Toby Perkins Portrait

Toby Perkins

Labour - Chesterfield

Shadow Minister (Education)

(since April 2020)
2 APPG memberships (as of 15 Jun 2022)
Beer, Tennis
7 Former APPG memberships
East Midlands, Kurdistan Region in Iraq, Pub, Pubs, Rugby Union, Self-Employment and Freelancing, Small Shops
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Home Affairs Committee
8th May 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
International Trade Committee
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Minister (Defence)
18th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Business, Innovation and Skills)
7th Oct 2011 - 18th Sep 2015
Statutory Instruments (Joint Committee)
12th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Statutory Instruments (Select Committee)
12th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Minister (Education)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 2nd Nov 2010
Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 2nd Nov 2010


Department Event
Monday 19th September 2022
14:30
Department for Education
Oral questions - Main Chamber
19 Sep 2022, 2:30 p.m.
Education (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 29th June 2022
Northern Ireland Troubles (Legacy and Reconciliation) Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 151 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 191 Noes - 271
Speeches
Tuesday 28th June 2022
Women’s Rights to Reproductive Healthcare: United States
Rape victims, women facing a life-threatening ectopic pregnancy and children who are victims of sexual abuse are all among the …
Written Answers
Friday 1st July 2022
Higher Education: Student Numbers
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students started an undergraduate degree course at each higher education …
Early Day Motions
Monday 13th September 2021
Emma Raducanu, 2021 US Open women's champion
That this House is delighted, amazed and inspired by the performances of Emma Raducanu in winning the US Open without …
Bills
Wednesday 22nd May 2019
Unauthorised Encampments Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 13th December 2021
9. Family members employed and paid from parliamentary expenses
Until 16 April 2021, I employed my partner, Amanda Collumbine, as Executive Office Manager. (Registered 14 January 2020; updated 03 …
EDM signed
Thursday 24th March 2022
P&O Ferries and DP World
That this House condemns in the strongest possible terms the decision of P&O Ferries to fire 800 staff without notice …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Toby Perkins has voted in 453 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

20 Dec 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill - View Vote Context
Toby Perkins voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Labour Aye votes vs 162 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 358 Noes - 234
View All Toby Perkins Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Alex Burghart (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(128 debate interactions)
Andrew Gwynne (Labour)
Shadow Minister (Health and Social Care)
(38 debate interactions)
Matt Western (Labour)
Shadow Minister (Education)
(34 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Education
(322 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(43 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(34 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(34 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Toby Perkins's debates

Chesterfield Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

The Government should repeal breed specific provisions in dangerous dogs legislation. We believe these provisions are a flawed approach to public safety and an ethical failing with regards to animal welfare.

The Government should provide more funding for stalking advocates for victims of stalking. This would help support victims, and should also help the police to investigate cases more thoroughly, potentially helping prevent threats to life.


Latest EDMs signed by Toby Perkins

23rd March 2022
Toby Perkins signed this EDM on Thursday 24th March 2022

P&O Ferries and DP World

Tabled by: Karl Turner (Labour - Kingston upon Hull East)
That this House condemns in the strongest possible terms the decision of P&O Ferries to fire 800 staff without notice or consultation with their trade unions, the RMT and Nautilus; demands the immediate reinstatement of the sacked workers; condemns their replacement with agency workers earning as little as £1.80 per …
125 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Apr 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 94
Scottish National Party: 12
Liberal Democrat: 7
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Alba Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
23rd September 2021
Toby Perkins signed this EDM on Monday 25th October 2021

Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall

Tabled by: Afzal Khan (Labour - Manchester, Gorton)
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; notes that this memorial now includes over 150,000 hand-painted hearts to symbolise all those who lost their lives during the coronavirus pandemic; praises the work of Covid-19 Bereaved Families for …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Feb 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 97
Scottish National Party: 16
Liberal Democrat: 10
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Conservative: 4
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
View All Toby Perkins's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Toby Perkins, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Toby Perkins has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Toby Perkins has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Toby Perkins


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make it a criminal offence to demand money to vacate an unauthorised encampment; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 22nd May 2019
(Read Debate)

Toby Perkins has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


214 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if she will make an assessment of the implications for her policies of trends in the level of BAME Further Education (a) students and (b) college leaders.

Government is clear that all learners from all backgrounds must benefit from our education and training policies. Our latest FE trends participation data (August 2011 to July 2019) shows that whilst the total number of people in further education in England fell, during the same period, the percentage of people in further education from Asian, Black, Mixed, and Other ethnic groups increased from 19.3% to 22.6%.

We have exceeded our target to increase the proportion of apprentices from ethnic minority backgrounds starting apprenticeships. 14.3% of starts in 2020/21 were by people of Black Asian and Minority Ethnic backgrounds, compared to 13.3% in 2019/20. We continue to raise awareness in schools through our ASK programme to support young people into apprenticeships and The Apprenticeship Diversity Champions Network promotes diversity in apprenticeships including encouraging more from ethnic minorities into key sectors with historic under-representation.

We are supporting the largest-ever expansion of traineeships as part of the government’s Plan for Jobs to ensure that more young people have access to high-quality training. Since their introduction in the 2013/14 academic year (AY), the diversity record on traineeships has shown steady improvement, with around one third of starts being from ethnic minority backgrounds in 2020/21.

We also provide extra funding for colleges to support the most disadvantaged students with low prior attainment or living in deprived areas and provide learner support for disadvantaged students to help them overcome barriers to learning.

We have been working with a number of representative bodies in the Further Education sector to strengthen leadership and governance, including through greater diversity. We recognise the importance of having a diverse and representative workforce, and have funded the Education and Training Foundation to deliver a range of programmes designed to increase the diversity of leaders and managers. We have also committed to a new mandatory annual data collection in FE, which will uncover a large range of characteristics of the workforce, including ethnicity, which will provide a robust picture of the ethnic makeup of the workforce.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the House of Commons Commission, how many times each Member of Parliament has been successful in the Question Ballot and been called on in the Chamber or virtually in (a) Ministerial Statements, (b) Departmental Question sessions and (c) Urgent Questions since 16 April 2020.

The outcome of the 'shuffle' for oral questions for Ministers is published in Future Day Orals available on the day after the shuffle in question takes place. Information on the outcome in respect of individual Members during the period since 16 April 2020 is not held by the House of Commons Service and could be compiled only at disproportionate cost.

The calling of Members to ask supplementary questions during question time and to ask questions following an Urgent question or Ministerial statement is the responsibility of the Speaker of the House of Commons, and not within the responsibilities of the House of Commons Commission.

Pete Wishart
Shadow SNP Leader of the House of Commons
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will review the decision to award photography studios a £2,600 restart grant; and if he will allocate additional funds to local authorities so that a grant of £8,000 can be awarded to those studios.

The Restart Grants announced by my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer on 3 March 2021 are one-off grants to businesses in the non-essential retail, hospitality, leisure, personal care and accommodation sectors, to support businesses to reopen as Covid-19 restrictions are relaxed.

Strand One of the Restart Grants aims to support non-essential retail with grants of up to £6,000. Stand Two is to support hospitality, accommodation, leisure, personal care and gym businesses, with grants of up to £18,000. The higher amount is in recognition that these sectors will have been allowed to open at a later date and are likely to be more severely impacted by remaining restrictions.

The main service principle will determine which threshold of funding a business receives. Businesses will need to declare which is their main service. Local Authorities will need to exercise their reasonable judgement to determine whether or not a business is eligible for grants, and under which funding threshold, and be satisfied that they have taken reasonable and practicable steps to pay eligible businesses, and to pay them the correct amount.

Local Authorities in England have also been allocated £2bn in additional funding via the Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG), to provide essential support that best suits their area. The latest FAQs issued to Local Authorities on 6 May explain that ARG funding can be used as a top-up for businesses that are in receipt of grants under other schemes.

Further guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-restrictions-support-grants-lrsg-and-additional-restrictions-grant-arg-guidance-for-local-authorities.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department made of the potential effect of the decision on the level of coronavirus restart grant to be awarded to photography studios on the revenue of those studios in the context of the restrictions placed on their business as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Restart Grants announced by my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer on 3 March 2021 are one-off grants to businesses in the non-essential retail, hospitality, leisure, personal care and accommodation sectors, to support businesses to reopen as Covid-19 restrictions are relaxed.

Strand One of the Restart Grants aims to support non-essential retail with grants of up to £6,000. Stand Two is to support hospitality, accommodation, leisure, personal care and gym businesses, with grants of up to £18,000. The higher amount is in recognition that these sectors will have been allowed to open at a later date and are likely to be more severely impacted by remaining restrictions.

The main service principle will determine which threshold of funding a business receives. Businesses will need to declare which is their main service. Local Authorities will need to exercise their reasonable judgement to determine whether or not a business is eligible for grants, and under which funding threshold, and be satisfied that they have taken reasonable and practicable steps to pay eligible businesses, and to pay them the correct amount.

Local Authorities in England have also been allocated £2bn in additional funding via the Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG), to provide essential support that best suits their area. The latest FAQs issued to Local Authorities on 6 May explain that ARG funding can be used as a top-up for businesses that are in receipt of grants under other schemes.

Further guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-restrictions-support-grants-lrsg-and-additional-restrictions-grant-arg-guidance-for-local-authorities.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason photography studios are no longer in the leisure services category for covid-19 support grants.

The Restart Grants announced by my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer on 3 March 2021 are one-off grants to businesses in the non-essential retail, hospitality, leisure, personal care and accommodation sectors, to support businesses to reopen as Covid-19 restrictions are relaxed.

Strand One of the Restart Grants aims to support non-essential retail with grants of up to £6,000. Stand Two is to support hospitality, accommodation, leisure, personal care and gym businesses, with grants of up to £18,000. The higher amount is in recognition that these sectors will have been allowed to open at a later date and are likely to be more severely impacted by remaining restrictions.

The main service principle will determine which threshold of funding a business receives. Businesses will need to declare which is their main service. Local Authorities will need to exercise their reasonable judgement to determine whether or not a business is eligible for grants, and under which funding threshold, and be satisfied that they have taken reasonable and practicable steps to pay eligible businesses, and to pay them the correct amount.

Local Authorities in England have also been allocated £2bn in additional funding via the Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG), to provide essential support that best suits their area. The latest FAQs issued to Local Authorities on 6 May explain that ARG funding can be used as a top-up for businesses that are in receipt of grants under other schemes.

Further guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-restrictions-support-grants-lrsg-and-additional-restrictions-grant-arg-guidance-for-local-authorities.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many weighing and measuring products have already successfully transitioned from the EC weights and Measures directive to the UK CA directive in 2021.

The UKCA marking requirements came into force at 11pm on 31 December and apply to most products placed on the market in Great Britain (England, Wales and Scotland) that were previously subject to CE marking requirements. The scope of the UKCA regime covers approximately 10,000 to 17,000 manufacturers across industries and product sectors.

In order to help businesses to transition to the new marking requirements, in areas where GB and EU rules remain the same, products with the CE marking, but without the UKCA marking, will be accepted on the GB market until 1 January 2022 in most cases (so long as they meet the relevant regulatory requirements). Businesses are not required to report to Government when they have transitioned to the new UKCA regime.

The Government continues to engage closely with industry to ensure that the transition to the new regime is as smooth as possible.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of products that will need to undertake the EC to UK CA transition for weights and measures equipment in 2021.

The UKCA marking requirements came into force at 11pm on 31 December and apply to most products placed on the market in Great Britain (England, Wales and Scotland) that were previously subject to CE marking requirements. The scope of the UKCA regime covers approximately 10,000 to 17,000 manufacturers across industries and product sectors.

In order to help businesses to transition to the new marking requirements, in areas where GB and EU rules remain the same, products with the CE marking, but without the UKCA marking, will be accepted on the GB market until 1 January 2022 in most cases (so long as they meet the relevant regulatory requirements). Businesses are not required to report to Government when they have transitioned to the new UKCA regime.

The Government continues to engage closely with industry to ensure that the transition to the new regime is as smooth as possible.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many employees work for the National Measurement Office.

The National Measurement Office (NMO) is part of the Office for Product Safety and Standards which is a directorate within the Department. NMO is an Approved Body responsible for product certification, quality management system certification, pre-assessment, and standards calibration for weights and measures instruments. Of the civil servants working in OPSS, 15 FTE are currently engaged principally on NMO functions of whom around a half are engaged on work related to the transition of certificates.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 4 May 2020 to Question 40974, on Postal Services: Coronavirus, whether he plans to make representations to the Royal Mail on the timeframe for reversing the temporary suspension of the Universal Service Obligation.

Royal Mail’s services are playing an important part to help mitigate the impact of coronavirus on individuals, families and businesses up and down the country, particularly during this period of increased social isolation.

Following Royal Mail’s announcement on 28 April that it would be temporarily suspending Saturday letter deliveries, on 1 May it stated that six days a week letter deliveries will resume from 13 June.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of businesses that have (a) made applications for loans under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and (b) have received approval for those applications, broken down by each bank to which those businesses applied.

As of 21 April, over £2.8bn worth of loans have been issued under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, to over 16,600 businesses. Lenders have received 36,000 completed applications.

The information is not currently available broken down by each lender. We are working with the British Business Bank, HM Treasury and the lenders on providing transparent and regular data publication going forward.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support an increase in the number of local authorities providing electric charging points in their car parks.

The On-street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS) is a demand-led funding scheme which assists local authorities with the cost of installing chargepoints in residential streets including in local authority owned car parks. The funding available is for 75% of the capital costs of procuring and installing the chargepoint, and is administered by the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV). In October 2019, Secretary for State for Transport wrote to all local authorities encouraging them to send their strategies for infrastructure deployment and to take advantage of ORCS funding.

Last month we announced that Government funding will be doubled to £10 million for the installation of chargepoints on residential streets next year. This additional investment could fund up to another 3,600 chargepoints across the country.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
21st Jan 2020
What discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for International Trade on support for UK alcoholic beverage manufacturers to export their products.

The Government provides a wide range of support to alcohol manufacturers – through trade shows, hosting bespoke ‘meet the buyer’ events in the UK and abroad, raising the sector’s profile at global events and tackling market access barriers.

My Rt hon Friend the Secretary of State would be happy to raise this issue with my Rt hon Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade when they meet later today.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate she has made of the number of businesses that went into administration as a result of the cashflows of those businesses being affected by outstanding invoices in the latest period for which such information is available.

The Insolvency Service publishes National Statistics on the total number of companies entering administration each calendar quarter at www.gov.uk and details of the circumstances leading to each administration must be provided by the administrator in the form of documents filed with Companies House.

The Government is completely focused on fulfilling its manifesto commitment to clamp down on late payments as part of its aim of making the UK the best place to work and grow a business. This includes strengthening the powers of the Small Business Commissioner to support small businesses that are exploited by their larger partners, strengthening the Prompt Payment Code, taking a tougher compliance approach with larger companies which includes greater transparency reporting requirements, and reviewing the role supply chain finance plays in prompt payment.

15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what progress has been made in tackling the late payment of invoices by businesses.

The government is completely focussed on fulfilling our manifesto commitment to clamp down on late payment and strengthen the powers of the Small Business Commissioner to support small businesses that are exploited by their larger partners.

Good progress is being made on the policies announced in our Government Response to the 2018 Call for Evidence to assess what further steps and intervention may be needed to create a responsible payment culture, where we will be:

o consulting on the merits of strengthening the Commissioner’s existing powers, to assist and advocate for small businesses in the area of late payments;

o strengthening and reforming the Prompt Payment Code and moving its administration to the Small Business Commissioner;

o taking a tough compliance approach to large companies who do not comply with the Payment Practices Reporting Duty. We have sent over 2,000 ‘help and enforcement’ letters to non-complaint companies and over 1,000 more unique companies have since filed reports;

o reviewing role supply chain finance plays in prompt payment & greater transparency in companies reporting supply chain finance.

In October we launched a Business Basics Fund competition of up to £1 million, which will encourage SMEs to utilise payment technology and boost productivity in SMEs by reducing the time taken to chase payments. Winners will be announced in April.

In November, the Financial Reporting Council issued an open letter to company report preparers recommending payment practices are reported in annual reports.

11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate he has made of the number of clubs in the Vanarama National League and National League North and South which are unable to fulfill their fixtures; and whether he has had discussions with the National League on supporting those clubs.

Government has already facilitated a unique promotional deal with the National Lottery who provided a £10 million cash injection to the Vanarama National League and National League North and South in October 2020. Further support is available to clubs in these three divisions through the Sports Winter Survival Package: this will allow them to both survive and finish their seasons if they choose to do so. Sport England, as administrators of the Sport Winter Survival Package, are working with any club that wishes to access support through the scheme. I discussed the support package with the National League on 29 January 2021.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he plans to put in place additional support for indoor tennis centres; and if he will make a statement.

Government has provided unprecedented support to businesses through tax reliefs, cash grants and employee wage support, which many sport clubs have benefited from. On 22 October 2020, the Government also announced a £100m support fund for local authority leisure centres. We have no plans to provide additional bespoke support for indoor tennis centres.

In addition, Sport England’s Community Emergency Fund has provided £220 million directly to support community sport clubs and exercise centres through this pandemic. On 26 January Sport England also published their strategy ‘Uniting the Movement’ and as part of this have committed an extra £50million to help grassroots sports clubs and organisations affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

We are continuing to work with organisations to understand what they need and how we may be able to support them.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what support he plans to provide for (a) community amateur sports clubs and (b) venues which are not eligible for the covid-19 lockdown grants announced in January 2021 on the basis that they do not pay business rates or have a rateable value.

Sports and physical activity providers and facilities are at the heart of our communities, and play a crucial role in supporting adults and children to be active.

Government has provided unprecedented support to businesses through tax reliefs, cash grants and employee wage support, which many sport clubs have benefited from. The £300m Sports Winter Survival Package also aims to protect the immediate futures of major spectator sports in England over the winter period. On 22 October 2020, the Government also announced a £100m support fund for local authority leisure centres.

In addition, Sport England’s Community Emergency Fund has provided £220 million directly to support community sport clubs and exercise centres through this pandemic. On 26 January Sport England also published their strategy ‘Uniting the Movement’ and as part of this have committed an extra £50million to help grassroots sports clubs and organisations affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

We are continuing to work with organisations to understand what they need and how we may be able to support them.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what proportion of the grant his Department provided to the Football Association to distribute to National League clubs was intended to replace gate receipts lost as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

As part of a promotional deal with the Football Association, the National Lottery provided £10m in funding for the 66 clubs in the National League. This initiative is in addition to the ongoing support the National Lottery provides to good causes through the National Lottery Distribution Fund. Funding has been allocated to clubs by the National League using an approach based broadly on past attendance. The National League will keep allocations under review and may amend them if any club suffers acute financial hardship.

The department does not hold records on the average attendance or gate receipts of National League clubs.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what criteria his Department used to determine the amount of money given to the Football Association to be distributed to clubs in the National League; and on what basis the National League will distribute that money.

As part of a promotional deal with the Football Association, the National Lottery provided £10m in funding for the 66 clubs in the National League. This initiative is in addition to the ongoing support the National Lottery provides to good causes through the National Lottery Distribution Fund. Funding has been allocated to clubs by the National League using an approach based broadly on past attendance. The National League will keep allocations under review and may amend them if any club suffers acute financial hardship.

The department does not hold records on the average attendance or gate receipts of National League clubs.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students started an undergraduate degree course at each higher education institution in England in each year since 2017; and what proportion of those students had left that course by (a) Christmas and (b) Easter of the first year.

Official Statistics on student retention are published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) as part of their UK Performance Indicators.

For the academic years 2014/15 to 2019/20, the following link: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/performance-indicators/non-continuation/table-t3 shows the number of undergraduate entrants[1] at each English higher education provider and their associated non-continuation rates.

These non-continuation rates are defined as the percentage of first year students who do not continue their studies after 12 months (full-time students) or 24 months (part-time students). Rates specific to leaving courses by (a) Christmas and (b) Easter are not published by HESA.

Whilst the department holds HESA Student data from which it could derive the information requested on how many students started an undergraduate degree course at each higher education institution since 2017, the information is not readily available and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

[1] Who did not leave within 50 days of commencing study.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students started in a level two course at each further education institution in England in each year since 2017; and what proportion of those students had left their course by (a) Christmas and (b) Easter of the first year.

The tables attached show the number of level 2 and level 3 courses started in each academic year alongside the number and percentage of courses with an end date before Christmas and before Easter[1] [2] [3].

[1] It is possible for one student to undertake more than one course.

[2] Data includes 16-19 (excluding Apprenticeships) ESFA funded courses.

[3] All courses have been included regardless of the outcome and completion status.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students started a level three course at each English further education institution in each year since 2017; and what proportion of those students had left that course by (a) Christmas and (b) Easter of the first year.

The tables attached show the number of level 2 and level 3 courses started in each academic year alongside the number and percentage of courses with an end date before Christmas and before Easter[1] [2] [3].

[1] It is possible for one student to undertake more than one course.

[2] Data includes 16-19 (excluding Apprenticeships) ESFA funded courses.

[3] All courses have been included regardless of the outcome and completion status.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to help protect clinically vulnerable members of staff from covid-19 in schools in England.

Most people who were previously identified as clinically extremely vulnerable (CEV) are now well protected after receiving their primary and booster vaccination doses. For most people who were identified as CEV, they are no longer at substantially greater risk than the general population and are advised to follow the same guidance as everyone else on staying safe and preventing the spread of COVID-19, as well as any further advice they may have received from their doctor.

As individuals are now mixing in an otherwise open society, regular testing within education providers is no longer as effective as it once was at preventing transmission. Instead, the most effective protection against severe disease from COVID-19 for everyone, including those at higher risk from COVID-19, is to get vaccinated.

Education providers should undertake a risk assessment of individuals with clinical vulnerabilities attending the provider and, as employers, should be able to explain the measures they have in place to keep staff safe at work.

Those at higher risk may also wish to consider additional advice:

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, in advance of the changes to Degree Apprenticeship End Point Assessment in September 2022, what analysis his Department has conducted on how the new arrangements will assure competence in civil engineering if not undertaken by independent professional engineering institutions.

This is a matter for the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. I have asked its Chief Executive, Jennifer Coupland, to write to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what representations he has received from civil engineering employers on the planned changes in End Point Assessment arrangements for degree apprenticeship from September 2022.

This is a matter for the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. I have asked its Chief Executive, Jennifer Coupland, to write to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has made an assessment of the costs to business of the changes in End Point Assessment arrangements for degree apprenticeships from September 2022.

This is a matter for the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. I have asked its Chief Executive, Jennifer Coupland, to write to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to undertake a review of the decision to change the arrangements for End Point Assessments for civil engineering degree apprenticeship by introducing regulation by Ofqual of End-Point Assessment Organisations.

This is a matter for the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. I have asked its Chief Executive, Jennifer Coupland, to write to you and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.


Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of impact of increased material costs on the adequacy of funding made available through the Further Education Capital Transformation Fund.

On 4 April 2022, the department announced the colleges that were successful in the Further Education Capital Transformation Fund bidding process.

Each college has received a grant offer from the department. Most colleges will also be contributing match funding. It is for colleges to manage their condition improvement project within the available budget.

The department will monitor progress across all college projects.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment his Department has made of the (a) adequacy and (b) condition of the FE college estate.

The Further Education (FE) Condition Data Collection took place in 2019. It is a visual survey that collects detailed condition, contextual and building management data for every FE college in England. Independent building survey organisations assessed elements of each building and graded them A, performing as intended, to D, immediate remedial action or replacement.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much of the Government’s £1.5 billion FE Capital Transformation Programme has been (a) allocated to capital projects or (b) remains unallocated as at 6 June 2022.

The Further Education Capital Transformation Programme (FECTP) is delivering the department’s £1.5 billion commitment to upgrade further education (FE) college estates.

In August 2020, the department allocated £200 million to all FE colleges and designated institutions in the first phase of the FECTP. This enabled colleges to undertake immediate remedial work and upgrade the condition of their estates.

In April 2021, the department announced it is working with 16 colleges, which are some of the most in need of support, to upgrade and revitalise their estates. In April 2022, the department announced that up to £405 million of funding is being provided to a further 62 colleges that were successful in bidding for funding through the FE Capital Transformation Fund.

The department will provide an update on plans for delivering the remainder of the £1.5 billion of funding later this year, including a confirmation on how much funding remains to be invested.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much and what proportion of funding allocated to the 16-19 Education Budget has been spent specifically on (a) Level 3 qualifications (b) Level 2 qualifications (c) Level 1 qualifications and d) entry qualifications over the last three academic years.

It is not possible to link 16 to 19 funding specifically to qualification levels because it is calculated and allocated per student.

The attached tables set out the total number (Table 1) and proportion (Table 2) of 16 to 19 enrolments by level for the 2018/19, 2019/20 and 2020/21 academic years.

Further information about 16 to 19 funding allocations is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/16-to-19-education-funding-allocations#published-allocations.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will ensure that any announcement on the future funding of the provisional list of level 3 qualifications is made to Parliament first.

A provisional list of level 3 qualifications that will have public funding approval withdrawn for 16-19 year olds, as they duplicate the content and purpose of wave 1 and 2 T Levels, will be published shortly. We will continue to keep Parliament up to date with our reforms to the qualifications landscape, including at level 3 and level 2 and below, as they progress.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the impact on learners studying at post-16 providers which have been rated by Ofsted as requiring improvement of the inability of those providers to apply for certain funds, grants and Government initiatives.

The vast majority of funds available to post-16 providers are available to all providers, regardless of Ofsted rating. This includes the Further Education Capital Transformation Fund which seeks to improve the condition of the further education college estate, the Post-16 Capacity Fund which seeks to ensure there is adequate space to accommodate the demographic increase in 16-18 year old learners, and the Skills Accelerator Development Fund which supports projects that build providers’ capacity to meet locally agreed skills priorities. Some funds may be targeted at providers with stronger Ofsted grades for a variety of reasons, including where programmes are at an early stage, and it makes sense to ask the strongest providers to work on the initial development phase or where we are looking for a provider to lead the delivery of a programme where the quality of provision is the overriding immediate priority.

The T Levels capital fund was restricted to providers rated Ofsted good or outstanding on a temporary basis while the programme embedded but now, in Wave 4 of the T Levels capital fund worth £150 million, all providers offering T Levels in 2023 are eligible to apply. The Higher Technical Education Growth Fund and the Institutes of Technology programme were also restricted to providers rated good or outstanding. This was to ensure effective delivery of these new qualifications and provision. Funding for Institutes of Technology was restricted to bids where all core further education partners were Ofsted good or outstanding, this is because they are expected to lead the provision of Higher Technical Education in an area. The impact of eligibility requirements for funds on learners are considered on a case by cases basis for each fund, bearing in mind the impact on protected characteristics and on learners in less affluent areas.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason post-16 providers rated by Ofsted as requiring improvement are unable to apply for certain funds, grants and Government initiatives.

The vast majority of funds available to post-16 providers are available to all providers, regardless of Ofsted rating. This includes the Further Education Capital Transformation Fund which seeks to improve the condition of the further education college estate, the Post-16 Capacity Fund which seeks to ensure there is adequate space to accommodate the demographic increase in 16-18 year old learners, and the Skills Accelerator Development Fund which supports projects that build providers’ capacity to meet locally agreed skills priorities. Some funds may be targeted at providers with stronger Ofsted grades for a variety of reasons, including where programmes are at an early stage, and it makes sense to ask the strongest providers to work on the initial development phase or where we are looking for a provider to lead the delivery of a programme where the quality of provision is the overriding immediate priority.

The T Levels capital fund was restricted to providers rated Ofsted good or outstanding on a temporary basis while the programme embedded but now, in Wave 4 of the T Levels capital fund worth £150 million, all providers offering T Levels in 2023 are eligible to apply. The Higher Technical Education Growth Fund and the Institutes of Technology programme were also restricted to providers rated good or outstanding. This was to ensure effective delivery of these new qualifications and provision. Funding for Institutes of Technology was restricted to bids where all core further education partners were Ofsted good or outstanding, this is because they are expected to lead the provision of Higher Technical Education in an area. The impact of eligibility requirements for funds on learners are considered on a case by cases basis for each fund, bearing in mind the impact on protected characteristics and on learners in less affluent areas.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish data on the number of companies that (a) provided T-level placements in 2020-21 and (b) confirmed to provide placements in 2021-22.

We currently do not, nor plan to, collect data on the number of T Level industry placements delivered, or committed to, by individual companies. Instead, this information is held by education providers, who are responsible for securing industry placements for their T Level students. Therefore, we are unable to report on the number of companies currently offering or planning on offering placements.

However, through our ongoing engagement with employers, education providers and key stakeholders, we are able to identify which sectors and geographical locations we need to focus on to support the delivery of further industry placement opportunities for T Level students.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken to ensure sufficient placements for T-Levels over the next three years.

We have provided an extensive programme of employer and provider support to help with the delivery and scale up of high-quality industry placements. We have invested £200 million over the past 4 years to help providers build their capacity and relationships with employers, and we have published practical industry placement delivery guidance for both education providers and employers. We are engaging directly with employers through the department’s employer engagement teams to provide a strong pipeline of employers, across all sectors, ready to offer placements and there is comprehensive package of support available for employers offering online guidance, webinars, and direct hands-on support to help them deliver industry placements. We have established a T Level employer ambassador network to engage with others in their industries on T Levels and placements, and we are further developing our communications materials to continue to raise the profile of T Levels and industry placements to an employer audience. We will continue to work closely with education providers and employers to identify any potential barriers to the delivery of placements for each of the T Levels and identify appropriate mitigations.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential need to attract industry professionals in green jobs to teaching positions in the further education sector; and what steps he plans to take to encourage industry professionals to engage with and share their skills with the further education sector.

​​The government is committed to supporting green skills across the country and a crucial part of this is ensuring further education (FE) providers have the best quality teachers and lecturers to teach the next generation workforce.

At the recent Spending Review, we set out investment of £3.8 billion in FE and skills over the course of the Parliament as a whole, to ensure people can access high-quality training and education that leads to good jobs, addresses skills gaps, boosts productivity and supports levelling up. This includes funding for programmes to support green skills crucial to the net zero transition.

In November 2020, we launched the Green Jobs Taskforce, working in partnership with business, local areas, skills providers, and unions, to ensure we have the skilled workforce to deliver net zero and our Ten Point Plan. Following that, and building on the Skills for Jobs White Paper, the Net Zero Strategy was published in October 2021 and set out how the government’s skills reforms will support teachers understanding of sustainability, strengthen links between employers and providers, support workers in high carbon sectors with the transition, and help to build a pipeline of future talent. The government is taking a number of steps to ensure the FE teacher workforce supports the transition to net zero.

We have worked with employers to develop a refreshed apprenticeship standard for FE teaching (Level 5 Learning and Skills Teacher), which came into effect in September 2021. For the first time, all FE teachers training via an apprenticeship will be required to integrate sustainability into their teaching, including through modelling sustainable practices and promoting sustainable development principles in relation to their subject specialism. This standard will soon be incorporated into all future FE teaching qualifications, so that all teachers across all subject areas will be able to embed and promote sustainability in their teaching.

The ‘Teach in FE’ service which launched in January this year, provides a new online service to raise awareness of FE teaching and encourage and support new teachers into the profession. It is supported by a campaign to bring potential teachers to the new service.

Our FE teacher training bursaries worth up to £26,000, are available to support those who want to train in a range of subjects including STEM, engineering and computing that can contribute to the expansion of green jobs

Since 2018, the Taking Teaching Further (TTF) programme has supported over 350 industry professionals to become FE teachers with another 550 places made available in the 2021/22 academic year. This has allowed FE providers across all of the 15 technical teaching routes, including in green and sustainable industries to get technical expertise into the classroom.

The Emerging Skills Electrification pilot is currently supporting providers and businesses to upskill their employees within electrification technology. The pilot funds free upskilling days for trainers at all further and higher education providers which enables them to teach new emerging skills courses in their colleges or universities.

Taken together, and alongside the wider suite of reforms to the skills system being implemented by government in partnership with industry, these measures will help to ensure more people can get the skills they need to enter and progress within green jobs.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many people participated in the Government's traineeship programme in (a) 2019-20 and (b) 2020-21.

Traineeship starts for the 2019/20 and 2020/21 academic year is shown in the table below.

Traineeship starts August to July

Age Group

2019/20

2020/21

Under 19

9,100

9,900

19-24

3,000

7,500

Total

12,100

17,400

Note:

  1. Volumes are rounded to the nearest 100
  2. Source: Individualised Learner Record

Further information on apprenticeship starts and traineeship starts can be found in the Apprenticeships and traineeships statistics publication, available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships#content-10-heading.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much of the public funding allocated for traineeships in (a) 2019-20 and (b) 2020-21 was returned to the Treasury due to being unspent.

In 2019-20, the department did not return any funding allocated for traineeships to Her Majesty's Treasury (HMT). In 2020-21, an underspend of £65 million was returned to HMT. This was because of the time involved in running a procurement to increase training provider capacity and the lag between providers developing their offer and engaging with potential employers and young people to mobilise delivery. Our procurement enabled additional money to reach 81 training providers of which 53 were new to the market. Traineeships starts increased by 44% in the 2020/21 academic year compared to 2019/20.

As is usual practice, any underspends in overall departmental budgets by the end of the financial year are first returned to HMT as per the Consolidated Budgeting Guidance.

We are supporting the largest-ever expansion of traineeships as part of the government’s Plan for Jobs to ensure that more young people have access to high-quality training. At Spending Review, we announced funding for up to 72,000 traineeships starts over the next 3 years. We have also extended the £1,000 incentive payments for offering traineeship work placement opportunities until 31 July 2022. We are continuing to support the further expansion of traineeships, and are working closely with employers, providers and key intermediaries to grow the programme.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what amount of previously unspent apprenticeship levy funds has been allocated by levy-paying employers to (a) small and (b) medium sized companies as part of the apprenticeship levy transfer scheme.

We are committed to supporting more employers to use apprenticeships to develop the skilled workforces they need, and to supporting more people, from all backgrounds, to benefit from the high-quality training that apprenticeships offer.

Large employers are able to choose how to spend their levy funds to best meet their skills needs, and since April 2018 have been able to transfer funds to other employers. We continue to make improvements to the levy transfer system to make it easier for large employers to make full use of their levy funds and support starts in their supply chain, sector, or local area, and to support more employers, including small and medium sized enterprises, to take on new apprentices.

Latest published figures on transfers can be found within the ‘Apprenticeship Service and monthly transparency data’ section of the Apprenticeships and Traineeships statistical release. As of 8 December 2021, there have been 2,860 apprenticeships recorded on the apprenticeship service that have started, or are due to start, during the 2021-22 academic year funded by a transfer of levy funds. Of these, 62% (1,760) were transfers to non-levy-paying organisations.

In September 2021, we launched a new online service to allow levy-paying employers to advertise funding pledges, and to enable other businesses to browse and apply for these funds. So far in the 2021-22 financial year, over 100 employers have pledged £7 million of levy funds for transfer through the new online service.

We do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will need or want to use all the funds available to them, but they are able to if they wish. As well as funding new apprenticeships in levy-paying employers, income from the levy is used to fund new apprenticeships in employers that do not pay the levy, as well as existing apprentices that started in previous years. In the 2020/21 academic year, 116,110 apprenticeship starts were in non-levy paying employers.

In the 2021-22 financial year, funding available for investment in apprenticeships in England is £2.5 billion and this will grow to £2.7 billion by 2024-25 financial year.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the long-term outcomes for those who are (a) in employment or (b) unemployed and who undertake training at a Skills Bootcamp in each subject.

Skills Bootcamps are open to adults aged 19 and over who are either in work, self-employed, recently unemployed or returning to work after a break. This training is not aimed at adults who are long-term unemployed.

We have now published the outcome data from wave 1 of Skills Bootcamps, delivered between September 2020 and 31 March 2021. This outcome data shows that Skills Bootcamps are supporting individuals to access new opportunities and are helping them progress in their careers. The outcome data is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/skills-bootcamps-outcomes#releaseHeadlines-summary.

Between September 2020 and March 2021, over 2,000 participants completed a Skills Bootcamp, of which at least 54% of individuals achieved a positive outcome as a result. A positive outcome is defined as a new full or part time job or apprenticeship, a new role, or increased responsibilities with their current employer or, for the self-employed, access to new opportunities.

The department has commissioned process and impact evaluation for wave 2 of Skills Bootcamps, which is currently being delivered in financial year 2021-22. Data on wave 2 and future wave 3 course completions will provide further evidence and learning to inform future delivery. This data will provide the same breakdown of outcomes as the data that we already published from wave 1. We are working with providers in wave 2 of the programme to ensure they provide consistent and accurate data.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what destination data his Department collates on employment outcomes for people who are (a) recently unemployed and (b) long-term unemployed who undertake training at a Skills Bootcamp in each subject; and if he will publish that data.

Skills Bootcamps are open to adults aged 19 and over who are either in work, self-employed, recently unemployed or returning to work after a break. This training is not aimed at adults who are long-term unemployed.

We have now published the outcome data from wave 1 of Skills Bootcamps, delivered between September 2020 and 31 March 2021. This outcome data shows that Skills Bootcamps are supporting individuals to access new opportunities and are helping them progress in their careers. The outcome data is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/skills-bootcamps-outcomes#releaseHeadlines-summary.

Between September 2020 and March 2021, over 2,000 participants completed a Skills Bootcamp, of which at least 54% of individuals achieved a positive outcome as a result. A positive outcome is defined as a new full or part time job or apprenticeship, a new role, or increased responsibilities with their current employer or, for the self-employed, access to new opportunities.

The department has commissioned process and impact evaluation for wave 2 of Skills Bootcamps, which is currently being delivered in financial year 2021-22. Data on wave 2 and future wave 3 course completions will provide further evidence and learning to inform future delivery. This data will provide the same breakdown of outcomes as the data that we already published from wave 1. We are working with providers in wave 2 of the programme to ensure they provide consistent and accurate data.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many people undertook workplace training opportunities in (a) Level 2 and (b) Level 3 qualifications in (i) 2017-18, (ii) 2018-19, (iii) 2019-20 and (iv) 2020-21.

Apprenticeship participation at level 2 and 3 in the 2017/18 to 2020/21 academic years is shown in the table below. Additionally, the number of traineeship starts in each academic year is shown (although traineeship programmes do not have a defined level).

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Level 2 apprenticeship participation

374,400

275,800

225,300

185,400

Level 3 apprenticeship participation

372,400

356,200

338,700

326,400

Total apprenticeship participation

814,800

742,400

719,000

713,000

Traineeship starts

17,700

14,900

12,100

17,400

Note:

  1. Volumes are rounded to the nearest 100
  2. Participation is the count of learners that participated at any point during the year. Learners undertaking more than one course will appear only once in the total participation, but will be counted individually at each level, in cases when a learner participates at more than one level in an academic year.
  3. Source: Individualised Learner Record

Further information on apprenticeship starts and traineeship starts can be found in the Apprenticeships and traineeships statistics publication: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of apprenticeship starts in (a) Quarter 1 of 2021, (b) Quarter 2 of 2021 and (c) Quarter 3 of 2021.

The latest published apprenticeship starts data covers the 2020/21 academic year and was published in November 2021 in the Apprenticeships and traineeships statistics publication: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships/2020-21.

Quarterly apprenticeship starts breakdowns for the 2021 calendar year show:

  • 83,500 starts in the first quarter (January to March).
  • 65,900 starts in the second quarter of the 2021 academic year (April to June).
  • So far, for the third quarter (only July), 21,300 starts have been reported so far.

The attached file contains monthly breakdowns of starts for the entire 2020/21 academic year.

The first in-year apprenticeship starts data for the 2021/22 academic year (covering August to October 2021) will be published in January 2022.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the ability of apprenticeship levy paying employers to transfer levy funds to non-levy paying employers.

The department is committed to supporting more employers to use apprenticeships to develop the skilled workforces they need, and to supporting more people, from all backgrounds, to benefit from the high-quality training that apprenticeships offer.

The department continues to make improvements to the levy transfer system to make it easier for large employers to make full use of their levy funds and support starts in their supply chain, sector, or local area, and to support more employers, including small and medium sizes enterprises, to take on new apprentices. In September 2021, the department launched a new online service to allow levy-paying employers to advertise funding pledges, and to enable other businesses to browse and apply for these funds.

It is encouraging to see that employers, including DPD, Mace Group, and Amazon UK, are taking advantage of this opportunity to support new apprenticeship starts in all sectors of the economy. So far in the 2021-22 financial year, over 100 employers have pledged £7 million of levy funds for transfer.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has (a) sought and (b) received representations from employers about the value that they place on BTEC qualifications.

The department has consulted in two stages on reforms to level 3 qualifications. For both consultations the department sought responses from employers and their representative bodies about our proposals for the range of qualifications that will be funded alongside T Levels and A levels in future. The review has engaged with employer groups representing a range of industry, including construction, digital, engineering, hair and beauty, as well as bodies representing both small and large employers.

We published our plans for reform in July 2021 alongside a summary of the responses received to the most recent consultation. This summary did not separate the responses by employers and their representatives from wider respondents.

We continue to work with the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education (the Institute) to ensure that employers remain at the heart of our reforms. The Institute works extensively with employers to make certain that qualifications are grounded in the needs of the workplace.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the financial effect of the adult education clawback for the academic year 2021- 22 on affected further education colleges.

We monitor college financial health on a regular basis and use this information to determine where support and intervention from the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) and Further Education Commissioner can help colleges to improve their position.

Where colleges are at risk of running out of cash, emergency funding is considered on a case-by-case basis and based on a thorough assessment of each college's circumstances and the minimum funding needed to minimise disruption to learners.

The financial impact on further education (FE) colleges who did not meet the Adult Education Budget (AEB) Reconciliation threshold for 2020 to 2021 funding year was assessed using information in the College Financial Forecasting Return (CFFR) submitted to the ESFA in July 2021. In addition, eligible FE colleges were able to submit an AEB Reconciliation business case with an updated CFFR or additional financial information, where clawback of funds meant this had a material financial impact on their cashflow in 2021-22 financial year.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to encourage employers in the (a) construction and (b) manufacturing sectors to offer apprenticeships, particularly to those aged under 25 years old.

Apprenticeships provide people with the opportunity to earn and learn the skills needed to start an exciting career in the construction and manufacturing industries. Employers in the construction, engineering and manufacturing sectors have developed over 230 high-quality apprenticeship standards in their industries. These range from level 2 to level 7 in occupations such as Stonemason, Town Planning and Process Automation Engineer.

In the 2020/21 academic year there were 20,000 apprenticeship starts in the Construction, Planning and the Built Environment sector subject area, and 39,500 starts in Engineering and Manufacturing Technologies.

The department is making apprenticeships more flexible so that they better meet the needs of employers in all sectors, including construction and manufacturing. This is so more employers and individuals can benefit from the high-quality training apprenticeships.

The department is supporting employers to offer more apprenticeships to young people in the construction sector where flexible working practices are commonplace, including short periods of project-based employment. The department is encouraging the use of more flexible training models, front-loaded training and flexi-job apprenticeships to ensure apprentices are ready to work on-site and can benefit from high-quality long-term training that an apprenticeship provides.

Employers can continue to benefit from the £3,000 incentive payment for hiring new apprentices until January 2022. Over 160,000 incentive payments have been claimed by employers so far, as of 22 December 2021, 78% of claims were for apprentices under 25.

The department continues to provide £1,000 to both employers and training providers when they take on apprentices aged between 16 and 18 years old, or 19-to-24-year-old apprentices who either have an education, health and care plan.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students began a (a) BTEC level 3, (b) NCFE CACHE diploma and (c) any other level 3 course in (i) the 2020021 academic year and (ii) the 2021-22 academic year, by institution and subject.

The attached file contains learning aim enrolments in the 2020/21 academic year by provider and aim title for:

(a) learning aims at level 3 with BTEC in the title.

(b) learning aims at level 3 where NCFE is the awarding organisation, and diploma in the title (Council for Awards in Care, Health and Education (CACHE) aims cannot be specifically identified).

(c) all learning aims.

Figures are split into learners aged 16-18 and 19+.

Figures for the 2021/22 academic year will not be available until the first data are published in January 2022.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many of the students that began T level courses in 2020-21 left the course before the end of the 2021 academic year, by institution and subject.

We have published the numbers of students recorded as enrolling on T Levels in 2020 (around 1,300) in the 2020 Action Plan: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/t-level-action-plan.

This figure was based on early data, we do not yet have the final official data for the 2020 to 2021 academic year. We are looking at what other data we might publish, as an addendum to the 2021 T Level Action Plan, in Spring 2022.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many days of work experience 2020-21 T level students (a) did in the 2020-21 academic year, by institution and subject and (b) have left to do in the 2021-22 academic year in order to meet the requirement of the qualification, by institution and subject.

We are aware that sourcing industry placements has been very challenging for the first cohort of T Level students due to COVID-19 restrictions and the residual economic challenges. We have been working closely with all of our T Level providers to ensure they have the support they need to source placement opportunities.

T Level providers monitor the completion of the required placement hours, so this specific data is not information we have at this point. However, the vast majority of students have either completed their placement, or they are in progress. We have introduced a number of temporary flexibilities to enable providers to deliver placement opportunities. We continue to monitor the situation to determine what further support is needed to ensure that all students can succeed on their T Level despite the impact of COVID-19.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students began T level courses at the start of the (a) 2020-21 and (b) 2021-22 academic year, by learning institution and subject.

Early data suggests that the number of T Level student enrolments for 2020 was around 1,300 – and for 2021 around 5,450. These figures were published in the 2020 and 2021 T Level Action Plans, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/t-level-action-plan.

The number of 2020 T Level starts in England were included in the 16-18 participation statistical data release in June 2021. T Level student numbers by institution will be published alongside T Level results. This is to match the approach we take with other qualifications such as BTECs or A levels. There is information on the funding provided to each institution for T Levels which includes the student numbers that this is based on, but these are predicted not actual student numbers. This is published as part of allocations data which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/16-to-19-allocation-data-2020-to-2021-academic-year.

We do not yet have the official data for 2021 T Level student enrolments. We are looking at what other data we might publish, as an addendum to the 2021 T Level Action Plan, in spring 2022.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the (a) likelihood and (b) potential effect of lifelong loan entitlement subsuming the Student Loans company.

Officials in the Department for Education are working closely and collaboratively with colleagues in the Student Loans Company (SLC) on the introduction of Lifelong Loan Entitlement from 2025.

The SLC is undertaking significant reform through its Evolve transformational programme which will provide a more efficient and user-friendly service. We are working closely with representatives from across the education sector, as well as key delivery bodies such as the SLC, to scope and design the necessary system changes to ensure it is ready to deliver the Lifelong Loan Entitlement (LLE). As flagged in the Skills Bill Impact Assessment, this includes using SLC data, such as monitoring metrics about the kind and rate of uptake for new student finance products, to centre users in our LLE design plans.

SLC has a successful history of delivering policy changes for Ministers and stakeholders. Changes of any scale are only implemented after considerable planning and testing to ensure that SLC’s systems possess the required robustness and resilience to ensure successful introduction.

We are committed to delivering at pace in order to introduce the LLE from 2025 and aware that delivering our vision will require extensive changes to the student finance system and the types of courses available. The legislation and regulation process may be complex, and must be informed by consultation, including detailed implementation work with the SLC.

The Evolve programme, and SLC’s ongoing transformation programme, will stabilise SLC’s existing technology base and IT infrastructure, which will enable the digitisation of the customer journey and remove existing manual processes. This will support the introduction of future system changes such as those which are required to deliver LLE.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the potential effect of the lifelong loan entitlement subsuming the Student Loans Company processes on current account holders with that company.

Officials in the Department for Education are working closely and collaboratively with colleagues in the Student Loans Company (SLC) on the introduction of Lifelong Loan Entitlement from 2025.

The SLC is undertaking significant reform through its Evolve transformational programme which will provide a more efficient and user-friendly service. We are working closely with representatives from across the education sector, as well as key delivery bodies such as the SLC, to scope and design the necessary system changes to ensure it is ready to deliver the Lifelong Loan Entitlement (LLE). As flagged in the Skills Bill Impact Assessment, this includes using SLC data, such as monitoring metrics about the kind and rate of uptake for new student finance products, to centre users in our LLE design plans.

SLC has a successful history of delivering policy changes for Ministers and stakeholders. Changes of any scale are only implemented after considerable planning and testing to ensure that SLC’s systems possess the required robustness and resilience to ensure successful introduction.

We are committed to delivering at pace in order to introduce the LLE from 2025 and aware that delivering our vision will require extensive changes to the student finance system and the types of courses available. The legislation and regulation process may be complex, and must be informed by consultation, including detailed implementation work with the SLC.

The Evolve programme, and SLC’s ongoing transformation programme, will stabilise SLC’s existing technology base and IT infrastructure, which will enable the digitisation of the customer journey and remove existing manual processes. This will support the introduction of future system changes such as those which are required to deliver LLE.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential (a) financial and (b) administrative effect of the lifelong loan entitlement on higher education providers.

The Lifelong Loan Entitlement (LLE) will be introduced from 2025, providing individuals with a loan entitlement to the equivalent of four years of post-18 education to use over their lifetime. It will be available for both modules and full years of study at higher technical and degree levels (levels 4 to 6), regardless of whether they are provided in colleges or universities. The government intends that the LLE will create new opportunities for providers to offer more flexible learning pathways for students and develop new business models.

The impact assessment published alongside the Skills and Post-18 Education Bill included a significant section on the LLE. This was produced as part of an ongoing process, assessing and carefully considering the possible effects of the LLE and how best to deliver it.

We are also actively speaking with higher education and further education providers, including considering the operational implications on their administrative and financial structures. We will continue to engage to understand provider needs as we build towards introduction from 2025.

There is also potential for income gain through new learners entering the system. Although the tuition fee income gains from new learners may be more modest given the shorter duration of courses, large enough numbers could result in a net benefit to higher education and further education providers on average.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to support employers with the provision of (a) training and (b) continuing professional development for existing staff.

Whilst the professional development and training of employees is a matter for individual employers, we are committed to supporting employers to equip staff with the skills they need.

Through apprenticeships, the government is supporting employers of all sizes to equip their staff with the skills they need now and in the future.

Apprenticeships funding will grow to £2.7 billion by the 2024-25 financial year, the first increase to apprenticeships funding since 2019-20, as we continue to support businesses to recruit the right people and develop the skills they need.

Apprenticeships are a great way for employers in all sectors to upskill or retrain existing employees at all levels of their organisations, and to support new employees, including those starting out in their careers. We are making apprenticeships more flexible so employers can choose the apprenticeship training that works for them, and even more people can benefit. For example, accelerated apprenticeships are supporting those with industry experience to achieve occupational competence more quickly by using their prior learning and tailoring the apprenticeship to meet their needs.

Skills Bootcamps offer free, flexible courses of up to 16 weeks, giving people the opportunity to build up sector-specific skills and fast-track to an interview with a local employer. For employers wanting to train their own employees through Skills Bootcamps, the government funds 70% of the cost.

Complementing this, the Free Courses for Jobs offer, which was launched in April 2021, gives eligible adults the chance to access their first level 3 qualifications for free. Employers can encourage their staff to take up courses available under this offer to upskill and access new opportunities in their current place of work.

In addition, from April 2022, any adult in England earning under the National Living Wage annually or unemployed, will also be able to access these qualifications for free, regardless of their prior qualification level.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of access to the lifelong loan scheme for people who have a degree qualification.

The government is introducing the Lifelong Loan Entitlement (LLE) from 2025 to support flexible learning, upskilling and retraining. The government is considering conditions of access and eligibility for study funded by the LLE and will be consulting on the detail and scope in due course. We are also working closely with representatives from across the education sector, as well as key delivery bodies to scope and design the necessary system changes.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of professional training available within companies for existing staff seeking to upskill within their current role.

Whilst the professional development and training of employees is a matter for individual employers, we are committed to supporting employers to equip staff with the skills they need.

Through apprenticeships, the government is supporting employers of all sizes to equip their staff with the skills they need now and in the future.

Apprenticeships funding will grow to £2.7 billion by the 2024-25 financial year, the first increase to apprenticeships funding since 2019-20, as we continue to support businesses to recruit the right people and develop the skills they need.

Apprenticeships are a great way for employers in all sectors to upskill or retrain existing employees at all levels of their organisations, and to support new employees, including those starting out in their careers. We are making apprenticeships more flexible so employers can choose the apprenticeship training that works for them, and even more people can benefit. For example, accelerated apprenticeships are supporting those with industry experience to achieve occupational competence more quickly by using their prior learning and tailoring the apprenticeship to meet their needs.

Skills Bootcamps offer free, flexible courses of up to 16 weeks, giving people the opportunity to build up sector-specific skills and fast-track to an interview with a local employer. For employers wanting to train their own employees through Skills Bootcamps, the government funds 70% of the cost.

Complementing this, the Free Courses for Jobs offer, which was launched in April 2021, gives eligible adults the chance to access their first level 3 qualifications for free. Employers can encourage their staff to take up courses available under this offer to upskill and access new opportunities in their current place of work.

In addition, from April 2022, any adult in England earning under the National Living Wage annually or unemployed, will also be able to access these qualifications for free, regardless of their prior qualification level.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason schools and colleges will be required to fund improvements to ventilation and air purification systems necessitated by the covid-19 outbreak from existing budgets.

Following the rollout of around 300,000 CO2 monitors to schools during the autumn term, over 350,000 monitors have been delivered to over 99% of eligible maintained schools, further education colleges, and the majority of nurseries. Schools are finding the monitors helpful to manage ventilation and, in the majority of schools, colleges, and nurseries, existing ventilation measures are sufficient.

The department also announced on 2 January that it would make up to 7000 air cleaning units available for poorly ventilated teaching spaces in state-funded education schools, colleges and nurseries where quick fixes to improve ventilation are not possible. All state funded schools (primary and secondary), further education colleges and nurseries can apply. This is in addition to the 1,000 department-funded air cleaning units that we announced on 18 November for special educational needs and disabilities and alternative provision providers.  The deadline for applications is 9am on 17 January and units will be delivered from February 2022.

For education providers that are not eligible for a department-funded air cleaning unit, the department has launched a marketplace which provides all state funded education providers a route to purchasing air cleaning units directly from suppliers at a suitable specification and competitive price. The marketplace is available for all state funded schools (primary and secondary), further education colleges and nurseries.

Maintaining adequate ventilation remains the responsibility of individual providers. The department expects the majority of solutions to poor ventilation to be relatively minor. Day to day maintenance and minor repairs, including those to improve ventilation, should typically be funded from general maintenance budgets from revenue allocations.

Where issues are identified, providers are expected to plan and prioritise any necessary works within existing budgets. Schools and sixth form colleges also receive an annual Devolved Formula Capital Allocation to spend on small capital projects or capital purchases, while further education colleges have benefited from a Capital Transformation Fund allocation in financial year 2020-21 for addressing condition need. For more substantial capital works, education providers and those responsible for buildings have access to funding to improve the condition of buildings through different routes depending on their size and type.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of his Department's spending on further education for (a) people aged 16 to 18, (b) people aged 18 to 25 and (c) people aged over 18 in each financial year since 2010-11.

Spend by the Department for Education (and previously the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) on further education, is reported through publication of the Annual Report and Accounts. These are available for each financial year since 2010-11.

The Department for Education reports are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-annual-reports.

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills reports are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/bis-annual-reports-and-accounts.

The government has recently announced very significant increases in spending on further education. The October Spending Review explained that total spending on skills will increase over the Parliament by £3.8 billion by the 2024-25 financial year, equivalent to a cash increase of 42%, compared to 2019-20.

In December we announced specific details of increased investment. There will be an increase of £615 million in funding for 16-19 education in the 2022-23 financial year which will be used to lift funding rates and pay for an extra 40 hours of education per student. A further 9 Institutes of Technology were announced, specialising in delivering higher technical education in areas across England. The T Level Capital Fund is now offering £150 million for colleges, schools, and other providers to bid on from the fourth wave of the T Level roll out.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason there has been a delay in confirming the outcomes of appeals against the adult education budget clawback.

A comprehensive review of each business case received was undertaken to ensure that our decisions were correct. We originally committed to confirming outcomes to eligible providers by 15 November 2021. There was a short delay, until 24 November 2021 whilst those outcomes were finalised and agreed.

Where a provider's business case was not fully supported, they have a right of appeal. The deadline for appeals was 1 December 2021 and we expect to be able to confirm the outcome of those appeals in early January 2022.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of higher apprenticeships available to 18-25 year olds as of 13 December 2021; and what recent assessment he has made of the quality of outcomes in terms of apprentices (a) completing their apprenticeships successfully and (b) securing permanent employment.

Apprenticeships provide young people with the opportunity to earn and learn the skills needed to start an exciting career in a wide range of industries, everything from artificial intelligence, archaeology, data science, business management, and banking. We want more young people across the country to benefit from high-quality apprenticeships.

In the 2020/21 academic year, over 28,200 under 25 year olds started higher level apprenticeships (at level 4 and above), an increase from 27,100 in 2019/20 and 24,400 in 2018/19. Employers decide which apprenticeships they offer and when in order to address their skills needs.

We are supporting employers to offer more apprenticeships to young people through encouraging more flexible training models such as front-loaded training, accelerated apprenticeships, and flexi-job apprenticeships. In addition, we continue to encourage more young people to consider apprenticeships through our Apprenticeship Support and Knowledge programme which reached over 600,000 students across England in the last academic year. Latest published figures show 1,500 higher level vacancies on the Find an Apprenticeship website which individuals of all ages can apply for. Employers can also choose to recruit apprentices through their own channels.

We know that achieving an apprenticeship leads to positive outcomes. Upon completion, 91% of apprentices go into work or further training with 89% in sustained employment and many apprentices remain with the same employer following their apprenticeship. Apprenticeships also offer good wage returns; median earnings for an apprentice completing at level 4 were £19,230 one year on, rising to £29,180 five years on.

In 2019/20, the overall apprenticeship achievement rate was 64% and we are taking action to improve achievement rates and ensure all apprentices receive a high-quality apprenticeship experience. This includes investing in a comprehensive package of professional development available to all apprenticeship providers and their workforces; extending Ofsted’s remit to inspect apprenticeships at all levels; and introducing a new risk-based accountability approach, comprising a wider set of quality measures to support provider improvement and more timely intervention.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to increase the level of apprenticeships funding for people aged 18 to 25.

Funding for apprenticeships in England will grow to £2.7 billion by the 2024-25 financial year to support apprenticeships in all employers, including employers that do not pay the levy who will continue to be able to reserve funding for 95% of apprenticeship training and assessment costs. In the 2020-21 financial year we have spent £835 million on new and continuing apprentices for people aged between 18 and 25.

Employers take the decisions about who they recruit as an apprentice, and which type and level of apprenticeship they offer. We will continue to provide additional funding to employers and training providers to support them to take on young apprentices. We offer employers and training providers an additional £1,000 so they can deliver effective support to each 16 to 18 year old apprentice they take on, or 19 to 24 year old apprentices who either have an education, health and care plan or have been in the care of their local authority. We also make it more attractive for the smallest employers (those with fewer than 50 staff) across the country to employ an apprentice by paying 100% of apprenticeship training and assessment costs. Alongside this, we are encouraging all employers to create new apprenticeship opportunities through the £3,000 employer incentive for hiring any new apprentices. This incentive payment has been extended until the end of January 2022.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he made of the proportion of his Department's overall spending on apprenticeships that supports people aged 18 to 25.

Apprenticeships are available for anyone aged 16 or over, and in the 2020/21 academic year young people under the age of 25 accounted for 50% of apprenticeship starts.

In the 2020-21 financial year total apprenticeships participation spend for apprentices of all ages was £1.8 billion. We have spent £835 million on new and continuing apprentices for people aged between 18 and 25.

These figures include additional payments we make in respect of apprentices aged 18-25, such as English and maths and the payments we make to employers and providers for taking on young apprentices. They do not include spend on incentive payments paid to employers for hiring new apprentices, nor on wider spend which supports the ongoing delivery of the apprenticeship programme.

To support employers to offer new apprenticeship opportunities to young people, we extended the higher incentive payment of £3,000 for every new apprentice hired until 31 January 2022 as part of the government's Plan for Jobs. 127,660 incentive payments have been claimed by employers so far, of which 77% were for those aged under 25 (as of 10 November 2021).

In addition, we provide £1,000 to both employers and training providers when they take on apprentices aged between 16 and 18 years old, or 19-to-24-year-old apprentices who either have an education, health and care plan or have been in the care of their local authority.

We encourage more young people to consider apprenticeships, by promoting apprenticeships in schools and colleges through our Apprenticeship Support & Knowledge (ASK) programme. This free service provides resources and interventions to help better educate young people about apprenticeships.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to evaluate the effectiveness of Local Skills Improvement Plans trailblazers and Development Fund pilot areas in advance of the full roll out of Local Skills Improvement Plans.

We have commissioned an independent external evaluation of the Skills Accelerator pilots to explore how employer representative bodies are leading local partners to develop Local Skills Improvement Plans, and how the Strategic Development Fund is being delivered. This will contribute to the evidence base on how the Local Skills Improvement Plan trailblazers and Strategic Development Fund pilots are being implemented, and inform the development of statutory guidance on Local Skills Improvement Plans and their national rollout.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that bodies responsible for the local skills improvement plans have received guidance on how to prepare those plans.

Employer representative bodies who are designated to lead the development of a Local Skills Improvement Plan will be given statutory guidance which will focus on the process by which a credible and robust plan should be developed. This guidance will be informed by the experience and independent evaluation of the trailblazers running in the 2021-22 financial year and our ongoing engagement with key stakeholders.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that bodies responsible for local skills improvement plans have access to local data on youth unemployment at a regional level; and with what frequency that data will be available.

When developing Local Skills Improvement Plans, designated employer representative bodies will be expected to draw on a variety of local labour market data and intelligence, including that on youth unemployment and young people not in education, employment or training. In addition to the information published by the Office for National Statistics on a quarterly basis, employer representative bodies will be expected to engage with local Jobcentre Plus representatives to better understand the specific and emerging circumstances for their local area. Our expectations of designated employer representative bodies, in terms of developing a robust Local Skills Improvement Plan, will be set out in statutory guidance.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to publish the qualifications to have funding removed under the level 3 qualification review; and if he will include in publication the criteria used to identify them.

The government recently announced that there will be an extra year before changes from the post-16 review of level 3 qualifications are implemented. We still plan to publish the final list of qualifications that will be defunded because they overlap with waves 1 and 2 T Levels by summer 2022, with a provisional list and accompanying criteria being published in the New Year.

The additional year means that we will remove 16-19 funding approval for qualifications that overlap with wave 1 and 2 T Levels from the 2024/25 academic year, and from wave 3 and 4 T Levels from the 2025/26 academic year.

The full range of qualifications that will be approved for funding in future will depend on the outcome of the new approvals process. Qualifications will need to demonstrate their necessity and meet new quality standards. These standards are currently in development and will be published in 2022.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when the outcome of the Post-16 study at level 2 and below consultation will be published.

On 10 November 2020, the department published a call for evidence on post-16 study and qualifications at level 2 and below, setting out our ambitions and inviting views on what is working well, and what more can be done to support people studying at these levels to realise their potential. The call for evidence closed on 14 February 2021.

This was the first step towards reform, allowing us to gather evidence from the education sector, industry and students. The next step will be to consult on detailed proposals. We anticipate publishing the consultation in early 2022.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
3rd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much further education colleges were originally told would be clawed back in adult education funds from each college; and how much was re-allocated to colleges following their appeal, by each further education college institution.

In March 2021 the reconciliation threshold for Education and Skills Funding Agency grant funded 2020/21 academic year Adult Education Budget adult skills, including non-formula funded community learning was lowered from 97% to 90% in recognition of the difficulties and uncertainties many providers are facing because of the impact of COVID-19.

The department intends to publish details of 2020/21 academic year final funding by the end of March 2022 following the completion of year end business processes.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
3rd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many further education colleges (a) appealed against the clawback of adult education funds and (b) were successful in their appeal against the clawback of adult education funds.

The department received 78 adult education business cases from eligible Education and Skills Funding Agency grant funded providers, of which 58 were further education colleges. In total, 65 business cases were supported, of which 48 were further education colleges.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
3rd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many further education colleges were advertising (a) T Levels and (b) an entry requirement for T Levels that included a need for GCSE Maths and English on their websites as of 2 December 2021.

The information requested is not held centrally. Providers are best placed to set entry requirements for the courses they deliver, including T Levels. T Levels have been designed to support a range of attainments. We have made changes to ensure that English and mathematics attainment do not present a barrier to students successfully completing T Levels. In future, we expect that providers will take an approach to T Level entry requirements that is in line with their current approach for other level 3 provision.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of colleges in discharging their legal duty under section 45 of the Education Act 1997.

Under Section 125 of the Education and Inspections Act 2006, Ofsted are required to comment on the careers guidance provided at colleges to 16 to 18 year olds and students aged up to 25 with an education, health and care plan as part of their inspection reports. As part of the Education Inspection Framework, Ofsted will also inspect and comment on careers advice when inspecting other further education and skills providers.

The ‘Careers Education in England’ report, published by the Careers and Enterprise Company in 2020, shows that since the launch of the government’s careers strategy in 2017, careers education performance in schools and colleges has consistently improved across all measures. On average, schools and colleges were found to meet 3.75 of the Gatsby benchmarks, compared to 1.87 in the 2016/17 academic year. We are also seeing accelerated progress for schools and colleges in the enterprise adviser network and in careers hubs.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much was clawed back from the adult education budget of each further education college in England in 2021.

The information requested is not yet available.

The 2020/21 funding year completed in July 2021. Providers are now checking their data for a final submission in October and considering whether to submit a business case for any local COVID-19 circumstances that may have affected their delivery. Following the final submission, we will reconcile the funding claimed in November and start to recover funding in December. We will be able to confirm planned recoveries in December.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what body is responsible for assessing whether colleges have failed in their legal duty under section 45 of the Education Act 1997.

Under Section 125 of the Education and Inspections Act 2006, Ofsted are required to comment on the careers guidance provided at colleges to 16 to 18 year olds and students aged up to 25 with an education, health and care plan as part of their inspection reports. As part of the Education Inspection Framework, Ofsted will also inspect and comment on careers advice when inspecting other further education and skills providers.

The ‘Careers Education in England’ report, published by the Careers and Enterprise Company in 2020, shows that since the launch of the government’s careers strategy in 2017, careers education performance in schools and colleges has consistently improved across all measures. On average, schools and colleges were found to meet 3.75 of the Gatsby benchmarks, compared to 1.87 in the 2016/17 academic year. We are also seeing accelerated progress for schools and colleges in the enterprise adviser network and in careers hubs.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the lowest average funding per pupil is for each local authority in England for (a) secondary academies, (b) secondary local authority maintained schools, (c) primary academies and (d) primary local authority maintained schools.

The Department produces published statistics on school revenue funding annually. The latest Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) publication, from January 2021, is available online and covers the average funding per pupil in the 2021/22 financial year for local authorities: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2021-to-2022.

The publication shows the average per pupil funding to schools for 5 to 16 year olds. There is no separate breakdown available for primary and secondary schools, nor for maintained schools and academies.

The publication does provide the primary unit of funding and secondary unit of funding, which can illustrate the breakdown of funding for primary and secondary schools. They are based on funding through the National Funding Formula (NFF) rather than the actual DSG allocations. Local authorities set their own local funding formulae, which means that the funding that schools receive, and how funding is split between primary and secondary schools, can differ from NFF allocations.

Maintained schools and academies are both funded on the same basis, based on their individual pupil and school level characteristics.

The attachment provides a table showing the average funding per pupil in 2021/22 for each local authority.

8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average funding per pupil is for each local authority in England by (a) secondary academies, (b) secondary local authority maintained schools, (c) primary academies and (d) primary local authority maintained schools.

The Department produces published statistics on school revenue funding annually. The latest Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) publication, from January 2021, is available online and covers the average funding per pupil in the 2021/22 financial year for local authorities: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2021-to-2022.

The publication shows the average per pupil funding to schools for 5 to 16 year olds. There is no separate breakdown available for primary and secondary schools, nor for maintained schools and academies.

The publication does provide the primary unit of funding and secondary unit of funding, which can illustrate the breakdown of funding for primary and secondary schools. They are based on funding through the National Funding Formula (NFF) rather than the actual DSG allocations. Local authorities set their own local funding formulae, which means that the funding that schools receive, and how funding is split between primary and secondary schools, can differ from NFF allocations.

Maintained schools and academies are both funded on the same basis, based on their individual pupil and school level characteristics.

The attachment provides a table showing the average funding per pupil in 2021/22 for each local authority.

5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeships have been created as a result of the government’s apprenticeship incentive scheme, by region.

The information requested for full year regional breakdown of apprenticeship starts for the academic years 2017/18, 2018/19 and 2019/20 is published in the ‘Apprenticeships and traineeship’ statistical publication. This is as presented in the following link, which includes a breakdown by apprenticeship level and geographical region: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships/2019-20#content-5-heading.

The following link generates the specific geographical breakdown as requested:https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/fast-track/2db61536-defe-4f82-a7e1-c14980382938.

The latest data on national apprenticeship planned incentive starts, broken down by month, is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships/2020-21#content-12-heading. Geographical breakdowns of incentive payments are not yet available.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeships were created, by region, in the (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19 and (c) 2019–20 academic years.

The information requested for full year regional breakdown of apprenticeship starts for the academic years 2017/18, 2018/19 and 2019/20 is published in the ‘Apprenticeships and traineeship’ statistical publication. This is as presented in the following link, which includes a breakdown by apprenticeship level and geographical region: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships/2019-20#content-5-heading.

The following link generates the specific geographical breakdown as requested:https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/fast-track/2db61536-defe-4f82-a7e1-c14980382938.

The latest data on national apprenticeship planned incentive starts, broken down by month, is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships/2020-21#content-12-heading. Geographical breakdowns of incentive payments are not yet available.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to announce the amount of the total apprenticeship levy underspend for the financial year 2020-21; and if he will make a statement.

The funds in apprenticeship service accounts are available for levy paying employers to use for 24 months before they begin to expire on a rolling, month by month basis. Employers began to pay the apprenticeship levy in April 2017 and unused levy funds began to expire in May 2019.

The attached table shows the figures for monthly levy expiry from May 2019 to date.

The levy is an important part of our reforms to apprenticeships which are vital for driving our economic recovery. It supports employers of all sizes to invest in high quality apprenticeship training. In the 2021-22 financial year, funding available for investment in apprenticeships in England will remain around £2.5 billion – double that spent in the 2010-11 financial year in cash terms.

We do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will need or want to use all the funds available to them, but they are able to if they wish. As well as funding new apprenticeships in levy paying employers, income from the levy is used to fund new apprenticeships in employers that do not pay the levy, as well as existing apprentices that started in previous years.

The funds available to levy paying employers through their apprenticeship service accounts are not the same as the Department for Education’s annual apprenticeships budget. The annual apprenticeship budget is set by Her Majesty's Treasury, and although closely linked, is distinct from the total levy income collected by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs.

Details of apprenticeship budget spend for the 2020-21 financial year will be included in the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Annual Report and Accounts which is due to be published in November 2021.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what amount of apprenticeship levy funding has remained unspent after a period of 24 months in each month since January 2018.

The funds in apprenticeship service accounts are available for levy paying employers to use for 24 months before they begin to expire on a rolling, month by month basis. Employers began to pay the apprenticeship levy in April 2017 and unused levy funds began to expire in May 2019.

The attached table shows the figures for monthly levy expiry from May 2019 to date.

The levy is an important part of our reforms to apprenticeships which are vital for driving our economic recovery. It supports employers of all sizes to invest in high quality apprenticeship training. In the 2021-22 financial year, funding available for investment in apprenticeships in England will remain around £2.5 billion – double that spent in the 2010-11 financial year in cash terms.

We do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will need or want to use all the funds available to them, but they are able to if they wish. As well as funding new apprenticeships in levy paying employers, income from the levy is used to fund new apprenticeships in employers that do not pay the levy, as well as existing apprentices that started in previous years.

The funds available to levy paying employers through their apprenticeship service accounts are not the same as the Department for Education’s annual apprenticeships budget. The annual apprenticeship budget is set by Her Majesty's Treasury, and although closely linked, is distinct from the total levy income collected by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs.

Details of apprenticeship budget spend for the 2020-21 financial year will be included in the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Annual Report and Accounts which is due to be published in November 2021.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to minimise reductions in adult education opportunities by providers that are facing claw-back from their 2020-21 Adult Education Budgets as a result of his Department's decision to set the reconciliation threshold for grant-funded providers at 90 per cent.

We are lowering the reconciliation threshold of the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) grant funded Adult Education Budget (AEB) (AEB adult skills including non-formula funded community learning and 19-24 traineeships) for 2020 to 2021, from 97% to 90%. This will mean that colleges that have under-delivered on this provision will be able to retain more funding than they normally would.

The allocations for the COVID-19 skills offer, including funding for the new level 3 adult offer, are ringfenced and the reconciliation threshold for under-delivery of this provision will remain at 97%.

Our primary aim is to support providers to continue to deliver as much quality provision as possible, including above the 90% threshold, whether that be face-to-face where permitted, online, or otherwise remotely. This includes sub-contracting (for AEB-funded provision only) where that is in line with our subcontracting conditions set out in the rules and contracts.

Our latest data shows that a threshold of 90% is a fair representation of the providers’ average forecasted delivery for the 2020/21 academic year.

We acknowledge the situation is still difficult for providers. Equally, we know that many providers have been able to deliver successfully remotely during lockdown. The return to face-to-face learning should further enhance providers’ ability to deliver.

For colleges who are eligible and are at risk of insolvency, they would be supported by the Insolvency Regime or the Emergency funding process.

This 90% threshold is the final position for the 2020/2021 academic year and will not be subject to change. There will not be a business case process. In areas where the AEB has been devolved, Mayoral Combined Authorities and Greater London Authority are responsible for considering any provider flexibilities in their areas.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on what evidence he based his decision to set the 2020-21 Adult Education Budget reconciliation threshold for grant funded providers at 90 per cent.

We are lowering the reconciliation threshold of the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) grant funded Adult Education Budget (AEB) (AEB adult skills including non-formula funded community learning and 19-24 traineeships) for 2020 to 2021, from 97% to 90%. This will mean that colleges that have under-delivered on this provision will be able to retain more funding than they normally would.

The allocations for the COVID-19 skills offer, including funding for the new level 3 adult offer, are ringfenced and the reconciliation threshold for under-delivery of this provision will remain at 97%.

Our primary aim is to support providers to continue to deliver as much quality provision as possible, including above the 90% threshold, whether that be face-to-face where permitted, online, or otherwise remotely. This includes sub-contracting (for AEB-funded provision only) where that is in line with our subcontracting conditions set out in the rules and contracts.

Our latest data shows that a threshold of 90% is a fair representation of the providers’ average forecasted delivery for the 2020/21 academic year.

We acknowledge the situation is still difficult for providers. Equally, we know that many providers have been able to deliver successfully remotely during lockdown. The return to face-to-face learning should further enhance providers’ ability to deliver.

For colleges who are eligible and are at risk of insolvency, they would be supported by the Insolvency Regime or the Emergency funding process.

This 90% threshold is the final position for the 2020/2021 academic year and will not be subject to change. There will not be a business case process. In areas where the AEB has been devolved, Mayoral Combined Authorities and Greater London Authority are responsible for considering any provider flexibilities in their areas.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what equality impact assessment he has made of the decision to claw back adult education funding from 2020-21 Adult Education Budget grant-funded providers.

We are lowering the reconciliation threshold of the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) grant funded Adult Education Budget (AEB) (AEB adult skills including non-formula funded community learning and 19-24 traineeships) for 2020 to 2021, from 97% to 90%. This will mean that colleges that have under-delivered on this provision will be able to retain more funding than they normally would.

The allocations for the COVID-19 skills offer, including funding for the new level 3 adult offer, are ringfenced and the reconciliation threshold for under-delivery of this provision will remain at 97%.

Our primary aim is to support providers to continue to deliver as much quality provision as possible, including above the 90% threshold, whether that be face-to-face where permitted, online, or otherwise remotely. This includes sub-contracting (for AEB-funded provision only) where that is in line with our subcontracting conditions set out in the rules and contracts.

Our latest data shows that a threshold of 90% is a fair representation of the providers’ average forecasted delivery for the 2020/21 academic year.

We acknowledge the situation is still difficult for providers. Equally, we know that many providers have been able to deliver successfully remotely during lockdown. The return to face-to-face learning should further enhance providers’ ability to deliver.

For colleges who are eligible and are at risk of insolvency, they would be supported by the Insolvency Regime or the Emergency funding process.

This 90% threshold is the final position for the 2020/2021 academic year and will not be subject to change. There will not be a business case process. In areas where the AEB has been devolved, Mayoral Combined Authorities and Greater London Authority are responsible for considering any provider flexibilities in their areas.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the flexible loan entitlement announced in January 2021 as part of the Lifetime Skills Guarantee will include maintenance support.

We are considering how maintenance loans and student support grants would be available for any study funded through the Lifelong Loan Entitlement (LLE). We will consult on the detail and scope of the LLE later this year.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to integrate increased levels of modular assessment in Further and Technical Education at (a) Level 3 and (b) lower levels.

The department is reviewing post-16 qualifications at level 3 and below to ensure that every qualification approved for public funding has a distinct purpose, is high quality, and supports progression to positive outcomes.

Our second stage consultation on level 3 advanced technical qualifications (https://consult.education.gov.uk/post-16-qualifications-review-team/review-of-post-16-qualifications-at-level-3/) closed on 31 January 2021, and our call for evidence (https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/post-16-study-at-level-2-and-below-call-for-evidence) on level 2 and below qualifications closed on 14 February 2021.

In the level 3 consultation, we proposed that assessing a student’s competence at the end of a course (summative assessment) becomes a key feature of technical education.

Summative assessment allows modular delivery of content but gives greater assurance that competence is achieved by assessing knowledge, skills, and behaviours once all learning has been completed. We are considering the circumstances under which it would appropriate for qualifications to diverge from this model.

We are carefully reviewing the responses to the level 3 consultation and plan to publish the government response later in the spring. We are developing proposals for consultation on level 2 and below and are considering which design principles might best meet students’ needs.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the impact that the introduction of an outcomes based funding model will have on educational opportunities for (a) 16-24 year olds, and (b) those aged 24 and above, who are NEET (Not in Education, Employment, or Training), or have additional needs.

The Skills for Jobs white paper sets out the government’s vision to simplify and streamline funding for further education to ensure everyone – including those who are not in education, employment or training or have additional needs – is able to access high value provision that is relevant to labour market needs and job opportunities. These changes will enable colleges and other skills providers to deliver the skills programmes and qualifications to support progression into further learning and respond to employer demand, supporting people to use their learning to enter the labour market, upskill and/or change careers.

This will be an integral part of our lifetime skills guarantee. By taking a focus on learner outcomes, we will incentivise colleges and skills providers to review their provision to ensure it leads to meaningful progression and employment for their learners, including the important focus on those learners with complex needs or learning difficulties.

A key part of this system will be supporting the collaboration between colleges and skills providers through local skills improvement plans. The department is testing detailed elements with the sector and will be setting out proposals in a full consultation later this year.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many BAME people currently hold posts as (a) heads of further education colleges and (b) further education governors.

Our College Staff Survey (CSS) 2018 found that 9% of heads (principals) of further education colleges in England were from a Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) background (87% white, 4% preferred not to say). This data is self-reported from 140 principals. The CSS also reports that 4% of leaders generally, encompassing those at other management levels and governors, were from a BAME background (91% white, 2% other and 3% preferred not to say). This data is self-reported from 2,486 leaders. We are unable to distinguish the ethnicity of governors because of a low response rate from this group. The CSS is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/college-staff-survey-2018.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency will introduce a comprehensive further education workforce data collection from the academic year 2020/2021, including ethnicity data. This will be mandatory from the following academic year (2021/2022). This will enable us to better identify the proportion of governors from a BAME background.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many people the Further Education Commisioner's office employ; at what grades those people are employed; and what the ethnic background is of each of those people employed at each of those grades.

The Further Education Commissioner works with a team of six Deputy Further Education Commissioners and 11 Further Education Advisers, whose details are available on gov.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/further-education-commissioner/about#who-we-are.

The Further Education Commissioner is also supported by a private office of three civil servants, including one team leader. The Department is unable to release diversity information where figures are fewer than five. These suppression rules are in place to protect the anonymity and privacy of individuals. The Further Education Commissioner also works with a number of civil servants from within the Further Education Directorate in the Education and Skills Funding Agency, who provide wider support.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many people are employed in managerial or senior positions at the Further Education Commissioner's office; and how many of those people identify as (a) White European and (b) BAME.

The Further Education Commissioner works with a team of six Deputy Further Education Commissioners and 11 Further Education Advisers, whose details are available on gov.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/further-education-commissioner/about#who-we-are.

The Further Education Commissioner is also supported by a private office of three civil servants, including one team leader. The Department is unable to release diversity information where figures are fewer than five. These suppression rules are in place to protect the anonymity and privacy of individuals. The Further Education Commissioner also works with a number of civil servants from within the Further Education Directorate in the Education and Skills Funding Agency, who provide wider support.

11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which further education colleges received additional funding as a result of significant financial difficulties in England in 2020.

The department has put in place the college oversight regime which aims to improve financial resilience and quality by incentivising and supporting college leaders to recognise issues and take action before matters become serious. Where colleges may get into serious financial difficulty, the Education and Skills Funding Agency may provide additional funding if a college might otherwise be likely to run out of money or provide funds to support an agreed restructuring solution.

The department is committed to annually publishing data on colleges that have received emergency funding or funding for a restructuring solution, including insolvency. Information published in December 2020 noted that in the period 1 April 2019 to 31 March 2020, 7 colleges were provided with emergency funding or insolvency financial support. All 7 of these colleges received emergency funding in 2020. Between 1 April to 31 December 2020 a further 3 colleges received funding, the total number of colleges provided with emergency funding in 2020 is therefore 10.

The department does not release details of the specific colleges that receive emergency funding as this information is commercially sensitive.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many further education colleges received additional funding as a result of significant funding difficulties in 2020.

The department has put in place the college oversight regime which aims to improve financial resilience and quality by incentivising and supporting college leaders to recognise issues and take action before matters become serious. Where colleges may get into serious financial difficulty, the Education and Skills Funding Agency may provide additional funding if a college might otherwise be likely to run out of money or provide funds to support an agreed restructuring solution.

The department is committed to annually publishing data on colleges that have received emergency funding or funding for a restructuring solution, including insolvency. Information published in December 2020 noted that in the period 1 April 2019 to 31 March 2020, 7 colleges were provided with emergency funding or insolvency financial support. All 7 of these colleges received emergency funding in 2020. Between 1 April to 31 December 2020 a further 3 colleges received funding, the total number of colleges provided with emergency funding in 2020 is therefore 10.

The department does not release details of the specific colleges that receive emergency funding as this information is commercially sensitive.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many level 2 apprentices that have been unable to progress to level 3 for six months or more are (a) awaiting their assessment and (b) have had their employment suspended or furloughed as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

We are committed to supporting apprentices at all levels, to safely continue with, and complete, their programmes during the COVID-19 outbreak while maintaining quality.

Provisional figures show that in the first quarter of 2020/21 academic year, 30,100 apprentices achieved their apprenticeships (frameworks and standards) including 11,270 apprentices at level 2. Latest figures show that 39% (13,789) of active level 2 apprentices are currently past their planned apprenticeship end date, compared to 21% (15,833) at the same time last year. There are a number of reasons why an apprentice may still be on their apprenticeship past their planned end date, beyond any disruption caused by COVID-19. For those apprentices who were expected to have completed their apprenticeship but have not done so yet, we do not have data on the reason for the delay.

The Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education has introduced flexibilities for end point assessment (EPA), including remote assessment where practical, 12 week extensions to the time limit for completion, and relaxation of the order in which elements of the EPA can be taken, in order to mitigate the effects of disruption caused by COVID-19. All assessment flexibilities and discretions put in place due to COVID-19 will be extended until at least 31 August 2021.

We have introduced flexibilities to allow furloughed apprentices to continue their training and undertake end point assessments. We do not collect data on the number of apprentices who have been furloughed as a result of COVID-19.

Apprenticeship standards are designed to ensure the apprentice is occupationally competent at the end of the apprenticeship. While it was previously possible to undertake an apprenticeship framework for the same job at different levels, with standards there is just one level per occupation. This means that upon completion, apprentices are fully equipped with the skills to successfully undertake their job. Apprentices and their employer can choose to progress to an apprenticeship, or further training, at a higher level at a time that is right for them.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many level 2 apprentices are unable to progress to level 3 as they are awaiting their assessment as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

We are committed to supporting apprentices at all levels, to safely continue with, and complete, their programmes during the COVID-19 outbreak while maintaining quality.

Provisional figures show that in the first quarter of 2020/21 academic year, 30,100 apprentices achieved their apprenticeships (frameworks and standards) including 11,270 apprentices at level 2. Latest figures show that 39% (13,789) of active level 2 apprentices are currently past their planned apprenticeship end date, compared to 21% (15,833) at the same time last year. There are a number of reasons why an apprentice may still be on their apprenticeship past their planned end date, beyond any disruption caused by COVID-19. For those apprentices who were expected to have completed their apprenticeship but have not done so yet, we do not have data on the reason for the delay.

The Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education has introduced flexibilities for end point assessment (EPA), including remote assessment where practical, 12 week extensions to the time limit for completion, and relaxation of the order in which elements of the EPA can be taken, in order to mitigate the effects of disruption caused by COVID-19. All assessment flexibilities and discretions put in place due to COVID-19 will be extended until at least 31 August 2021.

We have introduced flexibilities to allow furloughed apprentices to continue their training and undertake end point assessments. We do not collect data on the number of apprentices who have been furloughed as a result of COVID-19.

Apprenticeship standards are designed to ensure the apprentice is occupationally competent at the end of the apprenticeship. While it was previously possible to undertake an apprenticeship framework for the same job at different levels, with standards there is just one level per occupation. This means that upon completion, apprentices are fully equipped with the skills to successfully undertake their job. Apprentices and their employer can choose to progress to an apprenticeship, or further training, at a higher level at a time that is right for them.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what alternative arrangements he plans to put in place for the assessment of Level 2 apprentices on practical-based courses.

We are committed to supporting apprentices and employers to safely continue with, and complete, their programmes during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Following the announcement of a new national lockdown on 4 January 2021, training and assessment for apprentices at all levels should now take place remotely wherever possible.

The Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education has introduced alternative arrangements for end-point assessments, including remote assessment where practical, 12-week extensions to the time limit for completion, and relaxation of the order in which elements can be taken. All assessment flexibilities and discretions put in place due to COVID-19 will be extended until at least 31 August 2021.

To enable apprentices nearing completion to prepare for and undertake their end-point assessments, which were due in January 2021 or are planned for February or March 2021, face-to-face and practical-based training can continue where remote training is not possible.

End-point assessment and Functional Skills assessments can continue in colleges, training providers’ premises, assessment venues and workplaces where it cannot be conducted remotely and where providers and end-point assessment organisations judge it right to do so. End-point assessment is a key element of our reforms to enhance the quality of apprenticeships, ensuring apprentices are occupationally competent.

Where it is not possible for the apprentice to undertake their assessment, a break in learning can be agreed. Further guidance can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/957704/Providing_apprenticeships_during_the_coronavirus__COVID-19__outbreak.pdf.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of staff employed by his Department are apprentices.

As of 31 January 2021, 4.9% of staff employed by the Department for Education are apprentices.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding has been (a) allocated to and (b) spent on incentive payments for hiring a new apprentice since the start of that payment scheme.

Apprenticeships will be more important than ever in helping businesses to recruit the right people and develop the skills they need to recover and grow. To help employers offer new apprenticeships, they are now able to claim £2,000 for every new apprentice they hire under the age of 25, and £1,500 for new apprentices aged 25 and over. These incentive payments were announced as part of the government’s Plan for Jobs in July 2020 and the extension of the scheme (to the end of March 2021) was announced in the November Spending Review. Employers have been able to register to claim the incentive since 1 September 2020.

It is encouraging that employers continue to see the value apprentices can bring to their businesses, as of 8 January 2021 employers had so far claimed incentive payments for 18,670 apprentices. 15,270 of these were for 16–24 year olds and 3,400 were for those aged 25 and over.

Incentive payments are funded from the overall annual apprenticeship budget. In the 2020-21 financial year, funding available for investment in apprenticeships in England is almost £2.5 billion, double what was spent in the 2010-11 financial year.

Incentive payments are paid to employers in 2 equal instalments to maximise apprenticeship retention. Employers receive the first payment of 50% 90 days after the apprenticeship start date and the remaining 50% after 365 days. These payments are dependent on the apprentice remaining in employment and on their apprenticeship. £5 million has been paid to employers in incentive payments for apprentices who started between August and September 2020. This is the first payment of incentive payments in the academic year to date.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, by what method were people making apprenticeship starts between 1 August 2020 and 31 January 2021 recruited.

Apprenticeships are jobs with high-quality training, created by employers, and will be more important than ever in helping businesses to recruit the right people and develop the skills they need to recover and grow.

Apprenticeship opportunities in England can be found on the ‘Find an apprenticeship’ (FAA) service here: https://www.gov.uk/apply-apprenticeship. Employers can use the ‘recruit an apprentice’ service to advertise on FAA; we encourage employers to use this to maximise engagement with their vacancies. Prospective apprentices can search for vacancies on FAA and create an account to manage their applications and get alerts about new apprenticeships.

We publish figures for monthly apprenticeship vacancies reported on the FAA website here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships. Between August and December 2020, employers advertised over 36,000 apprenticeship vacancies on the FAA website. Apprenticeship vacancies for January 2021 will first be published on 25 February in our ‘Apprenticeships and traineeships: February 2021’ statistics publication: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/announcements/apprenticeships-and-traineeships-february-2021.

Employers can also choose to recruit apprentices through their own channels, for example their own websites, which we do not monitor.

To help employers offer new apprenticeships, they are now able to claim up to £2,000 for every new apprentice they hire. These incentive payments were announced as part of the government’s Plan for Jobs in July 2020 and the extension of the scheme (to the end of March 2021) was announced in the November Spending Review. It is encouraging that employers continue to see the value apprentices can bring to their businesses; as of 8 January 2021 employers had so far claimed incentive payments for 18,670 apprentices.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeship starts there were between 1 August 2018 and 31 January 2019.

The latest available apprenticeship starts data for the 2020/21 academic year covers 01 August to 31 October 2020, reported to date, and shows there were 91,100 apprenticeship starts. For the same period in 2019/20 there were 125,800 starts and in 2018/19 there were 132,000 starts.

Finalised figures for the first 6 months (01 August to 31 January) of the 2019/20 and 2018/19 academic years show there were 220,400 and 235,200 apprenticeship starts respectively.

Further breakdowns of these apprenticeship starts figures can be found in our Apprenticeships and traineeships: January 2020 statistics publication, available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships/2020-21.

The next publication of apprenticeship statistics (covering 01 August to 30 November 2020) will be the Apprenticeship and traineeships: February 2020 statistics publication, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/announcements/apprenticeships-and-traineeships-february-2021.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeship starts there were between 1 August 2019 and 31 January 2020.

The latest available apprenticeship starts data for the 2020/21 academic year covers 01 August to 31 October 2020, reported to date, and shows there were 91,100 apprenticeship starts. For the same period in 2019/20 there were 125,800 starts and in 2018/19 there were 132,000 starts.

Finalised figures for the first 6 months (01 August to 31 January) of the 2019/20 and 2018/19 academic years show there were 220,400 and 235,200 apprenticeship starts respectively.

Further breakdowns of these apprenticeship starts figures can be found in our Apprenticeships and traineeships: January 2020 statistics publication, available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships/2020-21.

The next publication of apprenticeship statistics (covering 01 August to 30 November 2020) will be the Apprenticeship and traineeships: February 2020 statistics publication, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/announcements/apprenticeships-and-traineeships-february-2021.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeship starts there were between 1 August 2020 and 31 January 2021.

The latest available apprenticeship starts data for the 2020/21 academic year covers 01 August to 31 October 2020, reported to date, and shows there were 91,100 apprenticeship starts. For the same period in 2019/20 there were 125,800 starts and in 2018/19 there were 132,000 starts.

Finalised figures for the first 6 months (01 August to 31 January) of the 2019/20 and 2018/19 academic years show there were 220,400 and 235,200 apprenticeship starts respectively.

Further breakdowns of these apprenticeship starts figures can be found in our Apprenticeships and traineeships: January 2020 statistics publication, available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships/2020-21.

The next publication of apprenticeship statistics (covering 01 August to 30 November 2020) will be the Apprenticeship and traineeships: February 2020 statistics publication, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/announcements/apprenticeships-and-traineeships-february-2021.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) laptops and (b) wireless dongles that have been provided by his Department to further education colleges in England.

The government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

This includes over 800,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to schools, academy trusts and local authorities by 17 January.

The department has already provided 4G wireless routers, with free data for the academic year, to schools, trusts and local authorities and continue to provide 4G wireless routers where children need to access remote education.

Disadvantaged learners aged 16-19 in schools and further education colleges are supported through the 16-19 bursary fund. During the 2020 summer term, we enabled schools and further education colleges to boost their bursary fund to meet any extra costs for student technology needs.

We have now extended the Get Help with Technology scheme to provide disadvantaged 16 to 19 year olds with technological support.

We expect to be able to invite most eligible further education providers, including colleges, sixth form colleges and school sixth forms, to order devices before the end of January. Other further education providers, such as independent training providers and special post-16 institutions, will also be in the frame if they have learners receiving free school meals.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of further education students without an appropriate digital device to allow them to study remotely.

The government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

This includes over 800,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to schools, academy trusts and local authorities by 17 January.

The department has already provided 4G wireless routers, with free data for the academic year, to schools, trusts and local authorities and continue to provide 4G wireless routers where children need to access remote education.

Disadvantaged learners aged 16-19 in schools and further education colleges are supported through the 16-19 bursary fund. During the 2020 summer term, we enabled schools and further education colleges to boost their bursary fund to meet any extra costs for student technology needs.

We have now extended the Get Help with Technology scheme to provide disadvantaged 16 to 19 year olds with technological support.

We expect to be able to invite most eligible further education providers, including colleges, sixth form colleges and school sixth forms, to order devices before the end of January. Other further education providers, such as independent training providers and special post-16 institutions, will also be in the frame if they have learners receiving free school meals.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many digital devices his Department plans to supply to further education colleges in England; and when the full allocation will be supplied by.

The government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

This includes over 800,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to schools, academy trusts and local authorities by 17 January.

The department has already provided 4G wireless routers, with free data for the academic year, to schools, trusts and local authorities and continue to provide 4G wireless routers where children need to access remote education.

Disadvantaged learners aged 16-19 in schools and further education colleges are supported through the 16-19 bursary fund. During the 2020 summer term, we enabled schools and further education colleges to boost their bursary fund to meet any extra costs for student technology needs.

We have now extended the Get Help with Technology scheme to provide disadvantaged 16 to 19 year olds with technological support.

We expect to be able to invite most eligible further education providers, including colleges, sixth form colleges and school sixth forms, to order devices before the end of January. Other further education providers, such as independent training providers and special post-16 institutions, will also be in the frame if they have learners receiving free school meals.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprentices are awaiting their End-Point Assessment and unable to complete their apprenticeship.

We do not hold data on the number of apprentices who are awaiting their end-point assessment. Our apprenticeships data is published here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships. There were 46,930 apprenticeship achievements reported between 23 March and 31 July 2020.

The Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education has introduced alternative arrangements for End-Point Assessments (EPAs), including remote assessment where practicable, 12 week extensions to the time limit for completion, and relaxation of the order in which elements can be taken. The Institute has published a list of over 100 apprenticeship standards where additional discretions have been introduced, including cybersecurity technologist and nursing associate. Further information on this is available here: https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/covid-19/recent-announcements/list-of-standards-with-temporary-discretions-or-flexibilities/.

Following the introduction of National Restrictions on 6 January, EPAs should now take place remotely wherever possible, in line with the Institute’s guidance on the delivery of assessment. Assessments can continue in colleges, training providers’ premises, assessment venues and workplaces where they cannot be conducted remotely and where providers and assessment organisations judge it right to do so. Further information is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/950845/Apprenticeship_response_to_COVID-19_FINAL.pdf#page=28&zoom=100,69,640.

All EPA flexibilities and discretions put in place due to the COVID-19 outbreak will be extended until at least 31 August 2021. We continue to review the flexibilities in place to ensure high-quality assessment can continue allowing apprentices to undertake their assessments despite current operating constraints. Our intention is to safeguard the quality of apprenticeships, and EPAs are an integral part of that.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what alternative arrangements he has made for apprentices who are unable to undertake End-Point Assessments.

We do not hold data on the number of apprentices who are awaiting their end-point assessment. Our apprenticeships data is published here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships. There were 46,930 apprenticeship achievements reported between 23 March and 31 July 2020.

The Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education has introduced alternative arrangements for End-Point Assessments (EPAs), including remote assessment where practicable, 12 week extensions to the time limit for completion, and relaxation of the order in which elements can be taken. The Institute has published a list of over 100 apprenticeship standards where additional discretions have been introduced, including cybersecurity technologist and nursing associate. Further information on this is available here: https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/covid-19/recent-announcements/list-of-standards-with-temporary-discretions-or-flexibilities/.

Following the introduction of National Restrictions on 6 January, EPAs should now take place remotely wherever possible, in line with the Institute’s guidance on the delivery of assessment. Assessments can continue in colleges, training providers’ premises, assessment venues and workplaces where they cannot be conducted remotely and where providers and assessment organisations judge it right to do so. Further information is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/950845/Apprenticeship_response_to_COVID-19_FINAL.pdf#page=28&zoom=100,69,640.

All EPA flexibilities and discretions put in place due to the COVID-19 outbreak will be extended until at least 31 August 2021. We continue to review the flexibilities in place to ensure high-quality assessment can continue allowing apprentices to undertake their assessments despite current operating constraints. Our intention is to safeguard the quality of apprenticeships, and EPAs are an integral part of that.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the equity of the decision to cease funding to the Union Learning Fund.

The government’s commitment to the Union Learning Fund has never been open-ended and the current funding is due to cease at the end of March 2021. We have always been clear any future funding would depend on the government’s Spending Review.

The decision considered the impact on Unionlearn and their activities and was taken in light of our expanded commitment to skills development through the National Skills Fund, and Lifetime Skills Guarantee. Overall we are investing much more in adult skills retraining, and doing so through a broad offer, rather than a small dedicated fund promoted through the union network.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when (a) he and (b) the Under-Secretary of State for Apprenticeships and Skills last discussed the Unionlearn service with the Trades Union Congress prior to 7 October 2020.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, has not met with the Trade Union Congress specifically to discuss Unionlearn, though regularly engages with unions to discuss a variety of matters related to his role.

I met with Frances O’Grady on 12 October to discuss our decision in relation to Unionlearn, and our expanded commitment to skills development through the National Skills Fund and Lifetime Skills Guarantee. I can confirm as part of that commitment all the money will be invested in skills and retraining that will be fully accessible to everyone.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussion he has had with (a) training providers, (b) Sector Skills Councils and (c) further education representative organisations on the decision to the terminate the Union Learning Fund.

The government’s commitment to the Union Learning Fund has never been open-ended and the current funding was due to cease in April 2021. We have made no commitment to funding beyond this date and have always been clear any future funding would depend on the government’s Spending Review. The decision not to renew funding after April 2021 has been communicated at this stage in the Spending Review process in order to give a greater period of notice.

As part of our expanded commitment to skills development through the National Skills Fund and Lifetime Skills Guarantee I can confirm all the money will be invested in skills and retraining that will be fully accessible to everyone.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Level 2 apprenticeships were (a) started and (b) completed in each year from 2010 to 2020.

The number of level 2 and 3 apprenticeships started and achieved from the academic year 2009-10 to the third quarter of the academic year 2019-20 are published at the links below:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/900237/Further-education-and-skills-July-2020-main-tables.xlsx;

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/435642/apprenticeships-starts-by-constituency_v2.xlsx.

The number of apprenticeship level 2 and 3 achievements in further education colleges, and independent providers between 2014/15 and 2018/19 are published here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/848359/PT4_Nov_19_FINAL_v0.2.xlsx;

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/765575/Apprenticeships_by_Provider_framework_standard_201415_to_201718.xlsx.

Data from the above links regarding the proportion of level 2 and 3 apprenticeships achieved by further education (FE) colleges and independent providers is shown in the table below.

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

General FE and Tertiary College, level 2

33%

33%

34%

35%

34%

General FE and Tertiary College, level 3

33%

32%

32%

31%

34%

Private Sector Public Funded, level 2

58%

57%

56%

55%

52%

Private Sector Public Funded, level 3

59%

62%

61%

61%

57%

Notes

1) The data source is the Individualised Learner Record (ILR).

2) Completions of apprenticeships are published as 'Achievements'.

3) Numbers are a count of the number of achievements at any point during the academic year. Learners achieving more than one apprenticeship will appear more than once.

4) Apprenticeship achievements include all funded and unfunded learners reported on the ILR.

5) Level 2 apprenticeships are published as 'Intermediate Apprenticeship', whilst level 3 apprenticeships are published as 'Advanced Apprenticeship'.

6) Apprenticeship achievements statistics should not be used to measure percentage progress within a year. They are independent performance metrics. Typically, apprenticeships can take 2 years to complete.

7) Independent providers are published as 'Private Sector Public Funded'. FE colleges are published as 'General FE and Tertiary College'.

8) In order to be counted as a successful achievement, all elements of the framework must have been achieved.

9) 2019/20 full year provider level data will be published in November 2020.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Level 3 apprenticeships were (a) started and (b) completed in each year from 2010 to date.

The number of level 2 and 3 apprenticeships started and achieved from the academic year 2009-10 to the third quarter of the academic year 2019-20 are published at the links below:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/900237/Further-education-and-skills-July-2020-main-tables.xlsx;

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/435642/apprenticeships-starts-by-constituency_v2.xlsx.

The number of apprenticeship level 2 and 3 achievements in further education colleges, and independent providers between 2014/15 and 2018/19 are published here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/848359/PT4_Nov_19_FINAL_v0.2.xlsx;

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/765575/Apprenticeships_by_Provider_framework_standard_201415_to_201718.xlsx.

Data from the above links regarding the proportion of level 2 and 3 apprenticeships achieved by further education (FE) colleges and independent providers is shown in the table below.

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

General FE and Tertiary College, level 2

33%

33%

34%

35%

34%

General FE and Tertiary College, level 3

33%

32%

32%

31%

34%

Private Sector Public Funded, level 2

58%

57%

56%

55%

52%

Private Sector Public Funded, level 3

59%

62%

61%

61%

57%

Notes

1) The data source is the Individualised Learner Record (ILR).

2) Completions of apprenticeships are published as 'Achievements'.

3) Numbers are a count of the number of achievements at any point during the academic year. Learners achieving more than one apprenticeship will appear more than once.

4) Apprenticeship achievements include all funded and unfunded learners reported on the ILR.

5) Level 2 apprenticeships are published as 'Intermediate Apprenticeship', whilst level 3 apprenticeships are published as 'Advanced Apprenticeship'.

6) Apprenticeship achievements statistics should not be used to measure percentage progress within a year. They are independent performance metrics. Typically, apprenticeships can take 2 years to complete.

7) Independent providers are published as 'Private Sector Public Funded'. FE colleges are published as 'General FE and Tertiary College'.

8) In order to be counted as a successful achievement, all elements of the framework must have been achieved.

9) 2019/20 full year provider level data will be published in November 2020.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of level (a) 2 and (b) 3 apprenticeships were completed by (i) Further Education colleges and (I) independent providers in each year since 2015.

The number of level 2 and 3 apprenticeships started and achieved from the academic year 2009-10 to the third quarter of the academic year 2019-20 are published at the links below:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/900237/Further-education-and-skills-July-2020-main-tables.xlsx;

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/435642/apprenticeships-starts-by-constituency_v2.xlsx.

The number of apprenticeship level 2 and 3 achievements in further education colleges, and independent providers between 2014/15 and 2018/19 are published here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/848359/PT4_Nov_19_FINAL_v0.2.xlsx;

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/765575/Apprenticeships_by_Provider_framework_standard_201415_to_201718.xlsx.

Data from the above links regarding the proportion of level 2 and 3 apprenticeships achieved by further education (FE) colleges and independent providers is shown in the table below.

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

General FE and Tertiary College, level 2

33%

33%

34%

35%

34%

General FE and Tertiary College, level 3

33%

32%

32%

31%

34%

Private Sector Public Funded, level 2

58%

57%

56%

55%

52%

Private Sector Public Funded, level 3

59%

62%

61%

61%

57%

Notes

1) The data source is the Individualised Learner Record (ILR).

2) Completions of apprenticeships are published as 'Achievements'.

3) Numbers are a count of the number of achievements at any point during the academic year. Learners achieving more than one apprenticeship will appear more than once.

4) Apprenticeship achievements include all funded and unfunded learners reported on the ILR.

5) Level 2 apprenticeships are published as 'Intermediate Apprenticeship', whilst level 3 apprenticeships are published as 'Advanced Apprenticeship'.

6) Apprenticeship achievements statistics should not be used to measure percentage progress within a year. They are independent performance metrics. Typically, apprenticeships can take 2 years to complete.

7) Independent providers are published as 'Private Sector Public Funded'. FE colleges are published as 'General FE and Tertiary College'.

8) In order to be counted as a successful achievement, all elements of the framework must have been achieved.

9) 2019/20 full year provider level data will be published in November 2020.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much money from the public purse has been spent on capital improvements to further education colleges in each year since 2000.

Since 2001, the following table outlines funding provided to support capital improvements in further education (FE) colleges.[1]

Year

£ million

2001-02

140

2002-03

233

2003-04

291

2004-05

360

2005-06

326

2006-07

367

2007-08

436

2008-09

582

2009-10

899

2010-11

76

2011-12

121

2012-13

198

2013-14

379

2014-15

122

2015-16

61

From 2015-16 until 2020-21, £980 million was devolved through the Local Growth Fund to Local Enterprise Partnerships to allocate against local skills and growth projects, including supporting skills capital projects.

The government is committed to upgrading FE colleges over the coming 5 years so they are great places to learn, by investing £1.5 billion to transform the FE college estate. That transformation has begun with an allocation of £200 million this year to FE colleges and designated institutions to tackle immediate remedial condition improvement projects. This adds to the investment already made in Institutes of Technology and T levels capital.

We will invest up to £290 million of capital funding to establish 20 employer-led Institutes of Technology, with the aim of achieving nationwide coverage across all regions. We have so far invested £21.4 million in 2019-20 and £18.9 million in 2020-21.[2]

Since November 2019, £11.1 million has been invested in delivering industry standard facilities in FE colleges to support the roll out of the new T levels qualification. This is supported with an investment of £5.4 million to support the purchase of specialist equipment for T levels.

[1] For 2001-02 to 2009-10 funding was through the Learning and Skills Council for 2010-11 to 2015-16 it was through the Skills Funding Agency.

[2] Funding for IOTs is mainly directed at FE Colleges, as they are delivering the bulk of provision, but some funding goes to Universities.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Education of 7 September 2020, Official Report, column 349, on Further Education College Finances, if he will publish a list of the 40 further education colleges officials of his Department are working with to help structure their finances.

The department does not release information on specific colleges we are working with as this is commercially sensitive.

Where colleges are expecting that they will face financial pressures, the Education and Skills Funding Agency and Further Education Commissioner teams are working directly with the college to ensure that there is the right support in place and that learners are protected.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department will extend pupil premium plus funding to previously looked after children up to the age of 18 given that education and training is now compulsory from 16 to 18.

In October 2019, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, announced a new package of cross-government support available to young people leaving the care system. This package includes £3 million to enable the department to pilot an extension of pupil premium plus to include 16-18-year-olds in further education. This pilot will test the effectiveness of pupil premium plus and potential wider rollout of pupil premium plus for children currently in local authority care in England and children who have ceased to be looked after by a local authority in England and Wales because of adoption, special guardianship order or a child arrangements order.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if his Department will extend the Care Leavers Internship Scheme to include all care-experienced and adopted young people.

Care leavers aged 18-30 years old are able to apply for an internship through the scheme. The scheme is aimed at providing opportunities for care leavers, rather than the wider cohort of all care-experienced children and young people. This is because care leavers can suffer from poor outcomes and have to make the transition to independence at a much younger age than their peers, often without the support of familial or wider support networks.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which further education colleges are in education administration as at 24 June 2020; when those colleges were placed into education administration; which colleges were in education administration in 2018 and are no longer in administration; and on what date those colleges (a) entered and (b) ceased to be in administration.

As at 24 June 2020, 2 further education colleges are in education administration. Hadlow College was placed into education administration on 22 May 2019. West Kent and Ashford College was placed into education administration on 16 August 2019. There have been no other cases.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of new apprenticeship starts were for (a) level 2, (b) level 3, (c) level 4 and (d) level 5 and above in each month of each year since 2014.

The attached table shows the proportion of apprenticeship starts per level of each month of the academic years 2014/15 to 2018/19, and the months up to April of the 2019/20 academic year.

Full-year figures for 2014/15 to 2018/19 are published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/881571/201920-april_monthly-app-starts-fwk.xlsx. Reported-to-date figures for 2019/20 are published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/894270/june-2020-release_underlying-CSV-app-data-to-april-2020.csv.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reason his Department introduced a temporary suspension on the ability of UK citizens to adopt rescue dogs from Romania.

Rescue animals or animals being moved to Great Britain for rehoming involves either the sale or the transfer of ownership of the animal and are classed as commercial movements. Therefore, these animals must move under the commercial rules. Great Britain has temporarily suspended the commercial import of dogs, cats and ferrets if they originate from or have been dispatched from Belarus, Poland, Romania or Ukraine, until 9 July 2022.

We appreciate the impact that the temporary suspension will have on those looking to adopt from these countries, however, this measure is important to protect our biosecurity and the health of pets in this country.

This decision has been taken because of the serious health risk to humans and animals in Great Britain from commercial cats, dogs and ferrets from Belarus, Poland, Romania or Ukraine that do not comply with UK health and documentation requirements.

We understand the fluid situation at present due to the crisis and are aware that Romania, Belarus and Poland are currently experiencing high volumes of animal movements from Ukraine. Movements from these countries into Great Britain therefore present a higher risk at the current time due to the flow of animals from Ukraine.

In particular, there is evidence to suggest that commercial consignments of pet animals from Ukraine are being moved into Poland, Romania and Belarus, including strays, rescue and abandoned animals. Unlike non-commercial pets accompanying Ukrainian refugees, these animals often have unknown history and disease status which increases the risk of disease spread.

We have amongst the highest standards of biosecurity in the world. The Government takes the importation of pets seriously and is committed to preserving our high standards of biosecurity. The movement of commercial pets from Belarus, Poland, Romania and Ukraine represents a clear and serious enough biosecurity risk at the current time, that we therefore consider the suspension of these movements necessary to protect the health of people and pets in Great Britain.

The Government appreciates the work of genuine rescue and rehoming organisations who work to ensure that unwanted and abandoned animals are given the opportunity to find a forever home whilst importantly complying with our animal health and welfare legislation. We continue to engage with stakeholders on the issue. However, this is a temporary measure which will be reviewed in due course.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to assist UK citizens who seek to adopt dogs from Romania.

Rescue animals or animals being moved to Great Britain for rehoming involves either the sale or the transfer of ownership of the animal and are classed as commercial movements. Therefore, these animals must move under the commercial rules. Great Britain has temporarily suspended the commercial import of dogs, cats and ferrets if they originate from or have been dispatched from Belarus, Poland, Romania or Ukraine, until 9 July 2022.

We appreciate the impact that the temporary suspension will have on those looking to adopt from these countries, however, this measure is important to protect our biosecurity and the health of pets in this country.

This decision has been taken because of the serious health risk to humans and animals in Great Britain from commercial cats, dogs and ferrets from Belarus, Poland, Romania or Ukraine that do not comply with UK health and documentation requirements.

We understand the fluid situation at present due to the crisis and are aware that Romania, Belarus and Poland are currently experiencing high volumes of animal movements from Ukraine. Movements from these countries into Great Britain therefore present a higher risk at the current time due to the flow of animals from Ukraine.

In particular, there is evidence to suggest that commercial consignments of pet animals from Ukraine are being moved into Poland, Romania and Belarus, including strays, rescue and abandoned animals. Unlike non-commercial pets accompanying Ukrainian refugees, these animals often have unknown history and disease status which increases the risk of disease spread.

We have amongst the highest standards of biosecurity in the world. The Government takes the importation of pets seriously and is committed to preserving our high standards of biosecurity. The movement of commercial pets from Belarus, Poland, Romania and Ukraine represents a clear and serious enough biosecurity risk at the current time, that we therefore consider the suspension of these movements necessary to protect the health of people and pets in Great Britain.

The Government appreciates the work of genuine rescue and rehoming organisations who work to ensure that unwanted and abandoned animals are given the opportunity to find a forever home whilst importantly complying with our animal health and welfare legislation. We continue to engage with stakeholders on the issue. However, this is a temporary measure which will be reviewed in due course.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of (a) beer, (b) gin, (c) whisky, (d) made-wines and (e) cider produced in the UK was exported in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

Her Majesty’s Government do not collate official statistics of total production in all alcohol categories, and export figures include some re-exported alcohol, especially in the wine category.

In 2018 values of £4.8 billion pounds worth of whisky, £620 million pounds of gin and geneva, and £64 million pounds of cider and other fermented beverages were exported. In each case these are the highest values in the last five years for which figures are available. £489 million pounds worth of beer was exported in 2018.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she has taken to support the regeneration plans being developed by the Chesterfield Canal trust.

The Department has not taken any such steps. Responsibility for canals in England and Wales, including their operation, development or restoration rests with the bodies that own them and for which they are the navigation authority. The Canal and River Trust (CRT) owns the eastern section of the Chesterfield Canal from the M1 motorway at Norwood to the River Trent, while to the west of the M1 motorway from Norwood the canal is owned by local authorities. The CRT works closely with the Chesterfield Canal Trust and supports their canal regeneration plans.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government (a) has taken and (b) proposes to take to reduce flooding from (i) the River Rother and (ii) the River Hipper.

The Environment Agency (EA) has taken a number of steps to reduce flooding from the River Rother and the River Hipper in Chesterfield. In partnership with Chesterfield Council the EA delivered two Property Level Protection projects in Brampton & Hollis Lane in 2016 and one in St Augustines Road last year. These have cost a total of £567,000 and protected a total of 93 properties. The EA has also delivered the St Augustines Road Flood Alleviation Study to investigate the use of sustainable drainage systems to manage surface water and other sources of flood risk affecting St Augustines Road. This cost £15,000 and was completed in 2017. Finally in 2019, the Homes & Communities Agency, in partnership with the EA, has delivered the Avenue Flood Balancing Reservoir, with the EA contributing £2.9 million. This is a flood storage reservoir designed to reduce flooding along the River Rother, better protecting 115 properties.

For ongoing work to reduce flooding in the future, a natural flood management (NFM) officer has been employed for two years using £69,000 of local levy funding to deliver NFM measures in the upper Rother Catchment, particularly benefitting Chesterfield and surrounding settlements. This proposal has been developed in partnership with Derbyshire County Council and the EA.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many new roads have been built in each of the last ten years; and of those how many are unadopted by local authorities.

The number of road enhancement schemes funded by the Department and completed in each of the last ten years is as follows:

Local Road Network

Strategic Road Network

2012/13

7

n/a

2013/14

6

n/a

2014/15

5

n/a

2015/16

7

5

2016/17

7

6

2017/18

3

10

2018/19

3

7

2019/20

0

7

2020/21

4

3

This includes all road enhancement schemes funded by the Local Major Scheme Grant or those on the Strategic Road Network (SRN) from 2015/16. It includes capacity enhancement schemes as well as new roads.

In addition, the Department has funded a number of schemes over the past 10 years from targeted funding programmes. These programmes include the Local Pinch Point Fund and National Productivity Investment Fund and these include new roads and road improvements.

The Department does not hold information on schemes that may have been funded from Local Authorities’ own budgets (including those provided through formula funding allocations such as Integrated Transport Block funding). The Department does not hold information on new roads built by third party organisations, such as private developers.

All Department-funded road schemes will have been adopted by the relevant local highway authority.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government plans to review legislation on new housing developments and the adoption of new roads by local authorities.

The Department for Transport does not keep a list, nor is routinely informed, of how many roads are built on housing developments.

The legislation covering the process for local highway authority adoption of private roads into the public road network is set out in the Highways Act 1980. The Department has no plans to review this legislation since it continues to ensure that any new roads that are adopted and then maintained at public expense are built to the required standard.

The Department does provide advice to developers and highway authorities on the road adoption process. The 2017 Advice Note can be found at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/adoption-of-roads-by-highway-authorities. An update of this advice note is planned to be published shortly.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many and what proportion of unadopted roads on developments built in the last ten years do not have street lighting.

The Department for Transport does not keep a list, nor is routinely informed, of how many roads are built on housing developments.

The legislation covering the process for local highway authority adoption of private roads into the public road network is set out in the Highways Act 1980. The Department has no plans to review this legislation since it continues to ensure that any new roads that are adopted and then maintained at public expense are built to the required standard.

The Department does provide advice to developers and highway authorities on the road adoption process. The 2017 Advice Note can be found at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/adoption-of-roads-by-highway-authorities. An update of this advice note is planned to be published shortly.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government holds statistics for accidents that have occurred on unadopted roads.

Statistics for accidents on unadopted roads are not held by the Department. The Department’s published road accident statistics are based on the STATS19 system of accidents reported by police forces, which covers accidents occurring on the publicly maintained highway.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, where the Infrastructure Maintenance Depot for the Eastern Leg of HS2 will be located.

Following the announcements in the Integrated Rail Plan, the need for, and optimal location of, any Infrastructure Maintenance Depot will be considered as part of the further development work on looking at the best way to take HS2 trains to Leeds.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the number of bicycle shops that will have the £2 million public liability insurance that is required for them to meet the eligibility criteria for the Fix Your Bike voucher scheme.

On 23rd May the Secretary of State announced £25 million of funding to provide up to £50 to members of the public wanting to get their old cycles roadworthy again through the Fix Your Bike Voucher Scheme and to help increase the provision of cycle fixing facilities across the country through the Big Bike Revival. We are aiming for applications for vouchers to open to members of the public as soon as possible.

With the help of representatives from the cycle industry, we have designed a scheme that is accessible to a wide range of types and sizes of businesses, including independent shops and SMEs, provided repairs are carried out by competent mechanics.

It is a requirement of the scheme that businesses have appropriate liability insurance to cover the repairs they carry out. This level of cover is an appropriate and standard form of insurance for the sector, and one which is easily accessible to businesses. We therefore expect that the great majority of bicycle repair businesses in England, SME’s included, will be able to achieve this requirement and participate in the scheme

The scheme opened to registration for bicycle shops on the 22nd of June and we have so far received hundreds of applications from businesses of all sizes. A list of participating businesses is available on the scheme website: fixyourbikevoucherscheme.est.org.uk/.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the number of bicycle repair shops who are SMEs that will be able to accept Fix Your Bike vouchers.

On 23rd May the Secretary of State announced £25 million of funding to provide up to £50 to members of the public wanting to get their old cycles roadworthy again through the Fix Your Bike Voucher Scheme and to help increase the provision of cycle fixing facilities across the country through the Big Bike Revival. We are aiming for applications for vouchers to open to members of the public as soon as possible.

With the help of representatives from the cycle industry, we have designed a scheme that is accessible to a wide range of types and sizes of businesses, including independent shops and SMEs, provided repairs are carried out by competent mechanics.

It is a requirement of the scheme that businesses have appropriate liability insurance to cover the repairs they carry out. This level of cover is an appropriate and standard form of insurance for the sector, and one which is easily accessible to businesses. We therefore expect that the great majority of bicycle repair businesses in England, SME’s included, will be able to achieve this requirement and participate in the scheme

The scheme opened to registration for bicycle shops on the 22nd of June and we have so far received hundreds of applications from businesses of all sizes. A list of participating businesses is available on the scheme website: fixyourbikevoucherscheme.est.org.uk/.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of a Chesterfield to Staveley A619-A6192 link road.

This scheme proposal has been submitted for consideration under the Major Road Network and Large Local Majors programme.

My officials are working with the Local Authority to support them as they develop the scheme. A decision regarding the scheme’s further development will be made in due course.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department monitors the performance of providers completing medical assessments for Personal Independence Claims; and whether she has taken steps in response to poor performance or customer service in the last five years.

It might be helpful to explain that the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessment is not a medical assessment as it does not require the Health Professional (HP) to diagnose a condition and to recommend treatment options. Instead, it requires the HP to look at the impact the condition or impairment has on an individuals’ daily life.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) manages the PIP contracts robustly and have a full set of service level agreements setting out our expectations for service delivery. We ensure a high standard is maintained, having an Independent Audit function that continually monitors performance, and provides feedback to its providers. The contracts allow us to recover any financial loss caused by poor performance, and we have the right to terminate the contract if there is sustained underperformance.

The department has worked continuously to drive improvements in the assessment service and providers have introduced a number of steps to increase performance across their services. This includes new or enhanced systems of assessment report quality checks, to improve the quality of advice the department receives. In addition, PIP assessment reports have been redesigned to have clearer justifications, which support improved benefit decision making.

PIP assessment providers have consistently exceeded their customer satisfaction target scores of 90% since the measure began in 2016.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to reduce the waiting times for personal independent payment medical assessments.

The Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessment is not a medical assessment as it does not require the Health Professional (HP) to diagnose a condition and to recommend treatment options. Instead, it requires the HP to look at the impact the condition or impairment has on an individuals’ daily life.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) is committed to assessing people as quickly as possible, in order that they receive the benefit and support they are entitled to in a timely manner. DWP has worked continuously with providers to drive improvements, to develop the PIP assessment process and how these impact on overall processing times. Telephone assessments were introduced at pace in 2020, when face-to-face assessments were suspended due to the pandemic, with video assessments introduced shortly after. These continue to be delivered alongside face-to-face and paper-based assessments.

Reducing processing times is a priority for the department, however under business-as-usual conditions, there may be referrals that take longer to progress. For example, an interpreter is required in a less common language, or a home visit to be arranged in a remote location. In addition, some claimants also fail to attend assessments for numerous reasons, which requires the department to understand and decide if a new referral to the assessment provider is needed. In these circumstances the overall time from claim registration to the claimant having an assessment may be extended.

The department has recently reiterated its commitment to continuously improve our services in ‘Shaping Future Support: The Health and Disability Green Paper’.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average backdated payment is for a Personal Independence claimant once they have gone through the full application, assessment and appeals processes.

The information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average waiting time is between prospective claimants applying for Personal Independent Payments and being assessed.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Available data on journey times for PIP New Claims is published in Table 1A of Personal Independence Payment statistics to April 2022, published on 14 June 2022 here.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will publish the financial criteria for eligibility for the Social Fund Funeral Payment scheme; and what was the average proportion of funeral costs that this scheme covered in the last 12 months.

The Funeral Expenses Payments (FEP) scheme provides an important contribution towards the cost of a simple, respectful funeral arranged by someone who is in receipt of certain income related benefits or tax credits.


The scheme meets the necessary costs of a burial or cremation in full and offers up to £1000 to meet other funeral expenses such as, the cost of a coffin, church and funeral director fees. In April 2020, we increased the maximum amount families can claim for these additional costs by 43%, from £700 to £1000, providing vital financial support to families grieving the loss of a loved one.

The average FEP award in 2020/21 was £1,838, while the average cost of a cremation was £3,765 and average cost for a burial funeral was £4,927. (Costs vary significantly by region).

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of staff employed by her Department are apprentices.

3.1 per cent of the department’s employees are undertaking an apprenticeship based on the last quarterly figures produced as at 30 November 2020.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what formula her Department uses to calculate universal credit payments for couples; and whether she has plans to review that formula.

The rate of standard allowance in universal credit for single claimants and couples is set each year by the government after a review of the level of benefit that a claimant may receive. The rates for universal credit were originally based on the corresponding rates within Income Support, Jobseeker’s Allowance and Employment and Support Allowance.

The standard rate in Universal Credit has been temporarily increased for the 20/21 tax year by £86.67 per month (equivalent to £20 per week) on top of the planned annual uprating. This additional increase means claimants will be up to £1040 better off.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants who transferred from (a) severe disability premium and (b) enhanced disability premium payments to universal credit are waiting for their payments to be (i) reinstated and (ii) backdated.

Disabled people are some of the biggest beneficiaries of Universal Credit, with around 1 million disabled households having on average around £100 a month more on Universal Credit than they would have had on the legacy benefits. When designing Universal Credit, a choice was made not to replicate every aspect of the disability provision in the previous system, including the Enhanced Disability Premium.

The Severe Disability Premium (SDP) gateway has been in place for over a year to prevent those claimants entitled to the SDP as part of their legacy benefit from claiming Universal Credit. We have successfully identified eligible former SDP claimants who have already moved to Universal Credit due to a change in circumstances, providing them with monthly payments and a lump sum in arrears, where appropriate.

As of 17 January 2020, 15,397 claims have been paid an SDP transitional payment. The median value of the lump sum payments is £2,280. To date, over £51.5m has been disbursed to support former SDP claimants, including the recurring payments that have now commenced.

Positive progress has been made and caseload growth has now slowed, however, in the event a new case is discovered payments will be in place quickly. It is not possible to estimate when we will have paid everyone who is entitled as some people become entitled to these payments retrospectively, and therefore the caseload is not a fixed number.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the timescale is for all universal credit claimants who previously received (a) severe disability premium and (b) enhanced disability premium to (i) have their payments reinstated and (ii) receive backdated payments.

Disabled people are some of the biggest beneficiaries of Universal Credit, with around 1 million disabled households having on average around £100 a month more on Universal Credit than they would have had on the legacy benefits. When designing Universal Credit, a choice was made not to replicate every aspect of the disability provision in the previous system, including the Enhanced Disability Premium.

The Severe Disability Premium (SDP) gateway has been in place for over a year to prevent those claimants entitled to the SDP as part of their legacy benefit from claiming Universal Credit. We have successfully identified eligible former SDP claimants who have already moved to Universal Credit due to a change in circumstances, providing them with monthly payments and a lump sum in arrears, where appropriate.

As of 17 January 2020, 15,397 claims have been paid an SDP transitional payment. The median value of the lump sum payments is £2,280. To date, over £51.5m has been disbursed to support former SDP claimants, including the recurring payments that have now commenced.

Positive progress has been made and caseload growth has now slowed, however, in the event a new case is discovered payments will be in place quickly. It is not possible to estimate when we will have paid everyone who is entitled as some people become entitled to these payments retrospectively, and therefore the caseload is not a fixed number.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the cost to the public purse was of legal challenges to her Department's policy to remove (a) severe disability premium and (b) enhanced disability premium payments from claimants transferring to universal credit.

The Government remains committed to ensuring everyone receives the support they need, which is why we currently spend a record £55 billion a year to support people with disabilities. Universal Credit is a simpler system than its predecessor. By not replicating the SDP and other premiums, we have been able to target additional support to a wider group of claimants and create a more streamlined system. It is important that the Government can design policy and challenge court decisions, where appropriate, that seek to change that policy.

As at 13 February 2020, the Department has spent £215,846.89 on legal costs defending and appealing the cases in relation to people formerly in receipt of Severe Disability premium that have transferred to Universal Credit. These figures include Government Legal Department litigation fees, counsel’s fees and other disbursements, as well as VAT where payable.

22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will take steps to (a) publish guidance and (b) bring forward legislative proposals to help tackle the rising costs for paid carers of attending home appointments.

We have no plans to bring forward legislative proposals. Under the Care Act 2014, local authorities have a duty to manage local care markets and should ensure that fee levels are appropriate to provide the agreed quality of care, enable providers to effectively support care users and invest in staff development, innovation and improvement. The majority of care workers are employed by private sector providers who set their pay and terms and conditions, independent of central Government. Local authorities work with care providers to determine fee rates, which should take account of wage costs, based on local market conditions.

However, we have made an additional £3.7 billion available for councils for 2022/23, which includes £1 billion specifically for social care. In addition, we are committing £1.36 billion over three years to the Market Sustainability and Fair Cost of Care Fund to support local authorities to move towards paying providers a fair cost of care. As a condition of receiving funding, local authorities will be required to submit an evidence-based cost of care exercise. This should accurately reflect local costs such as staff pay and travel time. We published guidance for the Market Sustainability and Fair Cost of Care Fund to ensure greater consistency in understanding the local costs and risks to local markets.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment his Department has made of the impact of rising fuel prices on carers who are required to attend home appointments.

No recent assessment has been made. The vast majority of care workers are employed by private sector providers which set terms and conditions independently of central Government. Local authorities work with care providers to determine fee rates, which should take account of employment costs, based on local market conditions. The Government continues to work closely with local authorities to understand the impact of emerging challenges, such as rising fuel costs.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the 10-Year Cancer Plan will be published.

Officials are analysing the responses received to the call for evidence to develop the 10 Year Cancer Plan. The Plan will set out how we will improve cancer services and further details will be published in due course.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total cost to NHS hospitals was of using (a) agency staff and (b) bank staff in (i) 2020-21 and (ii) 2021-2022.

The following table shows the expenditure on bank and agency staff in 2020/21. The information requested for 2021/22 is currently being collated and centrally verified.

2020/21

Agency staff

£2,436,415.00

Bank staff

£4,663,858,942

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure local authorities are able draw on resources from the £500m fund designed to support better mental health outcomes.

In 2021/22, we provided £500 million to accelerate plans to expand National Health Service mental health provision and target groups whose mental health has been most affected by the pandemic. This included a £15 million investment in activity to promote positive mental health in 40 of the most deprived local authority areas in England. The Department monitors the delivery and impact of this funding through a quarterly Ministerial Mental Health Recovery Board.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether it is his policy to make covid-19 antibody tests available to immunosuppressed patients; and when he those tests will be available in each CCG area.

There are currently no plans to implement targeted antibody testing for immunocompromised patients. National Health Service clinicians can arrange antibody testing for patients based on their assessment of clinical need. Those with a cancer diagnosis may also be able to access free antibody tests through the National Cancer COVID Survey, which aims to assess levels of protection conferred by antibodies following vaccination/infection in cancer patients.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of immunosuppressed people being able to have a covid-19 antibody test.

There are currently no plans to implement targeted antibody testing for immunocompromised patients. National Health Service clinicians can arrange antibody testing for patients based on their assessment of clinical need. Those with a cancer diagnosis may also be able to access free antibody tests through the National Cancer COVID Survey, which aims to assess levels of protection conferred by antibodies following vaccination/infection in cancer patients.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy not to enact the requirement to have a booster jab in order to be exempted from the requirement to take a lateral flow test before attending major events until the paper version of the covid-19 pass is able to record that a person has had their booster jab.

Visitors to settings in scope of mandatory certification are not required to complete testing if they have received two doses of an approved vaccine, one of the single-dose Janssen vaccine or are exempt from requirement to be vaccinated. We intend to change this requirement to include a booster dose once all adults have had an opportunity receive it.

The Travel NHS COVID Pass letter includes details of an individual's COVID-19 vaccinations, including booster doses. Booster vaccinations are not currently required for the Domestic NHS COVID Pass letter.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his planned timetable is for the paper version of the covid-19 vaccine certificate being capable of recording that a person has received their covid-19 booster vaccination.

Since 13 December, the Travel NHS COVID Pass letter includes all details about an individual's COVID-19 vaccination events, including booster vaccinations. A letter can be requested through NHS.UK or by calling 119. Booster vaccinations are not currently required for the domestic NHS COVID Pass letter.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many housebound patients that require covid-19 vaccinations at home there are in each Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) area; and how many of those patients have received the covid-19 booster vaccination as of 14 December 2021, by CCG.

The data requested is not held centrally. Identifying and vaccinating those who are housebound is managed at a local level as it requires access to more detailed patient information.

On 12 December 2021, the Prime Minister announced all eligible adults will now be offered a booster jab before the end of the year. To deliver this offer of boosters to all adults by the end of the year, General Practitioners teams are being asked to prioritise their services to free up capacity to support the COVID-19 vaccination programme, including for housebound patients, alongside delivering critical appointments such as cancer, urgent and emergency care.

For those completely housebound and unable to leave their homes, Primary Care Networks have established mobile or roving vaccination teams. A standard operating procedure and operational guidance has been provided to local health teams to support their efforts to reach those who are housebound.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to allow monoclonal antibodies to be used as a treatment for (a) immunosuppressed patients and (b) the general population.

Neutralising monoclonal antibodies are now being used for the treatment of COVID-19. Since September, Ronapreve (casirivimab and imdevimab) has been used to treat patients hospitalised with COVID-19 at high risk of progression and without their own antibodies, which would include immunosuppressed patients. Since 4 November this interim National Health Service (NHS) clinical policy was expanded to allow access to a wider group of patients with hospital-onset COVID-19 and from 20 December this policy included Xevudy (sotrovimab).

From December 16, a new NHS clinical policy makes monoclonal antibody therapies available for non-hospitalised patients who test positive on a Polymerase chain reaction test, developed symptoms within five days, are aged 12 or above and are considered highest risk of progression to severe disease, hospitalisation or death, including immunosuppressed patients. Xevudy has been available under this policy since 20 December.

Ronapreve may also be used in areas where local prevalence of the Omicron variant remains below 50%.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department will take to ensure that adequate provision is made for people who do not have smart phones and require physical covid-19 vaccination certificates.

The NHS COVID Pass has been developed to be inclusive to ensure that those without access to a computer or smartphone can demonstrate their vaccination status. The domestic or travel NHS COVID Pass letter can be requested by contacting 119.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the Government has to (a) commission and (b) fund research into further treatments for covid-19.

Through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the Department has funded and continues to commission and fund research into prospective treatments for COVID-19. UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) has also funded, some jointly with NIHR, a number of projects to identify targets and develop new treatments for people infected with COVID-19 and continues to provide support to research in this area.

The Department’s Antivirals Taskforce and Therapeutics Taskforce have established a horizon scanning function to develop a pipeline of treatments to be considered for United Kingdom research and procurement if proven to be effective.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance his Department is issuing to children who have received two doses of covid-19 vaccine who are planning to travel to the US and who are required to show confirmation of their vaccination status to enter venues in that country but whose vaccination status cannot be registered on the NHS covid pass.

The NHS COVID Pass is currently available to those aged 16 years and over. Few countries require children's vaccination status, a testing route is generally available or entry on the parent/guardians’ status. The Government recognises that a small proportion of children over 12 years have or will receive a full course of vaccination following the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation advice, and the growing requirement abroad for children to demonstrate their status. We are exploring ways for fully vaccinated children over 12 years to demonstrate their vaccination status for travel. For travel to United States, those under 18 years are exempt from vaccine requirements at the US border. Domestic certification requirements vary by US state.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether contractors and employees of suppliers who work in care homes, but are not employed by care companies directly, must provide evidence of being fully vaccinated against covid-19 before entering care homes.

The Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) (Amendment) (Coronavirus) Regulations 2021 requires care home providers to allow entry to the premises only to those who can demonstrate evidence of having had a complete course of an authorised COVID-19 vaccine or evidence that they are exempt from vaccination. These Regulations come into force on 11 November 2021. This includes all workers employed directly by the care home or care home provider, on a full-time or part-time basis, those employed by an agency and deployed by the care home, and volunteers deployed in the care home.

It will also include those providing direct care and those coming into care homes to do other work, for example healthcare workers, tradespeople, the Care Quality Commission’s inspectors and hairdressers and beauticians.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to Question 83754, on Coronavirus: Chesterfield, tabled on 1 September 2020 by the hon. Member for Chesterfield.

We take parliamentary scrutiny incredibly seriously and it is fundamentally important that Members are provided with accurate and timely information to enable them to hold Government to account. We are working rapidly to provide all Members with accurate answers to their questions, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s questions will be answered as soon as possible.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to Question 83753, on Coronavirus: Chesterfield, tabled on 1 September 2020 by the hon. Member for Chesterfield.

We take parliamentary scrutiny incredibly seriously and it is fundamentally important that Members are provided with accurate and timely information to enable them to hold Government to account. We are working rapidly to provide all Members with accurate answers to their questions, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s questions will be answered as soon as possible.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, of the people that took covid-19 tests at the Chesterfield covid-19 testing centre on 6 August 2020, how many results were communicated to people on (a) 7 August, (b) 8 August, (c) 9 August, (d) 10 August, (e) 11 August and (f) 12 August or later; and in how instances was no result communicated.

The Department does not publish data on the return of COVID-19 tests in the format requested.

During the week of 3 to 9 December, 91.8% of in-person tests were received the next day after the test was taken.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people took covid-19 tests at the Chesterfield covid-19 testing centre on 6 August 2020.

On 6 August, there were 102 pillar 2 tests for COVID-19 processed in Chesterfield.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with representatives of high street pharmacies on suspending prescription delivery charges for people who in self-isolation due to covid-19.

Patients who are required to self-isolate during the COVID-19 pandemic due to a medical condition as identified by NHS England and NHS Improvement will have any medication that they require delivered to their homes free of charge. These patients will receive a letter to notify them of this provision and how they can access it. If patients do not currently have their prescriptions delivered, they can arrange this by:

- Asking someone who can pick up their prescription from their local pharmacy; and

- Contacting their pharmacy to ask them to arrange for their prescription to be delivered to their home. This may be by a volunteer who we have vouched for.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of NHS preparedness for an outbreak of the coronavirus in the UK.

The United Kingdom is extremely well prepared for these types of outbreaks – we are one of the first countries in the world to develop a test for the new virus. The National Health Service is always ready to provide world class care to patients whether they have a common illness, or an infectious disease never seen here before.

The NHS has expert teams in every ambulance service and a number of specialist hospital units with highly trained staff and equipment ready to receive and care for patients with any highly infectious disease. Since April 2013, NHS England has commissioned a total of 15 adult respiratory extra corporeal membrane oxygenation beds from five providers in England, with further provision in Scotland. In periods of high demand, capacity can be increased.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether additional funding is being allocated to NHS trusts in preparation for a potential outbreak of the coronavirus.

We are investing £40 million in vaccine research, are working with international efforts on therapeutics, as well as the immediate launch of a capital facility to support any urgent works the National Health Service needs for the coronavirus response, such as the creation of further isolation areas and other necessary facilities. The United Kingdom is also ramping up efforts to fund ground-breaking research into vaccines, diagnostics and cures to fight against the threat of future viruses.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to secure the release of Jagtar Singh Johal.

The UK Government takes all allegations of human rights violations very seriously, and we regularly raise Mr Johal's case directly with the Government of India at official and Ministerial level. The Prime Minister raised Mr Johal's case with Prime Minister Narendra Modi on 22 April as part of a wide-ranging discussion. The Foreign Secretary last raised Mr Johal's case with the Indian Minister of External Affairs, Dr Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, on 31 March 2022. Consular staff have attended a number of hearings in Mr Johal's case in an observer capacity, and did so on 2, 3, 4, 7, and 9 June. This Government will continue to look to raise our concerns about Mr Johal's case at all appropriate opportunities.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if she will make an assessment of the possibility of Iran being engaged in espionage and terrorism in the UK through its embassy and diplomats.

It is the longstanding policy of successive British Governments not to comment on intelligence matters.

The UK has over 200 sanctions designations in place against Iran including in relation to human rights, nuclear proliferation and terrorism. This includes against the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps in its entirety. The UK is committed to working with the international community to ensure Iran abides by international laws and norms and is held to account for its destabilising activity in the region.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what diplomatic or political pressure the Government is putting on the Syrian regime to reduce the atrocities committed in that country.

The UK remains steadfast in our pursuit for accountability for atrocities committed in Syria. We co-sponsored the UN General Assembly resolution which established the UN International Impartial and Independent Mechanism (IIIM), and we have contributed £1.2 million to support the mechanism so far.

We have supported the Commission for International Justice and Accountability to collect evidence and build cases for prosecution of perpetrators of war crimes and crimes against humanity. These efforts have played a critical role in achieving the first conviction of a former member of Daesh, and the first court ruling worldwide over state-sponsored torture by the Assad regime in Koblenz, convicting Eyad al-Gharib for complicity in crimes against humanity in Syria.

We have contributed over £13 million since 2012 in support of Syrian and international efforts to gather evidence and assist victims of human rights abuses and violations. The UK drafts the UN Human Rights Council resolution on Syria, which was adopted in March, at the 46th Human Rights Council session. On 15 March, the UK announced six new sanctions; sending a clear message to the Assad regime: the UK will not stand by whilst the Regime and its backers continue to commit heinous crimes against the Syrian people.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the people responsible for atrocities in Syria are held to account.

The UK remains steadfast in our pursuit for accountability for atrocities committed in Syria. We co-sponsored the UN General Assembly resolution which established the UN International Impartial and Independent Mechanism (IIIM), and we have contributed £1.2 million to support the mechanism so far.

We have supported the Commission for International Justice and Accountability to collect evidence and build cases for prosecution of perpetrators of war crimes and crimes against humanity. These efforts have played a critical role in achieving the first conviction of a former member of Daesh, and the first court ruling worldwide over state-sponsored torture by the Assad regime in Koblenz, convicting Eyad al-Gharib for complicity in crimes against humanity in Syria.

We have contributed over £13 million since 2012 in support of Syrian and international efforts to gather evidence and assist victims of human rights abuses and violations. The UK drafts the UN Human Rights Council resolution on Syria, which was adopted in March, at the 46th Human Rights Council session. On 15 March, the UK announced six new sanctions; sending a clear message to the Assad regime: the UK will not stand by whilst the Regime and its backers continue to commit heinous crimes against the Syrian people.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment his Department has made of the political and security situation in Syria.

Ten years of conflict has exacted a heavy toll on Syria and continues to have a destabilising impact on the region. Humanitarian access must be maintained through the renewal of UNSCR 2533, which provides vital cross-border aid access from Turkey into Syria, later this year.

We welcome that the ceasefires in the North East and North West are broadly holding, but are concerned by reports of Russian and regime airstrikes in the North West. Where the ceasefires are under pressure, we urge all parties to increase their efforts to adhere to them. There also remains a continued threat from Daesh and we will work the Global Coalition to counter further violent extremism.

We believe UNSCR 2254 offers a clear path out of the conflict. We must hold the regime accountable for its crimes, and we remain committed to alleviating the terrible cost of this war on Syrians.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the Sri Lankan authorities in permitting the rights of the Tamil community to engage in peaceful protest in that country.

The UK Government is aware of the recent demonstrations that took place in the northern and eastern parts of Sri Lanka, and is concerned at reports of intimidating behaviour experienced by some demonstrators. Officials from the British High Commission in Colombo will continue to monitor closely events linked to the right to peaceful protest.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department plans to take to help ensure that the international community (a) upholds the rights of Tamils living in Sri Lanka and (b) ensures that Tamils are not subject to (i) prosecution and (ii) state harassment in the event that they engage in peaceful protests in that country.

The UK is working closely with international partners on a new resolution on Sri Lanka at the UN Human Rights Council. This resolution will provide a framework for continued international engagement on human rights and post-conflict accountability in Sri Lanka. The resolution will highlight concerns about the protection of minorities, and will call on the Government of Sri Lanka to ensure that the human rights of people in all of its communities are protected.

The Minister of State for South Asia and Minister responsible for Human Rights, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon, has raised the importance of protecting the rights of all communities, including minority groups, on several occasions with the Sri Lankan High Commissioner and Sri Lankan Foreign Minister Dinesh Gunawardena, most recently during calls on 9 February and 22 January respectively. We will continue to engage with the Government of Sri Lanka to underline the importance we attach to this issue.

Officials from the British High Commission in Colombo will continue to monitor closely events linked to the right to peaceful protest.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has taken steps to condemn the Government of Iran for reportedly plotting to bomb an Iranian opposition rally attended by British citizens in Paris in 2018.

We are aware of the ongoing trial of four Iranians in Belgium in relation to the 2018 plot against a conference in Paris. We are deeply concerned by reports that an Iranian diplomat is one of those standing trial in connection with the incident. While the legal process is ongoing, however, it would be inappropriate to comment further and we have not made specific representations to the Iranian Government. The UK strongly condemns the targeting of civilians and welcomes steps taken to hold those responsible to account. We continue to work closely with our European partners on security and counter-terrorism issues. We are not aware at this stage of a link to the UK.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent representations he has made to his counterpart in Iran on allegations that country intended to bomb an Iranian opposition party rally in Paris in 2018.

We are aware of the ongoing trial of four Iranians in Belgium in relation to the 2018 plot against a conference in Paris. We are deeply concerned by reports that an Iranian diplomat is one of those standing trial in connection with the incident. While the legal process is ongoing, however, it would be inappropriate to comment further and we have not made specific representations to the Iranian Government. The UK strongly condemns the targeting of civilians and welcomes steps taken to hold those responsible to account. We continue to work closely with our European partners on security and counter-terrorism issues. We are not aware at this stage of a link to the UK.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
26th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps her Department is taking to assist Zambia in its attempts to be the first nation to benefit from the Common Framework debt cancellation programme.

Zambia is one of three countries – along with Chad and Ethiopia - to have so far requested the Common Framework.

The Common Framework was agreed in November 2020 by the UK, along with the G20 and Paris Club, to help deliver a long-term, sustainable approach for supporting low-income countries to tackle their debt vulnerabilities.

In its February 2022 communique, the G20 reiterated its commitment to step up efforts to implement the Common Framework in a timely, orderly and coordinated manner. Progress in implementing the Common Framework has been a regular feature in the Chancellor’s discussions in the G7 and G20 and - as a creditor to Zambia - it is a priority to work with our international partners to ensure swift progress on the debt treatment.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of receipt of support from the Self Employment Income Support Scheme on recipients' ability to get a mortgage; and if he will make a statement.

Treasury ministers are in regular conversations with mortgage lenders about market conditions. Ultimately, the decision of a lender to offer products to customers is a commercial one, determined by their risk appetites, in which the government does not seek to interfere. Lenders will take into account the circumstances of individual customers, such as the security of their income (for which they may consider Self Employed Income Support Scheme (SEISS) payments); not having significant other debt; the borrower’s credit score and the loan to value of their mortgage.

The Government is clear that lenders should treat customers fairly, especially in the current context of Covid-19 and will continue to monitor the mortgage market and engage with industry on the availability of mortgage products.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when businesses that furloughed staff in March will receive their first furlough payments.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme opened for claims on 20 April. Payments will be made six working days after a claim is made. Employers who made a claim on or before 22 April will receive payments by the end of April.

21st Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending Government support schemes in response to the covid-19 outbreak to include company directors who pay themselves through dividends.

Income from dividends is a return on investment in the company, rather than wages, and is not eligible for support through the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme or Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS). Under current reporting mechanisms it is not possible for HM Revenue and Customs to distinguish between dividends derived from an individual’s own company and dividends from other sources, and between dividends in lieu of employment income and as returns from other corporate activity. Expanding the scope would require HMRC to collect and verify new information. This would take longer to deliver and put at risk the other schemes which the Government is committed to delivering as quickly as possible.

Those who pay themselves a salary through their own company may be eligible to claim for 80% of usual monthly wage costs, up to £2,500 a month, through the CJRS. Individuals who are not eligible for the CJRS may be able to access other support Government is providing, including the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the deferral of tax payments. More information about the full range of business support measures is available at?www.businesssupport.gov.uk/coronavirus-business-support/

21st Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Government allows new employees to qualify for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme if they can evidence that they started their employment prior to 19 March 2020 even if their employer had not registered them by that date with HMRC.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is open to any individual who was on an employer’s PAYE payroll on or before 19 March 2020 and for whom HMRC received an RTI submission notifying payment in respect of that employee on or before the 19 March 2020. Processing claims for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme where HMRC do not have RTI data by 19 March would require much greater manual handling by HMRC, which would significantly slow down the system while risking substantial levels of fraud. It would also require greater resource for HMRC when they are already under significant pressure to deliver the system designed. Those not eligible for the scheme may have access to other support Government is providing, including a package of temporary welfare measures and up to three months’ mortgage payment holidays for those struggling with their mortgage payments.
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on self-employed people; and whether he has plans to provide a package of support for self-employed people equivalent to the support the Government has made available to employed people as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer announced new support for the self-employed on 26 March 2020.

The new Self-Employed Income Support Scheme will help those with lost trading profits due to COVID-19. It will allow eligible individuals to claim a taxable grant worth 80% of their trading profits up to a maximum of £2,500 per month for the next 3 months. This may be extended if needed and is one of the most generous self-employed support schemes in the world.

To qualify, an individual’s self-employed trading profits must be less than £50,000 and more than half of their income must come from self-employment. Some 95% of people who receive most of their income from self-employment will benefit from this Scheme.

HM Revenue & Customs will contact individuals if they are eligible and will invite them to apply online using a simple form. HMRC are working on this urgently and expect people to be able to access the Scheme no later than the beginning of June.

More information about the Scheme, including the full eligibility criteria and how to claim, is available at www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-coronavirus-covid-19-self-employment-income-support-scheme

The Scheme supplements the significant support already announced for UK businesses and employees, including the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, and deferral of tax payments.

More information about the full range of business support measures is available at www.businesssupport.gov.uk/coronavirus-business-support/.

26th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 24 February 2020 to Question 1971, when the EU Commission requested the UK’s observations regarding post duty paid dilution and its compatibility with EU Law; when his Department responded to that request; and if he will publish that response.

The EU Commission requested the UK’s observations regarding post duty point dilution in February 2017. HM Revenue and Customs responded to that request in May 2017.

As communications between the Commission and Member States on infringement proceedings are generally confidential, the Government does not intend to publish the UK’s response.

13th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the EU has instigated infringement proceedings against the UK over its post production dilution duty regime; and if he will make a statement.

Budget 2018 announced the Government’s intention to introduce legislation prohibiting the practice of post duty point dilution (PDPD). This change is due to take legal effect from April 2020. The Government’s announcement followed a review by HM Revenue & Customs, which considered a wide range of information from businesses across the drinks industry and their representative bodies.

The review concluded that the practice, which is not adopted across the alcohol sector, leads to certain products enjoying an unjustifiable competitive advantage in the UK market place and that this advantage comes at a significant cost to the Exchequer.

The EU Commission has not instigated formal infringement proceedings against the UK on the matter of PDPD. However, under the EU’s pre-infringement process the Commission did request the UK’s observations regarding the PDPD and its compatibility with EU Law.

15th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what fiscal steps he is taking to encourage consumers to drink lower ABV beverages; and whether he plans to change the rates of taxation on alcohol.

Fiscal changes to alcohol, and tax rates are kept under review and the impact of a change to duty is considered at each fiscal event.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will make an assessment of the level of potential risk of Iran facilitating and engaging in acts of terrorism and espionage against Iranian dissidents and activists living in the UK.

We do not routinely comment on intelligence matters or specific threats.

The safety and security of our citizens is the Government’s top priority. As we made clear in the 2021 Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy, we are committed to addressing growing threats from Iran, as well as other states. We will continue to use all tools at our disposal to protect the UK and our interests from any Iran-linked threats

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passports have been delivered since TNT became the delivery provider; and how many complaints have been received regarding their service.

The volume deliveries by the secure delivery provider for Her Majesty’s Passport Office in the UK includes both passports and supporting documents. The delivery of passports alone is not held in a reportable format.

From 1 March 2020 to 30 November 2021, 8,286,931 passports and supporting documents have been delivered under the current contract for UK secure delivery services. 1829 complaints, were received about these services within the same period, which represents 0.02% of the delivery volume.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether officials in her Department have had discussions with representatives of TNT about complaints in respect of their passport delivery service.

Complaint information provides key insight to help identify and inform potential improvements to the services provided by Her Majesty’s Passport Office and its suppliers.

Complaints are therefore routinely discussed in the regular meetings held between HM Passport Office and FedEx (the parent company of TNT).

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of trends in the level of complaints in respect of the delivery of passports since TNT became the delivery provider.

The percentage of complaints about UK deliveries of passports and supporting documents is 0.02% between January and November 2021.

This compares to 0.02% in 2019 which was the last full year prior to the commencement of the current contract.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many investigations into police officers conducted by the Independent Office for Police Conduct have taken longer than 12 months from initial complaint to completion, by each police force area in each year from 2015 to date.

The Home Office does not hold data on IOPC investigations. The Independent Office of Police Conduct will write to my hon. Friend and I will place a copy of the letter in the Library of the House.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
16th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that Ukraine has the military weapons required to defend its territories.

Defence continues to play a leading role in helping Ukraine defend its territories, working with Allies and partners to support Ukraine's right to be a sovereign, independent and democratic nation.

We have already committed £1.3 billion for military operations and aid, including giving Multiple Launch Rocket Systems, to meet Ukrainian Armed Forces' requests for assistance. We are also making a major contribution to the coordination of military support from our Allies and partners to enable Ukraine to repel Russian aggression.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Nov 2021
What recent assessment he has made of the strength of the armed forces.

The total strength of the Armed Forces is 168,880.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what proportion of staff employed by his Department are apprentices.

As at 31 January 2021, three per cent of civilian staff employed by the Ministry of Defence are apprentices.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the number of people who surrendered their war widow's pension on remarrying or cohabiting before before 1 April 2015.

The information requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what was his Department's performance against Departmental Expenditure Limits in 2018-19 for (a) salaries, (b) accommodation and (c) equipment.

The Ministry of Defence performance in financial year 2018-19 for salaries, accommodation and equipment are published in the department's annual report and accounts, which can be found on https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/831728/MOD_Annual_Report_and_Accounts_2018-19_WEB__ERRATUM_CORRECTED_.pdf

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department underspent on (a) salaries, (b) accommodation and (c) equipment in 2019 through not achieving its target of a British Army standing strength of 82,000.

The Defence Secretary has made recruitment and retention in the British Army the Chief of the General Staff's overriding objective.

The Department's financial planning process allows for regular re-prioritisation of funds. Accommodation and equipment costs are relatively fixed in the short term and are unlikely to vary with fluctuations in strength.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what representations his Department has received on the compatibility of U-values and energy ratings for doors and their fire safety rating.

We are not aware of any representations that have been made on this specific issue. We are in regular discussions with relevant industry bodies and consult widely before making any changes to ensure that the standards we set are achievable.

11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to review legislation regarding energy efficiency standards for doors to address the potential conflict between energy efficiency and fire safety.

We are currently undertaking technical reviews of both Part B (Fire safety) and Part L (Conservation of fuel and power) of the Building Regulations and are in regular discussions with relevant industry bodies. We consult widely before making any changes to ensure that the standards we set are achievable.

25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many planning applications have been referred to him due to non-determination by a local authority in each year since 2015, by local authority.

Since 1 January 2015 up until 30 June 2020, there were 3,918 s78 planning appeals and householder appeals where the appellant appealed to The Planning Inspectorate before the local planning authority had made a decision on the relevant planning application (non-determination). This represents approximately 4 per cent of all s78 planning appeals and householder appeals received in the same time period.

The attached table provides the number of appeals against each Local Planning Authority and the year the appeal was submitted

21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when local authorities sent letters to businesses informing them how to apply for the Small Business Grants Fund, listed by each local authority; how many businesses eligible for that fund are in each local authority area; how many businesses responded to those letters with payment details by 17 April 2020; and how many businesses each local authority had paid a grant to by 21 April 2020.

Government has made £12.3 billion available under the Small Business Grants Fund and the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grants Fund. The funding is being delivered by local authorities and Government is working closely with them to ensure grant payments are made to businesses as soon as possible, whilst safeguarding public funds. Local authorities are contacting businesses directly to deliver these grants. We have encouraged businesses who believe they are eligible for a grant to check the arrangements in their area on their local authority website if they have yet to be contacted, and to contact their local authority where relevant.

As of 20 April, over 480,000 business premises have received grants, totalling over £6 billion. Please see a full breakdown of grant funding allocated to and distributed by each local authority here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-grant-funding-local-authority-payments-to-small-and-medium-businesses

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the (a) lowest and (b) average car parking price in council owned car parks in town centres was in 2018-19 in each local authority area.

The Department does not collect this information. However, as part of our work to implement the Parking (Code of Practice) Act 2019 and support local authority provision of off-street parking, we are working closely with both local government and private parking stakeholders to gather data and information to inform policy-making in this area.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much funding each local authority in England has (a) allocated to planning services and (b) raised in planning fees and charges in 2018-19.

My Department collects data from local authorities on the total amount of expenditure for development control and building control combined. Expenditure for 2018-19 was reported as approximately £828 million, with funding raised by sales, fees and charges in 2018-19 as approximately £528 million. These figures are set out in the MHCLG local government revenue outturn table RO5 which is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing-england-2018-to-2019-individual-local-authority-data-outturn

26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many fee-paying car parks in each local authority in England are owned by (a) local authorities and (b) private companies.

The Department does not collect this information. However, as part of our work to implement the Parking (Code of Practice) Act 2019 and support local authority provision of off-street parking, we are working closely with both local government and private parking stakeholders to gather data and information to inform policy-making in this area.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to encourage local authorities to provide electric charging points in local authority owned car parks.

Parking is the responsibility of local authorities and it is for them to determine what is best for their own area. However, the Government’s Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) offers a comprehensive package of support. This includes grants for supporting consumers to install charging infrastructure at home and funding for local authorities to support those households without off-street parking.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the timeframe is for the coming into force of the provisions of the Parking (Code of Practice) Act 2019.

On 3 November 2019 we announced we were contracting with the British Standards Institution (BSI) to develop the Code of Practice as a British Standard. Work with BSI commenced in December 2019, and they are now convening a group of key stakeholders, representing consumers and the industry, to write the Code. We have committed to developing the Parking Code of Practice this year. A public consultation will take place within six months, to give the parking industry, the public and other interested parties the opportunity to have a say. Further details will be announced in due course.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of staff employed by his Department are apprentices.

As of 31 March 2020, the Civil Service has achieved a total of 2.1% of its total workforce as apprentices against the legislative target for the public sector of 2.3% by March 2021. The Ministry of Justice has achieved 1.68% of the total staff employed within the department.

The Ministry of Justice’s Apprenticeship Strategy, designed to meet the allocated targets, consists of three strands:

  • Promoting the use of Cabinet Office-approved apprenticeships programmes to develop professional skills;
  • Designing and delivering operational apprenticeship standards for specific operational roles; and
  • Promoting the use of apprenticeships as an entry route/development of career pathways for staff at all levels of the organisation.

This target is a percentage of the total workforce so the percentage attained will change in line with workforce fluctuations over time, making it challenging to predict when a department will meet it. The data for 2018/19 can be found here. The data for 2019/20 can be found here.

Departments are committed to increasing the number of apprentices across the Civil Service and continue to work towards the 2.3% target.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
27th Apr 2020
What changes are required for the effective operation of courts and tribunals during the covid-19 outbreak.

Access to justice is an essential part of our lives - and I want to pay tribute to all those involved in keeping the wheels of justice turning - the judges, HMCTS staff, and partners throughout the justice system as well as legal professionals, volunteers and others.

Our priorities are to maintain access to justice – in particular for the most urgent cases such as bail applications and urgent family hearings – and to protect the safety of all who work in the courts and tribunals. To do this, we have already made changes in 5 broad areas:

  • Prioritising cases
  • Supporting our staff
  • Expanding use of video
  • Consolidating courts
  • Cleanliness

Despite the exceptional circumstances, our justice system remained ‘open’ to deal with the most vulnerable in society. In France, for example, courts are closed for all but ‘essential litigation’ and Italy is in full lockdown until 4th May.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)