Attorney General

The Attorney General’s Office (AGO) provides legal advice and support to the Attorney General and the Solicitor General (the Law Officers) who give legal advice to government. The AGO helps the Law Officers perform other duties in the public interest, such as looking at sentences which may be too low.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

Suella Braverman
Attorney General

 Portrait

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Labour
Emily Thornberry (LAB - Islington South and Finsbury)
Shadow Attorney General

Liberal Democrat
Lord Thomas of Gresford (LDEM - Life peer)
Liberal Democrat Shadow Attorney General

Plaid Cymru
Liz Saville Roberts (PC - Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Shadow PC Spokesperson (Attorney General)

Scottish National Party
Angela Crawley (SNP - Lanark and Hamilton East)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Attorney General)
Scheduled Event
Thursday 26th May 2022
Attorney General
Oral questions - Main Chamber
Attorney General
View calendar
Scheduled Event
Thursday 7th July 2022
Attorney General
Oral questions - Main Chamber
Attorney General
View calendar
Debates
Wednesday 9th February 2022
Select Committee Docs
None available
Select Committee Inquiry
None available
Written Answers
Tuesday 17th May 2022
Northern Ireland Protocol
To ask the Attorney General, what legal advice has she received on the Government’s proposals to adjust or remove the …
Secondary Legislation
Wednesday 30th March 2022
Fylde (Electoral Changes) Order 2022
This Order makes changes to electoral arrangements for the borough of Fylde following recommendations made by the Local Government Boundary …
Bills
None available
Dept. Publications
Friday 13th May 2022
12:28
Sentence increased for crossbow shooter
News and Communications
Treaty
None available

Attorney General Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Apr. 28
Oral Questions
Sep. 25
Urgent Questions
Oct. 07
Westminster Hall
Oct. 05
Adjournment Debate
View All Attorney General Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Attorney General does not have Bills currently before Parliament


Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament

Attorney General has not passed any Acts during the 2019 Parliament

Attorney General - Secondary Legislation

This Order makes changes to electoral arrangements for the borough of Tameside following recommendations made by the Local Government Boundary Commission for England. The area of the borough remains unchanged.
This Order makes changes to electoral arrangements for the borough of Fylde following recommendations made by the Local Government Boundary Commission for England. The area of the borough remains unchanged.
View All Attorney General Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
Petition Open
53 Signatures
(2 in the last 7 days)
Petitions with most signatures
Petition Open
53 Signatures
(2 in the last 7 days)
Attorney General has not participated in any petition debates
View All Attorney General Petitions

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

12th May 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what legal advice has she received on the Government’s proposals to adjust or remove the Northern Ireland Protocol.

It is a longstanding convention, accepted by governments of all parties, not to disclose whether the Attorney General has given legal advice or the contents of any advice. This extends to not commenting on the content of internal discussions in relation to the Attorney General’s function as a Law Officer and chief legal adviser to the Government. This convention protects the Law Officers’ ability to give full and frank legal advice on some of the most contentious and difficult issues the Government will be considering.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th May 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what proportion of total reported fraud cases have fallen under the remit of (a) the Serious Fraud Office and (b) other law enforcement agencies over the last twelve month period for which figures are available.

Neither of the Law Officers Department’s responsible for prosecuting fraud cases, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) and the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), hold data requested. Reported crime data is collated and held by the Home Office.

The SFO receives approximately 1,200 referrals of alleged criminality every year. These range in seriousness and come from a variety of sources, including the public, whistle-blowers and corporate referrals.

Every referral received is researched and/or assessed to help determine if it is a matter that the SFO should investigate.

The SFO only takes on only the most complex fraud and bribery cases. Should a referral not meet the reasonable suspicion threshold and the Director’s Statement of Principle, it may be referred to another law enforcement agency or discontinued.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th May 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what the estimated value of fraud reported to the Serious Fraud Office has been in each of the last ten years.

The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) does not hold the data on the estimated value of fraud reported to the Office over the last 10 years.

Referrals received by the SFO, whilst alleging crime, often do not provide an estimate of loss or actual loss reported. Identifying the true value of reported fraud requires investigation.

The SFO is committed to supporting the victims of fraud, bribery or corruption.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th May 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many reports of (a) serious or complex fraud, (b) bribery and (c) corruption, as defined within the remit of the Serious Fraud Office, there have been in each of the last ten years.

The SFO receives approximately 1,200 referrals of alleged criminality every year. These range in seriousness and come from a variety of sources, including the public, whistle-blowers and corporate referrals.

Every referral received is researched and/or assessed to help determine if it is a matter that the SFO should investigate.

The SFO only takes on only the most complex fraud and bribery cases. Should a referral not meet the reasonable suspicion threshold and the Director’s Statement of Principle, it may be referred to another law enforcement agency or discontinued.

The Serious Fraud Office does not hold data on reported fraud cases to other law enforcement agencies.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what is the status under UK law of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe's (a) 2016 and (b) conviction by the Revolutionary Court in Iran.

A determination of the status in UK law of the findings of courts in foreign jurisdictions is a matter for the UK courts, as and when the need arises for such a determination in domestic proceedings.

The Government is delighted that after years of detention, Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe is safely home and has been reunited with her family and loved ones.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many CPS (a) staff and (b) prosecutors work in the Serious Economic, Organised Crime and International Directorate as of 19 April 2022; and how many of those staff work primarily on issues of (i) international justice and organised crime, (ii) special crime and counter terrorism and (ii) fraud.

In April 2022, The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) launched a new Serious Economic, Organised Crime and International Directorate (SEOCID) which brings together specialists in economic crime, organised crime, proceeds of crime and international to deliver justice, combat crime across borders and take money from criminals.

This combined team of specialists will continue to work closely with investigators to disrupt the emerging threats of organised criminal gangs using cyber technology to exploit people, businesses, and the Government. Victims of complex SEOCID cases are often based in multiple jurisdictions. The directorate will work to improve their experience by ensuring investigators and prosecutors work closely and have a joint victim and witness strategy from the outset.

Establishing the new Serious Economic, Organised Crime and International Directorate is part of the CPS Economic Crime Strategy 2025.

The number of staff and prosecutors can be found in the table below:

Department

Head Count

FTE

HC of Prosecutors

FTE of Prosecutors

SERIOUS ECONOMIC ORGANISED CRIME INTERNATIONAL (SEOCID)

394

372.38

186.00

177.65

SPECIAL CRIME AND COUNTER TERRORISM DIVISION

146

140.29

69.00

67.10

Grand Total

540

512.66

255.00

244.76

NB: The data has been extracted from the CPS Oracle HR database and is accurate at point of enquiry on 21 April 2022. Consequent changes to data input may mean that this data will change at some point in the future.

*The system reports data as at the last day of the month rather than the first or any date in-between therefore the table is presented to the nearest reportable date to the questions asked.

*FTE figures have been rounded

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of full time equivalent civil service staff employed by the Crown Prosecution Service was in each financial year between 2010-11 and 2021-22.

The number of staff employed by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) during the periods specified is available in the table below. The data provided includes all staff grades full time equivalent averaged across each year. During this period the CPS has undertaken continuous improvement and modernisation programmes to improve efficiency and effectiveness. These included digitalisation, development of a national resourcing model, standard operating practices, resource efficiency measures, smarter/remote working practices, and establishment of remote teams. As a national service for England and Wales, the consequence of these measures is that we now have the ability to shift work to where capacity resides which is both much more efficient, and also fairer on the workforce.

Financial Year

Average Full Time Equivalent Staff

2010/11

7797

2011/12

7214

2012/13

6894

2013/14

6341

2014/15

5939

2015/16

5541

2016/17

5468

2017/18

5517

2018/19

5493

2019/20

5577

2020/21

5943

2021/22

6406

NB: The data has been extracted from the CPS Oracle HR database and is accurate at point of enquiry on 21 April 2022. Consequent changes to data input may mean that this data will change at some point in the future.

*The system reports data as at the last day of the month rather than the first or any date in-between therefore the table is presented to the nearest reportable date to the questions asked.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of full time equivalent civil service staff employed by the (a) Government Legal Department and (b)Treasury Solicitor’s Office was in each financial year between 2010-11 and 2021-22.

The average number of whole-time equivalent persons employed during each financial year (for which data is available) in the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) and Government Legal Department (GLD) is as follows.

Attorney General’s Office:

Financial Year

Total

Permanent Staff

Others

Ministers

2010-11

(Data not held)*

2011-12

40

2012-13

44

40

2

2

2013-14

42

40

2

2014-15

40

38

2

2015-16

40

38

2

2016-17

40

38

2

2017-18

44

42

2

2018-19

46

39

5

2

2019-20

49

47

2

2020-21

50

46

2

2

Treasury Solicitor’s Office (from 2010-11 to 2014-15 inclusive) and Government Legal Department (from 2015-16 to 2020-21 inclusive):

Financial Year

Total

Permanent Staff

Others

2010-11

(Data not held)*

2011-12

987

2012-13

1,046

927

119

2013-14

1,283

1,090

193

2014-15

1,667

1,426

241

2015-16

1,838

1,663

175

2016-17

1,862

1,657

205

2017-18

2,157

1,905

252

2018-19

2,362

1,998

364

2019-20

2,519

2,196

323

2020-21

2,605

2,166

439

It is important to note that several legal advisory units from departments across the civil service were incorporated into the Treasury Solicitor’s Department (TSol) and GLD account for the majority of staffing increases in the years preceding and succeeding the name change from TSol to GLD on 1 April 2015.

* The earliest Annual Report available in which these figures are published, is for the 2012-13 financial year, which also included a total whole-time equivalent figure for TSol and AGO for 2011-12.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of full time equivalent civil service staff employed in the Attorney General‘s Office was in each financial year between 2010-11 and 2021-22.

The average number of whole-time equivalent persons employed during each financial year (for which data is available) in the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) and Government Legal Department (GLD) is as follows.

Attorney General’s Office:

Financial Year

Total

Permanent Staff

Others

Ministers

2010-11

(Data not held)*

2011-12

40

2012-13

44

40

2

2

2013-14

42

40

2

2014-15

40

38

2

2015-16

40

38

2

2016-17

40

38

2

2017-18

44

42

2

2018-19

46

39

5

2

2019-20

49

47

2

2020-21

50

46

2

2

Treasury Solicitor’s Office (from 2010-11 to 2014-15 inclusive) and Government Legal Department (from 2015-16 to 2020-21 inclusive):

Financial Year

Total

Permanent Staff

Others

2010-11

(Data not held)*

2011-12

987

2012-13

1,046

927

119

2013-14

1,283

1,090

193

2014-15

1,667

1,426

241

2015-16

1,838

1,663

175

2016-17

1,862

1,657

205

2017-18

2,157

1,905

252

2018-19

2,362

1,998

364

2019-20

2,519

2,196

323

2020-21

2,605

2,166

439

It is important to note that several legal advisory units from departments across the civil service were incorporated into the Treasury Solicitor’s Department (TSol) and GLD account for the majority of staffing increases in the years preceding and succeeding the name change from TSol to GLD on 1 April 2015.

* The earliest Annual Report available in which these figures are published, is for the 2012-13 financial year, which also included a total whole-time equivalent figure for TSol and AGO for 2011-12.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what steps her Department is taking to increase prosecution rates for fraud.

Tackling Fraud is a top priority for this government and requires a sophisticated multi-agency approach, coordinating with domestic and international partners. As prosecuting agencies, both the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) and the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) play a vital part in that response.

Last year the CPS published its first ever Economic Crime Strategy, which affirms its commitment to improve criminal justice outcomes in this area and support victims. In the year ending September 2021, the CPS prosecuted 7,609 defendants, in cases where Fraud and Forgery was recorded as the principal offence. The conviction rate was 84.9%.

Taking into account judicial resolutions such as DPAs, the SFO’s successful judicial outcomes rate is 85% by case and 50% by defendant over the past four financial years [2018/19 – 2021/22].

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
6th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer from Lord Stewart of Dirleton on 1 December 2021 (HL4164), what assessment they have made of the effect waiting that over three years for a determination from the Crown Prosecution Service will have on the mental health of those accused of crimes.

Ensuring the timely delivery of justice and minimising delay is a key priority for the criminal justice system.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is committed to ensuring that the rights of the suspect and defendant are balanced with the rights of victims of crime, the seriousness of the offending, and the need to safeguard the public when considering each case on its own merits, as set out in the Code for Crown Prosecutors.

The CPS continue to work closely with criminal justice partners to ensure early engagement, proactive case management, robust case progression and effective and timely decision making.

Lord Stewart of Dirleton
Advocate General for Scotland
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much his Department spends on on communications staff on average each year.

On average the department spends £348,089.16 on communications staff. We have 7 staff dedicated to communications all of which are full time employees.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much her Department spends on communications staff on average each year.

On average the department spends £348,089.16 on communications staff. We have 7 staff dedicated to communications all of which are full time employees.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many communications staff in her Department are employed (a) full time, (b) part time and (c) under flexible working arrangements.

On average the department spends £348,089.16 on communications staff. We have 7 staff dedicated to communications all of which are full time employees.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many CPS prosecutions there have been to date for the theft of goods by customers from retail and wholesale premises that took place in the financial years (a) 2017/18 and (b) 2020/21.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a central record of prosecutions for thefts from retail or wholesale premises. This information could only be obtained by an examination of CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

While the CPS does not centrally collate data showing the number of people prosecuted for thefts from shops, data is available showing the number of offences of shop theft, charged by way of Section 1 of the Theft Act 1968, in which a prosecution commenced at magistrates’ courts. The table below provides this information for the years 2017-18 and 2020-21.

2017-2018

2020-2021

Theft Act 1968 {1(1) and 7} - Theft from shops

101,435

47,601

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

The figures relate to the number of offences and not the number of individual defendants. It may be the case that an individual defendant is charged with more than one offence. No data are held on the final outcome or if the charged offence was the substantive charge at finalisation.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many CPS prosecutions there have been as of 30 March 2022 for assaults and threats against shop workers and owners that took place in the financial years (a) 2017-18 and (b) 2020-21.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a central record of prosecutions based on the occupation of complainants, including shopworkers who were assaulted or threatened. This information could only be obtained by an examination of CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, with reference to the Public Sector Apprenticeships Target, how many apprentices were employed in (a) her office, (b) the Government Legal Department, and (c) the Crown Prosecution Service in the financial year 2021-22; and what proportion of the overall workforce did that represent in each case.

The Attorney General Office are working with the Government Legal Department and Crown Prosecution Service to finalise data on apprenticeships for 2021/22. Final figures are not yet available. The Cabinet Office, on behalf of the Civil Service, will be publishing a full breakdown of departmental performance on apprenticeships in the Autumn in line with previous years.

Data for all departments between 2017 and 2021 is available on gov.uk and shows the Attorney Generals departments recruited 278 apprentices, equivalent to 3.2% during 2020/21.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what discussions she had with relevant stakeholders prior to implementing the recent changes to the Crown Prosecution Service Director’s Guidance on Charging.

The Director’s Guidance on Charging is issued by the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) under section 37A of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984. The current version of the Director’s Guidance is the sixth version of Guidance that was first published in 2004.

The Director’s Guidance recognises the significant changes in the way that cases are investigated, charged, and prosecuted since the last edition was published in 2013.

Those changes include, in particular, the provisions of the 8th Edition of the Code for Crown Prosecutors published in October 2018, the Attorney General’s Guidelines on Disclosure 2020 and the revised Codes of Practice issued in 2020 under the Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996​.

The CPS consulted police forces through the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) on the contents of the Director’s Guidance before its publication in December 2020. That consultation included the sharing of initial drafts with all police forces via the NPCC, Police and Crime Commissioners and the Senior Presiding Judge. That was followed by the establishment of a joint CPS/police working group to discuss and where appropriate amend the Director’s Guidance. A further period of consultation followed with the police before it was finalised and the DPP also personally addressed all Chief Constables directly about the changes being made in version 6 of the Director’s Guidance at an event held by the NPCC in November 2020.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to a US appeals court overturning the conviction on 28 January of two Deutsche Bank traders accused of manipulating Libor rates, what plans, if any, they have to review the processes around investigating such offences in the UK.

The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) is a specialist prosecuting authority tackling the top level of serious or complex fraud, bribery, and corruption.

In 2012, the SFO commenced investigations into Libor manipulation which resulted in nine individuals – all holding significant positions in their respective banks – either pleading guilty or found guilty by a jury.

Many of these convictions have been reviewed by the Court of Appeal and none of them have been overturned.

Lord Stewart of Dirleton
Advocate General for Scotland
24th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, whether the Secretary of State for Transport has requested her advice on the legality of the dismissals by P&O Ferries in March 2022.

By convention, whether the Law Officers have been asked to provide advice, and the contents of any such advice, is not disclosed outside Government.

The Convention protects the Law Officers’ ability as chief legal advisers to the Government to give full and frank legal advice, and provides the fullest guarantee that government business will be conducted at all times in light of thorough and candid legal advice.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what recent discussions she has had with the Serious Fraud Office on victims of fraud; and what steps she is taking to help ensure that victims of fraud are compensated accordingly.

I meet regularly with the Director of the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) to discuss casework and corporate matters, including issues connected to victims of crime and compensation.

The SFO always aims to trace and seize money and other assets from criminals in all of its fraud, bribery and corruption cases, so that criminals do not benefit from their offending and victims can be compensated wherever possible.

The SFO continues to perform well in this regard and its proceeds of crime recovery rate was higher than all comparable UK agencies in three of the last four years. Last year, the SFO recovered the fourth highest amount in value out of 180 agencies across England and Wales, after HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC), the Metropolitan Police and the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), all of which are much larger organisations. Its success in recovering the proceeds of crime and the work of its Witness Care Team in supporting victims – sometimes totalling thousands in a single case – and witnesses were also positively recognised in two HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI) inspection reports published in the past year.

Internationally, the SFO recently obtained £210,610 in compensation as a result of its investigation into Amec Foster Wheeler Energy Limited. The funds will be transferred by the UK Government to the Federal Government of Nigeria, and will support key infrastructure projects, ensuring that the people of Nigeria benefit directly.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
18th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what the (a) total number and (b) proportion of prosecutions of each type of crime in each (i) region and (ii) local justice area of England and Wales is that have stopped post-charge because a victim did not provide evidence or has withdrawn in each of the last five years.

The total number and proportion of prosecutions for cases that have stopped post-charge because a victim did not provide evidence or has withdrawn, is not publicly available for each crime type by region and local justice area of England and Wales, in the format that has been requested. Figures for victim attrition for all crime by region are included in the local criminal justice scorecards, which can be found at www.criminal-justice-scorecard.justice.gov.uk/.This shows that the percentage of prosecutions that are stopped post-charge because a victim did not provide evidence or has withdrawn ranges from 11% in South West to 26% in North East in Q3 2021.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
21st Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many domestic abuse prosecutors have been newly trained in the Crown Prosecution Service in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

The Government is focused on delivering justice for victims of domestic abuse including through providing training resources to new prosecutors. Since November 2019, when figures became available, 568 prosecutors have attended instructor-led domestic abuse training as part of their induction programme to the CPS. Additionally, between 2017 and March 2022 online self-guided domestic abuse training courses were accessed on 6,184 occasions.

To support prosecutors outside of training, the CPS publishes Legal Guidance on Domestic Abuse which can be accessed at any time (https://www.cps.gov.uk/legal-guidance/domestic-abuse).

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
21st Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to her Answer of 28 February 2022 to Question 128272, on Fraud: Criminal Investigation, how many prosecutions for fraud and forgery were dropped in each (a) region of the country and (b) local justice area in each of the last five years.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) maintains a central record of the number of defendants whose prosecution was dropped where the Principal Offence Category allocated at finalisation was Fraud and Forgery. This information can be further disaggregated to show the number in each CPS Area and further into each Local Criminal Justice Area.

The tables below show the number of defendants allocated the Principal Offence of Fraud and Forgery whose prosecution was dropped during each of the last five years.

(a) Fraud and Forgery Prosecutions Dropped in each CPS Regional Area

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

Cymru Wales

60

44

62

56

32

Eastern

82

47

54

41

47

East Midlands

92

78

89

76

80

London North

172

124

118

109

78

London South

201

163

135

113

79

Merseyside & Cheshire

38

44

80

82

55

North East

61

70

47

33

31

North West

59

75

72

48

31

South East

76

53

55

41

35

South West

49

43

39

28

45

Thames and Chiltern

72

74

75

48

31

Wessex

51

32

79

98

67

West Midlands

161

154

149

93

95

Yorkshire & Humberside

92

85

79

69

68

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

The table above excludes prosecutions dealt with by the central specialist casework teams.

(b) Fraud and Forgery Prosecutions Dropped in each Criminal Justice Area

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

Avon & Somerset

20

12

22

14

20

Cambridgeshire

8

5

14

7

11

Cheshire

10

21

13

15

11

Cleveland and Durham

23

22

20

11

17

Cumbria

6

4

7

6

3

Derbyshire

27

15

21

19

22

Devon & Cornwall

21

24

14

10

16

Dorset

10

8

6

7

8

Dyfed-Powys

9

5

6

4

3

East Midlands

63

63

68

51

58

Essex

47

30

16

14

20

Gloucestershire

7

7

3

4

9

Greater Manchester

35

48

38

25

14

Gwent

11

4

9

10

0

Hampshire

28

18

25

23

7

Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire

37

34

48

25

14

Humberside

12

11

16

15

18

Kent

31

21

19

18

14

Lancashire

17

24

28

16

19

London

397

302

274

248

156

Merseyside

30

21

25

22

12

Norfolk and Suffolk

24

13

20

18

17

North Wales

15

8

13

12

6

North Yorkshire

17

10

10

8

9

Northumbria

37

48

32

22

14

South Wales

29

27

27

9

15

South Yorkshire

18

20

28

11

13

Staffordshire

22

26

16

5

8

Surrey

29

14

18

7

14

Sussex

18

15

15

15

7

Thames Valley

38

39

27

21

16

Warwickshire

19

8

5

4

3

West Mercia

16

23

29

14

9

West Midlands

47

39

30

18

22

West Yorkshire

45

47

38

33

29

Wiltshire

9

7

12

3

6

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

The table above excludes prosecutions originating from other investigatory authorities such as the Department of Work and Pensions or HM Revenue and Customs.

The Fraud and Forgery category includes offences created by the Fraud Act 2006, forgery or copying false instruments, bribery, money laundering, bankruptcy offences and cheating the public revenue. It is not possible to separately report prosecution outcomes by the individual offences allocated to this category.

During the last five years, the CPS has prosecuted 67,817 defendants for fraud and forgery offences and convictions have been obtained against 58,671 (86.5%) of these defendants.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
18th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, if she will publish the joint statement she signed with Ukraine’s Prosecutor General Iryna Venediktova on UK support in holding Russia accountable for the crimes that it is committing on Ukrainian soil.

The Memorandum of Cooperation signed by the Attorney General and the Ukrainian Prosecutor General was published on Gov.uk on the 13th of March 2022.

The Memorandum is available here.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
16th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the unduly lenient sentence scheme in relation to the offences of (a) death by dangerous driving and (b) driving under the influence.

Each eligible case in which a review of sentence is sought is considered personally by the Law Officers with the utmost care, to decide whether there are proper grounds to make a referral to the Court of Appeal. ‘Eligible’ means no more than 28 days have elapsed since the sentence and the offence is within the unduly lenient sentence scheme. The offence of death by dangerous driving is within the scheme; the offence of driving while under the influence of drink or drugs is not. Last year the Law Officers referred eight sentences passed in cases of death by dangerous driving to the Court of Appeal; four were increased. The decision whether to increase a sentence is a matter for the independent judiciary.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
16th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, on what occasions officials in her Department met with Treasury ministers or officials between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy- près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

There have been no Ministerial-level meetings (either Minister-Minister or Minister-Officials) between the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) and Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT) between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy-près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

The AGO does not hold official records of any meetings at official level between AGO and HMT between the 1st of January 2017 and the 16th of March 2022.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
16th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, on what occasions the Solicitor General or his predecessors met with Treasury ministers or officials between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy- près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

There have been no Ministerial-level meetings (either Minister-Minister or Minister-Officials) between the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) and Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT) between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy-près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

The AGO does not hold official records of any meetings at official level between AGO and HMT between the 1st of January 2017 and the 16th of March 2022.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
16th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, on what occasions she or her predecessors met with Treasury ministers or officials between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy-près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

There have been no Ministerial-level meetings (either Minister-Minister or Minister-Officials) between the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) and Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT) between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy-près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

The AGO does not hold official records of any meetings at official level between AGO and HMT between the 1st of January 2017 and the 16th of March 2022.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
15th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment she has made of the impact of increased homeworking during the covid-19 outbreak on her Department’s carbon footprint.

The Government is committed to making its estate and operations more sustainable and resilient, through the Greening Government Commitments. These commitments are reported on every quarter. As a very small department, the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) does not have bespoke plans to transition to Net Zero, however, we do engage with the Government Property Agency (GPA), who are responsible for the AGO estate in 102 Petty France, on any improvements to the estate.

The AGO does not hold any information on its carbon footprint and therefore has not carried out any assessment on the impact of home working.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what steps her Department is taking to measure its carbon footprint.

The Government is committed to making its estate and operations more sustainable and resilient, through the Greening Government Commitments. These commitments are reported on every quarter. As a very small department, the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) does not have bespoke plans to transition to Net Zero, however, we do engage with the Government Property Agency (GPA), who are responsible for the AGO estate in 102 Petty France, on any improvements to the estate.

The AGO does not hold any information on its carbon footprint and therefore has not carried out any assessment on the impact of home working.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, whether her Department has published a plan setting out the steps it plans to take to transition to net zero emissions.

The Government is committed to making its estate and operations more sustainable and resilient, through the Greening Government Commitments. These commitments are reported on every quarter. As a very small department, the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) does not have bespoke plans to transition to Net Zero, however, we do engage with the Government Property Agency (GPA), who are responsible for the AGO estate in 102 Petty France, on any improvements to the estate.

The AGO does not hold any information on its carbon footprint and therefore has not carried out any assessment on the impact of home working.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
9th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, whether a senior manager in her Department has been given the portfolio for leading on departmental sustainability.

The Government is committed to making its estate and operations more sustainable and resilient, through the Greening Government Commitments. These commitments are reported on every quarter. As a very small department, the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) does not have bespoke plans to transition to Net Zero, however, we do engage with the Government Property Agency (GPA), who are responsible for the AGO estate in 102 Petty France, on any improvements to the estate.

The AGO does not hold any information on its carbon footprint and therefore has not carried out any assessment on the impact of home working.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment her Department has made of the potential cost to Secretary of State for Justice's Department of the Crown Prosecution Service converting a broader background of lawyers into solicitors via the Prosecutors Pathway Programme.

The Prosecutor Pathway Programme provides a unique career and development route for our people into the legal profession and ultimately that of a qualified criminal lawyer trained and suitable for deployment in the role of Crown Prosecutor. This sponsored programme seeks to promote development opportunity for those who might otherwise have been unable to consider a career in law due to socio-economic, cultural, or early life opportunities and assure an inclusive and diverse profession for the future.

The Crown Prosecution Service has not made any assessment of the potential cost to the Secretary of State for Justice’s Department through its use of the Prosecutor Pathway Programme.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, whether her Department has implemented a training programme to provide civil servants with skills to support its transition to net zero.

The new Government Curriculum will include modules on the implications of Net Zero, climate change and wider environmental issues and will be piloted from April 2022. Thereafter, the Government Skills and Curriculum Unit will look at tailored provision for specific Functions and Professions and will signpost resources and training on Net Zero across all Government Departments which will be available to civil servants in the Attorney General’s Office (AGO).

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many cases at Crown Courts have been discontinued in the last 12 months as a result of the lack of a prosecuting barrister.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a central record of the number of cases dropped/discontinued at the Crown Court due to the lack of a prosecuting barrister. This information could only be obtained by an examination of CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much her Department spent in total on social media advertising in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022 as of 28 February 2022; and on which platforms that money was spent.

The Attorney General’s Office uses the free subscription services only on departmental social media accounts and therefore has had a nil spend on social media advertising.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, which of the Crown Prosecution Service's dedicated divisions for (a) international justice and organised crime, (b) special crime and counter terrorism and (c) specialist fraud will be responsible for prosecuting the new offences that will be established in the Economic Crime (Transparency and Enforcement) Bill.

In March 2021, the CPS launched its first ever Economic Crime Strategy to ensure we keep pace with the changing nature of crime. It is a high-level strategy which allows the flexibility to respond and adapt to new and emerging threats.

The CPS currently has a dedicated Specialist Fraud Division with specialist prosecutors to ensure it has the right skills and resources to prosecute complex economic crime cases, ranging from the prosecution of bankers and investment scams, to the prosecution of those who seek to defraud the taxpayer of millions of pounds.

With effect from the 1 April 2022, a new Serious Economic, Organised Crime and International Directorate will be launched, merging the Specialist Fraud Division and the International Justice and Organised Crime Division. This new directorate will provide more resilience and will be responsible for prosecuting the new offences established in the Economic Crime (Transparency and Enforcement) Bill.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment she has made of (a) the current capacity available and (b) the additional resources required for the Crown Prosecution Service to prosecute the new offences that will be established in the Economic Crime (Transparency and Enforcement) Bill.

In March 2021, the CPS launched its first ever Economic Crime Strategy to ensure we keep pace with the changing nature of crime. It is a high-level strategy which allows the flexibility to respond and adapt to new and emerging threats.

The CPS currently has a dedicated Specialist Fraud Division with specialist prosecutors to ensure it has the right skills and resources to prosecute complex economic crime cases, ranging from the prosecution of bankers and investment scams, to the prosecution of those who seek to defraud the taxpayer of millions of pounds.

With effect from the 1 April 2022, a new Serious Economic, Organised Crime and International Directorate will be launched, merging the Specialist Fraud Division and the International Justice and Organised Crime Division. This new directorate will provide more resilience and will be responsible for prosecuting the new offences established in the Economic Crime (Transparency and Enforcement) Bill.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many offences have been recorded under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 in each year since 2015; and how many of those offences led to a (a) prosecution and (b) conviction.

Data on the number of offences recorded under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 is captured in police recorded crime data and this information is available from the Home Office. The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not hold recorded crime data and therefore it is not possible to say how many recorded offences subsequently resulted in a prosecution or conviction.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, if he will provide a list of (a) professional staff networks and (b) social clubs operating within his Department; and if he will provide the (i) budgets and (ii) FTE staff time allocated to each group within each of the last three years.

The Attorney Gerneral’s Office does not have any professional staff networks or social clubs operating within the department.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
2nd Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, whether she plans to implement the recommendations from the Criminal Justice Joint Inspection into the police and CPS's response to rape post-charge in full; what her timetable is for implementing those recommendations; and if she will make a statement.

The CPS has welcomed the recent Criminal Justice Joint Inspection (CJJI) report on how well the criminal justice system serves survivors of rape and has largely accepted all the recommendations within it that relate directly to their work. They will use the report’s findings and recommendations to further inform their response to rape prosecutions and to build on the significant work undertaken so far, which has focussed on the following three main areas of work:
  • better collaboration with the police from the very start of an investigation, taking an offender-centric approach to case-building;
  • supporting prosecutors and expanding the size of specialist units so that they are properly resourced to respond to these challenging and complex cases; and
  • improving the support given to victims, and recognising the trauma they experience.
On the timeframes for implementing the two recommendations relating to communicating with victims, the CPS has already commenced a vital programme of work to improve how they communicate with victims. As part of this, the CPS has commissioned crucial research into victims’ needs to understand what victims need and want, so the CPS can serve them better. This research is part of a fundamental review into how the CPS can improve communication with victims. Although this three-phased programme is underway, the CPS will require time to complete it, to ensure that it fundamentally improves the quality of communication with victims. The CPS’s full response to the report and its recommendations can be found here.
Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, if she will (a) list the spending programmes her Department devolves for administration to local government in England and other local spending bodies and (b) specify the value for each programme for every year for which budgets are agreed.

The Attorney General’s Office does not have individual spending programmes which are devolved to local government or other local spending bodies.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
25th Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, if she will take steps to ensure that her Department and its agencies remove all internal covid-19 related policies, restrictions and mask mandates.

Throughout the pandemic, all Civil Service employers including the Attorney General’s Office (AGO), Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) Serious Fraud Office (SFO), Government Legal Department (GLD) and Her Majesties Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI) have followed government guidance in setting out their internal COVID-19 related policies. This includes complying with the Working Safely during Coronavirus (COVID-19): Guidance which sets out the key actions organisations should take to protect employees and customers in order to reduce the risk of COVID-19 spreading in workplaces, along with carrying out health and safety risk assessments that include the ongoing risk from COVID-19.

The Government’s recent Living with COVID-19 document, sets out how and when the remaining restrictions will be lifted in England. Government guidance was subsequently amended, including the Working Safely guidance. Which alongside risk assessments, sets out further actions organisations can take to protect employees and customers in the workplace, such as ensuring adequate ventilation, frequent cleaning and asking people with COVID-19 to stay home. The guidance advises that people continue to wear face coverings in crowded and enclosed settings where they come into contact with people they do not normally meet, when rates of transmission are high. Employers will continue to align their policies accordingly. Should individuals wish to wear masks as a matter of personal choice this should be respected.

In respect to the SFO estate, The Canadian High Commission (CHC), in their capacity as landlord, have requested SFO employees, contractors and visitors continue to wear face coverings in the common areas of 2 – 4 Cockspur Street. This includes the lobby, lifts, stairs, toilets, and reception.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many of the 1,109 convictions for rape recorded in the year ending March 2021 related to offences committed (a) before the year ending March 2018, (b) within the year 2018-19, and (c) within the year 2019-20.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a central record of the date an offence was committed. This information could only be obtained by an examination of CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many Deferred Prosecution Agreements the Serious Fraud Office signed between 25 April and 31 December 2013.

Between the 25th of April and the 31st of December 2013, no Deferred Prosecution Agreements (DPAs) were signed by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), as DPAs were only introduced on 24th of February 2014, under the provisions of Schedule 17 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013. Since then, the SFO has entered into a total of 12 DPAs.

During the period of the 25th of April 2013 and the 13th of December 2013, 9 SFO led prosecutions resulted in a conviction. All of these were brought against individuals. There were no prosecutions brought against corporate entities during this period.

Detailed information regarding SFO prosecutions and DPAs can be found on their website: https://www.sfo.gov.uk/.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions led by the Serious Fraud Office led to convictions against (a) corporate entities and (b) individuals between 25 April and 31 December 2013.

Between the 25th of April and the 31st of December 2013, no Deferred Prosecution Agreements (DPAs) were signed by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), as DPAs were only introduced on 24th of February 2014, under the provisions of Schedule 17 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013. Since then, the SFO has entered into a total of 12 DPAs.

During the period of the 25th of April 2013 and the 13th of December 2013, 9 SFO led prosecutions resulted in a conviction. All of these were brought against individuals. There were no prosecutions brought against corporate entities during this period.

Detailed information regarding SFO prosecutions and DPAs can be found on their website: https://www.sfo.gov.uk/.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many Deferred Prosecution Agreements the Serious Fraud Office signed in each year since 2010.

Since Deferred Prosecution Agreements (DPAs) were introduced in 2014, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has signed a total of 12. The table below provides details of the number of DPAs signed each year since their introduction in 2014.

Year

2015

2016

2017

2019

2020

2021

Total

DPAs signed

1

1

2

2

3

3

12

Since 2010, 122 SFO led prosecutions have resulted in a conviction. The table below provides details of the number of prosecutions that led to a conviction in each year since 2010, and whether these relate to a corporate entity or an individual.

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

total

Corporate

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

8

Individuals

1

8

20

14

17

5

9

12

19

5

2

2

114

Total

2

8

20

14

18

6

10

13

20

5

2

4

122

In 2022, the SFO is taking forward 7 trials, involving 20 defendants charged against a total of 80 counts. The high volume of trials taking place this year is in part a result of trials not being able to go ahead during the pandemic.

Detailed information regarding SFO prosecutions and DPAs can be found on their website: https://www.sfo.gov.uk/.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions led by the Serious Fraud Office led to convictions against (a) corporate entities and (b) individuals in each year since 2010.

Since Deferred Prosecution Agreements (DPAs) were introduced in 2014, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has signed a total of 12. The table below provides details of the number of DPAs signed each year since their introduction in 2014.

Year

2015

2016

2017

2019

2020

2021

Total

DPAs signed

1

1

2

2

3

3

12

Since 2010, 122 SFO led prosecutions have resulted in a conviction. The table below provides details of the number of prosecutions that led to a conviction in each year since 2010, and whether these relate to a corporate entity or an individual.

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

total

Corporate

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

8

Individuals

1

8

20

14

17

5

9

12

19

5

2

2

114

Total

2

8

20

14

18

6

10

13

20

5

2

4

122

In 2022, the SFO is taking forward 7 trials, involving 20 defendants charged against a total of 80 counts. The high volume of trials taking place this year is in part a result of trials not being able to go ahead during the pandemic.

Detailed information regarding SFO prosecutions and DPAs can be found on their website: https://www.sfo.gov.uk/.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)