B categories. The consultation closed on 11 December 2019. The government is now carefully considering the responses in detail and we will respond in due course.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the potential effect of the closure of the BBC Red Button Teletext service on the public's access to information.

The BBC is operationally and editorially independent from the government; therefore, the government has no role in deciding whether BBC services, such as the BBC Red Button teletext service, should be continued.

It is the BBC’s responsibility to assess the potential effect of the closure of the BBC Red Button service on the public’s access to information. The Government welcomes the BBC's decision to pause the closure of the Red Button service, ahead of its review of the impact of the closure on the most vulnerable including the elderly, and deaf and blind licence fee payers.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the efficacy of existing schemes to promote the creative industries in the regions and nations of the UK.

The Creative Industries Sector Deal was launched jointly between government and industry in 2018 in order to unlock growth for creative businesses across the regions and nations of the UK. The programmes are still underway and their evaluations are ongoing.

Among the Sector Deal programmes are Creative Scale-Up, which aims to increase the profitability, scalability and productivity of small creative industries businesses in three pilot regions – Greater Manchester, the West Midlands and the West of England.

Others include the Creative Clusters programme - which is developing nine world class-creative clusters across the UK, from Dundee to Bristol and Cardiff to York - and the Audiences of the Futures programme, which is working at the cutting edge of tech and creativity, with projects across the nation and with partners such as the RSC in Stratford and Aardman Animations in Bristol.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many trade advisory committees his Department has established; and who the members of each committee are.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has established two trade advisory committees jointly with the Department for International Trade. The members of these groups are stakeholders from various DCMS sectors and have a breadth of knowledge and experience in trade matters.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what (a) support and (b) guidance he has made available to creative businesses on preparing for the UK leaving the EU.

The UK’s creative industries are an exporting powerhouse, delivering around 12 per cent of the UK total for exports in services. The sector is one of our fastest growing, and continues to outpace wider economic growth by two to one and job creation by three to one.

We are working closely with industry and across government to ensure that our sectors are fully represented and supported in the UK’s future trade agreements, and we will continue to work with them during the transition period.

We want the creative industries to continue to flourish as part of a modern and ambitious global trading framework - from world-leading news coverage that reaches every corner of the globe, to life affirming arts and culture, and immersive technologies that bring people and communities together.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding from the public purse has been allocated to grassroots rugby union in each of the last three years.

Through Sport England, government has invested the following in grassroots rugby union in each of the last three years:

  • 2016/17: £4.06m
  • 2017/18: £3.45m
  • 2018/19: £4.02m

These figures include investment in both the Rugby Football Union as the national governing body for the sport, together with investment in specific community rugby union projects.

Over this time period, Sport England has invested a further £12.61m in multi-sport projects where rugby union is one of the sports benefitting.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding her Department has provided to grassroots rugby league in each of the last three years.

Through Sport England, government has invested the following in grassroots rugby league in each of the last three years:

  • 2016/17: £2.58m
  • 2017/18: £5.18m
  • 2018/19: £2.76m

These figures include investment in both the Rugby Football League Ltd as the national governing body for the sport, together with investment in specific community rugby league projects.

Over this time period, Sport England has invested a further £9.27m in multi-sport projects where rugby league is one of the sports benefitting.

As part of its support for grassroots rugby league, government is also investing up to £10m in rugby league facilities to help drive a legacy from the 2021 Rugby League World Cup.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding her Department has allocated from the public purse to Sport England in each of the last three years.

Sport England receives both Grant-In-Aid (GIA) funding and good causes funding from the National Lottery from DCMS. The allocated totals for each of the past three years are:

  • 2016/17: £105.6m GIA; £202.8m National Lottery
  • 2017/18: £100.8m GIA; £203.3m National Lottery
  • 2018/19: £104.5 GIA; £199.4m National Lottery

Overall income from the National Lottery Distribution Fund is variable and dependent on ticket sales. Sport England receives 12.4% of the Lottery returns to good causes which results in variable annual Lottery income to the organisation.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions she had with the (a) Premier League, (b) Football League and (c) Football Association on introducing safe standing in football grounds.

I meet with the Premier League, the Football League, the Football Association, the Sports Grounds Safety Authority and the Football Supporters Association regularly to discuss a variety of matters including this government’s commitment to move towards areas of standing in football stadia currently subject to the all-seater policy. I will be setting out the government's intention in this area in due course.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the potential merits of relocating the Arts Council outside of London.

The Government has committed to ensure that the administration of government is less London-centric and to locate more Civil Service roles and public bodies out of London and into the regions and nations of the United Kingdom


The Arts Council’s Head Office is in Manchester, and the majority of its staff are based there.

The Arts Council also has a network of a further eight Area Offices across the country: with offices in Birmingham, Brighton, Bristol, Cambridge, Leeds, London, Newcastle and Nottingham. Senior staff with sector expertise are based in each local area, and work closely with local strategic partners.

The Cabinet Office Places for Growth team is working with departments and public bodies on any future relocation plans.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the potential merits of introducing a Town of Culture designation.

Arts, culture and heritage plays a crucial role in making towns attractive places to live, work and visit. This is why DCMS is working closely with MHCLG to support the delivery of the Towns Fund.

In particular, we are supporting the delivery of the £95million High Streets Heritage Action Zone programme with Historic England. The programme will not only revive and regenerate historic high streets and town centres but will support a cultural programme to engage people in the life, culture and history of their places. Historic England will be working in close partnership with the National Lottery Heritage Fund, Arts Council England and the Architectural Heritage Fund.

In addition, the £250m Cultural Investment Fund announced in October will benefit many towns through culture-led regeneration.

DCMS will continue to explore other opportunities to support towns, and is engaging with towns in order to better understand their needs.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, on what date her Department plans to commence its review of the Gambling Act 2005.

The Government has committed to review the Gambling Act 2005 to make sure it is fit for the digital age. We will announce further details in due course.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has had discussions with (a) civil servants, (b) Cabinet colleagues and (c) recognised trades unions on the future of her Department since the December 2019 General Election.

The Government has announced that the Department for Exiting the EU will be wound up once the UK leaves the EU on 31 January. All Machinery of Government changes are a matter for the Prime Minister


The Prime Minister has set out an ambitious programme for the Government to unite and level up the country, delivering on its key priorities around getting Brexit done and investing in the NHS, education, safer streets and better infrastructure.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate she has made of the proportion of (a) all lottery funding support bids and (b) successful bids for lottery funding support, from religious organisations.

Good cause income raised by the National Lottery funds arts, heritage, sport and communities (covering health, education, environment and charitable causes). It is distributed at arms length of Government by twelve Lottery Distributing Bodies.

Religious and faith based organisations are eligible to apply for National Lottery funding and are typically required to demonstrate that projects will benefit the wider community and will not have any religious content.

Information about the religious status of organisations that apply for grants is not consistently collected, so it has not been possible to analyse the data on this basis.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions she has had with the Football Association on its partnership with Bet365.

I have spoken with the Chief of the Executive of the Football Association to hear the background of the sale of rights to IMG, which in turn resulted in Bet365 and other betting companies providing live streaming of FA Cup fixtures to account holders. Betting and Gaming Council rights holders in this deal have relinquished any exclusivity over these rights, so that they may now be streamed outside of betting environments, and the FA are exploring how they can rescind these deals. I shall be meeting with the FA this week to discuss their next steps.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions she has had with the National Lottery on releasing information on the geographical location of where tickets are purchased.

Following the discussion at the DCMS Select Committee on 24 October 2018, Ministers at the time wrote to Camelot who confirmed that they do not publish this information because it is commercially sensitive.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much her Department has spent on tackling loneliness in each (a) region and (b) constituent part of the UK in each of the last three years.

DCMS has secured over £20million of new grant funding for organisations across England working on tackling loneliness and bringing people together.

This includes the £11.5m Building Connections Fund (delivered in partnership with The National Lottery Community Fund and Co-op Foundation), which launched in 2018. In addition, The People’s Postcode Lottery has committed £5million of players money to top up its existing grants to charities that combat loneliness, and the Health Lottery has committed £4m to charities that work to improve social links in areas facing disadvantage across England.

Government has since granted an additional £1,369,174 to the Co-op Foundation to tackle youth loneliness via co-design and community spaces.

£2,369,174 of this funding was contributed by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

To date, government has spent a total of £6,775,297 on work to tackle loneliness across England through these funds.

The regional breakdown of the Building Connections Fund spend to date is as follows. It is not possible to separate out the DCMS element of this spend:

Region

Total

East Midlands

£717,560

East of England

£841,432

London

£1,254,052

North East

£933,572

North West

£822,266

South East

£1,017,672

South West

£1,225,764

West Midlands

£1,204,668

Yorkshire and the Humber

£1,082,361

Multi-region / National Projects

£1,049,572

The remainder of the £11.5 million is committed to administrative and evaluation costs. So far, £5,406,123.16 of the government contribution of £5,500,000 has been spent. All government funding will be spent by 31st March 2020.

The regional breakdown for the £1,369,174 granted to Co-op Foundation to tackle youth loneliness using co-design and community spaces funding is as follows.

Region

Total

East Midlands

£112,634

East of England

£79,132

London

£268,030

North East

£171,132

North West

£178,578

South East

£106,117

South West

£180,150

West Midlands

£113,406

Yorkshire and the Humber

£159,995

In addition, DCMS has spent over £1 million on other cross-England work on tackling loneliness as set out in the government’s loneliness strategy, including the Let’s Talk Loneliness campaign, the data pilots with local authorities and the cost of hosting the cross-government loneliness team.

As loneliness is a devolved issue, there has been no DCMS spend in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many civil servants in her Department work on projects relating to (a) digital, (b) culture, (c) media and (d) sport.

At 31 December 2019 DCMS employed 1,264 Civil Servants, the majority of whom worked directly on projects relating to digital, culture, media and sport as set out in the table below. The staff not included in this table are either part of the corporate centre (e.g Finance and HR), part of cross-cutting teams working across multiple policy areas (e.g the department’s Central Analytical Team) or part of teams which aren’t directly linked to digital, culture, media or sport (e.g. the Office for Civil Society and the Gambling team).

Work area

Civil Servants

Digital

542

Culture

116

Media

57

Sport

50

The information in the table above relates to Civil Servants on DCMS’ payroll. This includes permanent staff, those on fixed-term contracts, those on paid loan/secondment in/out of DCMS and those on paid maternity leave.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many civil servants were employed by her Department in each year between 2017 and 2020.

The number of Civil Servants employed by DCMS in each year between 2017 and 2020 is as follows:

Date

Headcount

31 March 2017

656

31 March 2018

887

31 March 2019

1,188

31 December 2019 (latest available)

1,264

The department’s headcount has steadily increased over the past four years due to an expanded policy remit and EU Exit preparations.

The information in the table above relates to Civil Servants on DCMS’ payroll. This includes permanent staff, those on fixed-term contracts, those on paid loan/secondment in/out of DCMS and those on paid maternity leave.

This information is included in the DCMS Annual Report and Accounts.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much her Department has spent on grassroots football for (a) men, (b) women and (c) in total in each of the last three years.

Through Sport England, Government is investing £24.6m in The Football Association over the course of 2016-21 for its work on grassroots participation, the football talent pathway, and coaching programmes. Within this, there is no specific ringfencing of funding between men's and women's programmes apart from £2.6m which is specifically reserved for women and girls talent programmes.

Separately, Government invested £18m in football facilities through the Football Foundation in each of 2017, 2018 and 2019. It is not possible to separate out the investment amounts by gender.

The Government has also committed to investing £550m into grassroots football facilities over the next 10 years to support plans to bid for the 2030 Men’s FIFA Football World Cup.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what criteria appointees to the board of the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation were assessed against when candidates were considered for that role.

The selection criteria for the Board was outlined within the expression of interest as published on the Cabinet Office's public appointments website. The candidates were asked to demonstrate high level experience of strategic leadership, communication and influencing skills and have a strong understanding of the Centre's role. As well as this - we were looking for relevant expertise across key areas which include; data science, business, ethics, social sciences, policy, law and regulation.

31st Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what childcare facilities her Department makes available for staff; how much her Department spent (a) overall and (b) per child on those childcare facilities in the last year; and how many staff members use those childcare facilities.

The specific information requested is not centrally held and to obtain it would incur a disproportionate cost.

Westminster Holiday Playscheme (​WHP​)​, a school holiday service run by Tinies Kids Clubs, is available to civil servants of specific government departments including DCMS. DCMS offers WHP childcare facilities to all staff with a 50% subsidy.

13th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to publish the outcome of the consultation Increasing the Regional Impact of Channel 4.

The government's consultation closed on 5 July and we will set out the next steps on this issue in due course.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many staff are seconded to her Department; and how many such staff are seconded from which companies and organisations.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Parliament is dissolved.

29th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, for what reason she is not a member of the Government's European Union Exit and Trade Committee.

The list of Cabinet Committees and Implementation Taskforces, and their membership, is published here; https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-cabinet-committees-system-and-list-of-cabinet-committees. Other Ministers attend the European Union Exit and Trade Committee where the agenda item concerns their portfolio.

17th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential barriers to working in the creative industries for (a) expectant mothers and (b) parents.

It is important that working parents have the choice and flexibility that enables them to fully realise their potential contribution to the creative industries workforce.

We will soon be hosting a Forum with industry leaders from across DCMS sectors, including the creative industries, which will aim to identify and share best practice around promoting diversity and social mobility in the workforce, to help ensure we have an economy that works for all.

17th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to increase the number of (a) children and (b) adults who swim regularly in West Yorkshire.

Government is committed to supporting everyone to get active and participation in swimming has an important role to play.

Sport England has invested more than £40,000 of National Lottery funding in a Kirklees swimming programme and since 2010 has invested £1.5 million of Lottery funding in swimming in West Yorkshire.

Since 2010, Sport England has invested £35,407,363 of National Lottery money has been invested in a range of swimming projects across Greater London, including £34,442,800 in swimming in Newham and the London Aquatics Centre.

Sport England is also in discussion with the Amateur Swimming Association regarding the investment it will be making in swimming for the 2017-21 period.

Sporting Future set out the Government's commitment to ensuring that no child left school unable to swim and commissioned the Amateur Swimming Association's Swim Group to undertake a review. The Group is finalising its report and will be sharing its findings with government shortly.

16th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to address the gender pay gap in cultural industries.

We have no such assessment . From April, large employers will be required to publish any differences in average earnings and bonuses paid to women and men. The Government’s Equalities Office (GEO) are responsible for policies regarding gender equality.

16th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the gender pay gap in the cultural industries.

We have no such assessment . From April, large employers will be required to publish any differences in average earnings and bonuses paid to women and men. The Government’s Equalities Office (GEO) are responsible for policies regarding gender equality.

2nd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential benefits to the audiovisual, creative and cultural sectors of continued participation in Creative Europe and its successors after the UK leaves the EU; and if she will make a statement.

The UK’s negotiations for exiting the EU are complex and the Government is focused on securing the best deal for Britain. Together with the Department for Exiting the EU, we are analysing all the impacts of leaving the EU, looking at over 50 sectors. Once we have left the EU, decisions on how taxpayers’ money will be spent will be made in the UK. There may be European programmes in which we might want to participate, but this will be a decision for the UK as we negotiate the new arrangements.

2nd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the UK's potential relationship with Creative Europe after (a) the UK leaves the EU and (b) Creative Europe's current budget period ends in 2020.

The UK’s negotiations for exiting the EU are complex and the Government is focused on securing the best deal for Britain. Together with the Department for Exiting the EU, we are analysing all the impacts of leaving the EU, looking at over 50 sectors. Once we have left the EU, decisions on how taxpayers’ money will be spent will be made in the UK. There may be European programmes in which we might want to participate, but this will be a decision for the UK as we negotiate the new arrangements.

27th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the potential effect on the British film industry of the UK leaving the EU; and if she will make a statement.

The UK’s negotiations for exiting the EU are complex and the Government is focused on securing the best deal for Britain. Together with the Department for Exiting the EU, we are analysing all the impacts of leaving the EU, looking at over 50 sectors. Once we have left the EU, decisions on how taxpayers’ money will be spent will be made in the UK. There may be European programmes in which we might want to participate, but this will be a decision for the UK as we negotiate the new arrangements.

27th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment her Department has made of the potential effect on funding of UK organisations specialising in culture of the UK leaving the EU.

The UK’s negotiations for exiting the EU are complex and the Government is focused on securing the best deal for Britain. Together with the Department for Exiting the EU, we are analysing all the impacts of leaving the EU, looking at over 50 sectors. Once we have left the EU, decisions on how taxpayers’ money will be spent will be made in the UK. There may be European programmes in which we might want to participate, but this will be a decision for the UK as we negotiate the new arrangements.

27th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment her Department has made of the potential effect on funding of UK organisations specialising in arts of the UK leaving the EU.

The UK’s negotiations for exiting the EU are complex and the Government is focused on securing the best deal for Britain. Together with the Department for Exiting the EU, we are analysing all the impacts of leaving the EU, looking at over 50 sectors. Once we have left the EU, decisions on how taxpayers’ money will be spent will be made in the UK. There may be European programmes in which we might want to participate, but this will be a decision for the UK as we negotiate the new arrangements.

27th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment her Department has made of the potential effect on funding of UK organisations specialising in heritage of the UK leaving the EU.

The UK’s negotiations for exiting the EU are complex and the Government is focused on securing the best deal for Britain. Together with the Department for Exiting the EU, we are analysing all the impacts of leaving the EU, looking at over 50 sectors. Once we have left the EU, decisions on how taxpayers’ money will be spent will be made in the UK. There may be European programmes in which we might want to participate, but this will be a decision for the UK as we negotiate the new arrangements.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to publish an update on the Alternative Student Finance product.

The government is committed to ensuring that all students with the potential to benefit from further and higher education are able to access it. The government will provide a further update on the Alternative Student Finance product when it sets out the full and final conclusion to the Post-18 Review of Education and Funding alongside the next multi-year Spending Review.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the availability of mainstream school places for children with autism in (a) Batley and Spen constituency, (b) Kirklees, (c) West Yorkshire and (d) England.

The majority of children with autism are educated in mainstream settings. Of those children identified with a primary need of autistic spectrum disorder as either requiring special educational needs support (67,867 children) or who have an education, health and care plan (82,847 children), 108,481 are currently educated in mainstream settings in England. This trend is replicated in the Kirklees local authority area, where 328 of 474 children with a primary need of autism are in mainstream settings, and in the Batley and Spen constituency, where the numbers are 75 out of 79 children. [1]

The statutory duty to provide sufficient school places, including for those with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), sits with local authorities. We provide funding for all of the places that are needed, based on local authorities’ own data. This is why we have announced nearly £500 million to provide places needed for 2023. This funding is on top of over £8.1 billion to provide places needed from 2015 to 2022 and our investment in the free schools programme.

Published data on school capacity estimates that, as at May 2019, Kirklees still needed to provide a further 300 places by September 2021. Funding is allocated at local authority level and cannot be broken down further. Kirklees has been allocated £53.2 million to provide new school places since 2010.

Under the SEND Code of Practice 2015, all mainstream schools are under a duty to use their best endeavours to support children with special educational needs (whether or not the child has an education, health and care plan). The Children and Families Act 2014 requires local authorities to keep the provision for children and young people with SEND under review (including its sufficiency), working with parents, young people, and providers.

[1] https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/special-educational-needs-in-england

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment has he made of the adequacy of the availability of options at GCSE level for children with autism in (a) Batley and Spen constituency, (b) Kirklees, (c) West Yorkshire and (d) England.

During the GCSE reform process from 2011, the Department consulted extensively with schools, colleges and universities, and employers on both the principles for reform and the detail of the content of individual subjects. As part of this, we also carefully considered the effect of the reforms on pupils with special educational needs and disabilities and published Equalities Impact Assessments for all subjects.

In addition to this, examination boards have a duty, under the Equality Act 2010, to make reasonable adjustments for pupils with disabilities who, because of their disability, would otherwise be at a substantial disadvantage when demonstrating their skills, knowledge and understanding. These adjustments are made to remove or reduce disadvantages that such students face compared with students who are not disabled.

Whilst decisions on what GCSEs to offer at a local level are for individual schools to take, all state funded schools have a statutory duty to provide a broad and balanced curriculum, and this is replicated in academy funding agreements.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment his Department has made of the importance of reading for pleasure in improving children’s literacy levels.

Reading for pleasure brings a range of benefits. As well as the strong links between reading for pleasure and attainment, there are a number of other positive effects including: improved text comprehension and grammar, positive reading attitudes, pleasure in reading in later life, increased general knowledge and character development.

The National Curriculum states that teachers are expected to encourage pupils to develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information. Within the National Curriculum, the programmes of study for English have been developed to make clear the importance of reading for pleasure. The National Curriculum also emphasises the importance of listening to, discussing and – as pupils’ fluency increases – reading for themselves a wide range of stories, poems, plays, and information books.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to support World Book Day 2021.

The Department has spoken with World Book Day about plans for the 2021 event, and we are exploring potential opportunities to highlight the importance and benefits of reading for pleasure on the day. The event is an opportunity for young people to celebrate what they most enjoy about reading, and we know that reading for pleasure brings a range of benefits, including: reading attainment and writing ability, text comprehension and grammar, breadth of vocabulary, positive reading attitudes, and pleasure in reading in later life. Further information on reading for pleasure can be found here: https://literacytrust.org.uk/research-services/research-reports/reading-pleasure-research-overview/.

Research also suggests that reading for pleasure is more important for children’s educational development than factors such as their parents’ level of education. Further information on this can be found at: https://cls.ucl.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Readingforpleasurestoppress.pdf. The Department supports reading for pleasure in a number of ways, including through the National Curriculum and the English Hubs programme.

The National Curriculum emphasises the importance of children listening to, discussing and – as their fluency increases – reading for themselves a wide range of stories, poems, plays and information books. The English Hubs programme is a £26.3 million programme dedicated to improving the teaching of reading, particularly for disadvantaged children. Since its launch in 2018 we have invested a further £17 million in this school-to-school improvement programme, which focuses on systematic synthetic phonics, early language and reading for pleasure. The programme has provided appropriate and targeted support to several thousands of schools across England and, in this academic year (2020/21), the programme is providing intensive support to over 850 partner schools.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of the £85 million of funding for laptops, tablets and 4G dongles, announced in April 2020, has been spent (a) in total and (b) by school in Batley and Spen constituency.

The Department has invested over £195 million to support remote education and access to online social care, delivering over 220,000 laptops and tablets during the summer term for disadvantaged children who would not otherwise have access to a digital device.

The Department is adding to this support by making over 340,000 additional laptops and tablets available to support disadvantaged children that might experience disruption to their education. Since September 2020, over 100,000 of these have been delivered to schools.

This scheme is not directly providing funding. It is providing a number of offers to support remote education, including laptops and tablets, 4G wireless routers, other internet offers and support for schools to access education platforms.

Data about the number of laptops and tablets delivered to local authorities and academy trusts over the summer term can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/912888/Devices_and_4G_wireless_routers_progress_data_as_of_27_August_2020.pdf.

Data about the number of laptops and tablets delivered or dispatched to Local Authorities or trusts since 1 September can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/929064/Ad-hoc_stats_note_shipped_data_231020_FINAL.pdf.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to support youth educational organisations resume courses that include overnight stays during the covid-19 outbreak.

As of 4 July, providers offering out of school activities to children, such as youth educational organisations, have been able to open for both indoor and outdoor provision with safety measures in place. Providers are also able to resume non-overnight domestic educational visits, and the Department has updated our protective measures guidance for these providers to support them to do so as safely as possible. The guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

The Department continues to advise against domestic overnight or overseas educational visits, and residential provision, for the time-being. This is consistent with the latest government guidance for accommodation providers, which advises that you should not stay overnight away from your home with members of more than one other household. The guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/covid-19-advice-for-accommodation-providers. We continue to keep this position under review; and will continue to be guided by the best scientific and medical advice, to ensure that the right decisions are taken at the right time.

The Government has also made financial support available to employers and the self-employed, including sole traders and limited company directors. Youth educational organisations that have been adversely affected by COVID-19 can find out what financial support is available for their business at: https://www.gov.uk/business-coronavirus-support-finder. They may be eligible for tax relief, loans or cash grants depending on their circumstances.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
4th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what procedure is in place to allow privately- educated students who had their Centre Assessed Grades rejected by exam boards to seek recourse.

Where schools and colleges had accepted entries from external candidates (students who they did not teach themselves because they were home-educated, followed distance-learning programmes or studied independently), those students should have been taken account of in the process of producing centre assessment grades, where the head teacher or principal was confident that they and their staff had seen sufficient evidence of the student’s achievement to make an objective judgement.

Not all external candidates were able to be awarded centre assessed grades this summer because they were not able to provide sufficient evidence to enable their exam centre to include them in their centre assessment grades and rankings. Students in this position will need to sit exams to get their grades, either in the autumn or in summer 2021.

Students wishing to enter for autumn exams should do so via the school or college where they were due to sit their exams in the summer. The exception is students who did not achieve a grade 4 or above in english or maths GCSE. These students will take those exams at their post September institution.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance the Government plans to provide for (a) singing and (b) wind instrument teachers to enable them to safely return to work as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

The Department has published detailed guidance for schools to prepare for all children and young people to return to full-time education from September 2020. The guidance published on 2 July outlines that there may be an additional risk of infection in environments where you or others are singing, chanting, playing wind or brass instruments or shouting, and provides further information on steps that schools should take to keep staff and pupils safe. The guidance can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/schools-and-colleges-to-reopen-in-full-in-september.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the ability of organisations in the creative industries to utilise the apprenticeship levy.

The apprenticeship levy is at the centre of our reforms to build an employer-led apprenticeship system and transform the quality of apprenticeship training. We continue to engage with employers in all sectors of the economy to help them realise the benefits of apprenticeships. In the creative sector, we work closely with industry bodies, such as the Creative Industries Council, Creative and Cultural Skills, and ScreenSkills.

In response to this engagement, we introduced transfers in 2018 to offer employers greater flexibility. This gives apprenticeship levy-paying employers the freedom to transfer funds to any employer, including smaller employers in their supply chain, or Apprenticeship Training Agencies and charities. In April 2019, we increased the cap from 10% to 25% of employers’ funds that can be transferred each year. An Apprenticeship Training Agency acts as the apprentice’s employer throughout their training, allowing them to complete the 12-month minimum apprenticeship duration through a series of shorter placements with different employers.

We are also working with employers and the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education to prioritise the development of 17 new standards in the creative sector to help address skills gaps.

We recognise that some employers in the creative industries experience challenges in utilising the apprenticeship levy to support starts in their business or the wider sector. The Department for Education and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport are working with ScreenSkills and industry partners on an innovative film and TV pilot which will enable 20 apprentices to benefit from hands-on experience on the sets of major films and TV shows. Launched on 23 January, it will explore a new model for how apprenticeships can be used to deliver multiple placements on film and TV productions, as well as addressing skills shortages.

Gillian Keegan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Ofsted registered nurseries have been sold to new owners in each of the last 12 months.

This is a matter for Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Ofsted registered (a) nurseries and (b) childminders have closed for business in each of the last 12 months.

This is a matter for Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
23rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Loneliness Strategy, published in October 2018, what progress his Department has made on publishing guidance on schools maximising the use of their premises, as well as other forms of income generation that can be beneficial to the community.

The Department intends to publish guidance for schools on income generation in due course. The guidance will set out different types of income generation activities, including letting out premises, working with local businesses, selling goods and services and applying for grants.

Our aim is to level the playing field between schools in their ability to generate income and help them build strong community links at the same time.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
17th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of 5 June, 2019, Official Report, Column HL122. what the evidential basis for the statement that there are now more children’s centres than at any time prior to 2008.

Based on information supplied by local authorities, as at 31 May 2019, there were 2,353 children’s centre and 700 linked sites[1] open to families and children providing children's centre services as part of a network.

Sure Start children’s centres were rolled out in three phases between 2004 and 2010. A National Audit Office memorandum to the Children, Schools and Families Committee in 2009[2] published data on the number of children’s centres rolled out in phases 1 and 2 as set out in the table below.

Number of centres during each phase

Cumulative total

Phase 1 2004-2006

1126

1126

Phase 2 2006-2008

1781

2907

There are no published records of the number of children’s centres that had been opened by the end of the 2007 calendar year. The 2008 statistic is based on management information that the Department for Education holds on the pattern of children’s centre designations[3] during the roll out of Phase 2 children’s centres between 2006 and 2008. This data shows there were fewer than 2,300 children’s centres prior to 2008.

The Department for Education will publish the management information in an ad-hoc statistical release in due course.

[1] Source: Get Information about Schools database https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/.

[2] National Audit Office memorandum to Children’s Schools and Families Committee, 2009 https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/0910_sure_start_memorandum.pdf

[3] To count towards children’s centre targets, centres were officially ‘designated’, meaning that they were open and providing some services, with plans in place to deliver all the required services within two years.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has made an assessment of proposals by ScreenSkills to reform the apprenticeship levy to (a) increase the number of paid apprenticeships in the film and TV industry and (b) enable apprenticeship training agencies to employ and pay the wages of apprentices and to arrange apprentice training with a number of different engagers on short-term projects; and if he will make a statement.

We have a well-established working relationship with ScreenSkills and welcome their feedback on the impact of our apprenticeship reforms on the film and television industries. This, together with feedback from our broader engagement with employers, is informing our ongoing evaluation of the impact of the reforms in England and our work to promote apprenticeships under the Creative Industries Sector Deal.

In my capacity as the Minister of State for Apprenticeships and Skills, I met the CEO of ScreenSkills in October 2018 to discuss their work to support the take-up of apprenticeships in the UK’s world-leading film and television industries. Officials from the Education and Skills Funding Agency continue to meet representatives of the organisation.

Levy-paying employers can already transfer funds to an Apprenticeship Training Agency, which acts as the apprentice’s employer. We recognise that this model can provide a valuable opportunity for employers, including those in the film and television industries and the creative sector more generally, to realise the benefits of apprenticeships for their business. We are continuing to engage with ScreenSkills to explore how such arrangements could support the creative industries.

In response to feedback from employers in a range of sectors, we have recently raised the cap on the amount of funds that levy-payers can transfer from 10% to 25% of the annual value of funds entering their apprenticeship service accounts.

8th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of disadvantaged children will not benefit from the funding for free school meals and activities during the summer break announced on 8 May 2019.

We do not know the number of children that will not benefit from the funding for free school meals (FSM) and activities during the 2019 summer holidays. This would depend on how many children in the funded areas choose to take up the offer of free holiday provision.

Our 2019 programme will take place in 11 local authority areas. It will enable us to test the effectiveness of a model of local coordination of free holiday club provision. We are carrying out an independent evaluation of this programme and will publish the results of this, including information on attendance.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools have applied to participate in the pilot test of reception baseline assessment in the Autumn term of 2019-20.

The next stage in the reception baseline assessment development process is a large-scale voluntary pilot, commencing in September 2019. Schools were able to sign up to take part in the pilot from 1 March to 5 April 2019. We have received a very good response; we intend to publish the number of schools that have applied to participate in the pilot in the near future.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on what date the Government will publish the results of the Apprenticeship Pay Survey 2018.

A publication date has not been set yet. The report is still being drafted and we will set a publication date once we have a final version of the report.

27th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the total cost to the public purse was of providing 30 hours of free childcare for 3 and 4 year olds in the (a) autumn 2018 and b) spring 2019 terms.

The government funds local authorities to deliver the early years entitlements on a financial year basis. Allocations for each of the 3 and 4-year old entitlements are:

2018-19 allocation (provisional)

Universal 15 hours entitlement for 3 and 4-year-olds

£2.29 billion

Additional 15 hours entitlement for eligible working parents of 3 and 4-year-olds

£693 million

Full details, including allocations for the other early years funding streams (15 hours entitlement for disadvantaged 2-year-old children, the early years pupil premium, disability access fund and maintained nursery schools supplementary funding) can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2018-to-2019.

Final funding allocations for 2018-19 will be updated in the summer using data from the January 2019 schools and early years census.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of eligible children are receiving 15 hours of free childcare for disadvantaged two-year olds in each local authority.

In January 2018, 154,960 two year olds benefitted from funded early education, representing 72% of the eligible population. Local authority breakdowns are available in Tables 1A and 8LA of the ‘Education provision: children under 5 years of age, January 2018’ national statistics release, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/education-provision-children-under-5-years-of-age-january-2018.

The 2019 national statistics release, covering the position in January 2019, will be published in June 2019.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what data his Department collects to monitor the effectiveness of money allocated from the public purse to early years early intervention strategies in (a) Kirklees and (b) Yorkshire.

The Public Health Outcomes Framework is a comprehensive source of data at local authority unitary, county and district level on the extent to which local strategies are successful and effective in improving outcomes for children in the early years. It is available at the following link: https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/public-health-outcomes-framework.

The framework includes data on outcomes for children aged 5 from the Early Years Foundation Stage Profile (EYFSP). Further information on the EYFSP is broken down by local authority and available to view at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/early-years-foundation-stage-profile-results-2017-to-2018. We do not publish this data at constituency or combined authority level.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children are currently eligible for 15 hours of free childcare for disadvantaged two-year olds; and what proportion of eligible children are in receipt of that childcare.

In January 2018, 154,960 two year olds benefitted from funded early education, representing 72% of the eligible population. Local authority breakdowns are available in Tables 1A and 8LA of the ‘Education provision: children under 5 years of age, January 2018’ national statistics release, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/education-provision-children-under-5-years-of-age-january-2018.

The 2019 national statistics release, covering the position in January 2019, will be published in June 2019.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average cost to the public purse is of providing 15 hours of free childcare for a disadvantaged two-year old.

The average cost to the public purse of providing 15 hours, across 38 weeks, of free childcare for a disadvantaged two-year-old is around £3,080.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of disadvantaged children are eligible for 30 hours of free childcare.

Eligibility for the 30 hours entitlement is based on parental income. It is available to families where both parents are working (or the sole parent is working in a lone parent family), and each parent earns the equivalent of a weekly minimum of 16 hours at national minimum wage or national living wage, and less than £100,000 per year. This also includes self-employed parents and parents on zero-hour contracts.

The government has made provisions to ensure that parents in certain circumstances will be regarded as being in work. This includes couple families where one parent is in receipt of benefits relating to caring responsibilities or their disability.

Full details on the eligibility criteria are set out in the regulations, which can be found here: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/1257/contents/made.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the average cost of childcare for children aged between one and two years old in (a) one parent and (b) two parent families.

Parents of children aged 0-2 in England that use childcare reported paying an average of £79 per child per week during term-time in 2018. The amounts paid by families vary depending on the amount of childcare used by their child, by the number of children in the family, by childcare provider type used, and by home region.

This data is published as annual official statistics from the ‘Childcare and Early Years Survey of Parents’.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information his Department holds on the proportion of early years providers that are co-operatives.

Information on early years providers that are co-operatives is not held centrally.

The department’s Survey of Childcare and Early Years Providers collects data on group-based providers, maintained providers and childminders. The survey is published annually.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the specific funding needs of early-years settings in deprived communities where provision is almost exclusively local authority funded.

We will be spending around £6 billion on childcare support in 2019-20 – a record amount. That includes funding for our free early education entitlements, on which we plan to spend around £3.5 billion this year alone.

The government’s Early Years National Funding Formula allocates funding to local authorities for the purpose of delivering our early years entitlements. Our new formula was introduced in April 2017 following extensive consultation and it includes an additional needs factor to weight funding according to disadvantage.

To accompany the government response to the consultation, we published an Equalities Impact Assessment looking into the effects of the formula on specific groups. Both documents may be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/early-years-funding-changes-to-funding-for-3-and-4-year-olds.

We also require local authority funding formulas, which allocate funding to providers, to have a mandatory deprivation supplement.

The government recognises the need to keep the evidence base on costs up to date. We continue to monitor the provider market closely through a range of regular and one-off research projects which provide insight into various aspects of the provider market.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many childminder agencies there are; and how many childminders are members of childminder agencies.

This is a matter for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many full-time equivalent staff of his Department are working on (a) early years' policy and (b) policy on provision of 30 hours of free childcare for three and four year olds.

As of 15 November 2018, there were around 60 full-time equivalent members of staff working on early years’ policy and this includes the delivery of 30 hours of free childcare for three and four-year olds. Other staff members in the funding and analysis teams also contribute to the early years’ policy development as part of their work.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the statutory basis for any obligation on (a) parents and (b) guardians to allow a child to take an assessment test before that child has reached the compulsory school age is.

The compulsory school age is five under section 8 of the Education Act 1996. Whilst the reception year is not compulsory, children who are aged four who are enrolled in a reception class in a state-funded school are still covered by the requirements under the Early Years Foundation Stage Framework within the Childcare Act 2006. This includes assessments carried out in the reception year.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
30th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) nurseries, (b) childminders and (c) nursery classes based in primary schools he has visited since his appointment.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has visited, since his appointment on 8 January 2018, five nurseries, and has spent time meeting nursery children and teachers during four primary school visits. He has not yet visited any childminders.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many graduates in paid employment in an early years setting who undertake training to achieve the Teachers’ Standards (Early Years) have accessed (a) grant funding, (b) employer incentive and (c) both grant funding and employer incentive in each year since that policy was introduced.

The number of employment-based early years trainees for whom the department provided early years initial teacher training (ITT) funding in academic years 2016/17 and 2017/18 is as follows:

Academic year

Number of early years ITT trainees

2016/17

451

2017/18

431

For all trainees shown above, both the training grant and employer incentive was provided.

We are unable to provide any data collected prior to the academic year 2016/17. A review of early years ITT data found that prior to the academic year 2016/17, data was not collected with sufficient quality to produce high quality statistics.

Further information about this and the subsequent actions put in place by the department, can be found in the ‘Data collection and quality’ section of the ITT Census 2017/18, found here at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/initial-teacher-training-trainee-number-census-2017-to-2018.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many individuals employed in early years settings have achieved level 3 qualifications in each of the last five years.

We do not centrally collect the data requested.

However, the number of workers with qualifications at various levels is published in our ‘Childcare and early years providers surveys’ at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/childcare-and-early-years-providers-survey-2016.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/childcare-and-early-years-providers-survey-2013.

The 2018 survey is due to be published on 1 November 2018.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons it is not possible to apply through UCAS to all drama schools that award degrees.

UCAS handles applications to higher education on behalf of providers, independent of government. Universities, colleges and other organisations that award degrees may sign up for their services, but whether they do so, or not, is their decision.

29th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will provide a list of the names and address of schools that are participating in the baseline assessment trial.

The reception baseline assessment was trialled in a nationally representative sample of schools between 10 September and 19 October 2018. Schools’ participation in the trials was voluntary.

In line with accepted practice, the names of the schools that are participating in these trials will not be released by the department. Schools were recruited on this basis and releasing this information could adversely affect school participation in future voluntary trialling, which would put our ability to develop high quality, valid and reliable assessments at risk.

In our response to the public consultation on the future of the primary assessment system in England, and having noted the support from respondents to that consultation exercise, we confirmed that we would introduce a reception baseline assessment from the 2020 to 2021 academic year onwards. As part of that, we committed to explore the issue of what information from the assessment should be shared with schools. That consideration is continuing and we will make a further announcement prior to the introduction of the assessment.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has received representations on the legality of a child's data being collected through baseline assessment testing but not accessible to (a) the child, (b) the parents of the child and (c) education staff; and if he will make a statement.

The reception baseline assessment was trialled in a nationally representative sample of schools between 10 September and 19 October 2018. Schools’ participation in the trials was voluntary.

In line with accepted practice, the names of the schools that are participating in these trials will not be released by the department. Schools were recruited on this basis and releasing this information could adversely affect school participation in future voluntary trialling, which would put our ability to develop high quality, valid and reliable assessments at risk.

In our response to the public consultation on the future of the primary assessment system in England, and having noted the support from respondents to that consultation exercise, we confirmed that we would introduce a reception baseline assessment from the 2020 to 2021 academic year onwards. As part of that, we committed to explore the issue of what information from the assessment should be shared with schools. That consideration is continuing and we will make a further announcement prior to the introduction of the assessment.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 19 October 2018 to Question 179290 on Primary Education: Nurseries, how many (a) mainstream and (b) special primary schools that opened since September 2017 (a) have, (b) have plans for and (c) do not have nursery provision.

37 mainstream primary free schools and one special primary free school have opened since September 2017. 17 of the mainstream primary free schools have nursery provision and six have plans for nursery provision. 14 of the mainstream primary free schools and the one special primary school that opened since September 2017 do not currently have, or have plans for, nursery provision.

In addition to this, four voluntary-aided primary schools have opened during this period, one of which includes nursery provision. The department does not hold information on the number of these schools planning nursery provision.

These figures relate to schools that have exclusively primary-aged pupils.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 19 October 2018 to Question 179290 on Primary education: nurseries, whether a cost benefit analysis is undertaken on plans for new primary schools (a) with and (b) without nursery provision.

All free school applications are subject to a rigorous application process. Each application, including those with a nursery element, is assessed against published criteria. The assessment process includes consideration of the capacity and track record of proposers, financial viability and value for money.

The cost of a nursery in a free school is integrated into the total cost of the project. It is not possible to separate out the costs of the nursery alone, as they will generally share facilities and services with the school itself.

For the purposes of forecasting, we estimate that the average additional per pupil cost of including a nursery within a primary free school is around £12,000 excluding VAT. For actual projects, costs will depend on a variety of local circumstances including site specifications and pupil numbers.

Where local authorities (LAs) identify the need for a new school, they must seek proposals to establish a new free school. They are responsible for setting the specifications (including for a nursery) and assessing applications. LAs are responsible for meeting the associated capital costs, principally using basic need funding provided by the department.

LAs are also responsible for approving proposals for new voluntary-aided schools, including where proposals include nursery provision. LAs and proposers are responsible for meeting the associated capital costs, with the proposer expected to cover up to 10% of this amount.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 19 October 2018 to Question 179290 on Primary Education: nurseries, what estimate he has made of the average cost to the public purse of including nursery provision in a new primary school.

All free school applications are subject to a rigorous application process. Each application, including those with a nursery element, is assessed against published criteria. The assessment process includes consideration of the capacity and track record of proposers, financial viability and value for money.

The cost of a nursery in a free school is integrated into the total cost of the project. It is not possible to separate out the costs of the nursery alone, as they will generally share facilities and services with the school itself.

For the purposes of forecasting, we estimate that the average additional per pupil cost of including a nursery within a primary free school is around £12,000 excluding VAT. For actual projects, costs will depend on a variety of local circumstances including site specifications and pupil numbers.

Where local authorities (LAs) identify the need for a new school, they must seek proposals to establish a new free school. They are responsible for setting the specifications (including for a nursery) and assessing applications. LAs are responsible for meeting the associated capital costs, principally using basic need funding provided by the department.

LAs are also responsible for approving proposals for new voluntary-aided schools, including where proposals include nursery provision. LAs and proposers are responsible for meeting the associated capital costs, with the proposer expected to cover up to 10% of this amount.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of the provision of (a) 30 hours of free childcare and (b) tax-free childcare on the number of childcare information officers employed by local authorities.

The information requested is not held centrally. The provision of children information officers is a matter for individual local authorities.

Local authorities have a statutory duty to provide information, advice and assistance to parents and prospective parents on the provision of childcare in their area, including the 30 hours offer and HM Revenue and Customs Tax-Free Childcare. The government requires all local authorities to pass through 95% of their three and four year old funding to early years providers.

The department also provides direct support from officials and through our delivery partner, Childcare Works, to ensure they are best placed to deliver the government’s childcare offers.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 19 October 2018 to Question 179290, how many mainstream and special (a) free schools that have opened since September 2017 (i) have or (ii) have plans for nursery provision and (b) primary schools that have been approved since that date have plans for nursery provision.

Of the mainstream and special free schools opened since September 2017, 21 have nursery provision, and a further nine have plans for nursery provision. These figures are broken down in the attached table.


Of the 20 primary schools approved by the department during the same period, 13 have plans for nursery provision. This includes 11 (of 18) schools approved following local authority-run competitions (as required by Section 6A of the Education and Inspection Act 2006) and 2 (of 2) special primary schools approved through the department’s special free school application wave. These figures relate to schools that have exclusively primary-aged pupils.

As local authorities (LA) are responsible for approving LA maintained schools, we do not hold information on the number of LA maintained schools approved in this period.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of (a) removing and (b) freezing business rates on early years and childcare settings.

Not all early years and childcare settings in England will pay business rates. The government has introduced a range of business rate reforms and measures, which will be worth more than £10 billion by 2023. This includes:

  • raising the rateable value threshold for 100% relief from £6,000 to £12,000, which means that about 655,000 small businesses pay no business rates at all.
  • A package of support worth £435 million over five years to support the businesses facing the steepest increases following the 2017 revaluation.

We are also increasing the frequency of property revaluations from every five to every three years following the next revaluation, to ensure that bills more accurately reflect property values.

Further, we provided powers under the Localism Act 2011 to enable local authorities to offer business rate discounts. In 2015, officials wrote to all councils to encourage them to use those powers to support access to local high-quality childcare provision. It is a matter for local authorities to exercise those powers as they see fit. We do not collect information on how local authorities have used these powers in relation to early years and childcare settings.

There has been no specific assessment made of the impacts of removing or freezing business rates on the early years market, however we have commissioned independent research to provide us with robust, up-to-date evidence on the costs of delivering childcare, including operating costs such as business rates.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of eligible disabled children are accessing 30 hours of free childcare.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of primary schools which have opened since September 2017 (a) include a nursery and (b) do not include a nursery.

Since September 2017, 60% of the mainstream and special free schools that have opened currently have, or have plans for, nursery provision. Since September 2017, 65% of mainstream and special primary schools approved, currently have plans for nursery provision.

In addition to this, four voluntary-aided (VA) primary schools have opened, one of these includes nursery provision. Some, or all of the VA schools, may be as result of local reconfiguration of schools in an area. As local authorities are responsible for approving VA schools, we do not hold information on the number of VA schools approved in this period.

These figures relate to schools that have exclusively primary-aged pupils.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of new primary schools that have been approved since September 2017 (a) include plans a nursery and (b) do not include plans for a nursery.

Since September 2017, 60% of the mainstream and special free schools that have opened currently have, or have plans for, nursery provision. Since September 2017, 65% of mainstream and special primary schools approved, currently have plans for nursery provision.

In addition to this, four voluntary-aided (VA) primary schools have opened, one of these includes nursery provision. Some, or all of the VA schools, may be as result of local reconfiguration of schools in an area. As local authorities are responsible for approving VA schools, we do not hold information on the number of VA schools approved in this period.

These figures relate to schools that have exclusively primary-aged pupils.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information his Department holds on the (a) number of nursery closures and (b) the length of time those nurseries were in business in each of the last five years.

This is a matter for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the libraries of both Houses.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons there are fewer children registered for 30 hours of free childcare in the autumn 2018 term than there were in the summer 2018 term.

The decline in numbers in the autumn term 2018 is an expected effect driven by four-year olds entering reception and no longer being able to use their code for the 30 hours policy. In autumn term 2018, there were 254,136 codes issued which is an increase from autumn term 2017 where there were 224,885 codes issued.

For the autumn term 2018, to be eligible for 30 hours free childcare a child will have to have turned three on or before the 31st August 2018. Most children who had turned four by 31st August will be in a reception place instead which results in less children with issued codes for the autumn 2018 term compared to the summer 2018 term.

We publish termly experimental statistics showing the number of children in a place. The full publication, which shows local authority and regional level breakdowns, is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/30-hours-free-childcare-eligibility-codes-issued-and-validated.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much his Department has spent from the public purse on (a) advertising and (b) marketing the 30 hours of free childcare in (a) autumn 2017, (b) spring 2018, (c) summer 2018 and (d) autumn 2018.

As of the 30 September 2018, we have spent £268,842.90 on advertising and marketing the 30 hours free childcare offer since it launched on the 1 September 2017. This includes paid for social media advertising, flyers and hosting information about the offer on the Childcare Choices website. The social media communications has been particularly successful, reaching more than 5.3 million people.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department’s Early Years Social Mobility Peer Review Programme, published in April 2018, when he plans to publish further information on the design of the programme.

Further information will be published alongside the launch of the main phase of the Early Years Social Mobility Peer Review Programme in early autumn 2018. Peer reviewers will be selected on the basis of their expertise and experience. All peer reviewers will be expected to have an excellent understanding of services for disadvantaged children and families as well as the drivers of outcomes at the age of five.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department’s Early Years Social Mobility Peer Review Programme, published in April 2018, which early outcomes for disadvantaged children were considered as part of the selection process for peer reviewers.

Further information will be published alongside the launch of the main phase of the Early Years Social Mobility Peer Review Programme in early autumn 2018. Peer reviewers will be selected on the basis of their expertise and experience. All peer reviewers will be expected to have an excellent understanding of services for disadvantaged children and families as well as the drivers of outcomes at the age of five.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the implications are for his Department's policy on baseline assessments of the report, A baseline without basis, published by the British Educational Research Association on 4 July 2018.

The Department for Education does not intend to change its policy on the reception baseline in response to the British Educational Research Association’s report.

The new baseline is being developed by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER), an organisation with a proven and respected track record of developing assessments.

The proposal to introduce the new baseline was set out in our 2017 public consultation on the future of the primary assessment system in England and drew support from a majority of respondents. Those responding in favour included the National Association of Head Teachers and the Association of School and College Leaders. Their responses were on the basis that the introduction of the new baseline will make it possible for statutory end of key stage 1 assessments to be removed, thereby making the primary assessment system more proportionate.

All aspects of the development of the new baseline will be informed by an extensive evidence base of research into the assessment of pupils in the early years. NFER will collect further evidence during the trial and pilot phases to inform the department’s decision-making. This will ensure that the reception baseline is robust. It will also ensure that the data collected is sufficiently valid and reliable for the purposes of creating a new value-added progress measure. This progress measure will recognise the progress that schools make with all their pupils, regardless of the pupils’ background, throughout their time at primary school.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the Government's childcare policies on the number of nurseries closing down.

The most recent Ofsted statistics, published on 27 June, show that the number of providers of childcare on non-domestic premises (group providers) has remained stable over time, having decreased by just 2% since 31 August 2012. There was also a small increase in the number of childcare places that they offer. These statistics can be viewed on Ofsted’s website at this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted/about/statistics.

We regularly monitor the effect of our early years and childcare policies on the childcare market. The take-up of our childcare entitlements is positive, with 94% of three and four year-olds benefiting from funded early education and 72% of eligible two year-olds taking up the 15 hours entitlement. Furthermore, since the roll-out of 30 hours’ free childcare, more than 340,000 children have benefited from a 30 hours place. This saves around £5,000 per year for parents who use the full 30 hours.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of allowing registered childminders to receive Government funding for providing care to a child who is related to them but does not live with them.

Childminders, including grandparents who are childminders, cannot receive early years funding, including the new 30 hours’ entitlement, for related children. This is set out in Sections 18(4) and 20 of the Childcare Act 2006: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2006/21/contents.

This long-standing position avoids creating an incentive for adults to register to become formal carers for related children they are already looking after on an informal basis.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 14 June 2018 to Question 152263 on Department for Education: Staff, what proportion of the 81.2 equivalent full time staff work on the 30 hours of funded childcare policy.

As at 31 May 2018, there were 26 full time equivalent members of staff working on the 30 hours free childcare policy out of 81.2 full time equivalent staff working in the Department for Education’s Early Years Group. Other staff members in the department also contribute to early years policy, including the 30 hours free childcare policy, as part of their work.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has made an assessment of the correlation between a child's socio-economic background and the extent to which they access in full the free childcare to which they are entitled; and if he will make a statement.

The government notes the recent research conducted by the London School of Economics on this issue. In February 2018, the Department for Education commissioned its own research into the factors affecting take-up of free early education entitlements. A report will be published in due course.

The government introduced an entitlement to 15 hours of free childcare a week for disadvantaged two year olds in September 2013. Since then more than half a million two year olds have benefitted from a place and 71% of eligible children are taking advantage of the offer. We have also increased the hours of free childcare available to all three and four year olds.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many staff in his department are currently working on the consultation into the future of children's centres.

As of 31 May 2018, there were 17.2 FTE members of staff in the Department’s Early Years Group working in the Quality, Outcomes and Providers team, which is the team responsible for children’s centres. Other staff members in the department also contribute to the early years policy as part of their work, however, the numbers for this are not held centrally.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many staff in his Department are working in the early years policy sector.

As at 31 May 2018, there were 81.2 full-time equivalent members of staff working in the Department for Education’s Early Years Group, working on and supporting early years policy. Other staff members in the department also contribute to early years policy as part of their work.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether students who complete the early years T-level will be licensed to practise within early years settings.

We recognise that to work in an early years setting, a practitioner must hold a full and relevant early years qualification that has been approved by the Department for Education. When developing the Early Years T Level, we will make sure that it aligns to the Early Years criteria and will enable a student to practice within an early years setting.

11th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether students who have completed the early years T-level will count towards an early years setting's Level 3 ratio when employed by that setting.

Students who have completed the Early Years T Level will count towards an early years settings level 3 ratio. When developing the T Level, we will make sure that it aligns to the Early Years criteria which will allow a practitioner to be included in the ratios.

23rd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 23 May 2018 to Question 144964 on children's centres, if he will place a copy in the Library of his Department's clarification to the Science & Technology Committee referred to in that answer.

I have written to the Chair of the Science and Technology Select Committee with a clarification. I would expect this letter to be published as part of the normal course of the inquiry. It should therefore be available to the House without the need for a copy to be placed in the Library.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the answer of 23 May to Question 143823 on Children: Day Care, what scrutiny his Department undertakes on the effectiveness of IT systems procured by local authorities to support the 30 free hours of childcare policy.

Local authorities are responsible for defining and procuring 30 hours systems that best fit their needs and requirements. As these requirements vary across local authorities, the department does not provide scrutiny of these systems.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the increase in the number of school start deferral requests for summer-born children between 2015 and 2017.

The Department recently published a research report on delayed school admissions for summer born pupils, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/summer-born-children-school-admission.

The report includes the findings of a survey of local authorities. The findings show that there has recently been an 84% increase in the number of requests for summer born children to be admitted to reception, rather than year one, at the age of five. Such requests represent 0.5% of the five-year-old population, and 75% were granted.

The findings also show that there are fewer requests made in areas where the local authority’s policy is only to grant requests supported by strong evidence, and there are more requests in areas with a higher proportion of granted requests. The report suggests this may be because parents are more likely to submit a request if they believe there is a higher chance of it being granted. The increase in requests may also be due, in part, to greater awareness of this option amongst parents. The Department remains committed to amending the School Admissions Code to ensure summer born children can be admitted to reception at age five where this is what their parents want.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
22nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of advertising careers in the childcare and early education sector in each of the last three years.

There has been advertising expenditure in relation to promoting the Early Years Initial Teacher Training route. Expenditure in the last three years, was as follows:

  • 2016-17: £36,000
  • 2015-16: £78,500
  • 2014-15: £53,616
Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much his Department spent on advertising and marketing the 30 hours of free childcare policy in the (a) Autumn 2017, (b) Spring 2018 and (c) Summer 2018 term.

As of the 30 April 2018, we have spent £240,771.05 on advertising and marketing the 30 hours free childcare offer. This includes social media advertising, flyers and hosting information about the offer on the Childcare Choices website – https://www.childcarechoices.gov.uk/.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 21 May 2018 to Question 144965 on Pre-school Education: Teachers, if he will publish the names of the (a) unions and (b) bodies referred to.

The names of the (a) unions and (b) bodies the department consults with in respect of regulations made under section 122 of the Education Act 2002 are:

Unions:

  • Association of School and College Leaders

  • Association of Teachers and Lecturers

  • National Association of Head Teachers

  • National Association of Schoolmasters Union of Women Teachers

  • National Union of Teachers

  • UCAC (Welsh teaching union)

  • Voice, the union

Bodies:

  • Amanda Spielman, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector (HMCI)

  • National Employers Organisation for School Teachers

  • National Governors Association

  • Welsh Government

  • British Association of Teachers of the Deaf

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has issued to local authorities on offering incentives to Early Years settings to provide 30 hours of free childcare places.

In April 2017, the department published operational guidance for local authorities and childcare providers, which highlights various case studies and different models of partnership working and their key features to help providers deliver the 30 hour’ entitlement. The guidance also provides online links to two toolkits specifically produced for providers to support partnership working across early years. The operational guidance can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/30-hours-free-childcare-la-and-early-years-provider-guide.

The government continues to encourage providers to take advantage of the free packages of business support the department has invested in via Childcare Works and key sector organisations including National Day Nurseries Asssociation, Pre-School Learning Alliance and Professional Association for Childcare and Early Years. Guidance’s on these are available by accessing the following links: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/early-years-business-sustainability and www.childcareworks.co.uk.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the oral evidence given by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State to the Science and Technology Select Committee on 1 May 2018, 384, what the evidential basis is for the statement that the number of children’s centres that are open in the most disadvantaged areas has stayed constant.

The percentage of children achieving a good level of development at age five and the gap between children eligible for free school meals and their peers at age five have been identified as improving in Staffordshire and Newcastle since children’s centre provision in those areas was reorganised in 2015-16. Further details are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/early-years-foundation-stage-profile-results-2016-to-2017.

The Sutton Trust report ‘Stop Start’ found that the proportion of children’s centres in disadvantaged areas has remained constant. We will be writing to the Science & Technology select committee to clarify this point.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, further to the oral evidence of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Education on Evidence-based early-years intervention inquiry on 1 May 2018, Q 384 and Q 457, HC 506, which outcome measures have been identified as improving in (a) Staffordshire and (b) Newcastle since children’s centre provision was reorganised.

The percentage of children achieving a good level of development at age five and the gap between children eligible for free school meals and their peers at age five have been identified as improving in Staffordshire and Newcastle since children’s centre provision in those areas was reorganised in 2015-16. Further details are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/early-years-foundation-stage-profile-results-2016-to-2017.

The Sutton Trust report ‘Stop Start’ found that the proportion of children’s centres in disadvantaged areas has remained constant. We will be writing to the Science & Technology select committee to clarify this point.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 17 of the Early Years Workforce Strategy, published in March 2017, when his Department plans to undertake a consultation on amending the regulations for Early Years Teacher Status.

We have carried out a consultation, including engagement with relevant stakeholders such as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, unions and bodies representing the interests of governing bodies of schools, school and college leaders and teachers.

We are now considering consultees’ feedback and will make an announcement in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 23 April 2018 to Question 136295 on Children’s Centres: Closures, what assessment has been made of the potential merits of requiring local authorities to report children’s centre closures in real time.

As indicated in my answer to question 136295, the current children’s centre statutory guidance says that local councils should update their children’s centre data on a regular basis to reflect any changes to provision. We believe that this is fit for purpose and do not believe it is necessary to place an explicit requirement on local authorities to report children’s centre closures in ‘real time’.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has issued to Local Authorities on the procurement of IT systems to deliver 30 free hours of childcare.

The arrangements between software suppliers and individual local authorities are often unique and systems, to support the delivery of 30 hours free childcare, are procured through an open market. Due to the commercial implications, the department remains unbiased and does not provide procurement advice.

The department has provided, through the Digital Accelerate Fund and the Delivery Support Fund, an additional £3.5 million to help local authorities improve localised IT systems for 30 hours. Local authorities were responsible for procuring any additional system functionality they required.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of the introduction of the national living wage on the financial viability of early years providers.

The government will be investing £1 billion a year to increase our hourly funding rates for the free entitlements and deliver 30 hours of free childcare. These funding rates are based on our ‘Review of Childcare Costs’, which was described as “thorough and wide ranging” by the National Audit Office. This looked at both the current costs of childcare provision and the implications of future cost pressures facing the sector, including the National Living Wage.

We continue to monitor delivery costs of our early years entitlements and have commissioned new research to provide us with robust and detailed cost data from a representative sample of early years providers.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the response of 23 April 2018 to Question 136295 on children’s centres, what assessment his department has made of the performance of the Get Information About Schools database since it was introduced in September 2017.

The Get Information About Schools service is currently a ‘Beta’ release, and therefore, still in development. The service consistently handles over 100,000 user sessions each month and there is an active feedback channel for users to leave comments and suggestions for improvement. In terms of children’s centres records, the data will only be as good as the information provided by local authorities.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to support parents of children under the age of 5 with the costs of childcare who want to undertake (a) further and (b) higher education courses.

The Care to Learn scheme can help with childcare costs for eligible parents aged under 20 who meet Care to Learn residency criteria and are in receipt of publicly funded education or training. Care to Learn payments are not income assessed and a maximum amount that can be claimed is £175 per child per week in London and £160 per child per week elsewhere. Further details are available at: www.gov.uk/care-to-learn.

For learners aged 19 and above, Learner Support is available to help those with a specific financial hardship that prevents them from taking part in learning. Colleges and providers have discretion to help learners meet costs such as childcare and travel.

A Childcare Grant is available to full-time student parents in higher education using registered or approved childcare, so that childcare costs incurred while studying do not act as an additional barrier for lower income families accessing higher education. The grant helps with childcare costs for children under 15, or under 17 if they have special educational needs. The amount of Childcare Grant payable in 2018-19 will be based on 85 per cent of actual childcare costs, subject to a maximum grant of £164.70 per week for one child only or £282.36 per week for two or more children.

Students are not entitled to receive a Childcare Grant if the student or their partner has elected to receive the childcare element of Working Tax Credit, the childcare element of Universal Credit, or is claiming support for childcare through the NHS bursary scheme.

Students with children may also be able to receive the Parents' Learning Allowance to meet course related costs, and students with adult dependants may be able to receive an Adult Dependants Grant. The maximum amount of Parents Learning Allowance payable in 2018/19 will be £1,669 and the minimum £50. Further information can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/student-finance/extra-help.

All three and four year olds and the most disadvantaged two year olds are entitled to access 15 hours a week of early education.

2nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students are enrolled in Early Years Initial Training Courses.
2nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information his Department holds on the spending of funds from the public purse on childcare and early years education provided by religious organisations.

The government funds local authorities to deliver the free entitlements in line with our regulations and guidance. It is the responsibility of local authorities to collect information from providers for funding purposes.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information his Department holds on the subject content of personal, social health education and citizenship teaching in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools; and if he will make that subject a statutory component of the national curriculum.

Schools can choose to teach Personal, Social, Health and Economic education (PSHE). Advice for schools on teaching of the subject can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/personal-social-health-and-economic-education-pshe/personal-social-health-and-economic-pshe-education.

The Department recently conducted an engagement process on the content of Relationships Education and Relationships and Sex Education, and on the status of PSHE. This involved a range of stakeholders and a public call for evidence. The Department plans to consult on draft regulations and accompanying statutory guidance shortly, before laying the regulations in the House for debate.

Citizenship remains a National Curriculum subject at secondary schools and is encouraged at primary schools. The secondary programme of study can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-citizenship-programmes-of-study.

The recommended programme of study for primary schools can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/citizenship-programmes-of-study-for-key-stages-1-and-2.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
1st May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether local authorities are permitted to refuse access to free school meals based on the age of a child.

All children in reception, year 1 and year 2 in England's state-funded schools, including academies and free schools, are entitled to free school meals. Eligibility is based on the child’s year group rather than their age.

For benefits-based free school meals, Section 512 of the Education Act 1996, as amended, places a duty on maintained schools, academies and free schools to provide free school meals to pupils of all ages that meet the criteria.


Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to support first aid training being undertaken by (a) early years settings and (b) childminders.

In 2016, following consultation, the department introduced a requirement in the Early Years Foundation Stage statutory framework (EYFS) for newly qualified level 2 and level 3 early years staff to also hold a current Paediatric First Aid (PFA) or emergency PFA certificate.

Childminders, and any assistant who might be in sole charge of the children for any period of time, must also hold a full current PFA certificate:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/early-years-foundation-stage-framework--2.

In the same year we launched the voluntary Millie’s Mark quality scheme with the National Day Nurseries Association to recognise those settings that go over and above the statutory requirement of the EYFS by ensuring that all staff on site have PFA training:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-gold-standard-in-paediatric-first-aid-launched.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many eligibility codes for 30 hours of free childcare have been generated for the summer term 2018.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of eligible (a) three and (b) four year olds have received an eligibility code for 30 hours of free childcare for the summer 2018 term.

The government set out in the 2015 Spending Review that we expect 390,000 children to be eligible for 30 hours free childcare. This includes both three and four year olds. This figure is a January snapshot and therefore is the mid-point, spring term estimate and an average across the year.

For the summer term, we said that we were aiming for 370,000 eligibility codes to be generated and we exceeded this target with 377,535 codes generated by 31 March. This was set out publically in the Management Information release on 12 April, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/30-hours-free-childcare-eligibility-codes-issued-and-validated.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of eligible two year old children receive 15 hours of free early years education each week.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to provide more information on the roll-out of 30 hours free childcare for fostered children.

The department is working with local authorities, fostering service providers, foster carers and others in the sector to develop plans to allow foster carers to access the additional 30 hours free childcare for their foster children where it is right for the child.

We plan to implement this change in time for September 2018. More detail will be set out shortly.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the organisations that submitted applications to run the Reception Baseline Assessment.

The department announced its preferred bidder for the Reception Baseline Assessment on 11 April. As government commercial procedure dictates, the contract for the Reception Baseline Assessment will be uploaded to Contracts Finder once contract award is complete. Information about the number of applications will be included in the contract award notice.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what advice his Department provides to early years settings on (a) identifying and (b) removing asbestos from premises.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is the lead regulator on managing asbestos and publishes guidance on effective and safe management of asbestos in line with the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012.

The Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage requires providers to keep children safe, ensure premises are fit for purpose, are able manage any risks and undertake risk assessments to identify aspects of the environment that need to be checked on a regular basis or be removed or minimised. Providers must comply with requirements of Health and Safety legislation.

The responsibility for managing asbestos in a building rests with the ‘duty holder’. The duty holder being the ‘person or organisation that has clear responsibility for the maintenance or repair of non-domestic premises.’ Duty holders are required to survey their building, create a register of Asbestos Containing Materials (ACMs) and write a management plan detailing the procedures for monitoring the condition of ACMs.

The department publishes guidance (‘Asbestos Management in Schools’) that would be relevant for early years provision in schools and could be applicable for a range of settings. This is intended to help duty holders understand their obligations and to support the effective management of asbestos.

The HSE advice remains that as long as asbestos-containing materials are undamaged, and not in locations where they are vulnerable to damage, they should be managed in situ.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to Stop Start, published by the Sutton Trust on 16 April 2018, if he will make an assessment on the implications for his policies on the recording of sure start centre closures as a result of the findings in that report.

The findings in the Stop Start report are estimates based on analysis of different datasets and a snapshot survey of local councils. Local councils currently supply data on children’s centre provision through the Department for Education’s ‘Get Information about Schools’ (GIAS) database at https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/. Statutory guidance says that local councils should update their children’s centre data on a regular basis to reflect any changes to provision. We believe that the GIAS database is the most efficient and proportionate method for local councils to report children’s centre closures on a regular basis. As set out in legislation, local councils have responsibility for determining precisely what services are delivered through children’s centres. We believe that this is the right approach.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to conduct a consultation on children's centres.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to Stop Start, published by the Sutton Trust on 16 April 2018, if he will make an assessment of the potential benefits of introducing a national register of children’s centres which sets minimum levels of Sure Start provision.

The findings in the Stop Start report are estimates based on analysis of different datasets and a snapshot survey of local councils. Local councils currently supply data on children’s centre provision through the Department for Education’s ‘Get Information about Schools’ (GIAS) database at https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/. Statutory guidance says that local councils should update their children’s centre data on a regular basis to reflect any changes to provision. We believe that the GIAS database is the most efficient and proportionate method for local councils to report children’s centre closures on a regular basis. As set out in legislation, local councils have responsibility for determining precisely what services are delivered through children’s centres. We believe that this is the right approach.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to publish information on the tasks on which children will be assessed under the forthcoming early years baseline assessment; and if he will make a statement.

The department will be working to develop the baseline assessment by trialling it in the 2018/19 academic year. A nationally representative selection of schools will be selected to participate in this trial, which will allow us to evaluate and refine the assessment. We will be consulting key stakeholders throughout this process.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to announce the funding rate for the early years level 3 apprenticeship.

This is a matter for the Institute for Apprenticeships. I have asked its Chief Executive, Sir Gerry Berragan, to write to the hon. Member and a copy of his reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses when it is available.

27th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to Childcare and early education funding in London Report for Greater London Authority, March 2018, published by the Mayor of London and the Family and Childcare Trust on 27 March 2018, if he will make an assessment of the implications for this policy on funding levels for 30 hours of funded childcare in London as a result of the findings in that report.

By 2019 - 20 we will be spending a record £6 billion on childcare support, which includes £1 billion a year by 2020 to deliver 30 hours of free childcare and fund the increase in hourly rates that we introduced in April 2017.

Our average hourly rates for three and four year olds compare very favourably with published research into the cost of childcare by Frontier Economics.

London is benefiting from our investment and has seen an increase of £116 million in their Dedicated Schools Grant early years allocation in 2017-18.

We have always been clear that getting the funding right is critical to the successful delivery of the government’s early years entitlements. This is why we have commissioned Frontier Economics to visit a representative sample of childcare providers and spend time with them to understand their costs in detail.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of childcare and early education funding on the number of (a) childminders and (b) nurseries between 31 August and 31 December 2017; and if he will make a statement.

The government is spending a record amount on childcare support, £6 billion by 2019-20. This includes £1 billion a year to deliver 30 hours of free childcare and fund the increase in rates that we introduced in April 2017. We have always been clear that getting the funding right is critical to the successful delivery of the government’s early years entitlements.

Ofsted publishes regular statistics on the number of providers on its Early Years and General Childcare Registers. The most recent statistics, covering the 31 August to 31 December period on this are available at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/childcare-providers-and-inspections-as-at-31-december-2017. The number of places offered by providers on the Early Years Register has remained broadly stable at 1.3 million since 2012, with a slight increase of almost 1,600 places in the last reporting period.


Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 86 of the Ninth Report of Session 2017-19 of the Treasury Select Committee, HC 757, whether the funding arrangements for the 2018-19 academic year take into consideration the increase in the national minimum wage and auto-enrolment into workplace pensions.

By 2019 – 2020, we will be spending around £6 billion on childcare support, including £1 billion a year to deliver the 30 hour childcare entitlement and fund the increase in rates that we introduced in April 2017. Our increased level of funding was based on our comprehensive “Review of Childcare Costs” which looked at both the current costs of childcare provision and the implications of future cost pressures. The Review was described as “thorough and wide ranging” by the National Audit Office. We front-loaded our funding increases, rather than staggering them over time, so that providers could benefit from them as soon as possible. We continue to monitor delivery costs and have commissioned new research to provide us with robust and detailed cost data from a representative sample of early years providers.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 26 March 2018 to Question 133561, what organisation or organisations received the contract related to a new SEND school workforce contract, the procurement for which began in December 2017.

We are in the final stages of a procurement process to better equip the schools workforce to support pupils with all types of Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND). We expect to award the contract in April and will announce the contractor at that point.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 26 March 2018 to Question 133554, on children: day care, what estimate he has made of the number of 2-year-olds who will be eligible in 2023.

Under the new annual net earned income threshold of £15,400, it is estimated that by 2023 around 7,000 more children will benefit from the two-year-old entitlement compared to the previous benefits system.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 15 March 2018 to Question 132134, on Children's Centres: Standards, whether he has made any additional resources available to local authorities to carry out inspections in place of Ofsted inspections.

Local authorities are not required to carry out children’s centre inspections in place of Ofsted inspections. Registered early years provision within children’s centres will continue to be inspected by Ofsted as part of the Common Inspection Framework. Children’s centre inspections are suspended and local authorities are responsible for managing children’s centres and ensuring the services they provide through children’s centres meet appropriate quality standards.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to oral evidence provided by the Under-Secretary of State to the Education Select Committee on 14 March 2018, whether the review of 30 hours of funded childcare will include eligibility criteria.

The Department for Education has commissioned an independent evaluation of the first year of delivery of 30 hours free childcare. This is due to be published in the summer and we will use the evidence from the report to inform the future delivery of the programme.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the answer of 16 March 2018 to Question 132418 on Children: Day Care, what estimate he has made of the proportion of children that are not eligible for the 30 hours of tax free childcare as a result of a household income being (a) too high and (b) too low.

30 hours free childcare is available to working parents of three and four year olds and eligibility is based on parental income.

A three or four year old is eligible for 30 hours free childcare if both their parents, or the sole parent in a lone parent family, expects to earn a weekly minimum equivalent to working 16 hours at national minimum or living wage and under £100,000 a year.

We estimate that 58% of three and four year olds are not eligible for 30 hours because either only one of their parents is employed or because their parent(s) do not meet the required minimum income threshold.

We estimate that less than 1% of three and four year olds are not eligible, even though both parents are employed and meet the required minimum threshold, because at least one of their parents expects to earn £100,000 or more per year.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to his oral contribution of 19 March 2018, Official Report, column 8, on Social Mobility, what estimate he has made of the number of two-year-old children who would be eligible for the free childcare entitlement (a) if the transitional arrangements remained in place and (b) under the new threshold.

Under the new annual net earned income threshold of £15,400, it is estimated that by 2023 around 7,000 more children will benefit from the two-year-old entitlement compared to the previous benefits system.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Education of 19 March 2018, Official Report, column 22, for what reason the whole-workforce training was not put in place before the decision not to renew his Department's contract with The Communications Trust was made.

The department’s one year contract with The Communication Trust (TCT) was awarded last Spring following a competitive exercise. The letter awarding the contract made it clear the department did not intend to extend the contract beyond March 2018. As part of the contract, TCT were required to develop a sustainability plan, which set out how the work would be sustained beyond the life of the contract.

The department started the procurement process for a new SEND school workforce contract in December 2017 to enable the contract to be in place from April 2018. This is in line with government procurement standards.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate he had made of the number of children who will be eligible for 30 hours of funded childcare in the summer term 2018.

Each term we have stated a target for the number of eligibility codes we expect to be issued to eligible parents. We are expecting to issue a total of 370,000 30 hours eligibility codes by 31 March 2018 for the summer term 2018.

Further information relating to 30 hours codes issued for the summer term was published on 15 March 2018 in ’30 hours free childcare: Spring term 2018’. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/announcements/30-hours-free-childcare-spring-term-2018.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 13 March 2018 to Question 131381 on Children: Day care, for which local authority and for what reasons that disapplication was approved.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State agreed to a request from Birmingham local authority to disapply the Finance Regulations so that funding rates allocated to their maintained nursery schools could be changed part way through the 2017-18 financial year.

The request had support from the early years sector and the schools forum and had undergone proper consultation. The change to the method of allocating funding would have complied with the Schools and Early Years Finance (England) Regulations, if it had been decided before the start of the financial year.


Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of (a) three and (b) four year olds are eligible for 30 hours funded childcare.

In the 2015 Spending Review the government set out that 390,000 children are expected to be eligible for 30 hours free childcare. We estimate this to be around 42% of 3 and 4 year olds.

The number of eligible children will increase with a rising population through the academic year as more children turn three.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many 3 and 4 year olds receive the early years Disability Access Fund.

Local councils make Disability Access Fund (DAF) payments and are required to pay £615 to early years settings for each child that is taking-up the three- and four-year old free entitlement (not in reception) and receiving Disability Living Allowance.

The early years and schools censuses based on census day in January 2018 will provide us with data about the take-up of the DAF. The early years census is open to local authorities until mid-April therefore final data is not available.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many families have (a) registered and (b) re-registered for a 30 hours of funded childcare place for the summer 2018 term prior to the 31 March 2018 deadline.

The department published data regarding the number of 30 hours codes issued for the summer term on 15 March in ’30 hours free childcare: spring term 2018’. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/announcements/30-hours-free-childcare-spring-term-2018.

The release set out that, as of the 7 March 2018, an estimated 353,045 eligible codes had been issued for the summer term.

Of these, 303,772 (86%) were children who had received a code for the spring term and includes autumn and spring children who have successfully reconfirmed. 49,273 (14%) of these are children only eligible for the summer term and therefore new applicants.

We expect these figures to continue to rise as the summer term application deadline of the 31 March 2018 approaches. The next update for summer term will be available in a management information release due in April 2018 at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/30-hours-free-childcare-eligibility-codes-issued-and-validated.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 12 March 2018 to Question 131577 on Teachers: Training , what the timetable is for the feasibility study to be completed.

The department is exploring a range of approaches for supporting graduates in the early years workforce – including in disadvantaged areas. This work is still underway and further information will be made available in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 02 February 2018 to Question 125731 on Children’s Centres: Standards, what criteria his Department plans to use to assess the quality of children’s centre provision.

I refer the hon. Member for Batley and Spen to the answer I gave on 2 February 2018 to question 125731, local authorities who manage children’s centres are responsible for ensuring the services they provide through children’s centres meet appropriate quality standards.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Written Statement of 4 December 2017 HCWS309 on Childcare update, what estimate he has made of the total number of two year olds that will be eligible for free childcare once (a) universal credit is fully rolled out and (b) the threshold proposed in that Written Statement is introduced.

Under the new annual net earned income threshold of £15,400, it is estimated that by 2023 around 7,000 more children will benefit from the two-year-old entitlement compared to the previous benefits system.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding each local authority has received from the 30 hours delivery support fund for the Summer 2018 term.

The Delivery Support Fund will provide support to the 147 local authorities who submitted a bid for funding. Funding allocations are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/30-hours-delivery-support-fund-grants-for-local-authorities.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the answer of 8 March 2018 to Question 131079 on Children's Centres, if he will publish the evidence his Department gathered on children's centres.

I refer the hon. Member for Batley and Spen to the answer I gave on 8 March 2018 to question 131079 and the answer I gave on 1 February 2018 to question 125413.

- http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2018-03-05/131079/.

- http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2018-01-29/125413/.

The government intends to work with sector leaders to identify how best to achieve the social mobility ambition set out in the report ‘Unlocking Talent, Fulfilling Potential’, including through children’s centres. The department will provide more information in due course. The report is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/667690/Social_Mobility_Action_Plan_-_for_printing.pdf.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 17 Early Years Workforce Strategy, published by his Department in March 2017, whether the feasibility study into developing a programme that specifically seeks to grow the graduate workforce in disadvantaged areas has been completed; and if he will place a copy of that study in the Library.

The department is considering a range of approaches to supporting graduates in the early years workforce – including the training routes available. This work is still underway.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 17 Early Years Workforce Strategy, published by his Department in March 2017, whether his Department has completed reviewing the early years initial teacher training routes; and if he will place a copy of that review in the Library.

The department is considering a range of approaches to supporting graduates in the early years workforce – including the training routes available. This work is still underway.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the answer of 1 March 2018 to Question 129559 on Children: Day Care, whether he has authorised any such disapplications.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State has allowed a disapplication request from one local authority to change the funding rates allocated to their early years providers part way through the financial year.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of Early Years settings that have fallen into financial difficulties as a result of delayed payments for 30 hours of funded childcare from local authorities.

The information requested is not held centrally.

It is the responsibility of local authorities to enter into agreements with providers to deliver free early education entitlements and childcare. These agreements should be clear about how and when providers will be paid and the documentation required from providers in order to receive payment.

The government’s expectations on what should be included in those agreements were set out in the department’s model agreement. The model agreement was developed in partnership with early years providers and local authorities. It is intended to bring greater consistency to provider agreements across all local authorities and all types of providers. Furthermore, it includes an expectation that from September 2018, all providers, especially childminders, should be paid monthly unless they request otherwise.

The Model Agreement: Early years provision free of charge and free childcare can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/
file/604417/Model_Agreement_FINAL_20170302.pdf
.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the answer of 5 March 2018 to Question 130185, on Pre-school Education: Assessments, whether it will be his Department's policy to have early years baseline assessments and the early years foundation stage profile assessments being conducted on the same children in the same academic year.

It is government policy that the reception baseline assessment (RBA) will be taken by all children within six weeks of entering reception. The same children will also be observed as part of the early years foundation stage profile assessment (EYFSP) during the reception year.

As set out in the response to Question 130185, the two assessments have different purposes. The RBA is a brief teacher-mediated assessment that will take place at the beginning of the reception year to establish a baseline for a new school-level progress measure between reception and Year 6. This means there will no longer be a need to test children at Key Stage 1. The EYFSP is intended to provide parents, carers and Year 1 teachers with a rounded assessment of a child’s knowledge, abilities and development at the end of the reception year.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has issued to parents who are asked to pay a deposit to secure a place at a setting that provides 30 hours of funded childcare.

The department’s statutory guidance requires local authorities (LAs) to work with providers to ensure that, if providers charge parents a deposit to secure their child’s free place, the deposit is refunded in full to parents within a reasonable time scale. Operational guidance for LAs and providers gives further details, stating that the purpose of the deposit is to give providers certainty that a parent will take up the place. LAs and providers should make it clear to parents that if they fail to take up their place, the provider is not obliged to refund the deposit.

LAs are responsible for ensuring that all eligible children can take up their place free of charge and that providers’ charging policies, including charging deposits, enable this. LAs must enter into arrangements with childcare providers to ensure the providers comply with legislative requirements. The LA is not required to fund a provider that is unwilling to accept these requirements.

The department’s statutory guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/682005/Early_education_and_childcare_Statutory_guidance_for-LAs.pdf.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2018 to Question 124482, on Children’s Centres, what evidence his Department has gathered since September 2015 to inform a consultation on children's centres.

Question 124482 referred to the answer to Question 118316. That answer referenced the gathering of evidence to consider what steps would be appropriate. The department has gathered evidence from numerous sources and held numerous discussions with representatives of stakeholder groups since September 2015, which contribute to the development of policy. We do not hold records of every discussion that has taken place.

The government intends to work with sector leaders to identify how best to achieve the social mobility ambition set out in ‘Unlocking Talent, Fulfilling Potential’, including through children’s centres. This is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/667690/Social_Mobility_Action_Plan_-_for_printing.pdf.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of levels of pay in the early years and childcare sector on settings' capacity to employ staff qualified to Level 3 or above.

The Department for Education does not set pay and conditions for early years professionals employed in private and voluntary sector organisations, which is the majority of the early years workforce.

The most recent data we have on the early years sector and pay is from the 2016 Survey of Childcare and Early Years Providers SFR (statistical first release). The accompanying research report, which is more detailed than the SFR, is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/593965/SFR09_2017_Research_Report.pdf. The section on Childcare staff pay in group-based and school-based providers can be found in pages 69 to 72.

Employers are responsible for staff recruitment. We do not hold data on unfilled vacancies. The Early Years Workforce strategy published in March 2017 is intended to support the early years sector to remove barriers to attracting, retaining and developing the early years workforce.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions his Department has had since September 2015 with (a) other government departments, (b) the children’s sector and (c) early years' practitioners on the consultation on children’s centres.

The department has had numerous discussions with representatives of each of the stakeholder groups named in the question about a range of early years issues, including children’s centres, since September 2015. We do not hold records of every discussion that has taken place.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many two year-old children were eligible for childcare places for disadvantaged two-year olds in each of the last five years.

The estimated number of two-year-olds eligible for 15 hours of free early education is shown in the table below:

Two-year-old eligible population estimates[1]

England

Years: 2015 -2017

Year

Eligible two-year-olds

2017

230,900

2016

246,500

2015

269,800

Source: Department for Work and Pensions estimates of eligible population

We do not hold an estimate for the eligible population prior to 2015. This is because the entitlement to 15 hours of free early education for disadvantaged two-year-olds was introduced in September 2013 and extended in September 2014. The January 2015 early years census, the first census following the extension, was the first to record the eligible population.

[1] The estimated number of eligible two-year-olds is based on analysis of administrative data held by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) containing information on benefit and tax credit records relating to November each year.

The estimate is therefore based on the benefit and tax credit eligibility criteria only. The following non-economic eligibility criteria are not covered: children with a current statement of Special Educational Needs (SEN) or an Education, Health and Care plan; children who are looked after by a local authority; children who are no longer looked after by the local authority as a result of an adoption order, a special guardianship order or a child arrangements order which specifies with whom the child lives. Two-year-olds from families in receipt of Universal Credit are also not included in the published figures.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) companies and (b) other organisations have submitted bids to the tendering process for the early years baseline assessment.

The procurement for a supplier to develop and deliver the reception baseline assessment is currently in progress. The process is following all due commercial procedure and, as such, no information can currently be disclosed on the number of bids received during the tendering stage.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether (a) he, (b) his predecessor, (c) current or former Ministers of his Department and (d) officials of his Department held meetings with contractors who had been encouraged to apply to carry out work relating to the incoming early years baseline assessment in which that assessment was discussed and before details of the contracts were made public.

The procurement for the reception baseline assessment has followed all due commercial procedure. As such, no current or previous Secretary of State, Minister or Department official has held meetings with contractors in which details of the reception baseline assessment were discussed or in which contractors were encouraged to apply for this work before the specification and contract were made public.

The Department for Education does not plan to include the performance management of teachers in the reception baseline assessment.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has plans to begin collecting information on the proportion of children accessing 30 hours of free childcare from (a) single and (b) two parent households.

Work is ongoing to strengthen Childcare Service management information so this information may be available in the future.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department plans to include the performance management of teachers in the early years baseline assessment.

The procurement for the reception baseline assessment has followed all due commercial procedure. As such, no current or previous Secretary of State, Minister or Department official has held meetings with contractors in which details of the reception baseline assessment were discussed or in which contractors were encouraged to apply for this work before the specification and contract were made public.

The Department for Education does not plan to include the performance management of teachers in the reception baseline assessment.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason observational assessment is not part of the assessment criteria for the incoming early years baseline assessment.

The early years foundation stage profile (EYFSP) assessment is observational and gives a picture of each child’s development over the early years foundation stage. Observational assessment over longer periods of time is crucial to support effective teaching and learning, which is why it remains a vital part of the EYFSP.

The reception baseline assessment, however, has a different purpose. It will enable schools to focus on the progress made by each year group through all of their time at primary school from reception to the end of key stage 2. For this purpose, we require assessment data that correlates with key stage 2 assessment data and which can determine pupils’ differing starting points so that consistent like-for-like comparisons can be made. To achieve this, observational assessments would represent a greater burden for teachers due to the significant additional moderation requirements to provide the consistent baseline for comparing school-level progress nationally.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 19 December 2017 to Question 118701, on children’s centres, what role he plans for children’s centres to have in delivering his Department’s social mobility action plan.

I refer the hon. Member for Batley and Spen to the answer given by the former Minister for Children and Families, (Robert Goodwill), my hon. Friend for Scarborough & Whitby, on 19 December 2017 to Question 118701.

Further details will be available in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children entered a grace period for 30 hours of free childcare; and what the average length was of grace periods during the September 2017 term.

Parents who fall out of eligibility are able to retain their childcare place for a short period, known as the grace period. A parent enters their grace period if they are found ineligible when reconfirming their details (every three months), or if they forget to reconfirm in time. In the case of the latter, this can mean that a parent is only in their grace period for a matter of days before successfully reconfirming. These parents do not lose their 30 hours place at the end of their grace period. Some parents who enter their grace period will successfully regain employment before they lose their childcare place.

Therefore, the number of children who entered their grace period during a term changes on a daily basis, and as such, the total number of children who have entered a grace period is not meaningful.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether local authorities are permitted to change the funding rate paid to childcare providers for 30 hours of free childcare during a school year.

Local authorities are required to consult providers on annual changes to their local formula for the forthcoming financial year. Local authorities must calculate and notify initial budgets to providers by 31 March. Unless a disapplication is authorised by the Secretary of State, the formula cannot be changed after the financial year has started.

More detail is set out in the Early Years entitlements: local authority funding of providers: Operational Guide 2018 to 2019.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent correspondence his Department has had with Ofsted on its decision to remove the requirement on childcare providers to complete self-evaluation forms.

Ofsted provides a form on its website that childcare providers can complete to self-evaluate their performance prior to inspection. Ofsted’s online myth-buster makes clear that completion of this form is optional but inspectors will ask providers about the quality of care and activities they provide, and how well the setting is meeting the learning needs of all children.

Ofsted has discussed removing the self-evaluation form template with stakeholder organisations and Department for Education officials were involved in that discussion. This is an operational decision for Ofsted and they will communicate with the wider sector about this in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many local authorities paid childcare and early education settings late for funded hours provided during the September term.

The information requested is not held centrally.

The department has made clear, in A4.13 and A4.14 of the early education and childcare statutory guidance for local authorities, that local authorities should pay all providers, particularly childminders, monthly and are expected to do so from September 2018. However, if a provider requests and the local authority agree an existing alternative sustainable method of payment may be continued. We have also stated in the statutory guidance that local authorities should sign up to the prompt payment code which has been produced by the Institute of Credit Management. The code is available to view here: http://www.promptpaymentcode.org.uk/.

The Early education and childcare - Statutory guidance for local authorities is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/early-education-and-childcare--2.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department is conducting a review of childcare costs.

The department’s long-standing annual Survey of Childcare and Early Years Providers, capturing information from a sample of approximately 10,000 providers, is the main way in which the department collects robust, wide-ranging and up-to-date evidence on childcare providers in England. This year, the analytical programme will be enhanced with more detailed research on provider finances and childcare costs for 2-4 year olds. This will involve externally commissioned research with site visits to a representative sample of early years providers to provide us with robust, up-to-date evidence on childcare costs.

The most recent Survey of Childcare and Early Years Providers is available to view here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/childcare-and-early-years-providers-survey-2016.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many childcare and early education settings have contacted his Department regarding funding rates for childcare since February 2017.

The department regularly receives correspondence from childcare and early years settings on a wide variety of topics, including funding rates. It has been made clear that getting funding rates right is key to the successful delivery of childcare entitlements, and the department is happy to hear from providers and other organisations on this.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 8 February 2018 to Question 126727, on Children: day care, for what reasons the Government does not collect this information centrally.

The information requested in relation to Question 126727 is not readily available and could only be provided at a disproportionate cost.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department records whether child care settings which receive public funding have sprinkler systems.

The department does not record whether early years childcare settings that receive public funding have sprinkler systems. However, the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) statutory framework, which is mandatory for all early years providers, requires providers to comply with requirements of health and safety legislation, including fire safety. Providers must have appropriate fire detection and control equipment (for example, fire alarms, smoke detectors, fire blankets and/or fire extinguishers) in working order. As the regulator, Ofsted is responsible for making sure providers comply with the requirements of the EYFS.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has undertaken any consultation with the Communication Trust and its delivery partners on his plans to discontinue funding for specialist speech, language and communication support; and whether he will release the findings of any such consultation.

The Department for Education’s current one-year contract with I CAN, on behalf of The Communication Trust (TCT) is due to end, as planned, at the end of March 2018. We were clear with TCT at the beginning of the 2017-18 contract that the contract was for one year only.

Over the last year, we have been working with TCT on the sustainability of their work beyond the contract period. We are also discussing with TCT how we will best ensure that all practitioners are able to make continued use of the wealth of materials, resources and training developed through this contract.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has made an impact assessment of its plans to discontinue funding for specialist speech, language and communication support.

Specialist speech, language and communication support is not funded directly by the Department for Education. It is commissioned locally, for example by local authorities using their high needs funding budgets, and also via clinical commissioning groups.

The department’s current one-year contract with I CAN, on behalf of The Communication Trust (TCT) is due to end, as planned, at the end of March 2018. The contract was to develop sustainable resources and programmes to support the education workforce to develop their skills in supporting children and young people with speech, language and communication needs. We are in discussion with TCT about how best to ensure that all practitioners are able to make continued use of the wealth of materials, resources and training developed through this contract.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the answer of 2 February 2018 to Question 125487, whether local authorities have discretion to not provide a free school meal to a child in (a) reception (b) year 1 and (c) year 2 because of their age.

Since 2014, state funded schools in England have been required by law to provide free lunches to all children in reception, Year 1 and Year 2, under the universal infant fee school meals policy. The criteria are not age related. The legislation is clear that local authorities must provide a free meal to a child in reception, Year 1 and Year 2, where a meal has been requested.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the answer of 1 February 2018 to Question 125414, on Communication Trust, what estimate his Department has made of the number of speech, language and communication needs specialists jobs that may be at risk as a result of his Department's decision to not renew that contract.

The Department for Education has funded The Communication Trust (TCT) to provide support to those working with children and young people with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) since 2007. Between 2007 and 2013 this was via direct grants to TCT; since 2013, it moved to a contractual arrangement, with funding secured via an open competition.

In March 2017, the Department for Education agreed a one year contract with I CAN, on behalf of TCT, to develop sustainable programmes and resources to help the workforce to develop their skills in supporting children and young people with SLCN. That contract is due to end, as planned, at the end of March 2018. The purpose of the contract was not to provide specialist roles, such as Speech and Language Therapists. Speech and Language Therapists working with children are employed by local authorities, the health service or directly by schools. Therefore, no roles involving the delivery of these services directly to children should be at risk as a consequence of this one year contract ending.

We remain committed to supporting those with SLCN and want to do more to embed knowledge and ensure good practice is disseminated and understood widely. That is why our new Social Mobility Action Plan (SMAP), ‘Unlocking Talent, Fulfilling Potential’ (https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/667690/Social_Mobility_Action_Plan_-_for_printing.pdf), prioritises work in the early years to close the word gap and improve early language acquisition for disadvantaged children. The SMAP includes proposals for continuing professional development training; and an early language assessment tool for health visitors and early years practitioners, to ensure that any language delays can be picked up and the right support put in place quickly. We expect to invite tenders for this work and would welcome bids from all suitably qualified organisations or consortia.

The department is in the process of procuring a new Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) strategic workforce contractor, to help schools to develop improved knowledge and skills among their staff, in relation to specific impairments. In addition, we are encouraging bids for the Strategic School Improvement Fund and the Teaching Leadership Innovation Fund which focus on improving provision for pupils with SEND. The Education Training Foundation is also being funded to increase the capability and capacity of the workforce to respond to the needs of students in Further Education.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the answer of 1 February 2018, to Question 125414, on Communication Trust, for how many consecutive years his Department has had contracts with The Communications Trust related to speech, language and communication needs.

The Department for Education has funded The Communication Trust (TCT) to provide support to those working with children and young people with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) since 2007. Between 2007 and 2013 this was via direct grants to TCT; since 2013, it moved to a contractual arrangement, with funding secured via an open competition.

In March 2017, the Department for Education agreed a one year contract with I CAN, on behalf of TCT, to develop sustainable programmes and resources to help the workforce to develop their skills in supporting children and young people with SLCN. That contract is due to end, as planned, at the end of March 2018. The purpose of the contract was not to provide specialist roles, such as Speech and Language Therapists. Speech and Language Therapists working with children are employed by local authorities, the health service or directly by schools. Therefore, no roles involving the delivery of these services directly to children should be at risk as a consequence of this one year contract ending.

We remain committed to supporting those with SLCN and want to do more to embed knowledge and ensure good practice is disseminated and understood widely. That is why our new Social Mobility Action Plan (SMAP), ‘Unlocking Talent, Fulfilling Potential’ (https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/667690/Social_Mobility_Action_Plan_-_for_printing.pdf), prioritises work in the early years to close the word gap and improve early language acquisition for disadvantaged children. The SMAP includes proposals for continuing professional development training; and an early language assessment tool for health visitors and early years practitioners, to ensure that any language delays can be picked up and the right support put in place quickly. We expect to invite tenders for this work and would welcome bids from all suitably qualified organisations or consortia.

The department is in the process of procuring a new Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) strategic workforce contractor, to help schools to develop improved knowledge and skills among their staff, in relation to specific impairments. In addition, we are encouraging bids for the Strategic School Improvement Fund and the Teaching Leadership Innovation Fund which focus on improving provision for pupils with SEND. The Education Training Foundation is also being funded to increase the capability and capacity of the workforce to respond to the needs of students in Further Education.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of eligible employees of his Department use childcare vouchers.

There are 890 employees in receipt of childcare vouchers in the department. This equates to 16 per cent of the workforce. This includes employees in the department’s Executive Agencies, which comprises of the Education and Skills Funding Agency, the National College for Teaching and Leadership and the Standards and Testing Agency.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Children and Families in his Department is unpaid.

It is not unusual for ministerial roles to be unpaid and this does not reflect the importance of the work.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Written Ministerial Statement of 7 February 2018, HLWS446, on Schools and Early Years Update, whether any of the poorest families will no longer be eligible for the disadvantaged two-year-olds' early education entitlement under the proposals set out.

Subject to parliamentary procedure, from 1 April 2018 a new net earned income threshold of £15,400 will come into force for families on Universal Credit. A typical family earning around this threshold, depending on their exact circumstances, would have a total annual household income of between £24,000 and £32,000, once benefits are taken into account. The two-year-old entitlement lasts for a year and once children have taken it up, they do not lose it, even if their family circumstances change. This means no two-year-old who has started his or her entitlement would lose it because of this change.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much his Department plans to spend on childcare for disadvantaged children in 2018; and how much his Department has spent on such childcare in each of last three years.

We fund 15 hours of free childcare a week for disadvantaged children aged two, three and four, as well as the early years pupil premium for disadvantaged three and four year olds.

Our funding allocations for the following financial years can be found at:

2018-19 (Initial allocation):

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2018-to-2019.

2017-18 (Provisional allocation):

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2017-to-2018.

2016-17 (Final allocation):

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2016-to-2017.

2015-16 (Final allocation):

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2015-to-2016.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many early years education and childcare providers have not received an Ofsted inspection in the last (a) five and (b) ten years.

Ofsted is the non-ministerial government department responsible for the regulation and inspection of early education and childcare providers. They publish a regular series of statistics relating to early years providers, which can be viewed from this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted/about/statistics.

This is a matter for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libaries of both Houses.


Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of early years education and childcare settings have been sold and purchased by a new owner in each of the last three years.

The information requested is not held centrally by the Department for Education or by Ofsted.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average ages are of parents in (a) single parent and (b) two parent families who have at least one child receiving 30 hours of funded childcare.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of children receiving 30 hours of funded childcare are in (a) single and (b) two parent families.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on what date his Department plans to release updated information on the proportion of childcare codes validated for the current term of 30 hours of free childcare.

The department will release updated information on the proportion of childcare codes validated for the 2018 spring term for 30 hours of free childcare on 8 February 2018.

The update will be uploaded alongside the other 30 hours management information releases and will appear here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/30-hours-free-childcare-eligibility-codes-issued-and-validated.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the proportion of children in reception classes that are receiving free school meals.

Although all children in infant classes can receive a free meal under universal infant free school meals, the school census still records which children would have been eligible for a free school meal (FSM) under the criteria used for later school years. Of the 663,796 reception pupils in the January 2017 census, 92,733 are recorded as having been eligible for an FSM under these rules. This accounts for 14% of reception pupils.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2018 to Question 124199 on children's centre inspections, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that future inspections are fit for purpose.

I refer the hon. Member for Batley and Spen to the answer I gave on 2 February 2018 to Question 125731 [http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2018-01-30/125731/].

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish (a) his, (b) his Ministers' and (c) his Parliamentary Under-Secretary of States' ministerial diary entries for 18 January 2018 with information relating to each event.

Ministers’ diaries hold a range of meetings, including regular meetings with departmental officials, meetings with external stakeholders, and visits to a various organisations. Details of all Ministerial meetings with external organisations for January will be published on GOV.UK in due course: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-ministers-quarterly-returns.

1st Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information he holds on the proportion of primary schools which do not have a nursery attached.

According to January 2017 statistics on schools, pupils and their characteristics, around 56% of state funded primary schools did not have any nursery pupils registered at the school. Figures for 2018 will be published later this year.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
31st Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2018 to Question 124199 on children's centre inspections, what plans his Department has to reintroduce regular inspections of children's centres.

I refer the hon. Member for Batley and Spen to the answer I gave on 25 January 2018 to Question 124199 [http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2018-01-22/124199/].

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2018 to Question 124199 on children’s centre inspections, how his Department is monitoring the quality of children’s centres in the absence of regular inspections.

As I said in my previous answer to question 124199, children’s centre inspections are suspended. As indicated in the letter of 25 September 2015 to Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Education, the Secretary of State for Education retains the ability to require Ofsted to undertake inspections and Ofsted itself retains the ability to inspect children’s centres if concerns are raised. The letter can also be viewed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sure-start-childrens-centre-inspections-sam-gyimah-letter.

Registered early years provision within children’s centres will continue to be inspected by Ofsted as part of the Common Inspection Framework. Local authorities who manage children’s centres are responsible for ensuring the services they provide through children’s centres meet appropriate quality standards.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether it is his Department's policy that a prematurely born child whose parents defer their child's school entry date should not be eligible for free school meals for all the years for which that child would otherwise have received free school meals; and if he will make a statement.

The government recognises the benefits of providing a healthy school meal to the most disadvantaged children and are committed to continuing to provide these meals to families in need. There exists a duty on maintained schools, academies and free schools to provide free school meals to pupils of all ages that meet the criteria. The criteria are not age related.

All children in reception, year 1 and year 2 in England's state-funded schools, including academies and free schools, are entitled to free school meals.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2018 to Question 124211, whether the recruitment targets set out in recent Annual Reports of the National College for Teaching and Leadership in respect to measuring quality and outcome of free childcare and entitlement to free early years education and childcare are the Government's targets; and if he will make a statement.

As confirmed in our responses to parliamentary questions 123211 and 123170, there are no targets for recruiting early years teachers. The early years initial teacher training programme has always been a demand-led programme.

The figures in the National College for Teaching and Leadership annual reports were a total number of places available to training providers to bid for. These figures were based on available resource and estimated demand for places. The department has not set a recruitment target for early years initial teacher training programmes.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what childcare support is available for children whose parent enters a women's refuge.

Parents who enter into a refuge will continue to be eligible for 30 hours like any other working parents, provided they work and earn the weekly minimum equivalent to 16 hours a week at their National Minimum Wage. [1]In addition, provision is made within the Statutory Guidance for parents who have been forced to leave their home and paid employment, for example, where the parent is a victim of domestic abuse or other serious crime, to retain their childcare place for longer than other parents.

There is also a range of other childcare support available for parents who enter a women’s refuge. All three- and four-year-olds, and some disadvantaged two-year-olds, are eligible for 15 hours a week of free early education. And, working parents with children under 12 (or under 17 for disabled children) are eligible for Tax- Free Childcare (TFC). TFC allows a parent to open an online account to pay for registered childcare. The government will top-up the money a parent pays into the account; for every £8 paid in, the government will add an extra £2. A parent can receive up to £2,000 per child (and up to £4000 for a disabled child). In addition, Universal Credit provides support with up to 85% of childcare costs, with the maximum limits of £646 for one child and £1,108 for two or more children.

[1] Early education and childcare Statutory guidance for local authorities, page 11, para A1.18, https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/596460/early_education_and_childcare_statutory_guidance_2017.pdf

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether a child who enters into a refuge with a parent remains eligible for 30 hours of funded childcare.

Parents who enter into a refuge will continue to be eligible for 30 hours like any other working parents, provided they work and earn the weekly minimum equivalent to 16 hours a week at their National Minimum Wage. [1]In addition, provision is made within the Statutory Guidance for parents who have been forced to leave their home and paid employment, for example, where the parent is a victim of domestic abuse or other serious crime, to retain their childcare place for longer than other parents.

There is also a range of other childcare support available for parents who enter a women’s refuge. All three- and four-year-olds, and some disadvantaged two-year-olds, are eligible for 15 hours a week of free early education. And, working parents with children under 12 (or under 17 for disabled children) are eligible for Tax- Free Childcare (TFC). TFC allows a parent to open an online account to pay for registered childcare. The government will top-up the money a parent pays into the account; for every £8 paid in, the government will add an extra £2. A parent can receive up to £2,000 per child (and up to £4000 for a disabled child). In addition, Universal Credit provides support with up to 85% of childcare costs, with the maximum limits of £646 for one child and £1,108 for two or more children.

[1] Early education and childcare Statutory guidance for local authorities, page 11, para A1.18, https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/596460/early_education_and_childcare_statutory_guidance_2017.pdf

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether there will be any change to specialist speech, language, and communication needs support available after March 2018; and which organisation will provide that programme.

The department let a one year contract with I CAN, on behalf of The Communication Trust (TCT), in April 2017 to support the workforce to develop their skills in supporting children and young people with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN). That contract is due to end as planned at the end of March 2018.

We recognise the important contribution this contract played in upskilling the workforce and supporting children and young people with SLCN and we remain committed to supporting those with SLCN.

The department is in the process of tendering for the provision of strategic support to the workforce in mainstream and special schools, enabling them to deliver high quality teaching which meets the needs of an increasingly broad range of special educational needs (SEN). The successful contractor will be expected to monitor any gaps in provision, and propose ways to meet those, working with relevant SEN organisations. This contract will run in 2018-19 and 2019-20.

In addition to this, as part of our drive to improve social mobility through education, we announced in our recent report, ‘Unlocking Talent, Fulfilling Potential’ https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/667690/Social_Mobility_Action_Plan_-_for_printing.pdf, our intention to work with Public Health England to support children’s early SLCN. Further details will be announced in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 22 January 2018 to Question 124199, on Children's Centres: Inspections, what the timetable is for new inspection criteria to be produced.

As previously stated in my answer to question 124199, children’s centre inspections are suspended. The letter from my hon. Friend, in his position as the former Parliamentary Under Secretary for Childcare and Education (Sam Gyimah) on 25 September 2015 to Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, stated that the Secretary of State for Education retains the ability to require Ofsted to undertake inspections and Ofsted itself retains the ability to inspect children’s centres if concerns are raised. The letter can be viewed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sure-start-childrens-centre-inspections-sam-gyimah-letter.

We are determined to improve early years provision across the board. In December 2017, we published our Social Mobility Action Plan, Unlocking Talent, Fulfilling Potential. This plan sets out the government’s ambition to close the word gap in the early years. This is a clear direction for all those who have a part to play. Our focus now is on delivering this ambition. Through our new early years system leadership programme we will work with sector leaders to identify how best to do so, including through children’s centres. We will provide further details in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason his Department did not renew the specialist speech, language, and communication needs contract with The Communication Trust.

The department let a one year contract with I CAN, on behalf of The Communication Trust (TCT), in April 2017 to support the workforce to develop their skills in supporting children and young people with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN). That contract is due to end as planned at the end of March 2018.

We recognise the important contribution this contract played in upskilling the workforce and supporting children and young people with SLCN and we remain committed to supporting those with SLCN.

The department is in the process of tendering for the provision of strategic support to the workforce in mainstream and special schools, enabling them to deliver high quality teaching which meets the needs of an increasingly broad range of special educational needs (SEN). The successful contractor will be expected to monitor any gaps in provision, and propose ways to meet those, working with relevant SEN organisations. This contract will run in 2018-19 and 2019-20.

In addition to this, as part of our drive to improve social mobility through education, we announced in our recent report, ‘Unlocking Talent, Fulfilling Potential’ https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/667690/Social_Mobility_Action_Plan_-_for_printing.pdf, our intention to work with Public Health England to support children’s early SLCN. Further details will be announced in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 18 December 2017 to Question 119402, when his Department will begin to invest that £50 million.

£50 million will be invested by the government to create more high quality school-based provision, as explained in the Social Mobility Action Plan, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/667690/Social_Mobility_Action_Plan_-_for_printing.pdf.

We will announce more details of our plans for distributing this investment, and the process that will be involved, in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 12 December 2017 to Question 118334, on children: day care, on what date he plans to make an announcement on the buddy system for local authorities.

Our delivery contractor, Childcare Works, continues to support and work closely with local authorities through the first year of national delivery, ensuring learning and best practice is shared across local authorities. Part of this support work includes the ongoing buddying scheme, which continues to progress well. Once the matches have been officially confirmed, this information will be made publically available.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 December 2017 to Question 116945, on children: day care, whether that contract has been signed; and whether the composition of the working group remains the same.

The department will be signing the contract to undertake the year one evaluation of 30 hours’ free childcare policy by the end of January. The consortium of Frontier Economics, researchers from the University of East London and NatCen Social Research remains the same.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 22 January 2018 to Question 123506, on Children's Centres: Closures, how many new children's centres have opened since 2010.

Based on information supplied by local authorities, fourteen children’s centres have opened since April 2010.[1]

[1] The figure for centres opened since 2010 does not include children’s centres that local authorities have reported closed and subsequently reopened.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 19 January 2018 to Question 123172, what the locations are of the 10 AP free schools, AP academies and Pupil Referral Units that cater for early years.

As at 24 January 2018, the department’s ‘Get information about schools’ website, available at: https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/ shows there are 42 pupil referral units (PRUs), alternative provision (AP) free schools and AP academies that offer provision for early years pupils aged four and under. The data containing the local authority names for these PRUs, AP free schools and academies can found in the attached annex A.

The department does not collect data on the number of referrals to alternative provision. However, as at January 2015, 2016 and 2017, six, seven and 10 children respectively aged three and four were placed in PRUs, AP academies and AP free schools.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 19 January 2018 to Question 123172, on pupil referral units, how many referrals have been made to the 10 AP free schools, AP academies and Pupil Referral Units for three and four years-olds in each of the last three years.

As at 24 January 2018, the department’s ‘Get information about schools’ website, available at: https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/ shows there are 42 pupil referral units (PRUs), alternative provision (AP) free schools and AP academies that offer provision for early years pupils aged four and under. The data containing the local authority names for these PRUs, AP free schools and academies can found in the attached annex A.

The department does not collect data on the number of referrals to alternative provision. However, as at January 2015, 2016 and 2017, six, seven and 10 children respectively aged three and four were placed in PRUs, AP academies and AP free schools.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the implications are for his Department's policies on the early years workforce of findings from the Nursery World and Save the Children survey on training and employing early years teachers, published on 22 January 2018.

We have noted the publication of findings from the survey regarding early years teachers, conducted by Save the Children in collaboration with Nursery World, published on 22 January 2018.

We continue to fund the 'Early Years Initial Teacher Training' programme, including bursaries and employer incentives.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 19 January 2018 to Question 123170, on what date the recruitment target for such teachers was dropped.

As confirmed in our response to parliamentary question 123170, there are no targets for recruiting early years teachers in the workforce. This has always been a demand-led programme and we continue to make early years initial teacher training places available based on this basis.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, where the children's centres are which have not received a five-year inspection as a result of the suspension of inspections imposed in September 2015.

Children’s centre inspections are suspended. There was widespread agreement at the time that they were not fit for purpose. As indicated in the letter of 25 September 2015 to HM Chief Inspector of Education, the Secretary of State for Education retains the ability to require Ofsted to undertake inspections and Ofsted itself retains the ability to inspect children’s centres if concerns are raised. The letter can also be viewed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sure-start-childrens-centre-inspections-sam-gyimah-letter.

This suspension should not affect the normal activity of children’s centres and we expect them to continue their work to improve the outcomes for children and families in local areas. Registered early years provision within children’s centres will continue to be inspected by Ofsted as part of the Common Inspection Framework.

The department does not hold a list of children’s centres that have not received five-year inspections as a result of the suspension. However, this information can be derived from publicly available data. Records of Ofsted inspections of children’s centres and children’s centre groups carried out between 2010 and 2015, including a list of names and addresses and the date of the last inspection are at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/childrens-centres-statistics. Real-time data on the current list of children’s centres and children’s centre groups including names and address is supplied by local authorities via the Get Information about Schools (GIAS) database portal at: https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information his Department holds on the number of children's centres which would have received a five year inspection before 31 December 2017 but did not as a result of his Department suspending such inspections in September 2015.

Children’s centre inspections are suspended. There was widespread agreement at the time that they were not fit for purpose. As indicated in the letter of 25 September 2015 to HM Chief Inspector of Education, the Secretary of State for Education retains the ability to require Ofsted to undertake inspections and Ofsted itself retains the ability to inspect children’s centres if concerns are raised. The letter can also be viewed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sure-start-childrens-centre-inspections-sam-gyimah-letter.

This suspension should not affect the normal activity of children’s centres and we expect them to continue their work to improve the outcomes for children and families in local areas. Registered early years provision within children’s centres will continue to be inspected by Ofsted as part of the Common Inspection Framework.

The department does not hold a list of children’s centres that have not received five-year inspections as a result of the suspension. However, this information can be derived from publicly available data. Records of Ofsted inspections of children’s centres and children’s centre groups carried out between 2010 and 2015, including a list of names and addresses and the date of the last inspection are at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/childrens-centres-statistics. Real-time data on the current list of children’s centres and children’s centre groups including names and address is supplied by local authorities via the Get Information about Schools (GIAS) database portal at: https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the timetable is for Ofsted to resume inspections of children's centres.

Children’s centre inspections are suspended. There was widespread agreement at the time that they were not fit for purpose. As indicated in the letter of 25 September 2015 to HM Chief Inspector of Education, the Secretary of State for Education retains the ability to require Ofsted to undertake inspections and Ofsted itself retains the ability to inspect children’s centres if concerns are raised. The letter can also be viewed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sure-start-childrens-centre-inspections-sam-gyimah-letter.

This suspension should not affect the normal activity of children’s centres and we expect them to continue their work to improve the outcomes for children and families in local areas. Registered early years provision within children’s centres will continue to be inspected by Ofsted as part of the Common Inspection Framework.

The department does not hold a list of children’s centres that have not received five-year inspections as a result of the suspension. However, this information can be derived from publicly available data. Records of Ofsted inspections of children’s centres and children’s centre groups carried out between 2010 and 2015, including a list of names and addresses and the date of the last inspection are at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/childrens-centres-statistics. Real-time data on the current list of children’s centres and children’s centre groups including names and address is supplied by local authorities via the Get Information about Schools (GIAS) database portal at: https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to provide updated funding formulas for maintained nursery schools.

Local authorities are responsible for funding maintained nursery schools in their area. We are providing supplementary funding of approximately £60 million a year to enable local authorities to protect maintained nursery school funding until 2019-20. Budgets after 2019-20 will be set at the next Spending Review.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of early years settings are accessible for people with disabilities.

We do not collect the data requested.

There is a duty on early years providers in the Equality Act 2010 to not discriminate against children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) or whose parents have SEND. Employers must make reasonable adjustments to make sure workers with disabilities are not substantially disadvantaged when doing their jobs.

The Early Years Foundation Stage Framework requires all early years providers to have in place arrangements to identify and support children with SEND and to promote equality of opportunity for all the children in their care. We also have a range of measures put in place to ensure that local areas can put the right support in place for children with SEND and their families to access early education, including the Disability Access Fund, and the SEN Inclusion Fund.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding from the public purse has been allocated to the Sure Start programme in each local authority; and how many families accessed health and support from the Sure Start programme within each local authority in each of the last five years.

Funding for children's services (including children's centres) gives local authorities the freedom to decide how best to target resources and respond flexibly to meet local need. Local authorities must meet their statutory duties on children’s centres from funding that currently forms part of the Department for Communities and Local Government Business Rates Retention Scheme.

Since April 2010, local authorities have reported expenditure on children’s centres (combined with early years) through annual Section 251 returns. This information is published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-local-authority-school-finance-data#local-authority-and-school-finance.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/section-251-materials.

Other government funding, including that for public health, adult skills training and troubled families may also be used locally to support services delivered wholly, or in part, through children’s centres.

The department does not hold data on the number of families that access health and support services through children’s centres centrally. This data is held at a local area level.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the (a) location and (b) name of Sure Start centres that have closed since 2010.

Since 18 September 2017, real-time data on Sure Start children’s centres and children’s centre linked sites has been supplied by local authorities via the department’s Get Information about Schools (GIAS) database portal at: https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/.

Based on the information supplied by local authorities[1], the attached spreadsheet provides details of the location of children’s centres that have closed since 2010.

Councils are reconfiguring services to deliver them more efficiently. If a council decides to close a children’s centre, statutory guidance is clear that they should demonstrate that local children and families would not be adversely affected and local areas continue to have sufficient children’s centres to meet their needs.

[1] The list of children’s centres closed since 2010 is based on information supplied by local authorities as at 18 August 2018 (10:30am).

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the National College for Teaching and Leadership has ever reached the recruitment target of 2,400 early years teachers per year; and if he will make a statement.

The government determines the supply of newly trained teachers with Qualified Teacher Status through a Teacher Supply Model.

There is no equivalent supply model to determine the number of early years teachers required and there is not a target set for recruitment of such teachers. We continue to make early years initial teacher training places available based on demand.

Experimental statistics on new entrants to early years initial teacher training for the academic year 2017/18 are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/initial-teacher-training-trainee-number-census-2017-to-2018.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Pupil Referral Units there are for early years pupils.

Alternative provision (AP) is education put in place for children of compulsory school age who would not otherwise receive suitable education because of illness, exclusion or any other reason. AP is arranged by local authorities (and in some circumstances schools) and can be delivered by a range of providers, for example, pupil referral units, AP free schools and AP academies.


As at 24 January 2018, the Department’s Get Information about schools website shows there are 42 pupil referral units, AP free schools and AP academies that cater to early years pupils aged four and under. Of these 42 institutions, 10 offer provision for early years pupils aged three and under. Get Information about schools is available at: https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 12 December 2017 to Question 118316, on what date work was last carried out on the children's centres consultation.

The work referenced in the answer to PQ 118316 as well as that referenced in PQ 118701 is being carried out by Department for Education officials in the course of business. PQ 118701 can be viewed here: http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2017-12-11/118701/.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 15 December 2018 to Question 121998, how many eligible children there are for 30 hours of funded childcare in (a) England, (b) each region of England and (c) each local authority area in England.

The government set out in the 2015 Spending Review that 390,000 children are expected to be eligible for 30 hours free childcare.

The number of eligible children will increase through the academic year as more children turn three.

We do not have a robust estimate of eligibility at a regional and local authority level. Local authorities have a statutory duty under section 7 of the Childcare Act 2006 to secure early education places free of charge for all eligible children and we expect local authorities to carry out analysis to understand local demand.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average number of funded hours used by families was per week by people with 30 hours places during the September term in 2017.

The department undergoes an annual Early Years Census in order to allocate funding for the free entitlements to local authorities, and to gather data on the uses of these entitlements. This data will be captured in January with the data being made available in the summer. We therefore do not currently hold data on the average number of funded hours used by people accessing a 30 hours place during the autumn term.

However, we do know that an average of 25.2 funded hours per week were taken up in Early Implementer areas, and 26.5 hours per week within the Early Rollout areas, by people accessing a 30 hours place during early delivery. More information on how the 30 hours was delivered in our early delivery areas is available via the links below.

Early Implementer evaluation report: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/629460/Evaluation_of_early_implementation_of_30_hours_free_childcare_.pdf

Early Rollout Evaluation report: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/642007/Evaluation_of_early_rollout_of_30-hours_free_childcare.pdf

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of nursery provision attached to primary schools is run (a) by private, voluntary and independent nurseries and (b) directly by the school with the children on that school's role.

This information is not held centrally.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what was the average cost was of a funded hour under the 30 hours free childcare policy during the 2017 September term.

In the financial year 2017-18, the average cost to government of a funded hour of free childcare for three- and four-year-olds, which includes the 30 hours free entitlement, is £4.94 pence.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many eligibility codes for 30 hours of free childcare have been issued for the January term in (a) the England, (b) each region of England and (c) each local authority area in England.

As of 8 January 2017, 326,068 eligibility codes for 30 hours of free childcare had been issued for the spring term as published in the management information release: 30 hours free childcare eligibility codes issued and validated: January 2018. The publication also includes a local authority breakdown and is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/30-hours-free-childcare-eligibility-codes-issued-and-validated.

See below for a breakdown of issued codes by region:

Region

Eligibility codes issued by 8 January 2018

NORTH EAST

14,814

NORTH WEST

50,584

YORKSHIRE AND THE HUMBER

33,304

EAST MIDLANDS

30,541

WEST MIDLANDS

34,103

EAST OF ENGLAND

34,473

INNER LONDON

12,925

OUTER LONDON

26,168

SOUTH EAST

53,163

SOUTH WEST

35,489

Unknown

504

Total

326,068

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of eligibility codes for 30 hours of free childcare issued for the January term have been validated in (a) England, (b) each region of England and (c) each local authority in England.

As of 8 January 2018, 266,494 eligibility codes for 30 hours of free childcare had been issued for the spring term as published in the management information release: 30 hours free childcare eligibility codes issued and validated: January 2018. The publication also includes a local authority breakdown and is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/30-hours-free-childcare-eligibility-codes-issued-and-validated.

See below for a breakdown of validated codes by region:

Region

Eligibility codes validated by 8 January 2018

NORTH EAST

12,833

NORTH WEST

42,947

YORKSHIRE AND THE HUMBER

27,780

EAST MIDLANDS

24,251

WEST MIDLANDS

28,889

EAST OF ENGLAND

27,370

INNER LONDON

9,624

OUTER LONDON

18,834

SOUTH EAST

43,176

SOUTH WEST

30,784

Unknown

6

Total

266,494


Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to provide more information on extending the eligibility for 30 hours of childcare to foster children.

As Minister for Children and Families and my hon. Friend, the Member for Scarborough and Whitby (Robert Goodwill), announced during the Westminster Hall debate on 19 December 2018, the department is working to allow foster carers to access the additional 30 hours free childcare for their foster children where it is right for the child.

The department is working with local authorities, fostering service providers, fostering charities and foster carers themselves to develop plans for delivery. More detail will be set out in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason the Early Years Investment Fund has been closed.

A decision was made not to continue development of the Early Years Investment Fund in order to ensure resources are being directed to where there is the greatest need.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) childminders and (b) group-based childcare settings rated (i) good and (ii) outstanding by Ofsted in each local authority have left the Early Years Register in each month of the last three years.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference the Oral Answer of the Prime Minister of 6 December 2017, Official Report, column 1023, what assessment her Department has made of which local authorities are operating the 30 hours of funded childcare policy effectively.

As set out in the experimental statistics published on 19 December, 224,885 codes have been generated for parents applying for 30 hours free childcare in the autumn term, and there are 202,783 children in a place. This information is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/30-hours-free-childcare-autumn-term-2017.

This demonstrates that local authorities are effectively delivering the policy and we continue to work closely with them, both directly and through our delivery contractor, ‘Childcare Works’, to support them to deliver 30 hours.

14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 12 December 2017 to Question 118327 on Children: Day Care, and with reference to the Early years national funding formula updated on 17 November 2017, whether the funding rates for financial year 2018-19 will be (a) amended or (b) if further funding will be announced later in December 2017.

The Early Years National Funding Formula hourly funding rates for local authorities to fund the free childcare entitlements for three and four year olds in 2018-19, were published on 17 November. This can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/early-years-national-funding-formula-allocations-and-guidance.

The 2018-19 initial early years funding allocations to local authorities will be announced shortly.

14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children attend early years settings which are rated either satisfactory or inadequate by Ofsted.

Ofsted is the non-ministerial government department responsible for the regulation of early education and childcare providers. They publish a regular series of statistics relating to early years providers, which can be viewed from this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted/about/statistics.

I have informed Ofsted of this question and Her Majesty's Chief Inspector will be writing to the Hon. Member in response. A copy of that letter will be placed in the Libraries of the House.

14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of eligible children received 15 hours of free childcare in each year since 2010.

The percentage of two, three and four year old children benefitting from funded early years education (years 2011 to 2017) is available within Table 5LA of the Main Tables on the department’s website at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/education-provision-children-under-5-years-of-age-january-2017.

The percentage of three and four year olds benefitting from funded early education places as at January 2010 is available within Table 1 of the Main Tables on the department`s website at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/provision-for-children-under-5-years-of-age-in-england-january-2010.

14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the number of children who were eligible for the 30 funded hours of childcare this term, but are not eligible in the January term because their parents (a) now exceed the earnings limit and (b) now earn below the minimum amount.

I am sorry, but the specific information that has been requested is not available.

We expect that a small proportion of parents will drop out of eligibility for 30 hours’ free childcare due to a change in their circumstances. Where this situation occurs, we have introduced a grace period which will enable parents to retain their childcare place for a short period if they have become ineligible for 30 hours. This is in order to avoid disruption for the child, enable parents to make alternative arrangements as a result of a loss of eligibility and allow providers and local authorities greater certainty when managing their childcare places.

Further information about the grace period can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/30-hours-free-childcare-la-and-early-years-provider-guide.


13th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of new primary schools that received permission to be built since June 2017 (a) included and (b) did not include plans to build a nursery.

11 of the 21 (52 per cent) mainstream primary and all-through schools that have opened since June 2017 have nursery provision. 10 of the 21 (48 per cent) schools opened without nursery provision.

The government has not approved any new school proposals since June 2017. The most recent new school approvals were made in April 2017 when 29 of the 45 (64 per cent) mainstream primary and all-through schools approved included proposals for nursery provision. We will next invite proposals for new schools in early 2018.

13th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what how many and what proportion of primary schools that have opened since June 2017 (a) did and (b) did not have an on-site nursery.

11 of the 21 (52 per cent) mainstream primary and all-through schools that have opened since June 2017 have nursery provision. 10 of the 21 (48 per cent) schools opened without nursery provision.

The government has not approved any new school proposals since June 2017. The most recent new school approvals were made in April 2017 when 29 of the 45 (64 per cent) mainstream primary and all-through schools approved included proposals for nursery provision. We will next invite proposals for new schools in early 2018.

13th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make it is her policy to create a capital fund to support the opening of nurseries in primary schools that do not have the facilities to provide one.

As stated in the Social Mobility Action Plan, we will invest £50 million to create more high quality school-based nursery provision for disadvantaged children: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/667690/Social_Mobility_Action_Plan_-_for_printing.pdf.

We expect that this investment will contribute to creating and increasing nursery provision in both new and existing schools, including those schools that already provide nursery places and those that do not.

11th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 11 December 2017 to Question 118033 on Pre-school Education: Teachers, for what reason her Department does not set a target for the number of enrolments in Early Years Initial Teacher Training courses.

The Early Years Initial Teacher Training programme is a demand-led training programme. It is for the training providers to decide on the number of places they can offer. They bid for places and we provide funding to meet the demand.

11th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2017 to Question 116185, when she expects to lay out more detail on extending 30 hours of funded childcare to children in foster care.

Foster carers are able to access the universal 15 hours of free childcare. We also are considering whether it is possible for children in foster care to take up the additional 15 hours in a way that promotes the best interests of the child.

8th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the cost to the public purse will be of developing the new reception baseline assessment announced in September 2017.

The Standards and Testing Agency is currently seeking a contractor to develop and deliver the new reception baseline assessment. The contract will cover the development, pilot and first two years of statutory delivery of the assessment.

The total value of the contract is estimated to be no more than £9.8 million over four academic years from September 2018 to August 2022. The majority of costs will be for the annual delivery of the assessment rather than its development.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she plans to provide the details of local authorities involved in the buddy system for delivering the 30 hours of funded childcare policy.

Our delivery contractor, Childcare Works, is currently in discussion with local councils, including some of our early delivery areas, about potential buddying matches. Once the matches have been officially confirmed, this information will be made publically available.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to pages 91-97 of her Department's Study of Early Education and Development (SEED): Study of Quality of Early Years Provision in England, published in December 2017, what steps her Department is taking to end regional variations in quality in early education.

The study of early education and development (SEED) findings (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/early-years-provision-quality) indicate that improvements in the quality of early years provision have been seen over time. The research showed no variation in quality by area deprivation. Furthermore, the regional variation seen is not indicative of low overall quality in any region.

The research backs up what we know – the number of childcare providers now rated good or outstanding by Ofsted has risen to 94% (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/childcare-providers-and-inspections-as-at-31-august-2017) and the attainment gap between disadvantaged children and their peers continues to close at age 5.

The early years workforce strategy published in 2017, sets out government's plans to help employers attract, retain and develop early years staff to support delivery of high quality provision.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether it is her policy to conduct a consultation into children's centres.

The government is committed to ensuring that all children, regardless of background, get the best possible start in life. Children’s centres have an important role to play.

I am aware of the previous commitment made to consult on the future of children’s centre services. However, we rightly want to take some time to gather evidence and consider what steps would be appropriate.

Local councils continue to have a duty to ensure there are sufficient centres or other settings such as family hubs to meet local need and to consult where they plan to make changes to local provision.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many local authorities will receive (a) less, (b) more and (c) the same funding in 2018-19 than in 2017-18 for delivering the 30 hours of funded childcare policy.

The 2018-19 funding allocations to local councils for delivering 30 hours of free childcare will be announced later in December 2017.


6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will place in the Library copies of all correspondence between her Department and the Advertising Standards Authority on the 30-hours of childcare policy.

A copy of all correspondence between the Department of Education and the Advertising Standards Authority regarding the 30 hours’ free childcare policy will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Batley and Spen, dated 11 October 2017.

A response to the letter is being finalised and will be sent to the hon. Member for Batley and Spen in due course.

6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans she has to respond to the recommendations of the Ofsted report entitled Bold beginnings: The Reception curriculum in a sample of good and outstanding primary schools, published in November 2017.

Access to a high-quality education from the earliest age is vital for giving all children the very best start in life, and to lay the foundation for success at primary school and beyond. We are in the process of making improvements to the early years foundation stage profile, as set out in the government response to the primary assessment consultation, published in September: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/644871/Primary_assessment_consultation_response.pdf. This includes revising the communication and language early learning goals (ELGs) to focus on developing children’s vocabulary and strengthen numeracy, reading and writing skills. We have also recently announced a series of programmes to tackle these early skills in Reception, including through our £140 million Strategic School Improvement Fund.

6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason the number of students enrolling on Early Years Initial Teacher Training courses is less than the target set by her Department; and if she will make a statement.

We fund the Early Years Initial Teacher Training programme, including bursaries and employer incentives, but it is a demand-led training programme and we do not set a target for recruitment.

5th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many fostered children received the two-year-old childcare entitlement in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Table 12 of the ‘Education provision for children under 5 years of age’ Statistical First Release shows the number of 2-year-old children funded for an early education place because they were looked after or adopted: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/education-provision-children-under-5-years-of-age-january-2017. It is not possible to separately identify those who were looked after by a foster carer.

5th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason she has not answered Named Day Question 116931 submitted on 30 November 2017.

I responded to the hon. Member for Batley and Spen, Tracey Brabin, within the time limit on 5 December 2017. The answer can be found here:

http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-questions-answers/?page=1&max=20&questiontype=AllQuestions&house=commons%2clords&uin=116931.

5th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Written Minister Statement of 5 December 2017, HCWS309, on childcare: update, whether any children who currently receive the two year-old entitlement will no longer be eligible under the proposed changes in that statement.

The Written Ministerial Statement on ‘Childcare update’, of 4 December 2017, said that “This threshold would increase the number of children benefitting – around 8,000 more children taking up this entitlement once Universal Credit is fully rolled out and in steady state”. We estimate that this will cost around £25 million per annum once Universal Credit is fully rolled out.

The Written Ministerial Statement was also clear that no child who had commenced the two-year-old entitlement would lose it as a result of the introduction of the new earnings threshold.

5th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Written Ministerial Statement of 5 December 2017, HCWS309, on Childcare update, what estimate her Department has made of the potential cost increase of that policy announcement.

The Written Ministerial Statement on ‘Childcare update’, of 4 December 2017, said that “This threshold would increase the number of children benefitting – around 8,000 more children taking up this entitlement once Universal Credit is fully rolled out and in steady state”. We estimate that this will cost around £25 million per annum once Universal Credit is fully rolled out.

The Written Ministerial Statement was also clear that no child who had commenced the two-year-old entitlement would lose it as a result of the introduction of the new earnings threshold.

5th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 December 2017 to Question 116938, on Children: Day Care, how many childcare providers have provided detailed financial information on their costs and revenues.

The Department for Education has received some information from a small number of providers and we remain open to receiving detailed financial information as part of our ongoing work to keep early years funding under review.

Providers are able to send in this information through our existing channels, which include the ‘Contact the Department for Education’ page at: www.gov.uk/contact-dfe.

5th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 December 2017 to Question 116938, on Children: Day Care, what are the existing communication channels are referred to in that Answer.

The Department for Education has received some information from a small number of providers and we remain open to receiving detailed financial information as part of our ongoing work to keep early years funding under review.

Providers are able to send in this information through our existing channels, which include the ‘Contact the Department for Education’ page at: www.gov.uk/contact-dfe.

4th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the reasons are for grandparents who are childminders to be ineligible to receive 30-funded hours of childcare for their grandchildren.

Childminders, including grandparents who are childminders, cannot receive early years funding, including the new 30 hours’ entitlement, for related children. This is set out in Sections 18(4) and 20 of the Childcare Act 2006: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2006/21/contents.

This long-standing position avoids creating an incentive for adults to register to become formal carers for related children they are already looking after on an informal basis.

4th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 4 December 2017 to Question 116575 on Pre-school Education: Recruitment, if he will publish the membership of the task and finish group.

The gender diversity task and finish group includes practitioners, training providers, unions, academics and employers. As set out in the Early Years Workforce Strategy, the group will report to the department on the factors influencing the number of men in childcare and present possible solutions to increase this number.

30th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department will spend on 30 funded hours childcare in the 2017-18 financial year.

Funding for the free early years’ entitlements is published in the Dedicated Schools Grant allocations. Indicative allocations for 30 hours, which cover a seven month period in 2017-18, can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2017-to-2018.

30th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 13 November 2017 to Question 111770, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of providing a secure means for childcare providers to provide detailed financial information on their costs and revenues.

We have been clear that where providers feel unable to deliver 30 hours of free childcare on government funding, they are welcome to share, if they feel able to do so, financial information on their costs and revenues. They can supply this information through existing communication channels.

30th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of children have access to a maintained nursery school.

In January 2017, there were 402 maintained nursery schools in 102 local councils. In total, they had 43,785 pupils.

We do not have information on the proportion of children who have access to a maintained nursery school. Maintained nursery schools’ catchment areas will vary according to locally set admissions criteria and as a result of the choices parents make about early years provision for their children.

30th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 30 November 2017 to Question 115754, on children: day care, on what date she expects a contractor to be appointed.

We have signed a letter of intent with a consortium of Frontier Economics, researchers from the University of East London and NatCen Social Research to undertake the year one evaluation of 30 hours free childcare policy. The contract will be signed in January with fieldwork commencing soon after.

30th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what fire safety standards her Department expects childcare settings to meet.

The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) statutory framework sets the standards that all early years providers must meet to ensure that children learn and develop well and are kept healthy and safe. The statutory framework is published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/early-years-foundation-stage-framework--2.

The welfare and safeguarding section in the EYFS requires childcare settings to comply with requirements of health and safety legislation, including fire safety requirements. Providers must take reasonable steps to ensure the safety of children, staff and others on the premises in the case of fire or any other emergency, and must have an emergency evacuation procedure. Providers must have appropriate fire detection and control equipment (for example, fire alarms, smoke detectors, fire blankets and/or fire extinguishers) which is in working order. Fire exits must be clearly identifiable, and fire doors must be free of obstruction and easily opened from the inside.

29th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2017 to Question 115567 on child minding what proportion of local authorities are paying providers on a monthly basis.

We expect all local councils to move to paying providers on a monthly basis by September 2018.

The model agreement, published on 3 March 2017, sets out the department’s expectations and is clear that local councils should pay all providers, particularly childminders, monthly by September 2018. A provider can request to continue an existing alternative and sustainable method of payment as long as the local council agrees.

In our statutory guidance for early education and childcare we are clear that local councils should use the model agreement unless they have good reason not to do so.

29th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the average pay in early years settings on their ability to fill vacancies; and if she will make a statement.

The Department for Education does not set pay and conditions for early years professionals employed in private and voluntary sector organisations.

The most recent data we have on the early years sector and pay is from the 2016 Survey of Childcare and Early Years Providers Statistical First Release (SFR). The accompanying research report, which is more detailed than the SFR, is available here (the section on 'Childcare staff pay in group-based and school-based providers' can be found on pages 69-72):

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/593965/SFR09_2017_Research_Report.pdf.

Employers are responsible for staff recruitment. We do not hold data on unfilled vacancies. The Early Years Workforce strategy published in March 2017 is intended to support the early years sector to remove barriers to attracting, retaining and developing the early years workforce.

29th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has a strategy to increase the proportion of male employees in the early years sector.

Following publication of the Early Years Workforce Strategy, we have set up a task and finish group of early years sector stakeholders to consider gender diversity in the sector in more depth. The group is in its early stages and more information will be available as work progresses.

29th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer on 28 November 2017 to Question 115556, Pre-school education: apprentices, how many and what proportion of apprenticeship starts (a) were completed and (b) remain employed in the early years sector.

The number of apprenticeships who completed their course is outlined below. The percentage of sustained employment rate for learners that completed an apprenticeship in ‘Child Development and Well Being’ is also provided:

Completions

Sustained
Employment Rate

Provision Type

2013/14

2014/15

2013/14

2014/15

Advanced Apprenticeship

9,200

9,130

84%

82%

Intermediate Apprenticeship

5,220

5,290

81%

79%

Source: Longitudinal Education Outcomes Study

Note:

  1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10; percentages are rounded to the nearest percent.
  2. Data are based on Individualised Learner Record data linked to the Department for Work and Pensions and HM Revenue and Customs data to observe benefit and employment activity, and include learners who may not have been employed in the same sector in which they achieved their apprenticeship.
  3. Data refer to learners completing training up to the 2014/15 academic year – the most recent year for which outcome measures are available.
  4. To be reported in sustained employment, learners must be in paid employment as recorded in Pay-As-You-Earn records in five out of six months between October and March in the following academic year or have returned a self-assessment form stating that they have received income from self-employment during that financial year.

Figures come from Official Statistics published on Outcome Based Success Measures available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/further-education-outcome-based-success-measures-2014-to-2015.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/655142/FE_learners___national__provider__and_geography_tables.xlsx.

28th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of children looked after by foster carers use the 15 hours of universally available funded childcare.

I am sorry, but the department does not hold the data requested.

28th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the cost of extending 30 hours of funded childcare to children in foster care.

Foster carers play a vital role in supporting some of our most vulnerable children and we recognise the importance of effective support for the recruitment and retention of foster carers. However, we also need to consider whether it is possible for children in foster care to take up the additional hours in a way that promotes the best interests of the child so I would like to work with local councils, fostering service providers and others in the sector to ensure we get the balance right. We will aim to set out more detail in due course.

28th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will require local authorities to produce a strategy for improving disadvantaged children’s outcomes.

The government recognises that young people from disadvantaged backgrounds can face additional challenges to achieving their potential. This is why we introduced the pupil premium in 2011 and invested over £11 billion, which includes almost £2.5 billion this year alone, in schools so that they can provide extra support to disadvantaged pupils of all abilities.

The attainment gap between disadvantaged pupils and their peers has decreased both at age 11 and age 16 since 2011. Schools have discretion over how they use pupil premium funding, according to the identified needs of their pupils.

While we have no plans to require local councils to produce strategies for improving disadvantaged children’s outcomes, they are free to do so if they wish.

27th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Disability Access Fund payments have been made since April 2017.

Local councils make Disability Access Fund payments and are required to pay £615 to early years settings for each child that is:

  • taking-up the three- and four-year old free entitlement (not in reception); and
  • receiving Disability Living Allowance.

The early years and schools censuses in January 2018 will provide us with data about the take-up of the Disability Access Fund.

27th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 7 November 2017 to Question 110302, on children: day care, whether her Department has appointed a contractor to evaluate the provision of 30 hours' free childcare during the first two terms of the national roll-out.

We are in the process of commissioning an independent evaluation study in a number of local councils across England to assess the implementation and impact of the 30 hours’ free childcare policy in the first year of national rollout. We have not yet appointed a contractor to undertake this work.

27th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what target her Department has set for the number of 30-free hours of childcare eligibility codes to be generated for the January term.

We are expecting to issue a total of 310,000 30 hours eligibility codes by 31 December 2017 for the spring term. We anticipate we may exceed this target given the popularity of 30 hours free childcare we observed in the autumn term.

Further information relating to 30 hours codes issued for the spring term will be issued in a future management information release. These can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/30-hours-free-childcare-eligibility-codes-issued-and-validated.

23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether a local authority has the power to (a) withdraw or (b) threaten to withdraw funding for 30 hours free childcare if it believes that charges placed by a setting onto parents for additional extras such as food and consumables are excessive.

Local councils have the power to impose requirements on childcare providers as a condition of funding in order to ensure that the early years’ provision is free of charge and/or that any financial assistance provided by the local council is used properly and in accordance with the provisions of the agreement between the provider and the local council. It is for local councils to work together with providers when developing their agreements.

23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to increase the number of childminders.

Childminders are an important part of the childcare sector and can often provide a level of flexibility that other providers cannot. To encourage new childminders into the market and to support existing childminders, we have made it easier for them to work outside of the home and play a full role in the 30 hours free childcare entitlement. This includes setting an expectation that they should be paid monthly by councils, offering start-up grants to new childminders delivering the free offer, supporting childminders to improve their business skills and creating new partnerships between childminders and schools.

23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason there is only one PVI representative on the Childcare and Education Panel recruited to scrutinise the Level 3 apprenticeship standard; and what assessment her Department has made of whether that is representative of the childcare and early education sector.

The Institute for Apprenticeships is an independent body with responsibility for the development and approval of apprenticeship standards. I have therefore asked the Chief Executive of the Institute, Sir Gerry Berragan, to write to the hon. Member for Batley and Spen directly responding to the question about the Childcare and Education Route Panel.

A copy of that response will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses when it is available.

23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many early years apprenticeships have been started in each of the last three years; and what proportion of those apprentices were employed in PVI settings.

The number of starts for the sector framework ‘Children’s Care Learning and Development’ by academic year are below.

Academic year

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Number of starts

21,900

24,160

27,200

Further information on breakdowns by framework or standard are available at the links below.

For final 2016/17 data: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/661049/201617_apprenticeships_by_framework_and_sector_subject_area.xlsx.

For data on previous years: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/650226/201617_Oct_Apps_Level_SSA_And_Framework_Data_Tool_FINAL.xlsx.

These data are collected from the Individualised Learner Record. We do not collect information on types of settings and so are unable to identify private, voluntary or independent settings from the collection.

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the effect of the minimum wage on the ability of early years providers to deliver 30 hours of free childcare.

Our ‘Review of Childcare Costs’ looked at both the current costs of childcare provision and the implications of future cost pressures facing the sector, including the National Living Wage. Our new funding rates are based on this review, which was described as “thorough and wide ranging” by the National Audit Office.

The government will be investing £1 billion a year to deliver 30 hours of free childcare and increase our hourly funding rates for the free entitlements. The government’s total hourly funding rate for three and four-year-olds (national average to local councils) increased from £4.56 to £4.94 in April 2017. This compares very favourably with research into the cost of childcare, published by Frontier Economics in July 2017, which shows that the mean hourly delivery cost of a three/four-year-old place was £3.72.

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many childcare settings are providing 30 free hours of childcare for at least one child; and what estimate she has made of the number of settings that will provide 30 free hours of childcare in the January term.

I am sorry, but the information is not held centrally.

21st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) childminders and (b) group-based childcare settings rated (i) good, (ii) outstanding by Ofsted and (iii) in total have left the Early Years Register in each month of the last three years, in each parliamentary constituency.

Ofsted is the non-ministerial government department responsible for the regulation of early education and childcare providers. They publish a regular series of statistics relating to early years providers, which can be viewed from this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted/about/statistics.

I have informed Ofsted of these three questions and Her Majesty's Chief Inspector will be writing to the hon. Member in response. A copy of that letter will be placed in the libraries of the House.

21st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) childminders and (b) group-based childcare settings (i) in total, (ii) rated good by Ofsted and (iii) rated outstanding by Ofsted have joined the Early Years Register in each month of the last three years in each local authority.

Ofsted is the non-ministerial government department responsible for the regulation of early education and childcare providers. They publish a regular series of statistics relating to early years providers, which can be viewed from this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted/about/statistics.

I have informed Ofsted of these three questions and Her Majesty's Chief Inspector will be writing to the hon. Member in response. A copy of that letter will be placed in the libraries of the House.

21st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) childminders and (b) group-based childcare settings rated (i) good, (ii) outstanding by Ofsted and (iii) in total have joined the Early Years Register in each month of the last three years, in each parliamentary constituency.

Ofsted is the non-ministerial government department responsible for the regulation of early education and childcare providers. They publish a regular series of statistics relating to early years providers, which can be viewed from this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted/about/statistics.

I have informed Ofsted of these three questions and Her Majesty's Chief Inspector will be writing to the hon. Member in response. A copy of that letter will be placed in the libraries of the House.

21st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many 30-free hours of childcare eligibility codes have been (a) generated and (b) validated in each (i) local authority and (ii) region.

216,384 eligibility codes for 30 hours free childcare were issued by 31 August for the autumn term. As of 6 November, 200,371 of these eligibility codes have been validated, as referred to in our management information release: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/30-hours-free-childcare-eligibility-codes-issued-and-validated.

On 19 December we will publish ’30 hours free childcare: Autumn term 2017’, a statistical publication on the first term of 30 hours, which will include a local council breakdown of codes issued and validated.

20th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many 30-free hours of childcare eligibility codes have been generated for children whose first term of eligibility is the January term.

The Department for Education is publishing management information relating to the rollout of 30 hours free childcare in monthly management information releases. These can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/30-hours-free-childcare-eligibility-codes-issued-and-validated.

Information relating to 30 hours codes issued and validated for the spring term will be issued in a future management information release.

13th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to ensure that early-years professionals cover oral health as part of their training.

We recognise the importance of healthy teeth - poor oral health can affect a child's ability to sleep, eat, speak, play and socialise with other children. Early Years Educator qualifications must cover the promotion of the health, safety and welfare of children. All early years’ providers have a responsibility to promote the health of children in their setting, set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage framework.

Good oral health can form part of this, and Public Health England (PHE) worked with the Department for Education to publish in December 2016 a toolkit for providers considering a supervised tooth brushing programme. PHE has also established a Child Oral Health Improvement Programme Board to ensure that every child grows up free from tooth decay.

13th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to deliver supervised tooth-brushing sessions for children in nurseries and school breakfast clubs.

We recognise the importance of healthy teeth - poor oral health can affect a child's ability to sleep, eat, speak, play and socialise with other children. Early Years Educator qualifications must cover the promotion of the health, safety and welfare of children. All early years’ providers have a responsibility to promote the health of children in their setting, set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage framework.

Good oral health can form part of this, and Public Health England (PHE) worked with the Department for Education to publish in December 2016 a toolkit for providers considering a supervised tooth brushing programme. PHE has also established a Child Oral Health Improvement Programme Board to ensure that every child grows up free from tooth decay.

10th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Sure Start centres there are; and how many of those centres there were in each of the last three years.

Since 18 September 2017, real-time data on Sure Start children’s centres and children’s centre linked sites has been supplied by local councils via the department’s Get Information about schools (GIAS) database portal at: https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk/.

Based on information supplied by local councils, there were 3,130 children’s centres and sites as at 18 November 2017; 3,205 children’s centres and sites at the beginning of the 2017 calendar year; 3,272 children’s centres and sites at the start of the 2016 calendar year; and 3,431 children’s centres and sites at the start of the 2015 calendar year.

The number of children’s centres and sites is based on information supplied to the GIAS database, as at 18 November 2017. These figures may be different to previous answers, and could change again in future, since local councils may update previous entries to the database at any time.

Councils are reconfiguring services to deliver them more efficiently. Where they decide to close a children’s centre, councils must demonstrate that children and families, particularly the most disadvantaged, will not be adversely affected and that they will not compromise their duty to have sufficient children’s centres to meet local need.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister for Children and Families of 6 November 2017, on free childcare, Official Report, column 1183, which journalists that Minister was referring to.

From the Official Report (Hansard), I believe this reference is from column 1184. I was not referring to any individual journalists, but to media coverage more generally, uch of which quoted the hon. member for Batley and Spen.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister for Children and Families of 6 November 2017, on free childcare, Official Report, column 1182, what plans her Department has to introduce a mechanism to allow early years settings to provide detailed information on the reasons underlying the costs of nursery provision.

The Minister for Children and Families has been clear that where providers feel unable to deliver 30 hours of free childcare on government funding, they are welcome to share with him, if they feel able to do so, detailed financial information on their costs and revenues. This is so that we can understand their concerns in more detail. They can supply information to the Minister for Children and Families through publically available communication channels.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 30 October 2017 to Question 109339, if she will take into account information from the independent published evaluation of early implementation on the income of families benefiting from the 30 free hours of childcare policy when assessing the effectiveness of that policy.

The department is using the findings from the early implementation evaluation, published in July, including those on parental income to assess the effectiveness of the policy.

We will also be drawing on the independent evaluation of the first two terms of national rollout to assess the effectiveness of the policy further. It is intended that this evaluation will collect data from parents, including their household income.

6th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the oral Answer from the Minister for Children and Families of 6 November 2017, on free childcare, what proportion of early years providers (a) can provide and (b) are outliers who are unable to deliver 30 hours of free childcare on Government funding.

Providers can choose whether or not to provide 30 hours of free childcare. Our independent evaluation of the early rollout programme found that 83% of providers who previously delivered the free entitlements were willing and able to offer 30 hours’ places. The full report can be found here https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/642007/Evaluation_of_early_rollout_of_30-hours_free_childcare.pdf.

Where providers feel unable to deliver 30 hours of free childcare on government funding, I invite them to consider sharing with me, if they feel able to do so, detailed financial information on their costs and revenues, so that I can understand their concerns in more detail.

1st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what childcare facilities her Department makes available for staff; how much her Department spent (a) overall and (b) per child on those childcare facilities in the last year; and how many staff members use those childcare facilities.

The department has no childcare facilities on its estate. There are two schemes in place, salary sacrifice and salary plus, which assist staff with childcare costs.

30th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 30 October 2017 to Question 109339, on children: day care, what the timetable is for publication of the independent evaluation.

The department will carry out an independent evaluation of 30 hours’ free childcare during the first two terms of national rollout.

We currently have an invitation to tender issued which will close on Thursday 2 November. We will review the bids and appoint an independent contractor to undertake the year one evaluation of 30 hours before the end of the year.

Following a scoping exercise the planned timetable for publication of the evaluation will be:

  • Research fieldwork: January – May 2018.
  • Report publication: by 1 September 2018.

30th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will publish all correspondence on the 30 hours free childcare policy which she has had with Suffolk Country Council in the last six months.

My Rt hon. Friend the Secretary of State has had no correspondence with Suffolk County Council on the 30 hours free childcare policy in the past six months.

30th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 30 October 2017 to Question 109339, on children: day care, what the timetable is for publication of the independent evaluation.

The department will carry out an independent evaluation of 30 hours’ free childcare during the first two terms of national rollout.

We currently have an invitation to tender issued which will close on Thursday 2 November. We will review the bids and appoint an independent contractor to undertake the year one evaluation of 30 hours before the end of the year.

Following a scoping exercise the planned timetable for publication of the evaluation will be:

  • Research fieldwork: January – May 2018
  • Report publication: by 1 September 2018.

30th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 30 October 2017 to Question 109407, on children: day care, which local authorities received funding; and how many projects were awarded that funding.

The funding was allocated to over 350 projects in 123 local authorities (LA) in January 2017 and March 2017.

The successful projects by LA were published here - https://www.gov.uk/guidance/early-years-capital-fund-2017.

27th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the retention rates are for qualified teachers in the North West who began their employment in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not available in the format requested. The retention rates for qualified teachers in England who began their employment in each of the last five years were published in Table 8 of the ‘School Workforce in England: November 2016’ in June 2017: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/school-workforce-in-england-november-2016.

Regional versions of these statistics are not available.

The Department has published information at regional level on the percentage of teachers who leave each year. These statistics were published in tables 2.1a and 2.1b in the ‘Local analysis of teacher workforce: 2010 to 2015’:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/local-analysis-of-teacher-workforce-2010-to-2015.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
27th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the retention rates are for qualified early years teachers in Yorkshire and the Humber who began their employment in each of the last five years.

I am sorry, but the information requested is not available as the department does not collect individual level data on qualified early-years staff.

27th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the retention rates are for qualified early years teachers in the North East who began their employment in each of the last five years.

I am sorry, but the information requested is not available as the department does not collect individual level data on qualified early-years staff.

27th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the retention rates are for qualified early years teachers in the West Midlands who began their employment in each of the last five years.

I am sorry, but the information requested is not available as the department does not collect individual level data on qualified early-years staff.

27th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the retention rates are for qualified early years teachers in the East Midlands who began their employment in each of the last five years.

I am sorry, but the information requested is not available as the department does not collect individual level data on qualified early-years staff.

26th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the retention rates are for qualified early-years teachers who began their employment in each of the last five years in the East of England.

I am sorry, but the information requested is not available as the department does not collect individual level data on qualified early-years staff.

26th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the retention rates are for qualified early-years teachers who began their employment in each of the last five years in the South West.

I am sorry, but the information requested is not available as the department does not collect individual level data on qualified early-years staff.

26th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the retention rates are for qualified early-years teachers who began their employment in each of the last five years in inner London.

I am sorry, but the information requested is not available as the department does not collect individual level data on qualified early-years staff.

26th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the retention rates are for qualified early-years teachers who began their employment in each of the last five years in outer London.

I am sorry, but the information requested is not available as the department does not collect individual level data on qualified early-years staff.

26th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the retention rates are for qualified early-years teachers who began their employment in each of the last five years in the South East.

I am sorry, but the information requested is not available as the department does not collect individual level data on qualified early-years staff.

24th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the announcement by her Department on 11 April 2017 on families to benefit from £55 million boost to childcare services, how many applications have been made to that fund; how much has been paid out from that fund; and how many childcare places that funding has established.

On 11 April 2017, we announced the allocation of £100 million of capital funding to create 30-hours places for eligible children to help meet demand from hardworking parents.

This funding was allocated to over 350 projects in 123 local councils in January 2017 and March 2017.

We are working closely with all projects awarded funding and will publish the outcomes in due course when all projects have completed.

24th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many two-year olds have received 15 hours free childcare in each of the last three years.

The number of 2-year-olds benefitting from funded early education is published in Table 1 of the ‘Education provision: children under 5 years of age’ statistical first release: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/education-provision-children-under-5-years-of-age-january-2017.

24th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 23 October 2017 to Question 108171, whether her Department plans to seek information on the income of people accessing 30 hours of free childcare.

The Department collected data on the household income of parents using 30 hours free childcare during the Early Implementation of the policy in eight local authorities. The independent published evaluation of early implementation summarised the income of parents that:

  • Used 30 hours
  • Used more childcare than in the past because of 30 hours
  • Changed their employment or working hours because of using 30 hours.

An independent evaluation will take place of the first two terms of national rollout of the policy. The evaluation intends to collect data from parents, including their household income.

The Department also collates some information on parent income through the annual Childcare and Early Years Survey of Parents, which provides Official Statistics on parents’ use of childcare and early years provision.

23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children on the 30 free hours of childcare scheme are attending (a) maintained nursery and primary schools and (b) private, voluntary and independent provision.

The number of children taking up the 30 hour offer in maintained nursery schools, primary schools and the private, voluntary and independent sector will be collected in January 2018 and published in the statistical first release ‘Education provision: children under 5 years of age’ in June/July 2018.

23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 23 October 2017 to Question 108604, on children: day care, whether her Department plans to collect the relevant information in future; and if she will make a statement.

The number of children with special education needs or a disability taking up the 30 hour’ entitlement will be collected in the January 2018 Early Years Census and published in the ‘Education provision: children under 5 years of age’ statistical first release in June/July 2018.

We do not collect data on whether parents are applying for 30 hours for a child with special educational needs or a disability because it is not part of the eligibility criteria. This means we are unable to identify which codes have been issued or validated for parents of children with special educational needs or a disability.

23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) childminders and (b) group-based childcare settings rated good or outstanding by Ofsted have withdrawn from the Early Years Register in each month of the last three years.

Ofsted is the non-ministerial government department responsible for the regulation of early education and childcare providers. They publish a regular series of statistics relating to early years’ providers, which can be viewed from this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted/about/statistics.

I have informed Ofsted of these two questions and Her Majesty's Chief Inspector will be writing to the hon. Member in response. A copy of that letter will be placed in the libraries of the House.

23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) childminders and (b) group-based childcare settings rated good or outstanding by Ofsted have joined the Early Years Register in each month of the last three years.

Ofsted is the non-ministerial government department responsible for the regulation of early education and childcare providers. They publish a regular series of statistics relating to early years’ providers, which can be viewed from this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted/about/statistics.

I have informed Ofsted of these two questions and Her Majesty's Chief Inspector will be writing to the hon. Member in response. A copy of that letter will be placed in the libraries of the House.