Justin Madders Portrait

Justin Madders

Labour - Ellesmere Port and Neston

First elected: 7th May 2015

Shadow Minister (Future of Work)

(since December 2021)

Shadow Minister (Employment Rights and Protections)

(since September 2023)

Shadow Minister (Business and Industrial Strategy)
4th Dec 2021 - 4th Sep 2023
Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform Bill)
2nd Nov 2022 - 29th Nov 2022
Shadow Minister (Health and Social Care)
10th Apr 2020 - 4th Dec 2021
Health and Care Bill
7th Sep 2021 - 2nd Nov 2021
Shadow Minister (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Labour)
10th Jul 2018 - 14th Mar 2019
Shadow Minister (Health and Social Care)
9th Jan 2018 - 14th Mar 2019
Shadow Minister (Health)
18th Sep 2015 - 9th Jan 2018
Petitions Committee
20th Jul 2015 - 26th Oct 2015


Scheduled Event
Wednesday 28th February 2024
16:30
Westminster Hall debate - Westminster Hall
28 Feb 2024, 4:30 p.m.
Digital exclusion
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Oral Question
Thursday 29th February 2024
09:30
Cabinet Office
Topical Question No. 4
If he will make a statement on his departmental responsibilities.
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Oral Question
Thursday 29th February 2024
09:30
Cabinet Office
Oral Question No. 16
What recent estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of procurement fraud during the covid-19 pandemic.
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Division Votes
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Ceasefire in Gaza
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 173 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 20 Noes - 212
Speeches
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Draft Carer's Leave Regulations 2024 Draft Maternity Leave, Adoption Leave and Shared Parental Leave (Amendment) Regulations 2024
As the Minister knows, we will publish our proposals with costings when we get to the general election. However, as …
Written Answers
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Disability Living Allowance
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will make an assessment of the impact delays …
Early Day Motions
Monday 14th September 2015
ACCIDENT BOOKS
That this House notes that the Social Security (Claims and Payments) Regulations 1979 state that an employer must have an …
Bills
Wednesday 30th November 2016
Football Supporters (Access) Bill 2016-17
A Bill to require football clubs to provide tickets to matches at a discount for persons under a specified age; …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 4th September 2023
4. Visits outside the UK
Name of donor: Stadt Reutlingen
Address of donor: Marktpl. 22, 72764 Reutlingen, Germany
Estimate of the probable value (or amount …
EDM signed
Tuesday 21st July 2020
Town and Country Planning
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that The Town and Country Planning (Permitted Development and Miscellaneous …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 18th January 2023
Fertility Treatment (Transparency) Bill 2022-23
A Bill to require providers of in vitro fertilisation to publish information annually about the number of NHS-funded IVF cycles …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Justin Madders has voted in 796 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Justin Madders Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Edward Argar (Conservative)
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
(151 debate interactions)
Penny Mordaunt (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(44 debate interactions)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
(39 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(414 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(56 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Health and Care Act 2022
(79,053 words contributed)
NHS Funding Act 2020
(6,534 words contributed)
Leasehold Reform (Ground Rent) Act 2022
(6,080 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Justin Madders's debates

Ellesmere Port and Neston Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Ellesmere Port and Neston signature proportion
Petitions with most Ellesmere Port and Neston signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

Review statutory maternity pay in line with inflation and cost of living

Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP) is currently:
90% of your average weekly earnings (before tax) for the first 6 weeks
£156.66 or 90% of average weekly earnings (whichever is lower) for next 33 weeks. This averages £7.5k p/a

We want the Government to commit to not signing any international treaty on pandemic prevention and preparedness established by the World Health Organization (WHO), unless this is approved through a public referendum.

The Government should create an emergency fund to deal with the massive waiting lists for autism & ADHD assessments for children AND adults. This would provide resources for local health services deal with current waiting lists and new patients.

The Government should commission a review of how Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) assessments are managed by the NHS, including through Shared Care Agreements, and increase funding to reduce waiting times.

Hundreds of thousands of people signed numerous petitions calling for actions that the Government has included in the Kept Animals Bill. The Government should urgently find time to allow the Bill to complete its journey through Parliament and become law.

Every year across the UK, millions of farmed animals are kept in cages, unable to express their natural behaviours and experiencing huge suffering. These inhumane systems cannot be the future of British farming. The UK Government must legislate to ‘End the Cage Age’ for all farmed animals.

The Government should repeal breed specific provisions in dangerous dogs legislation. We believe these provisions are a flawed approach to public safety and an ethical failing with regards to animal welfare.

The Government should reduce the cost of fuel through a reduction of 40% in fuel duty and VAT for 2 years. This can effectively offset the rise in fuel prices since 2020.

Make it illegal for any employer to mandate vaccination for its employees. This should apply to all public sector (including the NHS, armed forces, care workers), third sector and all private sector.

Current legislation allows for public use of fireworks 16 hours a day, every day, making it impossible for vulnerable groups to take precautions against the distress they can cause. Better enforcement of existing law is insufficient; limiting their sale & use to licensed displays only is necessary.

The Government should class in-person interaction with family members and unmarried partners abroad as an essential reason to travel.

Advice from the JCVI on the priority groups for a Covid-19 vaccine does not include school/childcare workers. This petition calls for these workers, who cannot distance or use PPE, to be kept safe at work by being put on the vaccine priority list when such a list is adopted into government policy.

Weddings take months and even years of intricate planning. Myself and many others believe the maximum number of guests authorised at wedding ceremonies should be increased. The number of guests permitted at weddings should be calculated according to venue capacity.

Extend funding to nightclubs, dance music events and festivals as part of the £1.57bn support package announced by the government for Britain's arts and culture sector to survive the hit from the pandemic. #LetUSDance

In light of the recent outbreak and lock down, those on maternity leave should be given 3 extra months paid leave, at least. This time is for bonding and social engaging with other parents and babies through baby groups which are vital for development and now everything has been cancelled.

I would like the government to review and increase the pay for healthcare workers to recognise the work that they do.

To revoke the Immigration Health Surcharge increases for overseas NHS staff. The latest budget shows an increase of £220 a year for an overseas worker to live and work in the UK, at a time when the NHS, and UK economy, relies heavily on them.

We would like the government to support and regard social care: financially, publicly and systematically on an equal par as NHS. We would like parliament to debate how to support social care during COVID-19 and beyond so that it automatically has the same access to operational and financial support.

Give NHS workers who are EU and other Nationals automatic UK citizenship if they stay and risk their own lives looking after the British people during the COVID crisis.


Latest EDMs signed by Justin Madders

21st July 2020
Justin Madders signed this EDM on Tuesday 21st July 2020

Town and Country Planning

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that The Town and Country Planning (Permitted Development and Miscellaneous Amendments) (England) (Coronavirus) Regulations 2020 (S.I., 2020, No. 632), dated 23 June 2020, a copy of which was laid before this House on 24 June 2020, be annulled.
55 signatures
(Most recent: 28 Sep 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 43
Liberal Democrat: 9
Conservative: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
Green Party: 1
8th July 2020
Justin Madders signed this EDM on Monday 20th July 2020

Town and Country Planning

Tabled by: Peter Bottomley (Conservative - Worthing West)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Town and Country Planning (Permitted Development and Miscellaneous Amendments) (England) (Coronavirus) Regulations 2020 (S.I., 2020, No. 632), dated 23 June 2020, a copy of which was laid before this House on 24 June 2020, be annulled.
14 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Jul 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 10
Liberal Democrat: 2
Conservative: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
View All Justin Madders's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Justin Madders, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Justin Madders has not been granted any Urgent Questions

4 Adjournment Debates led by Justin Madders

Wednesday 12th July 2023
Thursday 10th February 2022
Tuesday 9th March 2021
Wednesday 26th February 2020

2 Bills introduced by Justin Madders


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision about the regulation of the purchase of freehold by leaseholders; to introduce a system for establishing the maximum charge for such freehold; to make provision about the award of legal costs in leasehold property tribunal cases; to establish a compensation scheme for cases where misleading particulars have led to certain leasehold agreements; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 7th November 2017
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require football clubs to provide tickets to matches at a discount for persons under a specified age; to require local authorities to consider the needs of match going supporters when approving kick off times; to require football clubs to set aside a proportion of transfer fees paid for the development of football facilities for local clubs and young people; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 30th November 2016
(Read Debate)

1809 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
12 Other Department Questions
22nd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 3 March 2023 to Question 155151 on the Minimum Wage, what the total value of the contracts with the firms named in the list amount to.

Details of all government contracts, including the total contract value, above £10,000 for the core Department and above £25,000 for the wider public sector, are published to Contracts Finder as part of the Department’s commitment to transparency.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has contracted work to a business named in round 18 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme in the last 3 years.

The Department has contracted work to a business named in round 18 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme in the last 3 years. The Supplier has been engaged to provide recruitment services and supply contingent labour, through a regulated government Framework procured centrally for all government departments to use as needed. Through this Framework, the Supplier is governed by terms and conditions, overseen by the Framework Manager, and has agreed to the Framework rate card for the delivery of services.

Details of all government contracts, above £10,000 for the core Department and above £25,000 for the wider public sector, are published to Contracts Finder as part of the Department’s commitment to transparency.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
24th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when the Gambling Review White Paper will be published.

The Gambling Act Review is wide-ranging and aims to ensure gambling regulation is fit for the digital age. We will publish a White Paper setting out our conclusions and next steps in the coming weeks.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 30 January 2023 to Question 129887 on Parliamentary Estate: Air Conditioning, what the average yearly energy cost associated with running (a) air filtration and (b) conditioning systems on the Parliamentary Estate was in the last three years.

There is no data held on the amount of energy used or energy costs for either the air filtration or conditioning systems on the Parliamentary Estate.

25th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps she is taking to help support women experiencing the menopause in the workplace.

DWP commissioned an independent report on menopause and the workplace, as part of regular engagement with the members of the 50 PLUS Roundtable on older workers, which was published in November 2021. The Government’s response was outlined in July last year.

In the response, the Government committed to appoint a DWP Menopause Employment Champion who will work with the Women’s Health Ambassador on the issue of menopause and employment and drive forward work with employers on menopause workplace issues.

This commitment was reaffirmed in the Government's response to the Women and Equalities Select Committee report yesterday in our response to recommendation 6.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th Jun 2022
To ask the Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, whether any properties owned by the Church of England are being used under the Homes for Ukraine scheme.

The Church of England does not keep a central database of those sponsoring Ukrainian refugees, but guidance for parishes and clergy on the processes involved is available from the National Church Institutions and published here: https://www.churchofengland.org/sites/default/files/2022-04/Ukraine%20toolkit%20draft%208.pdf

Anecdotal evidence from dioceses suggests that expressions of interest number in the hundreds, including those in clergy accommodation, and that matches and arrivals have been steadily increasing. The Church Commissioners are aware of four bishops who have successfully sponsored refugees, with several others still waiting either to be matched or for their application to be completed. The Church of England Pensions Board and others have also issued guidance and are aware of residents taking up the opportunity to host Ukrainians in those properties

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
17th May 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether he has plans to bring forward measures to tackle sexual harassment in the workplace.

The Government is clear that everyone should be able to live without fear of harassment or violence, in the workplace as much as anywhere else.

In July 2021, as part of our strategy to tackle Violence Against Women and Girls, the Government committed to a new package of measures which will strengthen protections for those affected by harassment at work. We intend to introduce a new duty on employers to take steps to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace, as well as explicit protections against workplace harassment by third parties. We are also preparing our own practical guidance for employers on preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

The legislative commitments will be introduced when parliamentary time allows. We continue to seek an appropriate legislative vehicle; however, we are also ensuring that we take sufficient time to engage with a range of stakeholders, to ensure that what we introduce will be effective and make a real impact.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
17th May 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent steps has she taken to tackle sexual harassment in the workplace.

The Government is clear that everyone should be able to live without fear of harassment or violence, in the workplace as much as anywhere else.

In July 2021, as part of our strategy to tackle Violence Against Women and Girls, the Government committed to a new package of measures which will strengthen protections for those affected by harassment at work. We intend to introduce a new duty on employers to take steps to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace, as well as explicit protections against workplace harassment by third parties. We are also preparing our own practical guidance for employers on preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

The legislative commitments will be introduced when parliamentary time allows. We continue to seek an appropriate legislative vehicle; however, we are also ensuring that we take sufficient time to engage with a range of stakeholders, to ensure that what we introduce will be effective and make a real impact.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
17th May 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent steps she has taken to encourage businesses to take steps to prevent workplace harassment.

The Government is clear that everyone should be able to live without fear of harassment or violence, in the workplace as much as anywhere else.

In July 2021, as part of our strategy to tackle Violence Against Women and Girls, the Government committed to a new package of measures which will strengthen protections for those affected by harassment at work. We intend to introduce a new duty on employers to take steps to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace, as well as explicit protections against workplace harassment by third parties. We are also preparing our own practical guidance for employers on preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

The legislative commitments will be introduced when parliamentary time allows. We continue to seek an appropriate legislative vehicle; however, we are also ensuring that we take sufficient time to engage with a range of stakeholders, to ensure that what we introduce will be effective and make a real impact.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
13th Jul 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the House of Commons Commission, whether the Commission has plans to make the wearing of face coverings mandatory on the Parliamentary estate.

The Commission is led by the current Government advice on the use of face masks and coverings. Whilst the guidance on the use of face coverings in shops and supermarkets will change on the 24th July, it is not applicable to the Parliamentary estate, as no onsite services are currently provided to the public.

Face coverings are not a replacement for social distancing and regular handwashing which remain the most important actions. As hon. Members and staff can maintain social distancing and have easy access to handwashing facilities or hand sanitiser, it was concluded that face coverings are not necessary at this time. However, there is no bar on those choosing to wear face masks from doing so.

24th Jan 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the House of Commons Commission, whether any brands of mobile electronic equipment have restrictions on accessing Parliamentary (a) software systems and (b) wifi.

There are no restrictions in place for any brands of mobile electronic equipment when accessing Parliamentary software systems and wifi.

17th Oct 2023
To ask the Attorney General, if she will make an estimate of the average length of time between a case being referred to the Crown Prosecution Service and a prosecution decision being reached.

The average number of days (in calendar days) from a case being referred to the Crown Prosecution Service for a charging decision or early advice and decision to charge and prosecute being reached in the period 2022-2023 (1 April 2022 – 30 March 2023) was 45 days.

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
1st Mar 2023
To ask the Attorney General, whether her Department has contracted work to a business named in round 18 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme within the last 3 years.

The Attorney General’s Department have not contracted any work to the businesses named in the scheme. All employers need to pay their staff correctly. Paying the minimum wage is not optional, it’s the law. Under the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme, employers who have previously broken minimum wage law can be publicly named. The Department for Business and Trade follows a clear and thorough process allowing firms to make representations against being named if they meet our published criteria. Details of Government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
11th Jul 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what recent assessment she has made of the extent of delays in Crown Prosecution Service decision-making.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not collect data showing the average time from receiving a referral to making a legal charging decision. Legal charging decisions are decisions to authorise a charge, to take no further action or recommend and out of court disposal.

However, data is collected showing the average time from the first police referral to the CPS making the decision to authorise a charge. This data is published on the CPS website and on the CJS Delivery Dashboard and shows that during the calendar year 2021, it took on average 39 days from referral to charge.

11th Jul 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what the average time was between the Crown Prosecution Service receiving a referral and making a charging decision in the most recent period for which data is available.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not collect data showing the average time from receiving a referral to making a legal charging decision. Legal charging decisions are decisions to authorise a charge, to take no further action or recommend and out of court disposal.

However, data is collected showing the average time from the first police referral to the CPS making the decision to authorise a charge. This data is published on the CPS website and on the CJS Delivery Dashboard and shows that during the calendar year 2021, it took on average 39 days from referral to charge.

15th Sep 2021
To ask the Attorney General, if she will list the companies that have supplied Union Jack flags to her Department since 2019.

The Attorney General’s Office (AGO), Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Serious Fraud Office (SFO), Government Legal Department (GLD) and Her Majesty’s Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI) have not purchased any Union Flags over the last two years.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
14th Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the letter of 14 November 2023 to the Prime Minister from the rt hon. member for Fareham, if the Prime Minister will publish the document with clear terms agreed in October 2022 referred to in that letter.

Senior politicians will routinely discuss policy priorities with colleagues during a party leadership election. The Prime Minister has set out his priorities to tackle illegal and legal migration.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
24th Oct 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2023 to Question 196542 on Death, what assessment the Government has made of the causes of excess deaths in 2022.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon gentleman’s Parliamentary Question of 24th October is attached.

3rd Jul 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 8 June 2023 to Question 187732 on Former Ministers: Public Inquiries, how many occasions has legal support been provided to former ministers on matters relating to their personal conduct.

Former ministers may be supported with legal representation after they have left office when matters relate to their time and conduct as a Minister of the Crown.

The Cabinet Office does not maintain statistics on the total number of occasions legal support has been provided to former ministers.

The Ministerial Code and the Cabinet Manual provide guidance on personal liability in the context of legal proceedings for ministers and, in the case of the latter, former ministers.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what his Department's policy is on meeting the legal fees for former ministers called to give evidence to public inquiries.

There is an established precedent across multiple administrations that former Ministers may be supported with legal representation after they have left office when matters relate to their time and conduct as a Minister.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will place in the Library of the House copies of all correspondence between his Department and the Right Honourable Member for Uxbridge and South Ruislip on funding for his legal representation for the official covid-19 inquiry.

The Cabinet Office does not ordinarily publish correspondence for ongoing legal matters.

24th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people have been identified as not being suitable to invite to speak at Government events following the vetting of their social media histories; and if she will publish the names of those individuals.

It is not our intention to publish the guidance, as cross departmental networks may wish to adapt it.

We do not collate information on the number of people who are identified as unsuitable for speaking at Government events, nor would we publish the names of these individuals.

Civil Service Human Resources who sit within the Cabinet Office developed the guidance for all Cross-Government Diversity networks, and this requires the networks to carry out checks on external speakers prior to inviting them to participate in Civil Service events.


24th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish his Department's guidance on the vetting of the social media histories of people invited to speak at Government events.

It is not our intention to publish the guidance, as cross departmental networks may wish to adapt it.

We do not collate information on the number of people who are identified as unsuitable for speaking at Government events, nor would we publish the names of these individuals.

Civil Service Human Resources who sit within the Cabinet Office developed the guidance for all Cross-Government Diversity networks, and this requires the networks to carry out checks on external speakers prior to inviting them to participate in Civil Service events.


16th Mar 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Government plans to update the Contracts Finder platform from the beta phase.

The Government's Procurement Bill will create new legislative requirements for the publication of procurement notices. Once this work is completed, further consideration will be given to the development of Contracts Finder, including moving it from 'Beta' to 'Live'.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has contracted work to a business named in round 18 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme in the last 3 years.

The information requested is not held centrally and cannot be provided without incurring disproportionate cost; however, the Cabinet Office expects all contractors to pay their employees the National Living Wage and minimum rates for younger workers.

Paying the minimum wage is not optional, it is the law. Under the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme, employers who have previously broken minimum wage law are publicly named as a deterrent to the minority of employers who may be tempted to underpay their workers. Employers who pay workers less than the minimum wage have to pay back arrears of wages to the worker at current minimum wage rates. They also face hefty financial penalties of up to 200% of arrears - capped at £20,000 per worker - which are paid to the government. Since 2015 the government has ordered employers to repay over £100 million to 1 million workers.

Under this Conservative Government, the National Living Wage (NLW) will rise to £10.42 from 1 April 2023, an increase of 9.7 per cent, with rates for younger people rising in line with this.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many deaths have been recorded by the coronial system as relating to complications caused by the covid vaccine in each month since December 2020.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon. Member's Parliamentary Question of 17 February is attached.

17th Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people have been recorded as dying due to complications caused by covid-19 vaccines in each month since December 2020.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon. Member's Parliamentary Question of 17 February is attached.

17th Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate has he made of the number of people who have died as a result of reactions to the covid-19 vaccine in each month since December 2020.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon. Member's Parliamentary Question of 17 February is attached.

16th Dec 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 9 November 2022 to Question 78748 on MyCSP: Complaints, whether his Department is taking steps to improve the service provided by MyCSP.

Cabinet Office’s performance statistics indicate an improving trend of the services provided by MyCSP.

Cabinet Office continues to drive MyCSP to improve their current level of service and continues to work alongside MyCSP to deliver a number of short and medium term initiatives designed to improve the member experience.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
3rd Nov 2022
To ask the Minister of the Cabinet Office, how many complaints have been logged regarding poor service from MyCSP.

In the last 12 calendar months (between 1 November 2021 and 31 October 2022), MyCSP have resolved 195 complaints relating to MyCSP’s service.

During the same period, the Scheme Manager, Cabinet Office, logged 231 instances of a concern relating to MyCSP.

11th May 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the membership and terms of reference are of the UK Commission on Covid Commemoration Commission.

As the Prime Minister previously announced, the Government will set out the Commission membership and terms of reference in due course.

22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much has been spent on the All In, All Together scheme in each month since the conception of that scheme.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ117079 on 7 February.

7th Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has amended its outsourcing policies in response to the decision in Mr D Antwi and others v The Royal Parks Ltd: 2202211/2020 and others.

When conducting their procurement activities, central Government departments and their agencies must ensure that they meet their legal obligations under the Equality Act 2010 and its associated Public Sector Equality Duty in a way that is consistent with the Government’s value for money policy and relevant public procurement law.

The public procurement rules allow for equality-related issues to be taken into account in the procurement process where they are relevant to the subject matter, or relate to the performance, of the contract.

Procurement Policy Note (PPN) 01/13 was published to remind departments of their legal obligations under the Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED), when conducting their public procurement activities.

31st Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the (a) membership and (b) terms of reference are of the UK Commission on Covid Commemoration Commission.

As the Prime Minister announced on 12 May 2021, and referenced during Prime Minister's Questions on 26 January (Hansard volume 707, column 994), the Government will establish a UK Commission on Covid Commemoration to consider the most appropriate way to remember those who have lost their lives and to recognise those involved in the unprecedented response.

The Government will set out the Commission membership and terms of reference in due course.



28th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the inquiry into the Government's handling of the covid-19 pandemic will consider the provision of travel advice by the Government to the cruise industry.

The Prime Minister has appointed the Rt Hon Baroness Heather Hallett DBE to chair the public inquiry into COVID-19. The inquiry will be established on a statutory basis, with formal powers, and will begin its work in Spring 2022.

Draft terms of reference will be published in due course, following consultation with Baroness Hallett and ministers from the devolved administrations. As set out in the Prime Minister’s statement on 15 December, Baroness Hallett will then lead a process of public consultation, including with bereaved families and other affected groups, before the terms of reference are finalised.

27th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the terms of the inquiry into the Government's handling of the covid-19 pandemic are; and whether that inquiry will consider the Government's decisions on the procurement of lateral flow tests produced overseas.

The Prime Minister has appointed the Rt Hon Baroness Heather Hallett DBE to chair the public inquiry into COVID-19. The inquiry will be established on a statutory basis, with formal powers, and will begin its work in Spring 2022.

Draft terms of reference will be published in due course, following consultation with Baroness Hallett and ministers from the devolved administrations. As set out in the Prime Minister’s statement on 15 December, Baroness Hallett will then lead a process of public consultation, including with bereaved families and other affected groups, before the terms of reference are finalised.

11th Jan 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, how many allegations of breaches of coronavirus regulations have been made by staff employed in Downing Street.

I refer the Hon Member to the Terms of Reference to the Cabinet Office investigation, which have been deposited in the Library of the House.

24th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the publication of the timetable for the covid-19 inquiry.

On 12 May, the Prime Minister confirmed that a public inquiry into COVID-19 will be established on a statutory basis, with full formal powers, and that it will begin its work in spring 2022. The Prime Minister has committed to appointing an independent chair by the end of the year.

23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, what meetings have taken place between (a) Ministers and/or civil servants and (b) officials from Summit Resorts and Developments Limited (formerly David Lloyd Developments Limited) since 2019.

Formal Ministerial meetings, and Permanent Secretaries' meetings, with external organisations are published each quarter on gov.uk

23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish all details of meetings between Ministers and officials from his Department and representatives of Summit Resorts and Developments Limited, or its predecessor David Lloyd Developments Limited, since January 2019.

Details of ministerial meetings are published quarterly and can be found on GOV.UK.

16th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of the Union Jack flags purchased by the Prime Minister's Office in each of the last two years were manufactured in the UK.

Downing Street flags are supplied by JW Plant and by The Flag Consultancy. I understand these companies manufacture their flags in the United Kingdom.

16th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which companies have supplied Union Jack flags to the Prime Minister's Office since 2019.

Downing Street flags are supplied by JW Plant and by The Flag Consultancy. I understand these companies manufacture their flags in the United Kingdom.

15th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will list the companies that have supplied Union Jack flags to his Department since 2019.

Flags have been supplied to the Cabinet Office by Mitie FM Ltd. and Flagmakers. These flags were manufactured in the UK.

15th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of Union Jack flags purchased by his Department in each of the last two years were manufactured in the UK.

Flags have been supplied to the Cabinet Office by Mitie FM Ltd. and Flagmakers. These flags were manufactured in the UK.

13th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the (a) membership and (b) terms of reference is for the UK commission in Covid Commemoration.

Every death during the pandemic has been a tragic loss, made so much harder for those unable to say goodbye or grieve as they would have wished. It is absolutely right that we come together to mark and remember this period appropriately.

The Prime Minister announced on 12 May that the Government will support these efforts by establishing a UK Commission on Covid Commemoration. The Commission will carefully consider how communities across the country can remember those who have lost their lives and recognise those involved in the response in a fitting and permanent way.

The Government recognises the need for bereaved families to be represented on the Commission and are committed to ensuring this happens. I am grateful to them for all their efforts throughout the pandemic. The Government will set out the Commission membership and terms of reference in due course.

10th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many business in Ellesmere Port and Neston Constituency placed a bid for a public contract in (a) 2020 and (b) 2021; and what proportion of those bids were successful.

This information is not held centrally.

8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people are employed on zero hour contracts in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions he has had with the Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice group on the launch of the covid-19 inquiry; and how that group will be represented during that inquiry.

On 12 May, the Prime Minister confirmed the public inquiry into COVID-19 will begin in Spring 2022. The Government recognises that it must engage and consult with bereaved families and others, before the terms of reference are finalised. The terms of reference will set out the purpose and structure of the Covid-19 inquiry, including the exact areas that will be investigated.

The Government is aware of Bereaved Families for Justice’ call to be represented during the COVID-19 Inquiry. Throughout the pandemic senior ministers, including the Prime Minister, have met and will continue to meet with bereaved families.

We also recognise the need for bereaved families to be represented on the UK Commission on Covid Commemoration. The Commission will carefully consider how communities across the country can remember those who have lost their lives and recognise those involved in the response in a fitting and permanent way. I want to thank the Bereaved Families for Justice group for all their efforts in representing bereaved families throughout the pandemic.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people are employed on zero hour contracts in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of the Union Jack flags purchased by the Government were manufactured in the UK in each of the last two years.

Departments are responsible for their own procurement, therefore this information is not held centrally.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will list the companies that have supplied Union Jack flags to the Government since 2019.

Departments are responsible for their own procurement, therefore this information is not held centrally.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on introducing memorials across the UK in remembrance of people who have died from covid-19.

While the Government's immediate focus is on protecting the lives and livelihoods of the nation, there is nonetheless the need to mourn those who have died, and to mark and remember this period as one of immense struggle.

The Prime Minister announced on 12 May that the Government will establish a UK Commission on COVID Commemoration to consider the appropriate way to remember those who have lost their lives and to recognise those involved in the unprecedented response. The Government will set out the Commission membership and terms of reference in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what impact assessment was undertaken by his Department of the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman decision as of April 2021 to use the severity of Injustice scale on the number of complaints that will be accepted for investigation in comparison to before the scale was used.

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) is independent of Government and is accountable to Parliament through the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee for its performance. The PHSO will therefore reply separately to these questions by letter.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions he has had with the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman on its decision as of April 2021 to use a Severity of Injustice scale to decide on which complaints will be accepted for investigation.

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) is independent of Government and is accountable to Parliament through the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee for its performance. The PHSO will therefore reply separately to these questions by letter.

14th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions he has had with the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman on the increase in the (a) waiting time for allocation of complaints from 29 days to 74 days and (b) average time from allocation to completion to 152 days.

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) is independent of Government and is accountable to Parliament through the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee for its performance. The PHSO will therefore reply separately to these questions by letter.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make an assessment of the adequacy of the performance of the Parliamentary Ombudsman.

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) is independent of Government and is accountable to Parliament through the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee for its performance. The PHSO will therefore reply separately to these questions by letter.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average waiting time is from (a) a complaint being accepted for investigation and (b) a decision being made by the Parliamentary Ombudsman in the most recent period for which that information is available.

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) is independent of Government and is accountable to Parliament through the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee for its performance. The PHSO will therefore reply separately to these questions by letter.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average waiting time is for a complaint to be assigned to a Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman caseworker in the most recent period for which that information is available; and what that average waiting time was in March 2020.

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) is independent of Government and is accountable to Parliament through the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee for its performance. The PHSO will therefore reply separately to these questions by letter.

11th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will list the publications in which the Government's All Together insertions have been included; and if he will place a copy of each one of those insertions in the Library.

I refer the hon. member to the answer given to PQ 45460 on 18 May 2020 and PQs 152485-152495 on 22 February 2021.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the effect of the withdrawal of Public Procurement Note (a) 02/20 and (b) 04/20 on the rate of transmission of covid-19.

From the beginning of the pandemic the Government has taken a number of measures to accelerate payments to suppliers and preserve cash flow. Contracting Authorities can still make their own arrangements for contractual relief if necessary and since October 2020, we have encouraged businesses to consider the raft of financial support available - including the CJRS and loan schemes.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies' document entitled Analysis of SARS-CoV-2 transmission clusters and superspreading events, dated 3 June 2020, what role the covid-19 superspreading event in South Korea in January 2020 played in informing the covid-19 restrictions applied by the Government to gyms.

The Government considers evidence from a range of sources when deciding whether and how to apply restrictions to businesses and when to ease them, including for gyms and other sports and leisure facilities. No one wants to prevent businesses operating, but we have always been guided by the scientific evidence whilst seeking to keep as many businesses open as possible at each stage of our response. Scientific evidence supporting the government response to COVID-19 is regularly published at - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/scientific-evidence-supporting-the-government-response-to-coronavirus-covid-19

Gyms are currently closed as part of our national effort to control the spread of the virus. The government’s published Roadmap sets out our intention to reopen gyms and other premises when the time is right and will be supported by updated Covid secure guidance before each step of the Roadmap.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
18th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much has been paid in termination payments to employees who left employment in the Prime Minister's Office in each month of 2020.

The Prime Minister’s Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office. The Cabinet Office Annual Report and Accounts includes information on staff costs and exit packages for permanently employed staff, Special Advisers and Ministers within the Department, including the Prime Minister’s Office.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what his Department's policy is on which matters are considered sensitive by the FOI clearing house.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ 120771 on 30 November.

26th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many responses to FOI requests submitted to other Government Departments have been subject to approval by his Department prior to release.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ 120771 on 30 November.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Prime Minister, when he next plans to hold another People's PMQs session.

People’s PMQs are an opportunity for members of the public to ask me about issues that affect their lives. I hope to hold another one shortly.

23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Government departments and agencies have issued written instructions to their employees to work from home after 22 September 2020.

It is essential that we continue the business of government. In the Cabinet Office, as in all Departments, we have ensured COVID-secure workplaces are in place so that civil servants can do so safely.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to Answer of 16 June to Question 54932, whether all articles published in the All together advertising campaign are compliant with the Government Communication Service Propriety Guidance.

It is vital that we provide public information to citizens during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Government has negotiated a new and unique partnership with national and local newspapers to use their powerful, familiar voices as part of the All In, All Together campaign.

The partnership involves a combination of traditional advertising and sponsored content. This content is produced by participating newspapers and the Government has no editorial sign-off.

5th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many face coverings for use by the general population are held by Government.

Further to the answer given to PQs 48885, 48886, 48887 on 14 May 2020, the Government has published guidance on staying safe outside the home during the COVID-19 pandemic:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/staying-safe-outside-your-home/staying-safe-outside-your-home

The guidance includes information on the use of face coverings. We are asking people to make their own face coverings at home, using scarves or other textile items and we have published guidance to help illustrate the process.

In terms of the wider production of PPE for use for medical purposes, Lord Deighton has been appointed to lead the national effort to boost PPE production, and also support the scaling up of engineering efforts for small companies capable of contributing to supplies.

5th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his oral contribution of 28 April 2020, Official Report, column 218, how many face coverings have been produced since 28 April 2020.

Further to the answer given to PQs 48885, 48886, 48887 on 14 May 2020, the Government has published guidance on staying safe outside the home during the COVID-19 pandemic:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/staying-safe-outside-your-home/staying-safe-outside-your-home

The guidance includes information on the use of face coverings. We are asking people to make their own face coverings at home, using scarves or other textile items and we have published guidance to help illustrate the process.

In terms of the wider production of PPE for use for medical purposes, Lord Deighton has been appointed to lead the national effort to boost PPE production, and also support the scaling up of engineering efforts for small companies capable of contributing to supplies.

4th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many Government contracts have been awarded to Faculty in 2020; and what the value of those contracts is.

Details of Government contracts above £10,000, including the value of those contracts, are published on Contracts Finder: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search

All Government contracts which involve the processing of personal data, must adhere to the requirements of Procurement Policy Note – Changes to Data Protection Legislation & General Data Protection Regulation Action Note PPN 02/18.

4th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the cost to the public purse is of the Government's All together advertising campaign.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer given to PQ 35512 on 21 April 2020.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to cease the daily covid-19 Government press briefings.

The Government remains committed to providing the public with the information they need relating to Coronavirus. We will keep under review how best to provide information but Coronavirus press conferences will continue on weekdays.

13th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many contractors working for his Department have had their employment status assessed in relation to the new IR35 rules on off-payroll working; and how many of those staff are subject to those rules.

In total Cabinet Office has 469 contingent labour workers engaged via Public Sector Resourcing (PSR), all of whom have had their employment status assessed in relation to the new IR35 rules.

13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, when her Department plans to bring forward regulations to implement the Workers (Predictable Terms and Conditions) Act 2023; and whether she plans to hold discussions with businesses that (a) supply and (b) use agency workers before doing so.

The Government is planning to bring the Workers (Predictable Terms and Conditions) Act 2023 into force in Autumn 2024. We will hold discussions with businesses about the regulations, as part of our regular stakeholder engagement.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to her Department's publication entitled DIT ministerial gifts, hospitality, travel and meetings, published 20 July 2023, what was spent on (a) flights and (b) accommodation during the Minister of State for Investment's visit to San Francisco on 10 to 14 January 2023.

The total cost of flights and accommodation for the Minister of State for Industry's visit to San Francisco from 7 to 11 February 2023 is included within the "BEIS ministerial travel, January to March 2023" transparency data published on GOV.UK.

The total cost of flights and accommodation for the Minister for Investment's visit to San Francisco from 10 to 14 January 2023 is included within the "DIT Ministers' Overseas Travel: January to February 2023" transparency data published on GOV.UK.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to her Department's publication entitled BEIS: ministerial gifts, hospitality, travel, meetings, January to March 2023, published on 20 July 2023, what was spent on (a) flights and (b) accommodation during the Minister of State for Industry's visit to San Francisco on 7 to 11 February 2023.

The total cost of flights and accommodation for the Minister of State for Industry's visit to San Francisco from 7 to 11 February 2023 is included within the "BEIS ministerial travel, January to March 2023" transparency data published on GOV.UK.

The total cost of flights and accommodation for the Minister for Investment's visit to San Francisco from 10 to 14 January 2023 is included within the "DIT Ministers' Overseas Travel: January to February 2023" transparency data published on GOV.UK.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many and what proportion of employers that were included on a National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme list published since January 2011 have not paid arrears to affected employees.

The Government only names once HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has finished its investigations and once employers have repaid arrears to workers and paid the penalty to government.

Where there has been an underpayment, HMRC will instruct the employer to pay workers the arrears owed, and a penalty of up to 200% of arrears. In 2021/22, HMRC concluded over 2,800 minimum wage investigations and returned more than £16.3m in arrears to over 120,000 workers. HMRC issued 696 fines totalling £13.2m to businesses who had failed to pay the minimum wage.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to round 19 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme, published in June 2023, how many and what proportion of the named employers have now paid arrears to people who were paid less than the minimum wage.

The Government only names once HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has finished its investigations and once employers have repaid arrears to workers and paid the penalty to government.

Where there has been an underpayment, HMRC will instruct the employer to pay workers the arrears owed, and a penalty of up to 200% of arrears. In 2021/22, HMRC concluded over 2,800 minimum wage investigations and returned more than £16.3m in arrears to over 120,000 workers. HMRC issued 696 fines totalling £13.2m to businesses who had failed to pay the minimum wage.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 May 2023 to Question 184678 on Conditions of Employment: EU Law, which Hon. members wrote to her on that matter.

The information can only be obtained at disproportionate cost and would fall above the £850 cost threshold to retrieve this information.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
24th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 May 2023 to Question 184678 on Conditions of Employment: EU Law, how many hon. Members contacted her on that matter.

The information can only be obtained at disproportionate cost and would fall above the £850 cost threshold to retrieve this information.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
24th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 May 2023 to Question 184678 on Conditions of Employment: EU Law, if she will publish the cost of retrieving that information.

The information can only be obtained at disproportionate cost and would fall above the £850 cost threshold to retrieve this information.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
11th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Written Statement of 10 May 2023, HCWS764 on Regulatory Reform Update, what steps she plans to take to improve employment law.

We have identified several regulations where we see opportunities for improvements following our exit from the EU, including the Working Time Regulations and Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment), or ‘TUPE’, Regulations.

We will reduce time-consuming reporting requirements under the Working Time Regulations, which could save employers around £1bn a year. We are also simplifying annual leave and holiday pay calculations in the Working Time Regulations, and streamlining regulations that apply when a business transfers to a new owner.

These proposals do not seek to remove rights, but instead remove unnecessary bureaucracy in the way those rights operate, allowing business to benefit from the additional freedoms we have through Brexit.

The consultation on these proposals can be found here.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Written Statement of 10 May 2023, HCWS764 on Regulatory Reform Update, who she plans to consult on proposed changes to employment law.

The Government has launched a consultation on three areas of retained EU employment law to ensure that they are tailored to the needs of the UK economy while ensuring that workers’ rights continue to be protected. The consultation is available on GOV.UK, and will run until 7 July 2023. The three areas we are consulting on are:

  • Record keeping requirements under the Working Time Regulations;
  • Simplifying annual leave and holiday pay calculations in the Working Time Regulations; and
  • Consultation requirements under the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment), or ‘TUPE’, Regulations.
Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to her Oral contribution on 11 May 2023, Official Report, in response to the Urgent Question on the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, if she will publish the details of the correspondence she has received from hon. Members on that Bill on that matter.

The information can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she plans to revoke any regulations on employment rights following the passage of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill.

The Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill allows the United Kingdom to take the next step in reasserting the sovereignty of Parliament. It will end the special status of retained EU law in the UK statute book and ensures that, for the first time in a generation, the UK’s statute book will not recognise the supremacy of EU law or EU legal principles. The UK has one of the best workers’ rights records in the world and our high standards were never dependent on our membership of the EU. The Government has been conducting a comprehensive review of all retained EU law to ensure that our regulations are tailored to the needs of the UK economy, and is consulting on several regulations where we see opportunities for improvements, while not impacting workers’ rights, the consultation can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/retained-eu-employment-law-reforms

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
11th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Written Statement of 10 May 2023, HCWS764, on Regulatory Reform Update, if she will publish the advice her Department has received on the risks of legal uncertainty posed by sunsetting instruments made under EU law.

Amendments to the Bill have been laid at the Lords Report stage that will amend the operation of the sunset by introducing a schedule of legislation to be revoked. This Schedule should provide increased legal certainty and clarity for all stakeholders on retained EU law that will be revoked by 31 December 2023. These amendments were further debated during Commons Consideration of Lords Amendments on 24 May and remain part of the Bill.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
2nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will publish the guidance her Department uses for diversity network events which require checks on external speakers prior to inviting them to participate in Civil Service events.

The Department for Business and Trade has internal guidance that requests staff networks carry out due diligence on external speakers invited to speak at Civil Service events that they are hosting. It is imperative that we retain impartiality across the Civil Service, avoiding any politicised events or groups impacting on the working life of civil servants and distracting from the work delivered on Diversity and Inclusion. Our due diligence guidance is detailed on the approval form which networks must complete prior to inviting external speakers to their events.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, which regulations will not be subject to the sunset clause within the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill.

The scope of the sunset is defined in clause one and it covers ‘EU-derived domestic subordinate legislation’ and ‘retained direct EU legislation’.

Primary legislation will not sunset.

Clause 1 also contains the preservation power. This allows the UK Government and devolved governments to preserve specific pieces of retained EU law that would otherwise be subject to the sunset.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will make an estimate of the (a) number and (b) cost of penalties placed on employers for failure to pay an employment tribunal award in each year since 2019.

Workers should receive the money they are owed. We are committed to ensuring this happens and that they are protected from exploitation.

The Department offers the Employment Tribunal Unpaid Award Penalties Scheme as a free way for parties to incentivise prompt payment for their awards. The scheme operates as part of a wider system of enforcement options such as the Fast Track scheme in England & Wales and the civil courts.

Data held on Employment Tribunal Penalties is derived from a live case management system used for internal purposes which has not been subject to sufficient validation that would be required for us to be confident in releasing this to Parliament at this time.

We will consider what data we may be able to publish on this subject in the future as we recognise the importance of transparency in this area.

The Government is also currently reviewing at what point it is appropriate to start to use the powers that we have to name employers who do not pay relevant awards.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps she is taking to help increase the level of timely payment of employment tribunal awards.

Workers should receive the money they are owed. We are committed to ensuring this happens and that they are protected from exploitation.

The Department offers the Employment Tribunal Unpaid Award Penalties Scheme as a free way for parties to incentivise prompt payment for their awards. The scheme operates as part of a wider system of enforcement options such as the Fast Track scheme in England & Wales and the civil courts.

Data held on Employment Tribunal Penalties is derived from a live case management system used for internal purposes which has not been subject to sufficient validation that would be required for us to be confident in releasing this to Parliament at this time.

We will consider what data we may be able to publish on this subject in the future as we recognise the importance of transparency in this area.

The Government is also currently reviewing at what point it is appropriate to start to use the powers that we have to name employers who do not pay relevant awards.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, when the first list of employers who have not paid employment tribunal awards within a reasonable time will be published under the employment tribunal naming scheme.

Workers should receive the money they are owed. We are committed to ensuring this happens and that they are protected from exploitation.

The Department offers the Employment Tribunal Unpaid Award Penalties Scheme as a free way for parties to incentivise prompt payment for their awards. The scheme operates as part of a wider system of enforcement options such as the Fast Track scheme in England & Wales and the civil courts.

Data held on Employment Tribunal Penalties is derived from a live case management system used for internal purposes which has not been subject to sufficient validation that would be required for us to be confident in releasing this to Parliament at this time.

We will consider what data we may be able to publish on this subject in the future as we recognise the importance of transparency in this area.

The Government is also currently reviewing at what point it is appropriate to start to use the powers that we have to name employers who do not pay relevant awards.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
22nd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 8 March 2023 to Question 153826 on Redundancy Pay: Insolvency Service, of the 5,766 employers subject to formal insolvency proceedings in 2022, in how many cases were the company directors involved subject to (a) personal bankruptcy proceedings and (b) director-disqualification notices.

The Insolvency Service does not hold this information.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
1st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many employers have notified the Redundancy Payments Service of planned redundancies in the last 12 months.

Employers are required by law to notify the Secretary of State, in practice the Insolvency Service’s Redundancy Payments Service (RPS),of any proposal to dismiss 20 or more employees as redundant at one establishment within a period of 90 days or less. This advanced notification is normally via the ‘HR1’ form.

For the period 1 February 2022 to 31 January 2023, RPS received HR1s from 2,376 employers.

The Insolvency Service publishes figures regarding advanced notification of redundancy at the following link: advanced notification.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department has contracted work to a business that has been prosecuted by the Health and Safety Executive within the last three years.

The Department for Business and Trade, formerly the Department for International Trade has conducted a search of our databases for all contracts over £10k, resulting in a nil return.

We confirm that the former Department for International Trade had not contracted work to a business that has been prosecuted by the Health and Safety Executive within the last three years.

Details of Government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
27th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many statutory redundancy payments were processed by the Insolvency Service in (a) 2021 and (b) 2022.

The number of individuals who received a statutory redundancy payment from the Insolvency Service was 37,830 in the 2021 calendar year and 31,815 in 2022.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what the total cost to the public purse was of statutory redundancy payments processed by the Insolvency Service in (a) 2021 and (b) 2022.

The total value of statutory redundancy payments made by the Insolvency service in the 2021 calendar year was £148,379.673 and in 2022 was £148,352,681.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, which companies had employees that received redundancy payments from the Insolvency Service in (a) 2021 and (b) 2022; and how many employees received payments in each instance.

In 2021 there were 181 employers not subject to formal insolvency proceedings with 391 claims; and 4,769 employers subject to formal insolvency proceedings with 37,576 claims where a statutory redundancy payment was made by the Insolvency Service.

In 2022 there were 164 employers not subject to formal insolvency proceedings with 500 claims; and 5,766 employers subject to formal insolvency proceedings with 31,447 claims where a statutory redundancy payment was made by the Insolvency Service.

The names of employers subject to formal insolvency proceedings with more than 10 redundancy payments made are included in the attached tables.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department has contracted work to a business named in round 18 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme in the last 3 years.

All employers need to pay their staff correctly. Paying the minimum wage is not optional, it’s the law. Under the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme, employers who have previously broken minimum wage law can be publicly named. The Department for Business and Trade follows a clear and thorough process allowing firms to make representations against being named if they meet our published criteria.

The Department for Business and Trade does not hold information about the number of named employers who have a contract with a Government Department. However, government contracts over £10,000 are listed on Contracts Finder: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder. This Department only names employers once HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has concluded its investigations.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
21st Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to Table 17 of the EMP17: People in employment on zero hours contracts data released on 14 February 2023, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the increase in the proportion of those on a zero hour contract in temporary work between the October to December period in 2021 and the same period in 2022.

Zero hours contracts are an important part of the UK’s flexible labour market, they are useful where there is not a constant demand for staff, allowing flexibility for both employers and individuals – like carers, people studying, or retirees. For this small group, a zero hours contract may be the type of contract which works best for them.

Research from The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) found that 65% of zero hours contract workers are satisfied or very satisfied with their jobs, which is similar to the proportion of employees as a whole (63%) [2015].

The Government is supporting a Private Member’s Bill which will introduce a new right for workers – especially those on zero hours contracts - to request a more predictable working pattern.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, when the next National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme list for companies failing to pay National Minimum Wage will be published.

Publicly naming employers who do not comply with the rules remains an important part of our enforcement and compliance toolkit. It clearly demonstrates that it is never acceptable to underpay workers and that employers who do will be held responsible.

To date we have named around 2,500 employers, covering around £20.8 million in arrears and £24.1 million in penalties. The Government last named 208 employers on 8 December 2021, including some of the UK’s biggest household names. The next National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme list will be published in due course.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps her Department is taking to address levels of young people and students employed on zero hours contracts.

Zero-hours contracts remain an important part of the UK’s flexible labour market, for both employers where there is not a constant demand for staff and for individuals who may need to balance work around other commitments such as childcare and study.

Individuals on zero hours contracts represent a very small proportion of the workforce – just over 3%. For this small group, a zero-hour contract may be the type of contract which works best for them, providing flexibility to balance work and study with 22% of people on zero-hour contracts are in full-time education compared with 3% of other people in employment.

The Government is supporting a Private Member’s Bill which will introduce a new right for workers – especially those on zero hours contracts - to request a more predictable working pattern. The new right will allow a qualifying worker to make an application to change their existing working pattern if it lacks predictability in terms of the hours they are required to work, or if it is a fixed term contract of less than 12 months.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the latest data release entitled EMP17: People in employment on zero hours contracts, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of trends in the proportion of university students who are working in jobs with zero hours contracts.

Zero-hours contracts remain an important part of the UK’s flexible labour market, for both employers where there is not a constant demand for staff and for individuals who may need to balance work around other commitments such as childcare and study.

Individuals on zero hours contracts represent a very small proportion of the workforce – just over 3%. For this small group, a zero-hour contract may be the type of contract which works best for them, providing flexibility to balance work and study with 22% of people on zero-hour contracts are in full-time education compared with 3% of other people in employment.

The Government is supporting a Private Member’s Bill which will introduce a new right for workers – especially those on zero hours contracts - to request a more predictable working pattern. The new right will allow a qualifying worker to make an application to change their existing working pattern if it lacks predictability in terms of the hours they are required to work, or if it is a fixed term contract of less than 12 months.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the latest release of data entitled EMP17: People in employment on zero hours contracts, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the proportions of (a) 16-24 year olds and (b) 25-34 year olds in work who are on Zero Hour Contracts.

Zero-hours contracts remain an important part of the UK’s flexible labour market, for both employers where there is not a constant demand for staff and for individuals who may need to balance work around other commitments such as childcare and study.

Individuals on zero hours contracts represent a very small proportion of the workforce – just over 3%. For this small group, a zero-hour contract may be the type of contract which works best for them, providing flexibility to balance work and study with 22% of people on zero-hour contracts are in full-time education compared with 3% of other people in employment.

The Government is supporting a Private Member’s Bill which will introduce a new right for workers – especially those on zero hours contracts - to request a more predictable working pattern. The new right will allow a qualifying worker to make an application to change their existing working pattern if it lacks predictability in terms of the hours they are required to work, or if it is a fixed term contract of less than 12 months.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Strikes (Minimum Service Levels) Bill 2022-23, whether her Department is taking steps to ensure that workers requested to work by a work notice will have a protection from (a) unfair dismissal and (b) other employment sanctions where an individual needs to leave their place of work in the context of section 44(1A) of the Employment Rights Act 1996.

Section 44(1A) of the Employment Rights Act 1996 provides that workers have the right not to suffer detriment for refusing to work in circumstances where the worker reasonably believed they were in serious and imminent danger. Section 100(1)(d) also provides protection to employees from dismissal in those circumstances. If an employee has been named on a work notice, in order for a minimum service level to be achieved, they will continue to be able to rely on section 44(1A) to protect them from detriment and section 100(1)(d) to protect them from dismissal for refusing to work because they reasonably believe that they are in serious and imminent danger as they do now.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what her planned timetable is for completing the review of the (a) emission trading scheme and (b) sale of unused credits by companies that have closed down factories in the UK.

We have published the review of the UK Emissions Trading Scheme this week, available on gov.uk.

In the UK ETS, sites at risk of carbon leakage are given a proportion of their allowances for free, helping manage the risk that UK businesses’ decarbonisation efforts could be undermined by higher-carbon imports.

The scheme sets out rules around free allowances, including on their reduction and return where sites’ production and emissions levels decrease. We have published a consultation this week reviewing these rules, with proposals to ensure that surplus allowances are not retained by companies that have closed down in the UK.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
11th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to the Answer of 23 June 2023 to Question 189629 on Warm Home Discount Scheme, whether the evaluation of the reformed Warm Home Discount scheme included an impact assessment.

The evaluation of the scheme is ongoing and will span three years. It is due to conclude in Autumn 2026.

The Government produced impact assessments for the consultation in 2021 on expanding and reforming the Warm Home Discount scheme in England and Wales and for the publication of the Government Response in 2022, which are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/warm-home-discount-better-targeted-support-from-2022

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether her predecessor had discussions with (a) his Indian counterpart and (b) other stakeholders on the production or procurement of steel when he visited India 9 -23 March 2023.

The then Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero visited Mumbai and New Delhi from 19-22 March 2023. The then Secretary of State did not discuss the production or procurement of steel with India’s Minister for Power and New and Renewable Energy, Raj Kumar Singh. He met a range of other government and business representatives during the visit, where discussion topics included the need to accelerate the pace of the transition to clean energy in hard-to-abate sectors like steel and cement.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
11th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when her Department plans to respond to the consultation entitled New ecodesign requirements for lighting products, published on 10 January 2023.

The Government is analysing the responses to the consultation for new ecodesign requirements for lighting products and a response will be published in due course.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
11th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what estimate he has made of (a) the compensation owed to (i) Cadent and (ii) Cheshire West and Chester Council and (b) other financial consequences following the decision to cancel the hydrogen heating village trial.

The Government is continuing to develop the proposal for a hydrogen village trial in Redcar, Teesside with Northern Gas Networks (NGN). We are no longer considering Cadent’s proposal for a trial in Whitby, Ellesmere Port.

The costs incurred by the Gas Distribution Networks during the early planning and detailed design work for the hydrogen heating village trial were funded by Ofgem, with a contribution from the networks.

A decision on whether to proceed with the village trial in Redcar will be made by the Government later this year.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much time an operator has to return an overallocation of free carbon allowances.

Where a notice is issued by one of the scheme regulators requesting the return of overallocated free allowances, the relevant regulator will set the deadline for the operator to make their return. If an appeal is made this suspends the effect of a return notice until the appeal is determined or withdrawn.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what the process is for amending the allocation of free carbon allowances to operators when they change their inputs and outputs.

Free allocations to individual operators are managed dynamically via the Activity Level Changes (ALC) process to reflect significant increases and decreases in production accurately. Operators must submit a verified Activity Level Report to their UK ETS regulator annually. If the data shows an increase or decrease in activity of more than 15% from historic activity levels (calculated from the previous 2 years’ activity levels), free allocation of allowances will be recalculated.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether the Government has made any amendments to the EU Emissions Trading System installation cessation rules since setting up the UK Emissions Trading System.

The UK ETS Authority sought to ensure continuity for businesses in setting up the UK Emission Trading Scheme. The rules on cessations have been kept substantially the same within the UK Emissions Trading Scheme as they were in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme, with only minor administrative amendments to reflect that this is a domestic scheme and the role of the UK ETS Authority.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what regulations cover the sale of free carbon allowances by installations that have been offline for a calendar year.

If an installation has been offline for a calendar year and has reported a permanent cessation of activity, then free allowances are not distributed in the year after activity is permanently ceased. However, installations will retain free allowances they were entitled to in the final year during which they operate. Installations can choose whether to use these allowances for future compliance, or to sell them on the secondary market.

Where an operator does not report a permanent cessation and instead restarts activity after being offline, these free allowances will be subject to the Activity Level Change process. They can either use free allowances for compliance, sell them or retain them.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether there is an obligation on an installation to return unused carbon allowances when the facility is inactive.

In cases of permanent cessation of activity, free allowances are no longer distributed to an operator in the year after activity is permanently ceased. However, installations will retain free allowances they were entitled to in the final year during which they operate. In cases where an installation has not permanently closed but reports a reduction in production greater than the 15% Activity Level Changes threshold, free allowance allocations are adjusted, ensuring that they are reflective of actual production levels. In these cases, over-allocated allowances must be returned.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether there is an obligation on an installation to report to his Department on the (a) retention and (b) sale of free carbon allowances.

Free allowances are provided to qualifying operators to mitigate the risk of carbon leakage. These can be used to meet compliance obligations under the UK Emissions Trading Scheme, sold on the secondary market to other participants or held by operators in their accounts. There is no legal obligation for installation operators to report on their retention or sale of free carbon allowances.

All transactions under the UK ETS are recorded in the UK Emissions Trading Registry.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he has had recent discussions with energy companies on potential linage between the costs of green energy and of fossil fuels; and if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of such linkages on the development of green energy.

Ministers regularly meet with external stakeholders. Details of ministerial meetings with external organisations are published quarterly and can be found on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-energy-security-and-net-zero.

Data covering the 7 February 2023 until 31 March 2023 is due to be published shortly in line with Cabinet Office Guidance organisations are listed instead of individuals.

Levelised Costs of Electricity for generation technologies are reported in the Generation Costs Report which can be found on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/energy-generation-cost-projections. They compare the lifetime costs for a plant (construction, operating, and decommissioning costs) against its expected lifetime generation.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he is taking steps to encourage energy companies to ensure that retail prices reflect wholesale prices.

It is common for suppliers to use hedging strategies to buy energy months in advance to protect their customers from some fluctuations in wholesale costs. Leading to a lag before lower prices feed through to consumers. Ofgem now sets the energy price cap every three months, rather than six months to reduce the lag and ensure changes in the wholesale energy prices are passed on to consumers more quickly.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he has made an assessment of the adequacy of the accuracy of decisions for applications to the Energy Support Fund made by the automated decision making process.

Automated decision-making was utilised within the application process for the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding (EBSS AF) to identify any applications for households which have already received support either through the EBSS AF or the Energy Bills Support Scheme. This helped the department to process a large number of cases at once, ensuring eligible applicants could receive their support as soon as possible, whilst protecting public funds against fraud. Any applicant who believes that their application has been incorrectly rejected due to this process can call our contact centre helpline for further assistance.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many applications to the Energy Support Scheme have been refused and later overturned.

The Department does not have these figures at this time as applications for the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding are still being processed. The latest application figures, including rejected applications, were published on 15 June on GOV.UK - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-bills-support-scheme-alternative-fund-gb-ni-and-alternative-fuel-payment-alternative-fund-applications-made-by-customers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what progress he has made on the review of the Warm Home Discount.

The evaluation of the reformed Warm Home Discount scheme is expected to commence in summer, with a view to monitoring the results and informing the future of the scheme.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make an estimate of the cost to the public purse of providing free carbon allowances to businesses that have ceased operations in the last 12 months.

UK Emissions Trading Scheme (UK ETS) allowances are given for free to eligible industrial operators at risk of carbon leakage. In the year after activity is permanently ceased, these free allowances are no longer distributed. However, operators retain free allowances to which they were entitled in the final year they operate, as they will still have a carbon leakage exposure which must be mitigated.

Nine UK ETS operators permanently ceased operations by the end of the 2022 scheme year, and were allocated 623,241 allowances in that year, worth c.£49M at 2022 average UK allowances prices.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make an estimate of the value of carbon allowances issued to businesses that ceased operations in 2022.

UK Emissions Trading Scheme (UK ETS) allowances are given for free to eligible industrial operators at risk of carbon leakage. In the year after activity is permanently ceased, these free allowances are no longer distributed. However, operators retain free allowances to which they were entitled in the final year they operate, as they will still have a carbon leakage exposure which must be mitigated.

Nine UK ETS operators permanently ceased operations by the end of the 2022 scheme year, and were allocated 623,241 allowances in that year, worth c.£49M at 2022 average UK allowances prices.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
29th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department is taking steps to ensure that people who are eligible for the Alternative fuel payment are not digitally-excluded from the application process.

Eligible applicants to the Alternative Fuel Payment Alternative Fund without online access can apply via the contact centre helpline which can reached on 0808 175 3943. When contacting the helpline, a representative will guide them through the application process. The helpline is open 8am to 6pm on Monday to Friday.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
23rd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 8 March 2023 to Question 155157 on Department for Energy Security and Net Zero: Minimum Wage, what the total value was of those contracts let with Hays Specialist Recruitment Limited.

The total value of the contracts let with Hays Specialist Recruitment Limited, as referred to in the answer I gave the Hon. Member on 8 March 2023 to Question 155157, is £242,226.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department has contracted work to a business named in round 18 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme in the last 3 years.

Four contracts have been let with Hays Specialist Recruitment Limited which was named in round 18 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme, within the last 3 years.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
24th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how unclaimed Energy Bill Support Scheme vouchers will be used.

Customers in Great Britain have been widely urged to redeem their vouchers promptly. Latest figures published in February indicate 76% have been redeemed. Expired vouchers can be reissued by the supplier but all must be redeemed by 30 June 2023.

After the scheme closes on 30 June 2023, unspent funds must be returned to the Department. The electricity suppliers will not profit from vouchers being unredeemed.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
24th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department has had recent discussions with energy suppliers on (a) the proportion of Energy Bill Support Scheme vouchers that have not been claimed and (b) legislative proposals to help ensure that customers receive their full entitlement to those vouchers.

The Department has been engaging with suppliers regularly since the beginning of the Energy Bills Support Scheme (EBSS) to improve uptake of traditional prepayment meter vouchers and the latest figures published in February indicate in the first four months of the scheme 76% of issued vouchers were redeemed.

The EBSS GB is implemented by licence modifications to suppliers’ standard licence conditions underpinned by a Secretary of State direction on EBSS provision and delivery under section 7(3) of the Electricity Act 1989. Suppliers must deliver the EBSS discount to all eligible customers with any instances of non-delivery by exception only.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
24th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what discussions he has had with relevant stakeholders on the impact of the cost of energy on the financial viability of hospices.

Discussions have taken place and will continue to take place with a number of charities and businesses regarding increased energy costs, and Government is fully aware of the impact this is having on the hospice sector.

This is why the Energy Bill Relief Scheme was introduced, shielding eligible non-domestic customers from soaring energy prices. Following a HMT-led review, the new Energy Bill Discount Scheme, will run from April until March 2024, and will continue to provide a discount to eligible non- domestic customers, including the hospice sector.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of hydrogen village trials.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 16th January 2023 to Question 117986.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
3rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what discussions he has had with relevant stakeholders on the adequacy of the (a) Earnings Before Interest and Tax and (b) Headroom allowances used by Ofgem when calculating the Energy Price Cap.

Ministers and officials regularly meet with stakeholders on matters related to the energy retail market. The setting of the energy price cap is a matter for the independent regulator Ofgem.

Ofgem consults extensively on its methodology for determining the cap level, and recently published a Programme of Work for reviewing elements of the cap which is publicly available online at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/price-cap-programme-work.

The Government has confidence in Ofgem, as the expert independent regulator, to set the cap at a level that reflects the underlying efficient costs of supplying energy.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of funding for the roll out of fibre broadband.

As of January 2024, ThinkBroadband reports that over 80% of premises in the UK can now access a gigabit capable connection. To date, most of this rollout has been achieved by the commercial market.

Government acknowledges that there are premises that remain outside of the scope of the commercial build plans despite the commercial market going further than originally expected. These premises are some of the hardest and most expensive to reach in the UK and therefore require government subsidy if we are to achieve our ambition of nationwide gigabit coverage by 2030.

Project Gigabit is the government’s £5 billion investment in ensuring the premises which would otherwise be left out of commercial plans, get access to a gigabit capable connection. As of December 2023, we have 16 Project Gigabit contracts in place worth approximately £667 million of government subsidy. This, combined with the ongoing procurements equals more than £2 billion of investment to support the deployment of gigabit-capable broadband. We expect more procurements to go live and further contracts to be awarded and signed within the coming months.

For further updates on progress, including information on Project Gigabit procurements, Building Digital UK (BDUK) releases a quarterly update on progress towards our mission of nationwide coverage by 2030 with the latest being published in December 2023.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, with reference to the data on Senior Officials' travel expenses for her Department, January to March 2023, last updated on 25 July 2023, how much of the £684 cost for the visit by the Director for Digital Infrastructure to Barcelona starting on 26 February was on (a) flights and (b) accommodation.

On this visit, the Director of Digital Infrastructure’s expenses on flights were £218.44 and accommodation £211.09.

9th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, how many and what proportion of complaints made to the Information Commissioner’s Office met the threshold for action in each year since 2019.

The ICO has provided figures for 2021, 2022 and 2023 where the data is held, related to both data protection and Freedom of Information complaints cases. Due to the ICO’s retention and disposal policy, casework data prior to 2021 is no longer held.

You may wish to note that further information on complaints cases and outcomes dating back to 2016/2017 is available in the ICO’s Annual Reports which can be found here.

Data Protection Complaints

2021

%

2022

%

2023

%

Informal Action Taken

16118

37.63

13091

33.96

6351

37.51

Investigation Pursued

13

0.03

9

0.02

7

0.04

No Further Action

26691

62.32

25440

66

10570

62.43

Regulatory Action

6

0.01

6

0.02

3

0.02

Total

42,828

38,546

16,931

Freedom of Information Complaints

(these include Environmental Information Regulation cases)

2021

%

2022

%

2023

%

Informal Action Taken

796

14.06

971

14.69

486

13.80

No Further Action

3524

62.23

3365

50.92

1679

47.66

Decision Notice Served

1343

23.72

2273

34.39

1358

38.55

Total

5663

6609

3523

28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether her Department has contracted work to a business named in round 18 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme in the last 3 years.

There is 1 live contract with a business named in round 18 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme in the last 3 years. currently sits across both Department for Science, Innovation and Technology and Department for Energy Security and Net Zero.

The Supplier was procured supplier was procured from an audited and regulated government framework, that has public standard terms and conditions including legislation and statute compliance. The main compliance checks are undertaken by the framework owner/ buying authority and not the department. The department validates through supplier professional services rate cards and invoices for the hourly and daily rates of its professionals under this contract.

Contract Title

Main Contractor

Contract End Date

Contract Status

Total Contract Value

Power platform non clinical and clinical staff

Hays Specialist Recruitment Limited

31 March 2023

ACTIVE

£97,500

20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment she has made of potential sources of covid-19 disinformation.

DSIT’s Counter Disinformation Unit (CDU) stood up in March 2020 to address COVID-19-related disinformation and has been responding to acute disinformation risks ever since. Mis and disinformation can come from a range of sources, and the CDU takes an actor agnostic approach, working closely with social media platforms to support the introduction of systems and processes that promote authoritative sources of information.

6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with (a) relevant industry stakeholders and (b) trade unions on minimum service levels during official industrial action.

Ministers and officials from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy engage regularly with our stakeholders on a variety of issues, and I met with representatives from the Confederation of British Industry and the Trades Union Congress today (12th January 2023) to discuss minimum service levels The passage of the Strikes (Minimum Service Levels) Bill will give stakeholders the opportunity, via Members of Parliament, to share any concerns or constructive suggestions they may have.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 December 2022 to Question 106436, whether his Department is taking steps to increase the rate of acceptance for flexible working requests.

In December, the Government published its response to a consultation that considered changes to the right to request flexible working. The response commits to a range of measures that will help to maintain and increase acceptance rates. These include:

  • making the right to request flexible working a day one right;
  • introducing a new requirement for employees to consult with the employee when they intend to reject their flexible working request; and
  • allowing two statutory requests in any 12-month period (rather than the current one).

The response also commits to developing guidance on how to make and administer temporary requests for flexible working.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 December 2022 to Question 106439, if he will make an assessment of the reasons for the rise in the number of people recorded as looking for an additional job between (a) April and June and (b) July and September 2022.

Zero-hour contracts provide workers with greater flexibility to adjust their working hours and take on multiple jobs if they wish to do so. The Government introduced a ban on exclusivity clauses for zero-hour contracts in 2015.

We monitor the available data on zero-hours contracts on an on-going basis. According to the ONS published data, the estimate of the number of people on zero-hour contracts looking for an additional job in July – September 2022 is based on a small sample size and should be used with caution. The ONS also caution against comparing consecutive three-month periods when data is not seasonally adjusted.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 16 December 2022 to Question 106433, if he will estimate how many workers who have a zero-hour contract in their main job have taken a second job since the introduction of the Exclusivity Terms in Zero Hours Contracts (Redress) Regulations 2015.

BEIS published a post-implementation review for the regulations in 2021. The review includes analysis of the Labour Force Survey of people on zero-hour contracts in their main job who have a second job. The publication of the review can be found here.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 16 December 2022 to Question 106432 on Zero Hours Contracts, if he will make an assessment of the reasons why there have been very few claims related to the regulations.

The Exclusivity Terms in Zero Hours Contracts (Redress) Regulations post implementation review concluded that having a route of redress had improved the functioning of the labour market. Stakeholders representing workers stated that if a worker is raising an issue in this area, then it is often alongside a range of other concerns such as a reduction in shifts, short notice cancellation of shifts, or payment below National Minimum Wage, therefore, individuals may be more likely to raise a dispute in relation to another point of law rather than these regulations specifically.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of delivering the hydrogen village trial.

The early planning and detailed design work for the hydrogen village trial is being funded by Ofgem, with contributions from gas network shareholders. The Government anticipates that later stages will be funded by BEIS, Ofgem and the private sector. The final trial location and level of public funding will be decided later this year, following the submission of funding applications from the gas networks in March.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has had recent discussions with relevant stakeholders on the potential merits of providing additional support to households with renewable energy heating systems in the context of the rise in the cost of wood pellets.

The Government has doubled support to £200 for households using alternative fuels, including those using wood pellets, in recognition of the pressures caused by these rising fuel costs. The Government is committed to continued monitoring of prices over the coming months and will consider further intervention if required to protect UK households from extraordinary fuel prices.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has formed a policy position on hydrogen heating in the home.

The Government is coordinating a range of projects with industry, regulators and others to help assess the feasibility costs and benefits of using 100% hydrogen for heat. This will help ensure the necessary information is available to take decisions in 2026 on the role of hydrogen in heat decarbonisation.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with energy suppliers on financial assistance and debt write-off for households not covered by the Warm Home Discount Scheme.

Ministers and officials regularly meet with Ofgem and suppliers to discuss a range of issues relating to the energy market.

The Government introduced the ‘Breathing Space’ scheme which aims to address consumers’ ability to tackle debt and offers legal protections from creditors for 60 days. Under rules introduced by Ofgem, energy companies must set an appropriate repayment plan based on the customer’s ability to pay, for those at risk of or in debt.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many households were eligible for the Warm Home Discount in (a) 2020-21 and (b) 2021-22.

Energy suppliers were able to expand their eligibility criteria for the Broader Group in previous scheme years, therefore it is not possible to determine how many households were eligible to apply for a rebate.

In 2020/21, 2.26 million households received a rebate. In 2021/22, nearly 2.32 million households received a rebate. These figures were confirmed in Ofgem’s annual reports for scheme years 10 and 11.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effectiveness of an energy price cap for businesses.

Applying a price cap in the non-domestic market is impractical given the number of different contractual arrangements, the range of prices offered and the risk of market distortion. The Energy Bill Relief Scheme has been designed to offer a comparable level of support to the domestic Energy Price Guarantee by applying a discount to the wholesale element of non-domestic customers’ bills. Legislation came into force on 1 November, shielding businesses across the United Kingdom from soaring energy prices and saving some around half of their wholesale energy costs.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with stakeholders on the safety aspects of the Hydrogen Village trials.

BEIS officials hold regular discussions with the Health and Safety Executive and with the gas network operators to ensure appropriate safety arrangements will be in place before any community trials of hydrogen heating.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of incorporating Hydrogen Village trials into new housing developments.

The Government has committed to ensuring that all new buildings in England are ready for Net Zero from 2025 to future-proof new homes and avoid the need for later retrofitting. The Government expects heat pumps will become the primary heating technology for new homes under the Future Homes Standard and, for this reason, the number of new housing developments in the trial areas was not a criterion used during the village trial design and selection process.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Office for National Statics data entitled People in Employment on Zero Hours contracts published on 15 November 2022, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the rise in the number of people recorded as looking for an additional job between April-June 2022 and July-September 2022.

Zero hours contracts are a small but important part of the UK’s flexible labour market. This Government is committed to putting more power into the hands of individuals and businesses to find and create work that suits their personal circumstances.

The Government has widened the ban on exclusivity clauses, to contracts where the guaranteed weekly income is equivalent to or below the Lower Earnings Limit of £123 a week. The reforms ensure that workers in this group that have exclusivity clauses can top up their income with extra work if they choose.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the letter of 8 November from the Minister for Enterprise, Markets and Small Business to the hon. Member for Ellesmere Port and Neston, what steps his Department is discussing with the Ministry of Justice to enhance the efficiency, resilience, and sustainability of the employment tribunal system.

The Ministry of Justice and BEIS have introduced several measures to maximise capacity and efficiency in the Employment Tribunal to help respond to demand. This includes greater investment in Acas (to avoid the need for cases going to Tribunal) and greater support to ensure that those that do go to Tribunal are heard more quickly. For example, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Deputy Prime Minister has recently announced an extra £2.85 million investment in the Employment Tribunal this year, allowing up to 1,700 more cases to come before judges by the end of March 2023.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of people who have had requests for flexible working refused in the last 12 months.

In September 2021, the Government published a Post Implementation Review of the 2014 Flexible Working Regulations. This considered evidence from a range of different sources, including the Management and Wellbeing Practices Survey.

The survey found that in 83% of workplaces, where a request had been made, the request was granted, with 9% of employers reporting turning down a flexible working request in 2018-19 (the remaining proportion had an unknown outcome). These numbers remain broadly unchanged since the right to request flexible working legislation was extended in 2014.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his planned timetable is for the implementation of the policies set out in the Written Ministerial Statement entitled Employment Rights, HCWS411, published on 5 December 2022.

On 5 December the Government set out its position on flexible working and published the response to the consultation “making flexible working the default”, including plans for legislation.

The Government is pleased to support the Employment Relations (Flexible Working) Bill which gives effect to many of the measures, and is currently progressing through Parliament.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to strengthen protections for workers on zero-hour contracts to ensure that they have the ability to decline offered shifts without incurring a risk that they will not be offered suitable shifts in future.

Zero hours contracts are an important part of the UK’s flexible labour market, for both employers to manage changing demand and for individuals who may need to balance work around other commitments such as childcare and study.

The Government has made good progress in bringing forward measures that add flexibility for workers while ensuring the protection of employment rights including banning exclusivity clauses in Zero Hours Contracts in 2015. In 2020, the Government introduced the right for all workers to receive a day one written statement of rights, setting out leave entitlements and pay. This ensures all workers have transparent information about their employment relationship.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number people on zero-hour contracts who have taken up second jobs since the introduction of the Exclusivity Terms in Zero Hours Contracts (Redress) Regulations 2015.

BEIS published a post-implementation review for the regulations. The review includes analysis of the Labour Force Survey of people on zero-hour contracts in their main job who have a second job.

The review concluded that the objective of the regulations - to provide redress for individuals affected by employer non-compliance with the ban on exclusivity clauses - had been achieved, with stakeholders viewing the regulations as an important deterrent and effective and proportionate means of realising the policy objective.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of cases which have been brought to the employment tribunal service for people seeking redress under the Exclusivity Terms in Zero Hours Contracts (Redress) Regulations 2015 in the period since those regulations came into force.

The post-implementation review for these regulations states that there had been very few claims based on HM Courts & Tribunal Service data. Based on the information collected for the review, it was considered reasonable to assume that there was a maximum of between 5 and 10 employment tribunal claims a year related to the regulations.

The review concluded that the objective of the regulations - to provide redress for individuals affected by employer non-compliance with the ban on exclusivity clauses - had been achieved, with stakeholders viewing the regulations as an important deterrent and effective and proportionate means of realising the policy objective.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps to communicate the changes implemented by the Exclusivity Terms for Zero Hours Workers (Unenforceability and Redress) Regulations 2022 to (a) employers and (b) employees.

The changes implemented by the above Regulations came into force on Monday 5 December and were accompanied by social media posts and a Government press release which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/millions-of-britons-to-be-able-to-request-flexible-working-on-day-one-of-employment.

We also provided an update on the Regulations to all those who had responded to our consultation on this reform and all stakeholders who we engage with regularly on employment rights issues.

Employers and employees will be able to find guidance on the new Regulations on the Acas website. Acas provides free and impartial information and advice to employers and employees on all aspects of workplace relations and employment law.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 17 October 2022 to Question 54579 on Employment Tribunal Service: Costs, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of the median cost of seeking advice or representation for an employment tribunal claim on access to justice for people earning below the Lower Earnings Level.

With reference to my answer of 17 October to question 54579 the data used to estimate the median cost is already published and can be found in the Survey of employment tribunal applications 2018 survey at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/survey-of-employment-tribunal-applications-2018.

The Government is committed to supporting people to resolve their disputes without the need for costly litigation. Before an individual makes a claim to an Employment Tribunal they need to contact Acas first where they will be offered the option of free early conciliation to attempt to resolve disputes without needing a judicial determination. The Government also continues to invest in state enforcement and has more than doubled the National Minimum wage budget for compliance and enforcement to £27.8 million for 2022/23, up from £13.2 million in 2015/16.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 17 October 2022 to Question 54579 on Employment Tribunal Service: Costs, if he will publish the data he used to estimate the median cost.

With reference to my answer of 17 October to question 54579 the data used to estimate the median cost is already published and can be found in the Survey of employment tribunal applications 2018 survey at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/survey-of-employment-tribunal-applications-2018.

The Government is committed to supporting people to resolve their disputes without the need for costly litigation. Before an individual makes a claim to an Employment Tribunal they need to contact Acas first where they will be offered the option of free early conciliation to attempt to resolve disputes without needing a judicial determination. The Government also continues to invest in state enforcement and has more than doubled the National Minimum wage budget for compliance and enforcement to £27.8 million for 2022/23, up from £13.2 million in 2015/16.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make a comparative assessment of the potential impact of the cost-of-living crisis on workers employed on (a) zero-hour and (b) other contracts.

The Government has supported UK households through cost of living challenges by ensuring households on the lowest incomes have proportionally benefited the most from support packages.

The Government has announced further funding for 2023-24 that will ensure over 8 million of the most vulnerable households across the UK will continue to be supported through next winter via additional Cost of Living Payments. This is on top the 10.1% increase in benefits from April 2023, and support provided to all households from the Energy Price Guarantee which will save the average UK household £500 in 2023-24.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps to increase the number of installations of energy efficiency measures in homes in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

Improving the energy efficiency of the UK’s housing stock is critical in supporting households and contributing to the Government's Net Zero target.

In particular, it is essential that the Government supports low income, vulnerable and fuel poor households with energy efficiency measures, making it easier to heat homes and contribute to the long-term reduction in energy bills. The latest fuel poverty statistics show that, in 2020, in Ellesmere Port and Neston 12.2% of households were in fuel poverty.

Measures are being delivered to fuel poor households through a range of schemes including the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund, the Home Upgrade Grant, the Local Authority Delivery Scheme and the Energy Company Obligation (ECO). ECO has delivered 4,505 measures in Ellesmere Port and Neston as at end of September 2022.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has had recent discussions with businesses in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency on the potential impact of the cost of living crisis on those businesses.

The Government recognises the impact rising prices are having on businesses, including those in Ellesmere Port and Neston, and is engaging with businesses across the UK to understand these challenges and explore ways to mitigate them.

The Government has reversed the National Insurance rise, saving SMEs £4,200 on average; cut fuel duty for 12 months; raised the Employment Allowance to £5,000 and introduced the Energy Bill Relief Scheme which is shielding businesses across the country from soaring energy prices, saving some around half of their wholesale energy costs.

We have also announced £13.6 billion of support for businesses over the next five years, reducing the burden of business rates for SMEs.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many small and medium-sized enterprises in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency have received Government funding for support during the cost of living crisis in 2022.

The Government recognises the impact rising prices are having on businesses.

Businesses in Ellesmere Port and Neston will have benefitted from the Government’s reversal of the National Insurance rise, saving SMEs approximately £4,200 on average; the cut to fuel duty for 12 months; raising the Employment Allowance to £5,000 and the Energy Bill Relief Scheme to protect SMEs from high energy costs over the winter. In addition, at the Autumn Statement, my Rt Hon Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced £13.6 billion of support for businesses over the next five years, reducing the burden of business rates for SMEs.

The Government is also providing financial support through the Start Up loan scheme - 101 SMEs in Ellesmere Port and Neston have received loans to the value of £912,062 as of November 2022.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of homes in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency that have had external wall insulation installed as of 31 October 2022.

BEIS estimates that under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Green Homes Grant (GHG) Government schemes, there have been around 100 external wall insulation measures installed in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency. Data for ECO covers January 2013 to September 2022. Data for the GHG schemes cover October 2020 to September 2022.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps to increase the number of green jobs in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

The Net Zero Strategy sets out its plans to work with industry to create the skilled workforce needed to transition to a green economy and the Government have established the Green Jobs Delivery Group to drive this forward. The Group will support the delivery of up to 480,000 skilled green jobs by 2030.

Ellesmere Port is located within Hynet, one of two industrial clusters identified on the first track for the Government's Carbon Capture, Usage and Storage (CCUS) cluster sequencing programme. The Government estimates the carbon capture industry could support up to 50,000 jobs in the UK in 2030.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of homes that have had heat pumps installed in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency as of 31 October 2022.

The Microgeneration Certification Scheme Installations Database shows that as of 31 October 2022, 63 heat pump installations were registered in the Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

The database does not include all heat pump installations, for example, those installed without Government funding support, such as in new buildings, which are not typically recorded in the Microgeneration Certification Scheme Installations Database.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of homes that have had solar power panels installed in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency as of 31 October 2022.

At the end of October 2022, there were 1,418 domestic installations of solar panels recorded in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of homes that have had under floor insulation installed in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency as of 31 October 2022.

BEIS estimates that under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Green Homes Grant (GHG) schemes, around 1,300 cavity wall insulation measures, 800 loft insulation measures and 57 under floor insulation measures have been installed in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

Data for ECO covers January 2013 to September 2022. Data for the GHG schemes covers October 2020 to September 2022

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of homes with lofts that have had loft insulation installed in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency as of 31 October 2022.

BEIS estimates that under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Green Homes Grant (GHG) schemes, around 1,300 cavity wall insulation measures, 800 loft insulation measures and 57 under floor insulation measures have been installed in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

Data for ECO covers January 2013 to September 2022. Data for the GHG schemes covers October 2020 to September 2022

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency had cavity wall insulation as of 31 October 2022.

BEIS estimates that under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Green Homes Grant (GHG) schemes, around 1,300 cavity wall insulation measures, 800 loft insulation measures and 57 under floor insulation measures have been installed in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

Data for ECO covers January 2013 to September 2022. Data for the GHG schemes covers October 2020 to September 2022

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 7 November 2022 to Question 72238 on Brexit, what the special legal status of retained EU law is that he refers to in his Answer.

Retained EU Law, as introduced into UK law through the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 (EUWA), is subject to complex glosses associated with EU legal principles, which confer a special status on retained EU law. This includes the principle of supremacy, which continues to apply in domestic law, and means some retained EU law takes priority over ordinary domestic law, including Acts of Parliament, in the event of conflict. This is no longer appropriate given we have left the EU.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Statutory Instruments are within the scope of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill; and if he will place a list of all affected instruments in the House of Commons Library.

The Retained EU Law (REUL) Dashboard, published in June 2022, lists the 2,417 pieces of REUL identified at that point in time. This Dashboard will be updated on a quarterly basis as REUL is repealed and replaced, or more REUL is identified.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has worked closely with The National Archives on the underlying dataset. As part of this, the Department has asked The National Archives to search their archive for REUL that is no longer associated with an existing ministerial department. The aim of this work is to ensure that all REUL has been identified and the results will be added to the REUL dashboard.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what measures are in place to ensure the Energy Bill Support Scheme is paid to customers

The Energy Bills Support Scheme is delivering a £400 non-repayable Government discount in instalments over six months from October to March to help 29 million households in Great Britain with energy bills over the winter. Suppliers are reporting to BEIS on scheme delivery, including the redemption of prepayment meter vouchers. These figures will be published in due course.

Separate arrangements will be announced for households not eligible for the main scheme in Great Britain and for consumers in Northern Ireland.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
4th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reasons the energy price cap was originally unavailable to businesses who signed their contract before April 1, 2022.

Following additional evidence on high wholesale energy prices prior to April 2022, the eligibility criteria for the Energy Bill Relief Scheme was extended to include all fixed contracts signed from 1 December 2021. This is to ensure a fair and equitable scheme, where support offered to businesses and other non-domestic energy users covers all recent energy price increases, helping those businesses that have seen increased bills for a sustained period.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
3rd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential impacts of improving (a) terms and conditions and (b) pay on business performance.

We are determined to make the UK the best place in the world to work and grow a business.

Over the past year, we have proven our commitment to supporting workers across the UK, including raising the National Living Wage to its highest rate yet. The Government is also backing five Private Members’ Bills which have been introduced as a result of the Private Members’ Bill ballot in the House of Commons which will increase workforce participation, protect vulnerable workers, and level the playing field, ensuring unscrupulous businesses don’t have a competitive advantage.

These Bills build on the strengths of our flexible and dynamic labour market and give businesses the confidence to create jobs and invest in their workforce, allowing them to generate long-term prosperity and economic growth.

As a result of government action, there are now more employees on the payroll than ever before, and we will continue to build a high skilled, high productivity, high wage economy that delivers on our ambition to make the UK the best place in the world to work.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
3rd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has held with Cabinet colleagues on fuel support for households in the North Wales and Merseyside Distribution Network, in the context of that area having the highest capped price for dual fuel and electricity in the country.

My Rt hon Friend the Secretary of State has regular discussions with Cabinet colleagues on fuel support for households.

The setting of the tariffs is a commercial matter for individual suppliers, within the price cap set by Ofgem.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
3rd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department conducted an equality impact assessment on the setting of the Regional Energy Price Guarantee.

The Department conducted a full equality impact assessment of the Energy Price Guarantee scheme prior to its launch at the beginning of October.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
3rd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has held discussions with the Redundancy Payment Service on the National Minimum Wage.

Officials from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Low Pay Commission (LPC) speak to a wide range of stakeholders in relation to the National Minimum Wage. The LPC are an independent and expert body which makes annual recommendations on the appropriate rates for the National Living and Minimum Wages, and other low pay related issues. They carry out extensive research that draws on economic, labour market and pay analysis, independent research, and stakeholder evidence to inform their recommendations. That is why we always consider their advice when increasing the minimum wage rates.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
3rd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many employment tribunal cases have been lodged against the Redundancy Payment Service for each year from 2019 in relation to director employment status.

For the years 2019-2021 the Redundancy Payments Service was not party to any Employment Tribunal cases where a director’s claim had been rejected on status grounds. To date in 2022 there have been 139 cases.

These figures are internal Insolvency Service data and not official statistics.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to end unpaid internships.

Current legislation is clear that an individual’s entitlement to the minimum wage depends on whether they are a “worker” for minimum wage purposes. Most internships are already highly likely to constitute work and entitle the individual to be paid at least the minimum wage from the first day of employment.

It is the responsibility of all employers to ensure they are paying their staff correctly and we will continue to take robust enforcement action against employers who fail to pay the minimum wage. Since 2015 we have ordered employers to repay £100 million of unpaid wages to 1 million workers.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the potential impact of allowing shale gas extraction on the price that UK consumers pay for gas.

The Government has confirmed that it is adopting a presumption against issuing any further hydraulic fracturing consents. This position, an effective moratorium, will be maintained until compelling new evidence is provided which addresses concerns around the prediction and management of induced seismicity. The Government is taking other measures to build energy security and affordability.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the statement made by the Prime Minister in the House on 8 September 2022 that the Government would end the moratorium on shale gas extraction where there is local support, how his Department defines local support in that context.

The Government will come forward with proposals in due course.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if it remains his policy intention to implement a right to request more predictable contracts for all workers after 26 weeks of employment.

The Government remains committed to introduce a right to request a more predictable contract.

This right will allow a qualifying worker to make an application to change their existing working pattern if it lacks predictability in terms of hours they are required to work, the times they are required to work, and / or the duration of their contract.

14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether it remains his policy to bring forward legislative proposals on employment status.

On 26 July 2022, the Government responded to its employment status consultation which explored a wide range of employment status legislative proposals.

The response concluded that while the Government recognised the boundaries between the different statuses can be unclear for some individuals and employers, the benefits of a fundamental overhaul of the employment status system were outweighed by the potential disruption associated with legislative reform.

Alongside the Government response, the Government published guidance to help clarify the existing employment status boundaries, making it easier for business to comply with existing regulations and for individuals to understand which employment protections apply to them.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has had recent discussions with (a) retailers and (b) Cabinet colleagues on the adequacy of guidance on displaying pumpkin carving kits in retail settings.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State has not had recent discussions with (a) retailers or (b) Cabinet colleagues on the guidance on pumpkin carving kits in retail settings.

14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of technology on levels of inequality in the workplace.

The overall net effect of automation and AI on employment is unclear, but a plausible assumption based on historical trends and economic research for the UK would see a broadly neutral effect overall. Research published by BEIS in 2021 estimated that around 7% of existing UK jobs could face a high (over 70%) probability of automation over the next 5 years, rising to 18% after 10 years and just under 30% after 20 years. However, AI will also create many jobs through the boost it gives to productivity and economic growth.

The Government also welcomes research from academics and experts in the field including the ongoing work of the Pissarides Review into the Future of Work and Wellbeing, which is exploring the impacts of automation on work and wellbeing, and analysing how these are differently distributed between socio-demographic groups and geographical communities in the UK.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Boston and Skegness to the former Prime Minister of 1 September 2022, whether his Department is taking steps to help support people who will be most affected by (a) increasing automation and (b) the use of artificial intelligence.

The Government welcomes innovation, and the contribution of automation and artificial intelligence (AI) to economic growth. The UK is already a world leader in AI, ranking third in the world, with the UK AI sector worth over £15.6bn (DataCity 2020).

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy plays an essential role in helping articulate what employers need from the skills system and support the Government’s ambitious reform programme to support people who will be affected by automation get the skills they need. The Government has expanded investment in postgraduate Master’s conversion courses in AI. Alongside this we are funding scholarships for students from underrepresented groups. We have also announced £117m funding to create 1000 more PhDs.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has undertaken recent research into the use of technology by employers to closely monitor their employees.

The Department has not undertaken recent research into the use of technology by employers to closely monitor their employees.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his planned timetable is for making an announcement on an equivalent to the £400 payment under the Energy Bills Support Scheme for people who live in (a) a park home, (b) a houseboat and (c) off the grid.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave the hon. Member for St Albans on 22nd September to Question 48498.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the compensation processes for businesses affected by large scale utility works.

There are schemes which provide compensation to businesses affected by utility works. The Government has made no recent assessment of these schemes.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Answer of 19 April 2022 to Question 151160 on P&O Ferries: Redundancy, whether the investigations by the Insolvency Service have been completed; and whether any prosecutions have commenced.

The Insolvency Service has confirmed that the investigations into the circumstances surrounding the redundancies made by P&O Ferries are ongoing. As such no further comment or information can be provided at this time.

17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many (a) investigations have been commenced and (b) fines issued under regulation 7 of The Conduct of Employment Agencies and Employment Businesses Regulations 2003 in each year since 2010.

The Employment Agency Standards (EAS) Inspectorate enforces the requirements of the Conduct Regulations.

EAS has historically received a limited number of complaints about regulation 7. EAS investigates all relevant complaints and takes enforcement action where necessary. It does not have the power to issues fines, which rests with the court.

The table at Annex A shows the number of complaints EAS recoded in relation to regulation 7. This data is locally held management information taken from a live case management system. To date no breaches have been established under regulation 7 and no enforcement action has been taken.

Annex A

Operational year

Number of regulation 7 complaints

2012/2013

2

2013/2014

5

2014/2015

No reported complaints

2015/2016

No reported complaints

2016/2017

No reported complaints

2017/2018

No reported complaints

2018/19

2

2019/2020

No reported complaints

2020/2021

2

2021/2022

3

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Answer of 25 January 2022 to Question 108541 on Conditions of Employment, which Government departments he has been in regular dialogue with regarding reforms to the employment framework.

The Government is committed to bringing forward reforms to our employment framework as we build a high skilled, high productivity, high wage economy that delivers on its ambition to make the UK the best place in the world to work and grow a business.

It is important we consult widely on proposals for change and ensure stakeholders have the opportunity to share their views.

For example, we recently published a Government response to a consultation regarding reforms to the use of exclusivity clauses in employment contracts:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/measures-to-extend-the-ban-on-exclusivity-clauses-in-contracts-of-employment.

We carefully consider all consultation responses, which help inform decisions around how we take forward measures.

As reform of the employment framework is a complex cross-cutting topic, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has regular dialogue with other Government Departments with an interest.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to bring forward an employment bill in the 2022-23 parliamentary Session.

The Queen’s Speech set out a packed and ambitious legislative programme that includes a comprehensive set of bills which will enable us to deliver on priorities like growing the economy, which will in turn help address living costs and get people into good jobs.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to introduce paid leave for parents with children who require neonatal care.

The Government recognises that parents of babies receiving neonatal care need extra support during some of the most difficult days of their lives.

The Government is committed to introducing Neonatal Leave and Pay to meet this need and will bring forward legislation when Parliamentary time allows.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to protect women’s rights in the workplace.

The Government remains committed to bringing forward measures to further improve women’s rights in the workplace as soon as parliamentary time allows. These measures include:

  • extending redundancy protections for women after they return from maternity leave;
  • introducing a new duty on employers to take steps to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace, as well as explicit protections against workplace harassment by third parties;
  • introducing neonatal leave and pay; and
  • introducing a new right to one week of unpaid carer’s leave.

The Government has also recently consulted on measures to reform the right to request flexible working and will publish a response to that in due course.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to strengthen protections for the self-employed.

An individual’s entitlement to employment rights at work is determined by their employment status, employee, worker or self-employed.

Self-employed individuals should expect to have the most flexibility and control over how and when they work. It is a category for those who run and manage their own business. Generally, self-employed individuals have no statutory employment rights but are entitled to some health and safety protections/obligations as well as anti-discrimination rights when they are contracted by a customer or client.

The UK labour market is performing strongly with high employment and low unemployment and the Government’s three-tiered employment status framework strikes the right balance between the flexibility our economy needs and worker protections.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to introduce carer's leave.

The Government remains committed to supporting unpaid carers in work. Legislation to deliver our commitment to introduce one week of leave for unpaid carers will be brought forward when Parliamentary time allows.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish a response to his Department's consultation entitled Good work plan: proposals to support families.

In 2019, the Government consulted on high-level options and principles for reforming the parental leave and pay system to make it easier for parents to share care of their children in the first year of their lives. We are currently considering the responses to the consultation and will respond in due course.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of (a) pregnant women and (b) new mothers who have been unfairly dismissed in each of the last three years.

Employment Tribunal (ET) statistics report the number of complaints received under the ‘Suffer a detriment and/or dismissal on grounds of pregnancy, child birth or maternity’ jurisdiction for each year back to 2013 and is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/tribunal-statistics-quarterly-january-to-march-2021

This data represents all complaints that were received by the ET. Note this jurisdiction captures complainants who reported they suffered a detriment but not necessarily a dismissal, it is not possible to separate these cases due to the way the data is recorded.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the length of (a) Statutory Maternity Leave and (b) Statutory Paternity Leave.

The UK’s Maternity Leave entitlement is one of the most generous in the world, with employed women entitled to 52 weeks of maternity leave, of which 39 are paid.

Our Paternity Leave entitlement enables eligible employed fathers to take two weeks of paid leave within the first eight weeks following the birth or adoption placement. Eligible employed fathers also have other entitlements to balance work with childcare, including paid annual leave, unpaid parental leave and the right to request flexible working.

Shared Parental Leave allows eligible parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay in the first year.

In 2019, the Government consulted on high-level options for reforming parental leave and pay. We are currently considering responses to the consultation and will respond in due course.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to implement the outstanding recommendations of the Taylor Review.

We have made significant progress in implementing the recommendations of the Taylor Review, including closing the loophole which saw agency works employed on cheaper rates than permanent workers; quadrupling the maximum fine for employers who treat their workers badly; and giving all workers the right to receive a statement of their rights from day one.


The Government is committed to building on this record to deliver a high skilled, high productivity, high wage economy that delivers on our ambition to make the UK the best place in the world to work.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to introduce a right to bereavement leave following the miscarriage of a baby before 24 weeks of pregnancy.

The Government recognises that the loss of a child at any age is tragic and deeply upsetting. In April 2020 we legislated to give parents who lose a child under the age of 18 years a right to take up to two weeks off work in the 56 weeks following the death of their child. This right extends to parents of babies stillborn after 24 completed weeks of pregnancy.

Miscarriage is a very personal experience and some of those affected may want to stay at home, whilst others may prefer to continue to work or alternatively may need time off later. The Government believes that individuals are best placed to understand their own specific needs, and good employers will respond to requests made by their employees in a sensitive way.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to strengthen employment protections for pregnant women.

The Maternity and Parental Leave etc. Regulations 1999 currently give women on maternity leave priority over other employees who are also at risk of redundancy. Employers have an obligation to offer women on maternity leave a suitable alternative vacancy where one is available.

The Government has committed to extending this protection from redundancy so that it will start at the point the employee informs the employer that she is pregnant and will continue for a period after she has returned to work.

We will introduce these measures when Parliamentary time allows.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to extend redundancy protections for pregnant women.

The Maternity and Parental Leave etc. Regulations 1999 currently give women on maternity leave priority over other employees who are also at risk of redundancy. Employers have an obligation to offer women on maternity leave a suitable alternative vacancy where one is available.

The Government has committed to extending this protection from redundancy so that it will start at the point the employee informs the employer that she is pregnant and will continue for a period after she has returned to work.

We will introduce these measures when Parliamentary time allows.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to bring forward measures to tackle bullying in the workplace.

We have published guidance that sets out the steps that employees can take if they are experiencing bullying or harassment at work, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/workplace-bullying-and-harassment.

Acas provides free and impartial advice for employers and employees, and has also published useful guidance on how to deal with bullying in the workplace that we encourage individuals and employers to consider when dealing with such matters. This is available at: https://www.acas.org.uk/if-youre-treated-unfairly-at-work/being-bullied.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to tackle bullying in the workplace.

We have published guidance that sets out the steps that employees can take if they are experiencing bullying or harassment at work, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/workplace-bullying-and-harassment.

Acas provides free and impartial advice for employers and employees, and has also published useful guidance on how to deal with bullying in the workplace that we encourage individuals and employers to consider when dealing with such matters. This is available at: https://www.acas.org.uk/if-youre-treated-unfairly-at-work/being-bullied.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to ensure that workers are protected against unfair dismissal.

There are laws in place to ensure that any dismissal process should be fair and reasonable with appropriate equalities considerations. Employees who believe that they have been unfairly dismissed should seek advice from Acas. Employees with the necessary qualifying service who believe that they have been unfairly dismissed can complain to an employment tribunal who will consider the case.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to ensure that workers' rights are protected.

Protecting and enhancing workers’ rights remains a priority for this government. Over the past year, we have proven our commitment to supporting workers across the UK, including raising the national living wage in April 2022 to its highest rate yet, to help with the cost of living.

We are proud there are now more employees on the payroll than ever before, and we will continue to build a high skilled, high productivity, high wage economy that delivers on our ambition to make the UK the best place in the world to work.

We remain committed to making progress and on 9 May we announced our intention to bring forward legislation which will widen the ban on exclusivity clauses, which restrict staff from working for multiple employers, to contracts where the guaranteed weekly income is equivalent to or below the Lower Earnings Limit of £123 a week.

We also announced our commitment to publishing employment status guidance to help clarify the existing status boundaries, making it easier for individuals and businesses to understand which employment rights apply to them, enhancing worker protections whilst maintaining flexibility and ensuring a level playing field within the labour market.

12th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish his timetable for publishing the findings of the evaluation of Shared Parental Leave and Pay which took place in 2019.

Evaluating Shared Parental Leave and Pay is an important part of the policymaking process. The Government commissioned large, representative surveys of parents and employees which asked about a range of parental leave and pay entitlements as well as their experience of Shared Parental Leave specifically. We also consulted on high-level options for reforming parental leave and pay. We will publish our findings in due course.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Answer of 4 February 2022 to Question 113150, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to give Companies House powers to query and check information and identity verification.

The Government will be introducing a Bill on Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency this parliamentary session. The Bill will include reforms to broaden the Registrar of Companies’ powers so that she becomes a more active gatekeeper over company creation and custodian of more reliable data – including new powers to check, remove or decline information submitted to, or already on, the Company Register. The Bill will also include identity verification checks for people who manage, own and control companies and other UK registered entities. This will improve the accuracy of Companies House data, to support business decisions and law enforcement investigations.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy and effectiveness of the mandatory tests for new entrants to the energy sector.

Ofgem published an independent review 6 May 2022 which examined Ofgem’s processes in relation to market entry. This report can be found online at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/review-ofgems-regulation-energy-supply-market.

In December 2021, Ofgem published additional details on how it proposes to strengthen suppliers’ financial resilience so that they can cope with high and more volatile energy prices.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with energy companies on the supplier of last resort scheme.

My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State has had discussions with energy companies on a range of issues in relation to high wholesale energy prices and supplier market exits.

The administration of the Supplier of Last Resort regime is a matter for Ofgem, who ensure that the customers of failed suppliers are transferred to a new supplier on the best available terms and without any interruption to their supply.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the impact of the supplier of last resort scheme on the level of standing charges.

Standing charges are capped under the price cap and ensure millions of households pay a fair price for their energy. One component of the standing charge relates to network costs, which have recently increased in part due to the Supplier of Last Resort (SoLR) levy. The levy allows suppliers acting as a SoLR to reclaim reasonable additional otherwise unrecoverable costs. Ofgem have confirmed that network costs increased by £68 from April 2022, due to the Supplier of Last Resort (SoLR) levy costs.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
30th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Prime Minister's oral answer to the Rt Hon Keir Starmer MP on 23rd March 2022 when he confirmed legal action was being taken against P & O ferries under the Trade Union and labour relations act 1992 and the Employment Rights Act 1996, if he will confirm (a) the nature of the legal actions commenced, and (b) when those actions were commenced.

The way that P&O Ferries acted is unacceptable. My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State wrote to the Insolvency Service on 23 March asking it to undertake an urgent and thorough enquiry into the actions of P&O Ferries, to determine whether the law has been complied with and consider prompt and appropriate action where it has not.

The Insolvency Service has confirmed it has initiated formal civil and criminal investigations into the circumstances surrounding the redundancies made by P&O Ferries. While these investigations are being progressed it would not be appropriate to make further comment.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment his Department has undertaken on the effectiveness of shared parental leave arrangements.

The Shared Parental Leave and Pay scheme gives working families much more choice and flexibility about who cares for their child in the first year, and when.

Evaluating Shared Parental Leave and Pay is an important part of the policymaking process.

As part of the evaluation, in 2019, we commissioned large, representative surveys of parents and employers which asked about a range of parental leave and pay entitlements as well as their experience of Shared Parental Leave specifically. We also consulted on high-level options for reforming parental leave and pay.

The purpose of the evaluation is to assess the extent to which the implementation and take-up of Shared Parental Leave achieves its original objectives. Our findings will be published in due course.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what meetings officials in his Department attended prior to the decision to commission the British Geological Survey to provide scientific advice on shale gas extraction; and who attended those meetings.

The Government has commissioned the British Geological Survey to advise on the latest scientific evidence around shale gas extraction. The Government has always been clear that the exploration of shale gas reserves in England could only proceed if the science shows that it is safe, sustainable and of minimal disturbance to those living and working nearby.

This Department holds many meetings with companies to discuss a wide range of business issues. Details of meetings held by Ministers in the Department are recorded in the Department’s transparency data, which is published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/beis-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending the deadline for the completion of works under the Local Authority Green Homes Grant Scheme in the context of national shortages of windows and doors.

Market conditions are challenging with supply of products and materials affected across several measures. This is, in part, why extensions to the delivery period have already been granted. Where Local Authorities have planned or commissioned work in good time the extended timescales should allow sufficient time to source the necessary products.

When considering any changes to the timelines of the LAD scheme, the Government must also consider the potential impact this may have on subsequent energy efficiency schemes and the supply chain. This includes the projects awarded funding through the Sustainable Warmth competition and the next phase of the Home Upgrade Grant scheme.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions officials in his Department have had with relevant stakeholders on subsidies for energy generation for domestic purposes.

The Government continues to have significant engagement with industry including manufacturers, installers, trade associations and industry standards bodies. There have been no subsidies available for electricity generation at domestic-scale since the Feed-in Tariffs scheme closed in March 2019. However, in 2020, the Government introduced the Smart Export Guarantee, a market-led mechanism, enabling small-scale renewable generators, such as households with solar panels or small wind turbines, to receive payment for excess electricity sold back to the grid.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 February to Question 117804, what recent discussions he has had with relevant organisations regarding electronic balloting.

We have consulted relevant organisations, including professionals from expert associations, to seek their advice and recommendations.

We are now finalising our consideration of the recommendations of Sir Ken Knight’s e-balloting review before we issue our response in due course.

25th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he plans to take to ensure (a) investment in and (b) benefits for the local area from a hydrogen village in the North West by 2025.

The location for the hydrogen heating village trial has not yet been decided. The Gas Distribution Network Operators submitted their outline proposals in December 2021. The Government is expecting that one or more of these proposals will require detailed planning during 2022, including understanding local impacts, before location selection in 2023.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will hold discussions with Citizen's Advice on targeted support for low income households in April 2022 through an energy support grant.

BEIS Ministers and officials meet regularly with Citizens Advice to discuss a range of issues relating to the energy retail market. The energy price cap ensures millions of households pay a fair price for their gas and electricity. Support for energy bills is available to eligible low-income households through the Warm home Discount, the Winter Fuel Payment and the Cold Weather Payments.

On 3 February, the Government announced a package of support worth £9.1 billion to help domestic energy customers with the cost of rising energy bills. This includes a £150 non-repayable Council Tax rebate in April 2022 to all households in Council Tax Bands A-D, £144 million of discretionary funding for local authorities to support those not eligible for the Council Tax rebate and a £200 discount on energy bills this Autumn for domestic electricity customers’ bills, to be paid back automatically over the next five years.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on provision of financial assistance for energy costs of polling commissioned by Citizens Advice in January 2022 that found potentially 27 per cent of disabled people and 36 per cent of people on Universal Credit would not be able to cover the anticipated average price cap rise of £60 per month.

The published fuel poverty projections for 2022, show that while most households will need to pay more for their energy bills from April, the financial support offered combined with action on energy efficiency will keep the number of households in fuel poverty on a declining trend. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/fuel-poverty-statistics.

The Government is providing a package of support worth £9.1 billion in 2022-23 which includes a £150 Council Tax rebate for bands A-D, £144 million discretionary funding for local authorities and a £200 energy bill reduction which will help over 28 million households.

This is in addition to the support the Government will continue to provide through the Warm Home Discount Scheme, which this winter is providing over 2 million households a £140 rebate off their energy bill. The Government has announced that it would be increasing to £150 and help an extra 780,000 households next winter. Further, Winter Fuel Payments and Cold Weather Payments help ensure the most vulnerable are better able to heat their homes over the colder months.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on provision of financial support for energy costs of polling commissioned by Citizens Advice in January 2022 that found potentially 8.5 million people would not be able to cover the anticipated average price cap rise of £60 per month.

The published fuel poverty projections for 2022, show that while most households will need to pay more for their energy bills from April, the financial support offered combined with action on energy efficiency will keep the number of households in fuel poverty on a declining trend. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/fuel-poverty-statistics.

The Government is providing a package of support worth £9.1 billion in 2022-23 which includes a £150 Council Tax rebate for bands A-D, £144 million discretionary funding for local authorities and a £200 energy bill reduction which will help over 28 million households.

This is in addition to the support the Government will continue to provide through the Warm Home Discount Scheme, which this winter is providing over 2 million households a £140 rebate off their energy bill. The Government has announced that it would be increasing to £150 and help an extra 780,000 households next winter. Further, Winter Fuel Payments and Cold Weather Payments help ensure the most vulnerable are better able to heat their homes over the colder months.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the location and frequency of power cuts in England; and whether that information is used to inform investment priorities in power infrastructure.

Distribution Network Operators are obligated under their license conditions to plan and develop their distribution systems to meet a minimum reliability standard, incentivising investment in resilience measures.

Ofgem monitors performance to ensure operators meet their obligations and can take enforcement action against those who fail to meet them.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with EU representatives on the 90 in 180 day rule on UK citizens working in the EU.

UK nationals are able to travel visa-free for short stays for up to 90 days in a rolling 180-day period, for a limited number of business-related activities, as well as for tourism. UK nationals who plan to stay longer than 90 in 180 days or are carrying out activities that are not exempt from a Member State’s visa or work permit requirements, may need a visa, work permit or other documentation. Visa and work permit arrangements are set by individual EU Member States.

The Government will continue to engage with the EU, in line with the structures established by the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA), which allow for both Parties to raise issues of concern about compliance with that agreement.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the exclusion of the energy reseller arrangements from the energy price cap on mobile park homeowners.

The energy price cap on standard and default domestic supply tariffs was put in place in response to the problem of the ‘loyalty penalty’ as identified by the Competition and Markets Authority’s energy market investigation.

The maximum price set by Ofgem for resupplying gas or electricity which has already been bought from an authorised supplier, exists to protect people such as those who are residents of mobile park homes and buy their fuel from the park owner.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to take into account the Mayor of Liverpool City Region's 2021 manifesto commitment to replace methane with hydrogen in the city region’s gas grid by 2035 when assessing areas to progress hydrogen village trials.

The Government is supporting industry to deliver community trials of 100% hydrogen heating. BEIS and Ofgem received Gas Distribution Network Operators’ outline proposals for the village trial in December 2021. The Government expects that one or more of these will be selected to be developed into detailed proposals. The final decision on where the village trial will take place is expected in 2023 ahead of a trial start date of 2025.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of ensuring that the north west can benefit from a live hydrogen project in a similar way to the north east and its Hydrogen House demonstration site in Winlation.

The Government is supporting a range of projects that will help to reach our ambition for 5GW low carbon hydrogen production capacity across the UK by 2030. For example, in the North West, the Government are supporting HyNet which has been prioritised for CCUS deployment in the mid-2020s. The scheme has a core focus on industrial capture and CCUS-enabled (blue) hydrogen production. It will deliver low carbon hydrogen to a range of end use projects.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his timetable is for (a) analysing the feedback and (b) responding to the Design of the Energy Company Obligation ECO4: 2022-2026 consultation.

The consultation responses have been analysed and the Government intends to publish its response before the current ECO3 scheme ends at the end of March 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
3rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many trials of electronic balloting have taken place since the publication of the Knight review.

Before responding to the recommendations of Sir Ken Knight’s e-balloting review, including any trials of electronic balloting, the government is required by Section 4 of the Trade Union Act 2016 to consult relevant organisations, including professionals from expert associations, to seek their advice and recommendations.

2nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of new mothers on statutory paid maternity leave who transferred some of that paid leave to the child's father under the Shared Parental Leave scheme in each year since 2015-16.

Shared Parental Leave (SPL) and Pay was introduced in December 2014 for the parents of children due or adopted from 5 April 2015. The scheme enables eligible working parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay in the first year, where the mother does not intend to use her full maternity entitlements.

Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) by Quarter3 indicates that 4,500 individuals were in receipt of ShPP in Quarter 1 of 2021-22, and 5,300 individuals were in receipt of ShPP in Quarter 2 of 2021-22. Data for Quarter 3 of 2021-22 is not yet available.

HMRC does not hold information which calculates the total duration of ShPP received by individual claimants. However, the Table 1 sets out the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in 2020-21 by the number of months4 in the year that they made a claim:

Number of months claimed4 in 2020-21

Number of individuals in receipt of ShPP

1

3,400

2

2,700

3

2,100

4

1,400

5

700

6

500

7

300

8

100

9

100

Please note:

  1. The data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in November 2021 covering up to September 2021. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. The number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter are based on the total number of individuals in that quarter irrespective of when the payment first started. For example, some individuals in the Quarter 2 figures also appeared in Quarter 1 figures. Quarterly figures should not be added together to make a yearly count of individuals in receipt of ShPP due to double counting claimants from quarter to quarter.
  4. “Number of months claimed” counts each month the same individual was in receipt of ShPP, in a given tax year (2020-21). This should not be interpreted as the total duration of pay received. Where individuals are in receipt of pay which spans two financial years HMRC data shows only the period within each year. Where individuals have received pay spanning multiple months, however briefly, they will be recorded as receiving ShPP in each month.
  5. This data represents individuals in receipt of Shared Parental Pay only, so those who take unpaid Shared Parental Leave are not included.

The Government conducted a £1.5 million communications campaign in 2018 to promote the Shared Parental Leave Scheme. In addition to this campaign, we have also undertaken cost-free communications activities to promote the scheme such as blogs by parents who have taken the leave and articles regarding the introduction of the online tool which enables parents to map out leave with their partner

The number of hours officials spend on individual projects is not held centrally.

In order for fathers/partners to take Shared Parental Leave, the child’s mother must curtail their entitlement to 52 weeks of Maternity Leave and 39 weeks of Statutory Maternity Pay or Maternity Allowance to potentially share any remaining weeks of leave and pay with the child’s father/their partner or take SPL themselves (they may wish to do this as SPL is more flexible than Maternity Leave).

Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) show the number of individuals (including mothers and fathers/partners) in receipt of ShPP. This data provides a broad indication of the level of SPL take-up for parental leave entitlements but does not include anyone taking unpaid Shared Parental Leave. Table 2 sets out the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in each year since 2015-16.

Year (Apr to Mar unless otherwise stated)

No. of individuals6 in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay

2015-16

6,200

2016-17

8,600

2017-18

9,200

2018-19

10,700

2019-20

12,600

2020-21

11,200

2021-22 (Apr 21 to Sep 21)

7,600

Notes

  1. The data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in November 2021 covering up to September 2021. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”. This may especially be the case for 2021/22 data.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. These figures are based on the total number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in a given year, irrespective of when the payment first started. Therefore, some individuals will be counted in 2 years (for example, those who take SPL in March and continue in April etc will be counted in both years).
  4. For the 2015-16 tax year, those receiving Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (ASPP) for children born before 6 April 2015 cannot be distinguished from those claiming Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) within RTI data.
  5. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  6. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  7. This data represents individuals in receipt of statutory parental pay only, so those who take unpaid parental leave are not included.
2nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many hours were spent by officials in his Department on the ongoing evaluation of the Shared Parental Leave scheme in each year since 2018-19.

Shared Parental Leave (SPL) and Pay was introduced in December 2014 for the parents of children due or adopted from 5 April 2015. The scheme enables eligible working parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay in the first year, where the mother does not intend to use her full maternity entitlements.

Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) by Quarter3 indicates that 4,500 individuals were in receipt of ShPP in Quarter 1 of 2021-22, and 5,300 individuals were in receipt of ShPP in Quarter 2 of 2021-22. Data for Quarter 3 of 2021-22 is not yet available.

HMRC does not hold information which calculates the total duration of ShPP received by individual claimants. However, the Table 1 sets out the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in 2020-21 by the number of months4 in the year that they made a claim:

Number of months claimed4 in 2020-21

Number of individuals in receipt of ShPP

1

3,400

2

2,700

3

2,100

4

1,400

5

700

6

500

7

300

8

100

9

100

Please note:

  1. The data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in November 2021 covering up to September 2021. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. The number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter are based on the total number of individuals in that quarter irrespective of when the payment first started. For example, some individuals in the Quarter 2 figures also appeared in Quarter 1 figures. Quarterly figures should not be added together to make a yearly count of individuals in receipt of ShPP due to double counting claimants from quarter to quarter.
  4. “Number of months claimed” counts each month the same individual was in receipt of ShPP, in a given tax year (2020-21). This should not be interpreted as the total duration of pay received. Where individuals are in receipt of pay which spans two financial years HMRC data shows only the period within each year. Where individuals have received pay spanning multiple months, however briefly, they will be recorded as receiving ShPP in each month.
  5. This data represents individuals in receipt of Shared Parental Pay only, so those who take unpaid Shared Parental Leave are not included.

The Government conducted a £1.5 million communications campaign in 2018 to promote the Shared Parental Leave Scheme. In addition to this campaign, we have also undertaken cost-free communications activities to promote the scheme such as blogs by parents who have taken the leave and articles regarding the introduction of the online tool which enables parents to map out leave with their partner

The number of hours officials spend on individual projects is not held centrally.

In order for fathers/partners to take Shared Parental Leave, the child’s mother must curtail their entitlement to 52 weeks of Maternity Leave and 39 weeks of Statutory Maternity Pay or Maternity Allowance to potentially share any remaining weeks of leave and pay with the child’s father/their partner or take SPL themselves (they may wish to do this as SPL is more flexible than Maternity Leave).

Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) show the number of individuals (including mothers and fathers/partners) in receipt of ShPP. This data provides a broad indication of the level of SPL take-up for parental leave entitlements but does not include anyone taking unpaid Shared Parental Leave. Table 2 sets out the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in each year since 2015-16.

Year (Apr to Mar unless otherwise stated)

No. of individuals6 in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay

2015-16

6,200

2016-17

8,600

2017-18

9,200

2018-19

10,700

2019-20

12,600

2020-21

11,200

2021-22 (Apr 21 to Sep 21)

7,600

Notes

  1. The data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in November 2021 covering up to September 2021. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”. This may especially be the case for 2021/22 data.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. These figures are based on the total number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in a given year, irrespective of when the payment first started. Therefore, some individuals will be counted in 2 years (for example, those who take SPL in March and continue in April etc will be counted in both years).
  4. For the 2015-16 tax year, those receiving Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (ASPP) for children born before 6 April 2015 cannot be distinguished from those claiming Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) within RTI data.
  5. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  6. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  7. This data represents individuals in receipt of statutory parental pay only, so those who take unpaid parental leave are not included.
2nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much his Department has spent on promoting the Shared Parental Leave scheme in each year since 2014-15.

Shared Parental Leave (SPL) and Pay was introduced in December 2014 for the parents of children due or adopted from 5 April 2015. The scheme enables eligible working parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay in the first year, where the mother does not intend to use her full maternity entitlements.

Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) by Quarter3 indicates that 4,500 individuals were in receipt of ShPP in Quarter 1 of 2021-22, and 5,300 individuals were in receipt of ShPP in Quarter 2 of 2021-22. Data for Quarter 3 of 2021-22 is not yet available.

HMRC does not hold information which calculates the total duration of ShPP received by individual claimants. However, the Table 1 sets out the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in 2020-21 by the number of months4 in the year that they made a claim:

Number of months claimed4 in 2020-21

Number of individuals in receipt of ShPP

1

3,400

2

2,700

3

2,100

4

1,400

5

700

6

500

7

300

8

100

9

100

Please note:

  1. The data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in November 2021 covering up to September 2021. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. The number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter are based on the total number of individuals in that quarter irrespective of when the payment first started. For example, some individuals in the Quarter 2 figures also appeared in Quarter 1 figures. Quarterly figures should not be added together to make a yearly count of individuals in receipt of ShPP due to double counting claimants from quarter to quarter.
  4. “Number of months claimed” counts each month the same individual was in receipt of ShPP, in a given tax year (2020-21). This should not be interpreted as the total duration of pay received. Where individuals are in receipt of pay which spans two financial years HMRC data shows only the period within each year. Where individuals have received pay spanning multiple months, however briefly, they will be recorded as receiving ShPP in each month.
  5. This data represents individuals in receipt of Shared Parental Pay only, so those who take unpaid Shared Parental Leave are not included.

The Government conducted a £1.5 million communications campaign in 2018 to promote the Shared Parental Leave Scheme. In addition to this campaign, we have also undertaken cost-free communications activities to promote the scheme such as blogs by parents who have taken the leave and articles regarding the introduction of the online tool which enables parents to map out leave with their partner

The number of hours officials spend on individual projects is not held centrally.

In order for fathers/partners to take Shared Parental Leave, the child’s mother must curtail their entitlement to 52 weeks of Maternity Leave and 39 weeks of Statutory Maternity Pay or Maternity Allowance to potentially share any remaining weeks of leave and pay with the child’s father/their partner or take SPL themselves (they may wish to do this as SPL is more flexible than Maternity Leave).

Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) show the number of individuals (including mothers and fathers/partners) in receipt of ShPP. This data provides a broad indication of the level of SPL take-up for parental leave entitlements but does not include anyone taking unpaid Shared Parental Leave. Table 2 sets out the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in each year since 2015-16.

Year (Apr to Mar unless otherwise stated)

No. of individuals6 in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay

2015-16

6,200

2016-17

8,600

2017-18

9,200

2018-19

10,700

2019-20

12,600

2020-21

11,200

2021-22 (Apr 21 to Sep 21)

7,600

Notes

  1. The data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in November 2021 covering up to September 2021. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”. This may especially be the case for 2021/22 data.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. These figures are based on the total number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in a given year, irrespective of when the payment first started. Therefore, some individuals will be counted in 2 years (for example, those who take SPL in March and continue in April etc will be counted in both years).
  4. For the 2015-16 tax year, those receiving Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (ASPP) for children born before 6 April 2015 cannot be distinguished from those claiming Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) within RTI data.
  5. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  6. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  7. This data represents individuals in receipt of statutory parental pay only, so those who take unpaid parental leave are not included.
2nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Answer of 9 February 2021 to Question 146798 on Paternity Leave and the Answer of 21 May 2021 to Question 829 on Parental Pay, how many people received Statutory Shared Parental Pay in 2020-21, by the number of months in the year that they made a claim.

Shared Parental Leave (SPL) and Pay was introduced in December 2014 for the parents of children due or adopted from 5 April 2015. The scheme enables eligible working parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay in the first year, where the mother does not intend to use her full maternity entitlements.

Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) by Quarter3 indicates that 4,500 individuals were in receipt of ShPP in Quarter 1 of 2021-22, and 5,300 individuals were in receipt of ShPP in Quarter 2 of 2021-22. Data for Quarter 3 of 2021-22 is not yet available.

HMRC does not hold information which calculates the total duration of ShPP received by individual claimants. However, the Table 1 sets out the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in 2020-21 by the number of months4 in the year that they made a claim:

Number of months claimed4 in 2020-21

Number of individuals in receipt of ShPP

1

3,400

2

2,700

3

2,100

4

1,400

5

700

6

500

7

300

8

100

9

100

Please note:

  1. The data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in November 2021 covering up to September 2021. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. The number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter are based on the total number of individuals in that quarter irrespective of when the payment first started. For example, some individuals in the Quarter 2 figures also appeared in Quarter 1 figures. Quarterly figures should not be added together to make a yearly count of individuals in receipt of ShPP due to double counting claimants from quarter to quarter.
  4. “Number of months claimed” counts each month the same individual was in receipt of ShPP, in a given tax year (2020-21). This should not be interpreted as the total duration of pay received. Where individuals are in receipt of pay which spans two financial years HMRC data shows only the period within each year. Where individuals have received pay spanning multiple months, however briefly, they will be recorded as receiving ShPP in each month.
  5. This data represents individuals in receipt of Shared Parental Pay only, so those who take unpaid Shared Parental Leave are not included.

The Government conducted a £1.5 million communications campaign in 2018 to promote the Shared Parental Leave Scheme. In addition to this campaign, we have also undertaken cost-free communications activities to promote the scheme such as blogs by parents who have taken the leave and articles regarding the introduction of the online tool which enables parents to map out leave with their partner

The number of hours officials spend on individual projects is not held centrally.

In order for fathers/partners to take Shared Parental Leave, the child’s mother must curtail their entitlement to 52 weeks of Maternity Leave and 39 weeks of Statutory Maternity Pay or Maternity Allowance to potentially share any remaining weeks of leave and pay with the child’s father/their partner or take SPL themselves (they may wish to do this as SPL is more flexible than Maternity Leave).

Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) show the number of individuals (including mothers and fathers/partners) in receipt of ShPP. This data provides a broad indication of the level of SPL take-up for parental leave entitlements but does not include anyone taking unpaid Shared Parental Leave. Table 2 sets out the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in each year since 2015-16.

Year (Apr to Mar unless otherwise stated)

No. of individuals6 in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay

2015-16

6,200

2016-17

8,600

2017-18

9,200

2018-19

10,700

2019-20

12,600

2020-21

11,200

2021-22 (Apr 21 to Sep 21)

7,600

Notes

  1. The data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in November 2021 covering up to September 2021. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”. This may especially be the case for 2021/22 data.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. These figures are based on the total number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in a given year, irrespective of when the payment first started. Therefore, some individuals will be counted in 2 years (for example, those who take SPL in March and continue in April etc will be counted in both years).
  4. For the 2015-16 tax year, those receiving Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (ASPP) for children born before 6 April 2015 cannot be distinguished from those claiming Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) within RTI data.
  5. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  6. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  7. This data represents individuals in receipt of statutory parental pay only, so those who take unpaid parental leave are not included.
2nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2021 to Question 146798 on Paternity Leave and the Answer of 21 May 2021 to Question 829 on Parental Pay, how many people received Statutory Shared Parental Pay in (a) Q1, (b) Q2 and (c) Q3 of 2021-22.

Shared Parental Leave (SPL) and Pay was introduced in December 2014 for the parents of children due or adopted from 5 April 2015. The scheme enables eligible working parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay in the first year, where the mother does not intend to use her full maternity entitlements.

Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) by Quarter3 indicates that 4,500 individuals were in receipt of ShPP in Quarter 1 of 2021-22, and 5,300 individuals were in receipt of ShPP in Quarter 2 of 2021-22. Data for Quarter 3 of 2021-22 is not yet available.

HMRC does not hold information which calculates the total duration of ShPP received by individual claimants. However, the Table 1 sets out the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in 2020-21 by the number of months4 in the year that they made a claim:

Number of months claimed4 in 2020-21

Number of individuals in receipt of ShPP

1

3,400

2

2,700

3

2,100

4

1,400

5

700

6

500

7

300

8

100

9

100

Please note:

  1. The data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in November 2021 covering up to September 2021. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. The number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter are based on the total number of individuals in that quarter irrespective of when the payment first started. For example, some individuals in the Quarter 2 figures also appeared in Quarter 1 figures. Quarterly figures should not be added together to make a yearly count of individuals in receipt of ShPP due to double counting claimants from quarter to quarter.
  4. “Number of months claimed” counts each month the same individual was in receipt of ShPP, in a given tax year (2020-21). This should not be interpreted as the total duration of pay received. Where individuals are in receipt of pay which spans two financial years HMRC data shows only the period within each year. Where individuals have received pay spanning multiple months, however briefly, they will be recorded as receiving ShPP in each month.
  5. This data represents individuals in receipt of Shared Parental Pay only, so those who take unpaid Shared Parental Leave are not included.

The Government conducted a £1.5 million communications campaign in 2018 to promote the Shared Parental Leave Scheme. In addition to this campaign, we have also undertaken cost-free communications activities to promote the scheme such as blogs by parents who have taken the leave and articles regarding the introduction of the online tool which enables parents to map out leave with their partner

The number of hours officials spend on individual projects is not held centrally.

In order for fathers/partners to take Shared Parental Leave, the child’s mother must curtail their entitlement to 52 weeks of Maternity Leave and 39 weeks of Statutory Maternity Pay or Maternity Allowance to potentially share any remaining weeks of leave and pay with the child’s father/their partner or take SPL themselves (they may wish to do this as SPL is more flexible than Maternity Leave).

Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) show the number of individuals (including mothers and fathers/partners) in receipt of ShPP. This data provides a broad indication of the level of SPL take-up for parental leave entitlements but does not include anyone taking unpaid Shared Parental Leave. Table 2 sets out the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in each year since 2015-16.

Year (Apr to Mar unless otherwise stated)

No. of individuals6 in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay

2015-16

6,200

2016-17

8,600

2017-18

9,200

2018-19

10,700

2019-20

12,600

2020-21

11,200

2021-22 (Apr 21 to Sep 21)

7,600

Notes

  1. The data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in November 2021 covering up to September 2021. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”. This may especially be the case for 2021/22 data.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. These figures are based on the total number of individuals in receipt of ShPP in a given year, irrespective of when the payment first started. Therefore, some individuals will be counted in 2 years (for example, those who take SPL in March and continue in April etc will be counted in both years).
  4. For the 2015-16 tax year, those receiving Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (ASPP) for children born before 6 April 2015 cannot be distinguished from those claiming Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) within RTI data.
  5. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  6. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  7. This data represents individuals in receipt of statutory parental pay only, so those who take unpaid parental leave are not included.
2nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of new fathers eligible to take Shared Parental Leave in each year since 2015-16.

Shared Parental Leave (SPL) and Pay was introduced in December 2014 for the parents of children due or adopted from 5 April 2015. The scheme enables eligible working parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay in the first year, where the mother does not intend to use her full maternity entitlements.

The evaluation of the Shared Parental Leave and Pay scheme remains important for the Government, and we will publish our report in due course. This will include an up-to-date estimate of eligibility and take-up.

27th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment on the potential impact of the energy reseller arrangements on mobile park home owners (a) obtaining the best energy deals and (b) accessing (i) solar panels and (ii) other sustainable energy measures.

The Maximum Resell Price rules set by Ofgem aim to protect mobile park homeowners from excess charges if they are not directly responsible for their energy supply. Mobile Park homeowners who are directly responsible for their energy supply have the right to choose their own energy supplier and can access solar panels and other sustainable energy measures subject to agreement with the mobile park owner.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the suitability of the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund in achieving sufficient electric car charging points for social housing tenants.

The £3.8bn Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund is to decarbonise social housing as the name suggests.

However, in November 2021, the Government announced that it would require EV charging infrastructure to be installed in new homes and homes undergoing major renovation with associated parking. This will include flats and social housing. This will come into effect from June 2022.

We are reforming our EV chargepoint grants for homes to better support low income families who may live in flats or rented accommodation.

In 2022 we will provide grants of up to £30,000 to install charging in apartment block carparks and we will open our electric vehicle charge points grants to landlords, both private and public, so that they can provide charging for their tenants.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of increasing the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund to enable the implementation of decarbonisation measures beyond the home, such as funding for electric car charging points.

The £3.8bn Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund is to decarbonise social housing as the name suggests.

However, in November 2021, the Government announced that it would require EV charging infrastructure to be installed in new homes and homes undergoing major renovation with associated parking. This will include flats and social housing. This will come into effect from June 2022.

We are reforming our EV chargepoint grants for homes to better support low income families who may live in flats or rented accommodation.

In 2022 we will provide grants of up to £30,000 to install charging in apartment block carparks and we will open our electric vehicle charge points grants to landlords, both private and public, so that they can provide charging for their tenants.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will outline his planned timetable for reforms to enable Companies House to introduce a power to query and check information and identity verification.

The Government’s plans for reforms to Companies House will deliver significant improvements to the integrity of the UK’s register of companies and assist greatly in the fight against economic crime. These reforms will include the identity verification of directors, People with Significant Control and those filing on behalf of a company, and new powers for the registrar to query and check information.

We will legislate when Parliamentary time allows.

27th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making changes to the energy reseller arrangements to enable a mechanism for refunds to be issued to park home owners in the case of disruption to energy supply.

Changes to the Maximum Resell Price rules are a matter for Ofgem.

Ofgem’s Quality of Service Guaranteed Standards for energy distribution companies lay out the criteria for domestic and business customers to receive payments for the inconvenience of loss of supply.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to make changes to the Working Time Regulations.

The Government is committed to building a high skilled, high productivity, high wage economy that delivers on our ambition to make the UK the best place in the world to work and grow a business. All policies – including retained EU law - are kept under review to ensure that they meet our objectives but the government has no intention of reducing workers’ rights.

24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to reduce the qualifying period for claiming unfair dismissal.

The qualifying periods are intended to strike the right balance between ensuring fairness for employees and providing flexibility to employers.

It is important to note that no qualifying period applies if a dismissal is for certain specified reasons which are particularly serious, or because employees have claimed another statutory employment right, for example the right not to be unlawfully discriminated against or to request flexible working. We believe this provides the right balance for employers and employees.

24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 12 January 2022 to Question 96929 on Minimum Wage: Government Departments, how many of the employers named have a contract with a Government Department.

The purpose of the Naming Scheme is to increase awareness of the rules, and to act as a deterrent to the minority of employers who may be tempted to underpay their workers. It is for that reason that publicly naming employers who do not comply with the rules remains an important part of our enforcement and compliance toolkit. To date we have named over 2,500 employers and across the entirety of the Naming Scheme, covering £20 million in arrears and over £24 million in penalties.

BEIS does not hold information about the number of named employers who have a contract with a Government Department. However, government contracts over £10,000 are listed on Contracts Finder: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder. BEIS only names employers once Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has concluded its investigations. For the employers named on 9 December 2021, HMRC’s investigations had concluded between 2014 and 2019.

20th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans for pre-legislative scrutiny of the Employment Bill.

It is important that any legislative reforms to our employment framework are fully informed by stakeholder engagement and scrutiny. That is why we have consulted in detail in most measures proposed and have carefully considered responses. We also have regular stakeholder engagement across the proposed measures. Due to this scrutiny already applied to these measures, we do not currently propose to undertake pre-legislative scrutiny.

20th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what consultation his Department has conducted with (a) relevant stakeholders and (b) other Government Departments on the forthcoming Employment Bill.

The Government is committed to bringing forward reforms to our employment framework to make the UK the best place in the world to work and grow a business. It is important we consult widely on proposals for change and ensure stakeholders have the opportunity to share their views. For example, we have recently concluded a consultation containing proposals to reform flexible working regulations (https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/making-flexible-working-the-default) and have published a Government response to a consultation regarding the establishment of a single enforcement body for employment rights (https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/good-work-plan-establishing-a-new-single-enforcement-body-for-employment-rights).

We will carefully consider all consultation responses, which will help inform decisions around how we take forward measures. As this is a complex cross-cutting topic, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has regular dialogue with other Government Departments with an interest.

20th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many officials are working on the Employment Bill.

The Government is committed to building a high skilled, high productivity, high wage economy that delivers on our ambition to make the UK the best place in the world to work and grow a business. As this is complex and cross-cutting, officials in the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy have been working closely with officials across other Government Departments on developing measures. For instance, we have recently concluded a consultation containing proposals to reform flexible working regulations (https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/making-flexible-working-the-default) and have published a Government response to a consultation regarding the establishment of a single enforcement body for employment rights (https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/good-work-plan-establishing-a-new-single-enforcement-body-for-employment-rights).

20th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what progress the Government has made on drafting the Employment Bill.

The Government is committed to building a high skilled, high productivity, high wage economy that delivers on our ambition to make the UK the best place in the world to work and grow a business. We will bring forward reforms to our employment framework when Parliamentary time allows it. In the meantime, we will continue to take necessary action to support businesses and protect jobs.

20th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to reform the law on fire and rehire practices.

This Government has been clear that we expect employers to treat their employees fairly and in the spirit of partnership. Using threats about firing and rehiring as a negotiation tactic is unacceptable. We expect employers and employees to negotiate new terms and conditions and there are laws around how this must be done, and legal protections in place when firms are considering redundancies.

We asked Acas to produce new and updated guidance which was published on 11 November, and sets out the employer’s responsibilities when considering changes to employment contracts. In their guidance, Acas state that an employer should only consider dismissing and offering to rehire someone on new terms (‘dismissal and re-engagement’) as a last resort. The guidance is available from: http://www.acas.org.uk/changecontract.

10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 26 April 2018 to Question 137053, the Answer of 20 May 2019 to Question 254256, the Answer of 24 September 2020 to Question 95140 and the Answer of 19 July 2021 to Question 32423 on Parental Leave, when he plans to publish the report of his Department's evaluation of the Shared Parental Leave scheme.

Evaluating Shared Parental Leave and Pay is an important part of the policymaking process.

As part of the evaluation, we commissioned large, representative surveys of parents and employees which asked about a range of parental leave and pay entitlements as well as their experience of Shared Parental Leave specifically. We also consulted on high-level options for reforming parental leave and pay.

We are currently analysing this information and will publish our findings in due course.

10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to collect data on the uptake of parental leave entitlements.

HMRC routinely collect data on the uptake of parental pay entitlements which provides some useful indicators of leave uptake.

The Government is currently undertaking an evaluation of the Shared Parental Leave and Pay scheme. This evaluation will include survey and administrative HMRC data on the uptake of the Maternity, Paternity and Shared Parental Leave and Pay schemes in recent years. We will publish the findings in due course.

10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to encourage the take up of shared parental leave.

In order to make it easier for parents to access Shared Parental Leave, and easier for employers to administer it, the Government also launched a new online tool last year. This shows how many weeks of leave and pay are available and lets parents map out how weeks will be shared with their partner, supporting conversations with employers.

In addition, the Government is evaluating the Shared Parental Leave and Pay scheme, which will help us understand what would enable more parents to take up the entitlement. We will publish the findings in due course.

10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to extend the time limit for employment tribunals.

A claim to an Employment Tribunal must usually be made within three months. For certain claims, redundancy pay or equal pay, the claim must be made within six months. The Employment Tribunals already have the discretion to allow claims submitted out of time, on a case by basis.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the amount of compensation awarded by employment tribunals but not received by employees in each of the last three years.

In England and Wales, individuals can choose to pursue enforcement of their award through applying to their local county court for an enforcement order. After this, enforcement officers will seek to secure payment from the employer. In 2010, a Fast Track scheme was introduced which was designed to speed up and simplify the process of enforcing tribunal awards and ACAS settlements. In Scotland unpaid claimants can ask for an ‘extract of the judgment’ so that a sheriff officer can use this to force the respondent to pay.

The Department for Business, Enterprise and Industrial Strategy also offers a free service to help incentivise prompt payment. Should an employer fail to pay an award then individuals can apply to ask to have them fined and named publicly. The respondent will get a warning notice giving them 28 days to pay the outstanding award. If this is not done they may be eligible for an additional financial penalty on top of the original award.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish a response to his Department's consultation entitled Making flexible working the default.

The Government’s consultation on making flexible working the default was published on 23 September 2021 and ran for 10 weeks until 1 December 2021, receiving over 1,600 responses. The Government is now analysing these responses and will issue its response to the consultation in due course.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to his Department's press notice of 9 December 2021 entitled National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme, how many of the employers named have a contract with a Government Department.

All employers need to pay their staff correctly. Paying the minimum wage is not optional, it’s the law. Under the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme, employers who have previously broken minimum wage law can be publicly named. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy follows a clear and thorough process allowing firms to make representations against being named if they meet our published criteria.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with stakeholders on reducing the qualifying period for claiming unfair dismissal.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State meets regularly with a wide range of stakeholders, including trade unions and employers, to discuss various policy matters including questions of employment law.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with relevant stakeholders on changes to the Working Time Regulations.

BEIS Ministers have regular discussions with stakeholders – but no specific recent discussions with stakeholders on changes to Working Time Regulations have been had.

1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment she has made on the effectiveness of the arrangements on royalties, music copyright and licensing for (a) small musicians and (b) new and upcoming acts.

As set out in its response to the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee’s report on the economics of music streaming, the Government has launched a comprehensive programme of work to ensure the music industry, including grassroots musicians and new and upcoming acts, can continue to thrive in the age of streaming.

23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish all details of meetings between Ministers and officials from his Department and representatives of Summit Resorts and Developments Limited, or its predecessor David Lloyd Developments Limited, since January 2019.

Departments publish quarterly details of Ministers’ meetings with external organisations on GOV.UK. Details for the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/beis-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings.

Data for July to September 2021 will be published in due course.

Details of meetings held by officials are not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he plans to take to help ensure that people on pre-payment meters are supported to maintain energy supply in the event of an increase in gas prices.

Protecting the most vulnerable during this period of high gas prices has been our top priority. The Pre-payment Meter Price Cap came into force on 1 April 2017 and currently protects 4 million pre-payment meter households on default tariffs.

In December 2020 Ofgem introduced new licensing conditions, including an Ability to Pay Principle, and an obligation on suppliers to proactively identify self-disconnecting and self-rationing pre-payment meter customers. These new rules require energy suppliers to offer emergency and friendly-hours credit to all pre-payment meter customers.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of increasing the feed in tariff in line with the increase in energy costs.

Support under the FIT scheme, which is closed to new entrants, aims to deliver returns of approximately 5-8% for investors in small-scale low-carbon generation. The methodology used to set the tariffs considers the technology costs and electricity generation expectations and not the retail price of electricity. The tariff rates are adjusted annually, in line with the Retail Price Index (RPI). FIT generators also benefit from a reduction in their electricity bills when the electricity is used onsite and import costs are avoided.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of Green Home Grant Scheme vouchers have been redeemed as of August 2021.

Official statistics published on 23rd September for the Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme describe the status of applications prior to 6th September.

Statistics include figures on measures installed and vouchers paid. In order to be recorded as measure installed, the customer must have begun the process of redeeming a voucher. Redemption is complete on payment of the voucher.

The next statistical release will be published on 18th November 2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the outcome of the consultation on further policy designs for the Clean Heat Grant.

The Government Response for the Boiler Upgrade Scheme, previously the Clean Heat Grant, has now been published alongside the Heat and Building Strategy.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Green Home Grant Scheme vouchers have been issued in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency; and what proportion have been redeemed.

Official statistics published on 23rd September for the Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme describe the status of applications prior to 6th September

This includes vouchers issued and measures installed in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency. To be recorded as installed, the customer must have begun the process of redeeming their voucher.

The next statistical release will be published on 18th November.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with stakeholders on the difficulties Green Home Grant Scheme Voucher holders have experienced redeeming their vouchers.

BEIS officials have worked collaboratively with ICF, the scheme administrator, and partners within industry.

This has included regular roundtable and working group meetings with stakeholders chaired by senior officials, and senior official attendance of meetings hosted by installer trade bodies.

Ensuring customers and installers are clear on the information and checks required has been a top priority.

As of 27 September, 36,441 vouchers with a value of £161.9 million have been paid.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the impact of increased energy costs on households in the UK.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State is working closely with Ministers across government on the impact of global gas price rises and that will continue.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of Union Jack flags purchased by his Department in each of the last two years were manufactured in the UK.

The Department purchased six Union Jack flags in 2020 and one Union Jack flag in 2021. Three of these were for display on a pole and four for table settings.

The flags were purchased from the Hampshire Flag Company, which manufactures at its site in Waterlooville, Hampshire.

All flags purchased in the past two years have therefore been manufactured in the UK.

15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which companies have supplied Union Jack flags to his Department since 2019.

Since 2019 all Union Jack flags purchased by the Department have been supplied by the Hampshire Flag Company.

13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department's timetable is for responding to the Clean Heat Grant consultation which concluded on 5 March 2021.

The Government Response to the Clean Heat Grant consultation is expected to be published in autumn this year.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the postcodes of the 260 post office branches which were listed as closed as of 30 June 2021.

BEIS does not hold information on specific postcodes of post office branch closures.

A list of open post office branches can be found in the post office network report: https://corporate.postoffice.co.uk/secure-corporate/our-network/post-office-network-reports/#.

9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many households in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency have received income under the feed-in tariff.

There are 953 accredited domestic Feed-in tariff (FIT) installations listed on the Central FIT Register in the Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency. Of those accredited, 927 are currently in receipt of FIT payments and 947 have received FIT payments at some point.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what percentage of households in (a) Cheshire West and Chester (b) England have prepayment meters.

Data on electricity customers on prepayment tariffs are published as part of the Quarterly Energy Prices statistical series (here).

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total amount is of funds approved under the (a) Bounce Back Loan scheme and (b) Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan scheme for businesses in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

The analysis of final Coronavirus loan scheme data was published on July 6, 2021 on the British Business Bank website.[1]

Under the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, 1,560,309 loans were delivered in total, to the sum of £47.36 billion.

Under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, 131 loans were offered in the Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency, to the sum of £31,605,525. Under the Bounce Back Loan Scheme in the same constituency, 1461 loans were offered, to the sum of £39,697,177.

In total, 1592 loans were offered across the constituency, to the sum of £71,302,701.

[1] https://www.british-business-bank.co.uk/press-release/analysis-of-final-coronavirus-loan-scheme-data-shows-79-3bn-of-loans-to-1-67m-businesses-evenly-distributed-across-whole-of-the-uk/

8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many mobile park home owners have been investigated by Ofgem for mis-selling or over-charging in their roles as energy resellers.

Ofgem has not investigated any mobile park home owners acting as energy resellers. Mobile park home owners acting as exempt energy resellers are exempt from the requirement to hold a supply licence, but must comply with certain duties set out in the Electricity Act 1989 and Gas Act 1986.

Ofgem are responsible for setting the maximum resale price that applies to energy resellers. The maximum resale price is the most that anyone can charge for reselling gas or electricity. The most recent direction was made in 2014: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/sites/default/files/docs/2014/03/mrp_direction.pdf.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the recommendation from the Climate Change Committee's 2021 Report to Parliament that Ofgem undertake a programme of research with his Department to identify priority candidate areas for hydrogen for the decarbonisation of heat.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 9th July 2021 to Question 25021.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Green Homes Grant applications were (a) received and (b) approved in each month since January 2021 for (i) England and (ii) Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

Official statistics published on 24th June for the Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme describe the status of applications prior to 3rd June. This includes applications received and approved across England and the English Parliamentary Constituency, Ellesmere Port and Neston.

The next statistical release will be published on 22 July.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the recommendation from the Climate Change Committee's 2021 Report to Parliament to set requirements for all new gas boilers to be hydrogen-ready by 2025 at the latest, while ensuring that all new boilers outperform current and expected future air quality standards.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 9th July 2021 to Question 25020.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the combined potential effect of (a) UK Emission Trading Scheme costs and (b) industrial energy oncosts on the competitiveness of UK ammonia production.

To mitigate adverse affects on competitiveness and the risk of carbon leakage from UK Emissions Trading Scheme (UK ETS) costs, ammonia producers receive a significant number of allowances for free. As part of the Free Allocation Review, we will be looking at possible future changes to the allocation of free allowances within the UK ETS. We published a call for evidence on 17 March 2021 which closed on 23 April 2021, and we will publish a response in due course.

The Government recognises that the UK’s industrial electricity costs are currently higher than those in many other countries. This partly reflects how the costs of the electricity system are distributed across household and industrial customers. Nevertheless, we are committed to minimising energy costs for businesses to ensure our economy remains strong and competitive and we have therefore put various schemes in place to reduce the policy cost in electricity prices for those energy intensive industries most at risk of facing a significant competitive disadvantage, including production of ammonia.

Furthermore, the Government has schemes worth nearly £2 billion in operation, or in development, supporting energy intensive industries to decarbonise. These schemes include the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund to help companies reduce their energy costs and transition to low carbon technologies, the Industrial Decarbonisation Challenge Fund to support industry with the deployment of low-carbon technologies in industrial clusters, and to improve the resource and energy efficiency of foundation industries.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he plans to take in response to the recommendation of the Climate Change Committee's 2021 Progress Report to Parliament, published on 24 June 2021, that his Department should set requirements for new gas boilers to be hydrogen-ready by 2025 while ensuring that new boilers outperform current and expected future air quality standards.

The Government will respond formally to this and the Climate Change Committee’s other recommendations by October 15.

We are supporting the development of prototype ‘hydrogen-ready’ boilers through the Hy4Heat programme.

In advance of strategic decisions on the role of hydrogen for heating, we will assess the case for encouraging, or requiring, new gas boilers to be readily convertible to hydrogen in preparation for any future conversion of the gas network. As set out in the 2020 Energy White Paper, we will consult on the role of ‘hydrogen ready’ appliances later this year.

The Government is exploring the benefits of improving efficiency and raising product standards in heating appliances, including gas boilers. This presents an opportunity to improve energy efficiency in millions of homes, reducing carbon emissions now, while providing householders greater comfort and savings on energy bills. More detail on how we will look to improve the efficiency of energy-using products such as gas boilers will be set out in the Energy-Related Products Policy Framework as announced in the Prime Minister’s Ten Point Plan.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he plans to take in response to the recommendation of the Climate Change Committee's 2021 Progress Report to Parliament, published on 24 June 2021, that OFGEM should undertake a programme of research with his Department to identify priority candidate areas for hydrogen for the decarbonisation of heat.

The Government will respond formally to this and the Climate Change Committee’s other recommendations by October 15.

Hydrogen is a potential key option for decarbonising heating, alongside heat pumps and heat networks. The Department is working with OFGEM, industry and others to deliver a range of research, development, testing and trials projects designed to determine the feasibility, costs and benefits of using low carbon hydrogen as an alternative to natural gas for heating, including transitioning all or parts of the gas network.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the scientific evidential basis is for the Government's policy on covid-19 restrictions on weddings.

The roadmap has been informed by the latest scientific evidence from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) and its working groups on the pace and sequencing of reopening.

10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with wedding industry representatives on the outcome of the test events in Liverpool; and what assessment he has made of the potential merits of implementing the measures used at those test events to permit larger weddings to take place.

Information provided by the Liverpool test events is contributing to the Events Research Programme and helping us draw conclusions on how to bring about the return of larger events, including weddings, after Step 4.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister announced that, from 21 June, there will no longer be a maximum number cap for attendees. The number of guests will be determined by how many people the venue or space can safely accommodate with social distancing measures in place.

10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the restart grant scheme for businesses in the wedding industry.

The £5 billion Restart Grant scheme announced by my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer on 3 March 2021 are one-off grants to businesses in the non-essential retail, hospitality, leisure, personal care and accommodation sectors, to support businesses to reopen as Covid-19 restrictions are relaxed.

Strand One of the Restart Grants aims to support non-essential retail with grants of up to £6,000. Stand Two is to support hospitality, accommodation, leisure, personal care and gym businesses, with grants of up to £18,000. The higher amount is in recognition that these sectors have been allowed to open at a later date and are likely to be more severely impacted by remaining restrictions.

The Department does not hold sector or subsector level data, however we have released a breakdown of Restart Grant funding allocations and payments by Local Authority area which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-grant-funding-local-authority-payments-to-small-and-medium-businesses.

10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the impact of the covid-19 restrictions on the wedding industry; and what discussions his Department has had with wedding industry representatives on the potential implications for that industry of extending the roadmap out of covid-19 lockdown.

BEIS Ministers and officials meet with representatives of the sector-led UK Weddings Taskforce on a regular basis to discuss the challenges faced by the sector and how best to support it through the pandemic.

10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing sector specific support for those in the wedding and events industry for the remainder of 2021.

Over the course of the pandemic the Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support to businesses, including those in the wedding industry, which we keep under regular review.

7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to Answer of 25 May 2021 to Question 2333 on Employment: Coronavirus, how many fixed penalty notices have been issued.

It is an offence for an employer to knowingly allow a person who is required to self-isolate to work anywhere other than where they are self-isolating. If an employer is reasonably believed to be in breach of this requirement, they may be issued with a Fixed Penalty Notice, ranging from £1,000 to £10,000.

Local Authorities provide written and verbal advice to businesses to enable them to comply with their obligations. Enforcement action is taken against employers who do not follow this advice and who do not take reasonable steps to ensure that their workers who must be self-isolating are not working from outside their home.

We will publish information on the number of fixed penalty notices which have been issued in due course.

19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reasons mental health services were excluded from personal care businesses for the eligibility criteria of the Re-Start Grant.

The Restart Grant scheme aims to support businesses in their local economies to reopen as coronavirus restrictions are eased across the country. Mental health services are out of scope for this scheme as they were not mandated to close during the January Lockdown due to the services they provide being essential to the public.

However, further funding has been made available via the Additional Restrictions Grant to support those businesses that have had their trade adversely affected by the local and national restrictions.

The Additional Restrictions Grant is a discretionary fund and is also administered by Local Authorities to support businesses in the way they see fit. Local Authorities in England have been allocated £2bn in additional funding to provide support that best suits their area.

Businesses should consult their Local Authority to determine whether they might be eligible for Additional Restrictions Grant support.

17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many fixed penalty notices have been issued to employers for knowingly allowing a person who is required to self-isolate to work other than where they are self-isolating since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

It is an offence for an employer to knowingly allow a person who is required to self-isolate to work anywhere other than where they are self-isolating. If an employer is reasonably believed to be in breach of this requirement, they may be issued with a Fixed Penalty Notice, ranging from £1,000 to £10,000.

Local Authorities provide written and verbal advice to businesses to enable them to comply with their obligations. Enforcement action is taken against employers who do not follow this advice and who do not take reasonable steps to ensure that their workers who must be self-isolating are not working from outside their home.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason travel agents are eligible for strand 1 Restart Grant Funding rather than strand 2.

Travel agents are eligible for strand 1 of Restart Grants as they are classified as non-essential retail.

Strand 2 of Restart Grants is for hospitality, leisure, accommodation, personal care and gym and sport businesses, most of which will not fully reopen until step 3 of the Roadmap out of lockdown and which are likely to continue to be most significantly affected by social distancing rules, cleaning protocols and other measures in place to tackle Covid-19.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with representatives of Mobile Home Park owners on energy resellers as defined by OFGEM, in the context of mis-selling or overcharging of the maximum resale price for energy costs in relation to mobile home parks.

BEIS Ministers and officials regularly meet with consumer representatives to discuss a variety of issues relating to the energy market.

Ofgem’s Maximum Resale Price Provisions state the maximum price at which gas or electricity may be resold must be the same price that the reseller paid per unit of energy and the standing charge. The maximum resale price rule does not apply where an inclusive charge is made for accommodation and there is no separate agreement for the resale of gas and electricity. Under the terms of their written agreement, mobile home residents can request documentary evidence in support and explanation of any charges for gas and electricity payable to the site owner under the agreement. If the site owner does not provide the information, the resident can apply to the First Tier Tribunal for a determination.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 26 March 2021 to Question 167238 on Employment: Coronavirus, if he will publish the (a) number and (b) value of fixed penalty notices that have been issued to employers for knowingly allowing a person who is required to self-isolate to work anywhere other than where they are self-isolating since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

My answer of 26th March set out the employer offence of allowing a worker to attend a place of work (other than the place of self-isolation) when they have been advised of the need to self-isolate. It also set out the Government’s overall approach to ensuring compliance and guidance on employment rights and self-isolation.

We will publish information on the number of fixed penalty notices which have been issued in due course. We do not centrally collect data on the value of fixed penalty notices.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many employers have been fined under The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (Self-Isolation) (England) Regulations 2020 for preventing an employee from adhering to the required self-isolation period.

It is critically important that the following people stay at home and self-isolate immediately: anyone who has tested positive with COVID-19, anyone who has been contacted by NHS Test and Trace or their local authority, and anyone who has returned from abroad and is required to quarantine.

The Government has developed guidance on employment rights and self-isolation so that workers and employers are clear about their rights and obligations. The guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/if-you-need-to-self-isolate-or-cannot-attend-work-due-to-coronavirus

In addition, anyone who is due to work anywhere other than where they are self-isolating (normally their home) must inform their employer that they are required to self-isolate. An individual can receive a Fixed Penalty Notice of £50 for not doing so.

It is an offence for an employer to knowingly allow a person who is required to self-isolate to work anywhere other than where they are self-isolating. If an employer is reasonably believed to be in breach of this requirement, they may be issued with a Fixed Penalty Notice, ranging from £1,000 to £10,000.

Local Authorities provide written and verbal advice to businesses to enable them to comply with their obligations. Enforcement action is taken against employers who do not follow this advice and who do not take reasonable steps to ensure that their workers who must be self-isolating are not working from outside their home.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many early conciliation requests the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service has received on (a) the calculation of wages under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, (b) grievances on covid-secure measures in the workplace and (c) requests to employees who are clinically extremely vulnerable to return to the workplace since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

Since the start of the pandemic Acas received 28,925 notifications which include a wages act jurisdiction. Acas has not collected additional data on the precise issues in question.

11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, of 9 March 2021, Official Report, column 822, if he will publish the ACAS report on the use of fire and rehire practice.

The information gathered by Acas is a valuable source of information for Officials who are now giving this evidence thorough consideration. The Government will communicate its response in due course.

10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the scope of the Ofcom Review of Future Regulatory Framework in relation to courier companies.

Ofcom launched a call for inputs on 11 March 2021 which outlines the main themes it is considering as part of its review of postal regulation. Ofcom intends to publish a full consultation on the future regulation of postal services later this year before concluding its review in 2022.

3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 10 February 2021 to Question 147901 on the Warm Home Discount Scheme, how many Pension Credit Guarantee Credit recipients have received rebates under the Warm Home Discount scheme as of 19 February 2021.

A total of 978,563 Pension Credit Guarantee Credit recipients were identified as eligible through the data matching process between the Department for Work and Pensions and energy suppliers, and a further 50,000 have successfully claimed a rebate through the WHD helpline. This means that a total of over 1,028,000 rebates will have been issued through the Core Group as of 4 March 2021, which is the latest available data.

As energy suppliers are responsible for payment of rebates and are not due to report final numbers until after the end of the scheme year, on 31 March, we can only comment on the number of “Instructions to Pay” that have been issued to energy suppliers rather than the number of rebates paid.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of financial support for social clubs during the period of covid-19 lockdown restrictions.

The Government has brought forward a substantial package of financial support for the hospitality sector over the last year. On 3 March 2021, my Rt hon Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer set out in the Budget a £65 billion three-point plan to provide support for jobs and businesses, with extensions to furlough, self-employed support, business grants, loans and VAT cuts – bringing total fiscal support to over £407 billion.

24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of social clubs on social isolation and loneliness.

The Government recognises that hospitality, including social clubs, plays an important role in supporting our communities and helping to combat loneliness. However, the restrictions put in place to reduce the transmission of COVID-19 are necessary to protect the NHS and to save lives.

The Government has brought forward a substantial package of financial support for the hospitality sector over the last year and, and my Rt hon Friend the Prime Minister’s ‘COVID-19 Response - Spring 2021’ provides a roadmap out of the current lockdown in England.

On 3 March 2021, my Rt hon Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer set out in the Budget a £65 billion three-point plan to provide support for jobs and businesses, with extensions to furlough, self-employed support, business grants, loans and VAT cuts – bringing total fiscal support to over £407 billion.

24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with representatives of social clubs on the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on such clubs.

I meet regularly with the groups representing the hospitality sector to understand the impact of the pandemic on jobs and businesses.

The Government has brought forward a substantial package of financial support for the sector over the last year and, and my Rt hon Friend the Prime Minister’s ‘COVID-19 Response - Spring 2021’ provides a roadmap out of the current lockdown in England. On 3 March 2021, my Rt hon Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer set out in the Budget a £65 billion three-point plan to provide support for jobs and businesses, with extensions to furlough, self-employed support, business grants, loans and VAT cuts – bringing total fiscal support to over £407 billion.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to appoint a new director of labour market enforcement.

Cracking down on non-compliance in the labour market is a priority for the Government, and a new Director for Labour Market Enforcement will be appointed as soon as possible.

We have launched a recruitment campaign and are progressing the recruitment process. The outcome will be announced in due course.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of covid-19 restrictions on people with hidden disabilities; and whether his Department has made an assessment of how the needs of those people are being met by retailers and other businesses.

The safer workplaces guidance provides some suggestions to help employers make their workplaces COVID-Secure for their employees, visitors, and customers. The Government took into account the needs of people with disabilities when developing the guidance.

The guidance does not replace existing employment, health and safety or equalities legislation. It provides information to employers on how best to meet these responsibilities in the context of COVID-19.

The Government welcomes efforts by retailers who have implemented a range of measures including dedicated hours and access for the elderly, disabled and priority access groups, and prioritising online deliveries for the most vulnerable.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with stakeholders on a plan for re-opening the wedding industry after the third national lockdown.

I recently attended a meeting with the newly formed sector-led Weddings Taskforce where stakeholders presented ideas for the reopening of the wedding sector when the current national lockdown is lifted.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of sector specific support for the wedding industry when the national covid-19 lockdown restrictions announced in January 2021 are eased.

The Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support to businesses, including those in the wedding sector. This includes the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, government-backed loans, Local Restrictions Support Grants and additional funding provided to Local Authorities to support businesses. On 5 January, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a one-off top up grant worth up to £9,000 per property to help businesses up to the Spring.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of people eligible for the Warm Home Discount scheme have had that discount applied to their energy bill.

For the current Warm Home Discount scheme year (2020/21), of the 1.2 million Pension Credit Guarantee Credit recipients, around 1 million will receive the rebate automatically on their energy bills, as a result of data matching between DWP and participating energy suppliers. In most cases these automatic rebates are provided before 31 December. In addition, a further 200,000 low income pensioners, who meet part of the eligibility criteria, will receive a letter from Government encouraging them to claim via a dedicated helpline if they meet the remaining criteria. Of these, over 45,000 have so far claimed a rebate through calling the helpline.

In addition, over 1.1 million vulnerable and low income households will also receive a rebate through the Broader Group. Government sets mandatory Broader Group eligibility criteria, of which the potential eligible pool is estimated to be around 3.1 million households. However, energy suppliers are also able to optionally add additional eligibility criteria, subject to approval from the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets. Due to the limited funding available, Broader Group rebates are generally issued by energy suppliers on a first come, first served basis.

Energy suppliers are responsible for the issuing of rebates to eligible customers and they must do so by 31 March 2021. Although most rebates will have generally been issued by the end of January, there will still be rebates issued throughout February and March.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of sector specific support for travel agents as a result of the comments of the Minister for COVID Vaccine Deployment advising people not to book overseas summer holidays.

We recognise that these are very challenging conditions for businesses in the travel sector, including travel agents, which is why we have provided a range of measures to support the sector. On top of our wider economic support package, we have provided business rates relief and one-off grants for eligible hospitality and leisure businesses – and we have cut VAT for tourism and hospitality activities from 20% to 5% until the end of March.

Additionally, ABTA and the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) recently announced an extension to their current ABTA and ATOL- backed Refund Credit Note (RCN) regimes, meaning that ATOL-protected holidaymakers can book with confidence following confirmation that the Government will protect refund credit notes offered if packages are cancelled as a result of covid-19.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of security procedures around covid-19 vaccine (a) supply chains, (b) storage and (c) transport.

The Government takes security extremely seriously and is ensuring all necessary steps are taken.

26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of queuing measures that retailers have in place due to covid-19 on fair and equitable access for elderly, disabled and priority groups.

The Government welcomes efforts by retailers who have implemented dedicated hours and access for the elderly, disabled and priority access groups, as well as prioritising online deliveries for the most vulnerable.

The safer workplaces guidance provides some suggestions to help employers make their workplaces COVID-Secure for their employees, visitors, and customers. The Government took into account people with disabilities when developing the guidance. We expect all businesses to take into account the Government’s guidance, discussing with neighbouring businesses and their local authorities where applicable.

The guidance does not replace existing employment, health and safety or equalities legislation. It provides information to employers on how best to meet these responsibilities in the context of COVID-19.

22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the requirements to report state aid support to the EU.

EU State aid rules no longer apply to subsidies granted from 1 January 2021 in the UK. The only exception is aid within scope of the Withdrawal Agreement, specifically Article 10 of the Northern Ireland Protocol and Article 138 in relation to aid for EU programmes and activities within the Multiannual Financial Framework.

The UK must provide the EU with details of aid granted under either of these two limited circumstances on an annual basis and in line with the relevant transparency obligations for individual awards. The UK will also fulfil its obligations to provide details of aid granted before the end of the transition period.

The UK has committed to transparency obligations within the subsidies chapter of the UK/EU Trade and Co-operation Agreement. These obligations will be met through a new publicly accessible transparency database which will be available in due course.

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits click and collect options for non-essential retail in reducing the rate of transmission of covid-19.

The single most important action we can all take is to stay at home unless people have a reasonable excuse, as set out in law.

In order to reduce social contact and help reduce the rate of transmission, the regulations require some businesses to close and impose restrictions on how some businesses provide goods and services. All shops can continue to operate click-and-collect (where goods are pre-ordered and collected without entering the premises) and delivery services. This allows the public to have access to goods they need quickly, where they aren’t available from retailers that can remain open.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many (a) directly managed, (b) retail outlets and (c) outreach Post Office Branches have been closed at any point since 2000.

The management of the Post Office network, including the number and type of branches open and closed at any one time, is an operational matter for the Post Office, and therefore the Government does not hold this information.

It is, however, a requirement under Provision 11 of the Postal Services Act 2011 for the Post Office to publish an annual report about the Post Office branch network and customer accessibility. This report is also laid before Parliament.

The Post Office Network Reports are available online and the most recent report as of March 2020 can be found here: http://corporate.postoffice.co.uk/secure-corporate/our-network/post-office-network-reports/.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the findings of the Office of National Statistics on Coronavirus and the impact on output in the UK economy: October 2020 that travel agent output is 89.9 percent less than in February 2020; and what plans he has to introduce specific support for the travel agency and tour operator sector.

The Government recognises the travel sector has been particularly hard hit by COVID-19. We are regularly assessing the impact on tourism businesses and are continuing to engage across Government and with stakeholders - such as the Association of British Travel Agents and Association of Independent Tour Operators - to assess how we can most effectively support the recovery of travel and tourism across the UK.

On top of our wider economic support package, we have provided business rates relief and one-off grants for eligible hospitality and leisure businesses. We have also cut VAT for tourism and hospitality activities from 20% to 5% until the end of March, and we have confirmed that the Government will protect refund credit notes if ATOL-protected packages are cancelled as a result of COVID-19.

14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the implications for its policies of the National Hair and Beauty Federation's December 2020 State of Industry survey; and what plans the Government has for specific support for that sector.

From 2 December, close contact services have been allowed to open in Tiers 1-3. Unfortunately, due to the very rapid rise of infections in Tier 4 areas, close contact services are closed. The Government has put in place a wide-ranging package of financial support for sectors impacted by Covid-19, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and Kickstart Scheme grants.

14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to his Department's news story, Advice for people struggling to pay essential bills because of coronavirus, published on 11 September 2020, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the potential merits of requiring payment holidays to be extended.

Throughout the Coronavirus crisis, Government and regulators have worked with regulated industries to support consumers who are struggling financially. The decision to extend support measures is taken in each sector to meet the varying needs of the consumers in those markets.

For instance, FCA advises that consumers can until the end of March apply for payment deferrals including on mortgages, loans, credit cards, overdrafts, and motor finance. Ofcom recently asked telecoms providers to bring in further support, including proactively engaging with those in debt, and waiving penalty charges.

9th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the evidential basis was for setting capacity at 15 for wedding receptions in covid-19 tier 1 and 2 areas.

Wedding receptions by their nature are particularly vulnerable to the spread of COVID-19. This guidance for wedding receptions and celebrations at tiers 1 and 2 has been drafted on the basis of the scientific evidence available. We keep this guidance under review.

16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many post offices have been closed in England as a result of being assessed as not commercially viable since 2018.

The Government recognises the critical role that post offices play in communities and for small businesses across the UK and remains committed to the long-term sustainability of the network.

Overall post office branch numbers are published yearly by the Post Office in their Network Report and Government, via UK Government Investments, monitors network numbers regularly. The report for 2018/19 can be found at http://corporate.postoffice.co.uk/media/46607/networkreport2019_final_190210.pdf.

Changes to the Post Office network can and do happen, often for reasons beyond the Post Office’s control, for instance a postmaster retirement. When this happens, the Post Office will try to restore services as soon as possible by putting in place temporary arrangements or working hard to find an alternative location.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Green Home Grants have been approved since the scheme opened.

The Green Homes Grant opened to applications on the 30 September 2020. As of 2nd November 2020, 31,279 grant applications have been received. BEIS will continue to monitor application data as the scheme progresses.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will provide a breakdown of the reasons for Green Home Grant application refusals.

We have designed the Green Homes Grant voucher application process to automate checks where possible and minimise the time taken for voucher approval. However, should a customer’s application be rejected, they may receive correspondence advising they have been rejected on the basis of the following criteria:

  • Quotes submitted are ineligible;
  • The property is ineligible (for example due to its location);
  • The customer has failed identity or land registry checks;
  • The customer is ineligible for the low-income scheme;
  • The measures selected are ineligible or no primary measure has been selected;
  • An on-site audit has confirmed the customer is ineligible.

In order to raise any questions or concerns about the scheme, customers should contact the scheme administrator via the ‘Contact us’ link on the GOV.UK guidance pages. The first vouchers have now been issued and my officials will continue to monitor application data as the scheme progresses.

Applications are thoroughly checked for compliance with the scheme rules to help ensure value for money, protect consumers, and detect malpractice.

29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with the UK Association for Science and Discovery Centres on a resilience fund for science centres.

We have been closely liaising with the UK Association for Science Discovery Centres through meetings with Ministers and officials. We recognise that, as with so many other organisations and individuals, that COVID-19 has created challenges for these centres.

Some centres have already and others are planning to reopen in the coming period so they can continue to offer experiences which bring science to life in order to inspire and involve their visitors.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment has he made of the potential effect of the covid-19 outbreak on science and discovery centres.

The Government recognises the impacts of COVID-19 on science and discovery centres across the UK and Ministers and officials have met the Association of Science and Discovery Centres.

Science and discovery centres in England have access to the unprecedented support the Government has announced for business and workers, to protect them against the current economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic. Many are also part of museum groups or are heritage sites. Museums and heritage organisations can access over £200 million of coronavirus support schemes from Arts Council England and the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Science and discovery centres outside England may be eligible for further support from the devolved governments.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the need for sector-specific support for the wedding industry as a result of the new coronavirus measures announced on 22 September 2020.

The Chancellor has laid out the Government’s Winter Recovery Plan. This includes measures to support businesses, such as extending the current government-backed loan schemes and introducing the Pay as You Grow and Job Support Schemes. There are also specific measures to support the self-employed, such as the SEISS Grant Extension.

13th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many contractors working for his Department have had their employment status assessed in relation to the new IR35 rules on off-payroll working; and how many of those staff are subject to those rules.

The Department conducts IR35 status determinations on all its self-employed contractor roles. The status determination is based on HMRC’s Check Employment Status for Tax tool, as well as HMRC guidance on finance risk, control, and supervision over the worker and right to substitution. The Department then uses its agencies to recruit based on the job description and IR35 status.

For 2018-19, the Department employed 66 contractors, with 59 outside of scope of IR35.

IR35 statistics relating to self-employment are published in the Department’s annual report and accounts at: beis-annual-report-accounts-2018-2019.

29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what her planned timetable is to respond to her Department's consultation on Measures relating to the land-based gambling sector.

The Department’s consultation on measures relating to the land-based gambling sector sought further views on a number of key policy proposals within the Gambling Act Review white paper. A response detailing the government’s position across each area will be published in due course.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many people over the age of 75 have been subject to court action for the non-payment of TV Licence in each of the last five years.

Collecting and enforcing the Licence Fee is the responsibility of the BBC. The BBC has recently confirmed that no enforcement action has been taken against over-75s for TV licence evasion at this stage.

The Government has been clear that the BBC must ensure that it supports those affected by its decision on the over-75s concession, and we expect them to do so with the utmost sensitivity.

13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the data on Ministerial travel for her Department, January to March 2023, last updated on 27 July 2023, how much was spent for the visit by the Minister of State for Media, Tourism and Creative Industries to Barcelona from 27 February to 1 March on (a) flights and (b) accommodation.

Minister Lopez travelled to Barcelona to attend Mobile World Congress. The return flight cost £334.46 and her accommodation cost £928.54.

9th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to implement the policies in the white paper entitled High stakes: gambling reform for the digital age, published on 27 April 2023.

Our white paper set out a range of proportionate measures to tackle practices and products which can drive harm and ensure that people who are at risk of gambling harm and addiction are protected. These include new player protection checks, a stake limit for online slots games, improvements to consumer redress and a statutory levy on operators to fund research, education and treatment.

We are working with the Gambling Commission and other stakeholders to bring these measures into force as soon as possible, subject to further consultation where appropriate. The Government will publish a number of targeted consultations this summer, with the Commission also consulting on a number of priority areas.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will publish the guidance her Department uses for diversity network events which require checks on external speakers prior to inviting them to participate in Civil Service events.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport follows guidance provided by the Civil Service HR Inclusive Practice team at the Cabinet Office. It is imperative that we retain impartiality across the Civil Service, avoiding any politicised events or groups impacting on the working life of civil servants.

29th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 3 March 2023 to Question 155151 on the Minimum Wage, if he will publish the name of the company which received that contract.

In the last 3 years, the Department has awarded contracts to Hays Specialist Recruitment for the supply of specialist workers, through regulated government frameworks.

In line with government transparency policy, the Department has published details of contracts awarded to Hays Specialist Recruitment to Contracts Finder. This information is therefore in the public domain.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
3rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many over 75's have been subject to court action for the non-payment of TV Licence in each of the last three years for which data is available.

Collecting and enforcing the Licence Fee is the responsibility of the BBC. The BBC has recently confirmed that no enforcement action has been taken against over-75s for TV licence evasion at this stage.

The Government has been clear that the BBC must ensure that it supports those affected by its decision on the over-75s concession, and we expect them to do so with the utmost sensitivity.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
7th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the timetable is for the publication of the gambling review White Paper.

The Gambling Act Review is an extensive evidence-led review, which aims to ensure regulation is fit for the digital age. We will publish a White Paper setting out our vision and next steps in the coming weeks.

14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if his Department will make a comparative assessment of the adequacy of the level of IT skills possessed by the workforce in (a) the UK and (b) other members of the G7.

The latest economic statistics show that there are now 1.81 million people working in the Digital Sector in the UK. The number of people working in digital occupations, which require advanced digital (i.e. IT) skills such as computer programming, has increased by 54% since September 2020.

Digital skills covers a broad range of competencies, knowledge and skills. DCMS commissioned research found that over 83% of job adverts require digital skills, which includes baseline digital skills such as using productivity software tools, as well as specialist digital skills such as programming and data science.

Countries adopt different approaches to evaluating the level of digital skills possessed by their workforces. Comparative data from the World Economic Forum indicates that digital skills among the active population in the UK is 58%, placing the UK 4th relative to other members of the G7.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an estimate of the proportion of households that have access to broadband in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency as of 10 October 2022.

According to the website ThinkBroadband, 88.9% of premises in the Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency have access to gigabit-capable broadband. This is above the national average of 71%.

Furthermore, 99% of premises in the constituency have access to superfast broadband (speeds in excess of 30 Megabits per second). Superfast broadband speeds should allow residents to work from home and stream high definition content simultaneously on multiple devices.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 17 May 2022 to Question 808 on Gambling, when she will publish the Gambling Review White Paper.

I refer the Honourable Member to the answer I gave on 13 June to Question UIN 13827.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the timetable is for the publication of the forthcoming Gambling Review White Paper.

The Gambling Act Review is wide-ranging and aims to ensure that the regulation of gambling is fit for the digital age. We will publish a white paper setting out our conclusions and next steps in the coming weeks.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she has taken to progress the publication of the forthcoming Gambling Review White Paper.

The Gambling Act Review is wide-ranging and aims to ensure that the regulation of gambling is fit for the digital age. We will publish a white paper setting out our conclusions and next steps in the coming months.

Ministers and officials have meetings with various stakeholders to support ongoing work and policy development. There has also been a wide-ranging series of meetings to support the Gambling Act Review, including with representatives of the racing industry. Records of ministerial meetings are published quarterly and are available on GOV.UK.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 20 January 2022 to Question 104346 on Television Licences: Older People, what discussions she has had with the BBC in relation to the conduct of Capita in enforcing payment of the TV Licence from people who are over 75.

The Secretary of State has raised the issue of enforcement action against the over-75s for TV Licence Fee evasion with the BBC.

The BBC has confirmed that no enforcement action has been taken against over-75s for TV licence evasion at this stage.

The Secretary of State has been clear that the BBC must ensure that it supports those affected by its decision on the over-75s concession and we expect them to do so with the utmost sensitivity.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate she has made of the number of demand letters for non-payment of the TV Licence fee that have been sent to people who are over 75 years of age.

More than nine in ten over-75s customers have now made arrangements for a free or paid licence, or updated the BBC on a change in their circumstances. The BBC has provided assurances to the government that its letter writing policy has not changed since the over-75s concession was removed.

The Secretary of State has been clear that the BBC must ensure that it supports those affected by its decision on the over-75s concession and we expect them to do so with the utmost sensitivity.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has had recent discussions with Capita on collecting non-payment of TV Licence fines from people who are over 75.

The Government has not had any recent discussions with Capita on the issue of TV Licencing. Responsibility for collecting and enforcing the Licence Fee is the responsibility of the BBC.

We expect the BBC to ensure that it supports those affected by its decision on the over-75s concession with the utmost sensitivity.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with relevant stakeholders on a potential Great Exhibition project; and if he will make a statement.

The Secretary of State has had no such meetings. For meetings conducted by the previous Secretary of State please see the answer to Written Parliamentary Question 98965.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to reply to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Ellesmere Port and Neston of 20 September 2021 regarding a constituent's case and the music industry.

A response was issued on 6 December 2021 under the case reference MC2021/17134. We apologise for the delay in responding.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions (a) Ministers and (b) officials in her Department have had with PRS for Music on matters relating to the music industry and artists.

DCMS ministers and officials are regularly in contact with a number of stakeholders across the music sector on a range of issues, and this includes PRS for Music.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 Terms of Reference and Call for Evidence, published in December 2020, what his timetable is for concluding that review following the call for evidence which closed on 31 March 2021.

Our Gambling Act Review call for evidence received c.16,000 submissions from a range of stakeholders and members of the public, which we are considering carefully. The Government will publish a white paper setting out and consulting on next steps in the coming months.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many and what proportion of Union Jack flags purchased by her Department in each of the last two years were manufactured in the UK.

All of the 67 Union Flags purchased by the Department in the last two years have been manufactured in the UK.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, which companies have supplied Union Jack flags to his Department since 2019.

Since 2019 all of the Union flags that have been supplied to the Department have been provided by The Flag Consultancy, a subcontractor of Arcadis, who are contracted to deliver flags and flag services under the current Event Management Services Contract.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the absence of pricing standards and regulation for fixed wireless operators on digital exclusion.

Pricing regulation in the telecoms sector is a matter for Ofcom, the independent regulator. However, most providers of fixed wireless access price their services in line with comparable fixed line services and on a national basis.

In 2019 the Government issued Ofcom with a Statement of Strategic Priorities for telecommunications to which it must have regard when exercising its regulatory functions. This includes tackling harmful industry practices and improving the support available to vulnerable consumers.

In order to tackle digital exclusion we have introduced the Broadband Universal Service Obligation to provide a digital safety net, ensuring a minimum level of service to participate in society and the economy, based on information provided by Ofcom. The USO came into effect on 20 March 2020, providing consumers with a legal right to request a decent broadband service, providing download speeds of at least 10 Mbps and upload speeds of 1Mbps. Whilst there is still more to do, the evidence suggests this approach is working as Ofcom’s Online Nations 2021 report showed that people are using online services more than ever with the number of UK homes with internet access increasing to about 94%.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment has been made of the cost of fixed wireless internet access in households where fibre broadband is not accessible.

There is now a thriving market of over 80 providers rolling out gigabit broadband all over the UK and 46% of premises currently have access. Furthermore 96% of the UK have access to superfast broadband services, one of the highest in Europe. Some premises in the UK may be served by broadband provided over a wireless network (known as fixed wireless access, or FWA), using either a mobile network or a dedicated network.

The pricing of fixed wireless internet access services is typically defined by most providers on a national basis, and does not vary depending on whether fibre broadband is available or not. Analysis suggests that pricing is comparable with fixed line services. These services are made available by providers where they have coverage and capacity to do so. Consumers can compare fixed wireless access products through various price comparison and other consumer websites, and both MNOs and Wireless Internet Service Providers (WISPs) offer a range of services and prices to suit consumer needs.

19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the timetable is for the findings of the Independent Inquiry into Football Index to be published.

The Secretary of State has appointed Malcolm Sheehan QC to lead the independent review into the regulation of BetIndex Limited, the operators of Football index. The review is expected to provide a report for publication in the summer. Its findings will form part of the evidence informing the government’s ongoing Review of the Gambling Act 2005, which was announced in December 2020.

9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 29 June 2021 to Question 21254 on broadband: rural areas, what the contracted investment ratios are for each superfast contract across the country.

The public investment percentages for each superfast contract are set out in the attached table. All elements of public funding not provided by BDUK are classed as Local Body funding, who will in turn have agreements in place with their respective funding partners. The public investment ratios can change through the life of a contract through contract changes or as a result of any underspends.

8th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the provision of subtitles on catch up TV platforms.

The government recognises that as part of a digitally inclusive society, television content should be accessible for all UK audiences. The Digital Economy Act 2017 introduced new provisions to the Communications Act 2003 giving the Secretary of State the power to establish new accessibility requirements - including subtitling - for on-demand providers.

Ofcom published further recommendations on 9 July 2021, following a request made by this Government and a public consultation. We will give careful consideration to these and will set out next steps in due course.

23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the £825 million owed by BT to his Department following rural broadband upgrades has been returned; and how much of that funding has been re-invested to complete rural upgrades.

£825m is BT's current forecast of clawback repayments due over the terms of the respective contracts awarded under the Superfast programme, not a figure that is owed immediately.

Contractually, take-up clawback can be placed in an account held by the supplier for up to the full seven years of the contract's term. An early release of these clawbacks was agreed to be reinvested through the programme of up to £129m for the furtherance of the programme's objectives.

Returned funding beyond this will be apportioned to the public investors in each superfast contract across the country in line with contracted investment ratios and the public investors in turn will need to decide how they wish to utilise this funding.

19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much has been invested in the delivery of super-fast broadband by constituency for each year since 2015.

DCMS does not hold information on spend on superfast broadband at constituency level. Spend within superfast broadband project areas in England is summarised in the below table:

DCMS Investment in the delivery of Superfast Broadband from financial year 2015/16

Financial year = April to March

Negative amounts represent unused funding returned to DCMS.

County

2015/16 £m

2016/17 £m

2017/18 £m

2018/19 £m

2019/20 £m

2020/21 £m

South Yorkshire

0.85

2.37

1.21

3.21

1.98

-

Bedfordshire and Milton Keynes

0.70

0.08

2.38

1.31

1.13

0.62

Cheshire

1.35

2.29

0.08

-

-

-

Cornwall

-

2.29

0.84

1.40

1.43

-

Cumbria

8.06

4.21

1.60

-

-

-

Derbyshire

6.47

1.58

0.61

-

-

-

Dorset

5.66

-

1.30

0.16

1.84

-

Durham

4.38

1.40

1.28

-

0.33

-

East Riding of Yorkshire

2.17

1.92

2.39

1.60

-

-

East Sussex

5.18

2.00

1.00

-

-

-

Essex

3.01

2.67

2.43

1.20

0.96

0.54

Hampshire

2.22

2.64

4.51

2.05

-

-

Herefordshire & Gloucestershire

9.72

0.06

1.50

0.65

0.73

4.05

Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire

0.22

2.03

2.81

0.30

-

-

Isle of Wight

1.34

(0.93)

(0.01)

-

-

-

Kent

0.62

3.38

1.68

-

-

-

Lancashire

2.10

0.47

2.44

0.93

-

-

West Yorkshire

0.35

1.04

-

-

-

-

Leicestershire

0.42

0.94

3.61

-

-

-

Lincolnshire

5.94

0.68

-

-

-

-

Merseyside

2.70

-

-

-

-

-

Norfolk

2.70

-

3.41

4.40

-

-

North Lincolnshire

0.39

1.10

-

0.40

-

-

Northamptonshire

0.49

3.18

0.13

0.85

0.85

-

Northumberland

4.24

1.58

1.42

-

-

-

Nottinghamshire

3.49

2.63

-

-

0.55

0.17

North Yorkshire

-

-

-

1.14

6.18

-

Oxfordshire

4.12

-

-

-

-

-

Rutland

-

0.18

-

-

-

-

Black Country

2.19

0.71

0.09

-

-

(0.08)

Shropshire

3.01

0.10

2.89

2.03

4.25

0.73

Devon & Somerset

17.97

1.01

-

1.36

1.09

0.42

South Gloucestershire

0.05

0.46

-

0.11

1.58

0.46

Staffordshire

1.43

1.85

0.33

-

-

-

Greater Manchester

0.85

-

-

-

-

-

Suffolk

1.41

-

-

13.85

-

-

Swindon

0.19

0.54

-

0.20

-

-

Telford & Wrekin

0.13

0.28

1.75

-

-

(0.05)

Warwickshire

0.99

2.83

1.12

0.67

1.62

2.27

Berkshire

1.35

0.72

0.57

0.10

0.94

-

West Sussex

2.04

0.92

0.33

-

-

-

West Oxfordshire

-

-

-

-

1.60

-

West Yorkshire

-

1.44

2.08

2.71

0.06

-

Wiltshire

0.05

2.22

0.33

0.07

0.53

0.58

Worcestershire

1.39

2.39

-

0.02

0.87

0.61

Funding for delivery in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland was provided through funding transfers to the devolved administration governments. The devolved administrations in turn manage deployment and funding delivery in each of the nations. In the period 2015/16 to 2020/21 the relevant funding transfers were: Scotland £50.99m; Wales £12.11m; Northern Ireland £11.45m.

The total DCMS investment in the Superfast Broadband Programme to date across the UK as whole is £737m from the start of the programme in 2011.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of (a) support and (b) opportunities for disabled children in gymnastics.

The Government recognises the importance of ensuring support and opportunities for sport, including gymnastics, are available disabled people. Our strategy ‘Sporting Future’ sets out a clear ambition to increase levels of physical activity amongst under-represented groups, working closely with the sector to achieve this.

DCMS welcomes the recent formation of the British Gymnastics Disability Gymnastics Panel which aims to provide more opportunities for disabled participants, with the group seeking to influence, shape and drive inclusive opportunities in gymnastics.

Sport England, DCMS's arm’s length body for grassroots sport in England, recently launched their new ten year strategy, ‘Uniting the Movement’. The strategy reinforces their commitment to tackle inequalities in sport and physical activity, and provide opportunities to people that have traditionally been left behind, including disabled people. Sport England’s Active Lives Children surveys provide information on activity levels across a variety of sports, including gymnastics, and include data on participation by children with disabilities. The latest reports can be found here.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing Government-backed covid-19 cancellation Insurance for the live events sector.

The Government is aware of the concerns which have been raised about the challenge of securing indemnity cover for live events. My officials continue to work closely with the affected sectors to understand all barriers to reopening, including potential challenges around indemnity cover.

Understandably, the bar for considering Government intervention is set extremely high, especially in light of recent announcements including the extension to the furlough scheme and local business support. My officials are continuing to collect evidence of all of the barriers live events are facing to reopening, including access to indemnity insurance through the market.

We are keeping the situation under review and working closely with HMT on this issue to determine the appropriate and most effective response for the sector within the public health context.

11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing re-opening grants for the live events sector.

We appreciate the important role that the live events sector plays in the UK’s economy, and that the Covid-19 pandemic presents a significant challenge to this sector.

That is why we announced the unprecedented £1.57bn Culture Recovery Fund in July 2020. This includes over £800 million to almost 3800 arts, culture and heritage organisations in England, helping to support at least 75,000 jobs. Additionally, the Chancellor announced in the 2021 Budget an additional £300 million to support theatres, museums and other cultural organisations in England through the Culture Recovery Fund. This extra funding, together with other cultural support such as funding for our national museums, means that our total support package for culture during the pandemic is now approaching £2 billion.

More generally, the Prime Minister has set out the Roadmap to reopening the Economy, and the Budget has set out a ‘Restart Grant’ of up to £18,000 to over 680,000 business premises, giving them the cash certainty they need to plan ahead and safely relaunch trading over the coming months. We are also providing all English local authorities with an additional £425 million of discretionary business grant funding, on top of the £1.6 billion already allocated. Altogether, this support will cost £5 billion. This brings the total cost of cash grants provided by the Government to £25 billion.

10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many properties in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency are connected to broadband via exchange-only lines.

According to Ofcom’s 2018 Connected Nations report, 3% of UK broadband lines are exchange only lines.

Given the continued deployment of alternative networks, Ofcom estimates that the number of premises that can only receive broadband from such lines is around 1%.

Ofcom does not hold this data at a constituency level.

Matt Western
Shadow Minister (Education)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the level of disabled access and opportunities in British Gymnastics at (a) youth and (b) adult level.

Sport England’s Active Lives Adult and Children surveys provide information on activity levels across a variety of sports, including gymnastics, and include data on participation by disabled people. The latest reports can be found here.

Government recognises the importance of ensuring disabled access to sports facilities. Our sport strategy, Sporting Future, sets out a clear ambition to increase levels of physical activity, particularly amongst under-represented groups, including disabled people.

This is reinforced in Sport England’s new strategy Uniting the Movement, which sets out their 10 year vision to transform lives and communities through sport and physical activity. The strategy seeks to tackle the inequalities seen in sport and physical activity and provide opportunities to people that have traditionally been left behind, including those with a disability, helping to remove barriers to activity.

Government is also currently in the process of recruiting a new cohort of Disability and Access Ambassadors, one of whom will focus on the Sport and Physical Activity sector. The ambassador will help to drive improvements in the accessibility and quality of services and facilities in the sector for disabled people, as consumers and employees.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many properties in the UK are connected to broadband via Exchange Only lines.

According to Ofcom’s 2018 Connected Nations report, 3% of UK broadband lines are exchange only lines. Given the continued deployment of alternative networks, Ofcom estimates that the number of premises that can only receive broadband from such lines is around 1%.

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the effect gym closures and restrictions on sports during the covid-19 outbreak on mental and physical wellbeing.

Sports and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health, and are a vital weapon against coronavirus.

On Monday 4 January the Prime Minister announced a national lockdown and instructed people to stay at home to control the virus, protect the NHS and save lives. Restrictions are designed to get the R rate under control through limiting social contact and reducing transmissions. These regulations were voted on by the House on 6 January.

You can continue to exercise alone, with one other person or with your household or support bubble. This should be limited to once per day, in a public outdoor place and you should not travel outside your local area. You should maintain social distancing. Indoor and outdoor sports facilities, including gyms, must close.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish the latest scientific evidence supporting the closure of golf courses during the January 2021 covid-19 lockdown period.

Sports and physical activity, including golf, are incredibly important for our physical and mental health, and are a vital weapon against coronavirus.

The purpose of the restrictions is to reduce the time people spend outside of their homes and the number of interactions they have to an absolute minimum. The severity of the current situation means that we have been required to close all sports facilities. This is a decision that no government would want to take and we will remove the restrictions, as a priority, as soon as the public health situation allows.

The restrictions are designed to get the R rate under control through limiting social contact and reducing transmissions. All decisions made by the Government relating to the pandemic have been based on advice and guidance from health and scientific experts. These regulations were voted on by the House on 6 January.

You can continue to exercise alone, with one other person or with your household or support bubble. This should be limited to once per day, in a public outdoor place and you should not travel outside your local area. You should maintain social distancing.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions he has had with the National League Board on (a) the distribution of funds to National League Football clubs to assist with covering lost gate revenue due to the covid-19 outbreak and (b) publishing the findings of the Independent Review Panel on club funding.

The government brokered a promotional deal between the National League and Camelot in September 2020. This led to an invaluable injection of £10m support to help clubs in completing their 2020/21 season. Whilst the distribution of this funding is a matter for the National League, the government was clear in supporting the deal that it expected the proceeds to be allocated sensibly to support clubs for as long as possible. The Secretary of State has had no conversations with the National League Board on either the actual distribution of funds or the findings of the Independent Review Panel.

Separately, in November 2020 the government announced a £300m Sports Winter Survival Package. This funding aims to support major spectator sports severely impacted by covid restrictions to help them survive through the winter period. The needs of the lower tiers of the National League are being considered in relation to this support package by Sport England, who are administering the fund. Final funding decisions are being taken by an independent board.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how his Department plans to assess the effectiveness of spectators returning to football stadiums in Tier 1 and Tier 2 areas; and when a review of spectator numbers will take place.

The Government remains committed to working towards achieving football stadiums’ maximum socially distanced capacity as soon as it is safe to do so.

From Wednesday 2 December, it has been possible for fans to be readmitted to sports grounds where local COVID alert levels allow. The Government continues to be in close contact with the Sports Technology Innovation Group, formed of sporting bodies and health experts, and the Sports Grounds Safety Authority to assess the latest thinking and high-tech solutions that could enable further spectators to return.

We will continue to work with both bodies, alongside the football authorities, to determine the next steps in viably increasing spectator capacities without compromising public safety.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment has been made of the risks of covid-19 transmission during group exercise classes where covid-secure measures are in place.

As the Prime Minister said on 23 November, the national restrictions ended on Wednesday 2 December, and gyms and sport facilities will reopen across all tiers. The decision to allocate tiers is based on a range of factors and will be reviewed every 14 days.

The Prime Minister further updated the public on the Government’s COVID response on Saturday and announced tier 4 in which indoor gyms and sports facilities will need to close. In Tiers 3 and 4 we have taken further measures to limit social interactions and therefore opportunities for the virus to spread. Unfortunately in these areas group activity and exercise classes indoors are also advised against.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the risks of covid-19 transmission during tennis doubles matches between mixed households.

As the Prime Minister said on 23 November national restrictions ended on Wednesday 2 December, and gyms and sport facilities can reopen across all tiers. This means that certain leisure and sporting facilities including tennis courts and facilities are able to open subject to relevant social contact rules in each tier.

In tier 4, outdoor sports courts can remain open for individual exercise, and for people to use with others within their household, support bubble, or with one person from another household. Organised outdoor sport for under 18s and disabled people will be allowed.

As set out in the COVID Winter Plan the decision to allocate tiers is based on a range of factors and will be reviewed every 14 days. In Tier 3 and 4 areas we have taken further measures to limit social interactions and therefore opportunities for the virus to spread.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the role that bingo halls play in combating social isolation and loneliness.

A report by GambleAware in 2016 found that 94% of bingo players played because it was fun, and 85% to socialise, while 58% found it provided intellectual stimulation. As well as an opportunity to socialise, players reported it was a chance to be around other people (69%) and somewhere patrons could feel safe even when they are on their own (76%).

This government is committed to tackling loneliness, having provided around £25 million of funding as part of the £750 million charity funding package to organisations which deliver activities that tackle social isolation and loneliness. We have inspired organisations to take action, establishing the Tackling Loneliness Network in June 2020 and encouraged people to reach out to others through our campaign 'Let's Talk Loneliness’.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of encouraging broadcasters to broadcast remaining Premier League fixtures played this season as free to air broadcasts.

The Government recognises the importance to the country and to the wider football economy of the return of Premier League football matches, played behind closed doors, when it is safe to do so. The Government believes it could be helpful in discouraging people from leaving home to watch matches during the coronavirus emergency if some games and more highlights were available free to air. The Government is in talks with the English Premier League and broadcasters about a safe return to playing out the season, including the potential for free-to-air matches, and will provide an update in due course.

15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he is taking steps to investigate the Saudi Government’s purchase of Newcastle United Football Club.

The sale is a matter for the parties concerned, and for the Premier League to assess under its Owners’ and Directors’ Test. As such no steps are being taken.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many contractors working for his Department have had their employment status assessed in relation to the new IR35 rules on off-payroll working; and how many of those staff are subject to those rules.

DCMS assess employment statuses for tax purposes according to the 2017 IR35 amendment. We are currently engaged with 37 contractors, of which 14 are currently in scope of the IR35 tax legislation.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 14 January 2020 to Question 489, when the Information Commission will provide its final update on the use of personal data in political campaigns to the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee.

The Information Commissioner’s Office has indicated it will provide the Committee with its final update at the Information Commissioner’s next appearance at the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee. A date for this has not been confirmed yet.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to prevent the concealed microtargeting of people's data.

The Data Protection Act 2018 introduced tighter regulation of the way that personal data is collected, stored and processed and includes safeguards such as the right to be forgotten.

Our future work on online targeting will be informed by independent expert advice, including the review of Online Targeting published by the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation on 4 February 2020. The report includes a set of formal recommendations to the government, which we will respond to within six months.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions the Minister for Digital and Broadband has had with the transparency working group.

Ministers and officials have regular meetings and discussions with stakeholders including those at the multi-stakeholder Transparency Working Group. Details of Ministerial meetings are published quarterly on the Gov.uk website.

The Transparency Working Group includes representatives from a wide range of organisations with an interest in transparency reporting in relation to online harms. The first meeting of the Transparency Working Group was chaired by the Minister for Digital and Broadband. Following the recent change in ministerial portfolios, the group will now be chaired by the Minister for Digital and Culture.


This group will feed into the government’s transparency report, which was announced in the Online Harms White Paper and which we intend to publish in the coming months.

13th Feb 2020
What recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the governance of premier league football clubs.

Football clubs are the heart of local communities, they have unique social value and many with a great history. It is vital they are protected and fans should have their voices heard.

The governance of football is first and foremost a matter for the relevant authorities, in this case the Premier League and the Football Association. These bodies have a duty to govern the sport and provide assurances to fans, players and indeed employees, that proper protections are in place.

However, we have committed to a fan led review of football governance, which will include consideration of the Owners’ and Directors’ test, to ensure we protect the game for fans.

We will liaise closely with fan representatives and the football authorities as we decide the scope and structure of this work.

8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her planned timetable is for the completion of the long-term removal of reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete in school buildings in cases where a (a) capital grant is provided and (b) rebuilding project is agreed.

The government is funding the removal of RAAC present in school and colleges either through grants, or through the School Rebuilding Programme. A list of education settings with confirmed RAAC and the funding route to remove RAAC was published on 8 February 2024, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reinforced-autoclaved-aerated-concrete-raac-management-information.

The longer-term requirements of each school or college will vary depending on the extent of the issue and nature and design of the buildings. Permanently removing RAAC may involve refurbishment of existing buildings such as replacing the roof or rebuilding affected buildings. For schools joining the School Rebuilding Programme, schools are prioritised for delivery according to the condition need of their buildings, readiness to proceed, and efficiency of delivery. For schools and colleges receiving grants, the department will work with the responsible bodies to support them through the grants process as they undertake the buildings works to remove RAAC permanently. The department is working with responsible bodies to take forward this work as quickly as possible.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a funding mechanism for pay in further education that is separate to per-pupil funding.

Colleges and other Further Education (FE) providers are responsible for setting the pay of their teaching and support staff. The government plays no role in this process. Colleges and other providers can make their own decisions about teacher pay in light of their own recruitment and retention needs and local skills priorities.

The department is investing an additional £185 million in the 2023/24 financial year and £285 million in the 2024/25 financial year to drive forward skills delivery within the sector. This funding is to help colleges and other providers to address their key priorities, including tackling recruitment and retention issues in high-value subject areas critical to our economy.

For academic year 2023/24 there is an 8.3% increase in the average 16-19 programme funding per student compared to academic year 2022/23. This funding supports colleges and other providers with staffing and other delivery costs.

The 2021 Spending Review set out an investment of £3.8 billion in skills across this Parliament to enable learners to access the skills and training they need to transform their lives.

The department is also delivering a programme to directly support the sector to recruit excellent staff, which includes a national recruitment campaign; strengthening and incentivising the uptake of initial teacher education, including through teacher training bursaries in priority subjects worth up to £29,000 each (tax free for 2023/24); and Taking Teaching Further, a programme that supports FE providers to recruit and provide early career support to those with relevant knowledge and industry experience to retrain as FE teachers.

To boost the recruitment and retention of teachers, we will also give eligible early career teachers in key science, technology, english and mathematics and technical shortage subjects, working in disadvantaged schools and colleges, up to £6,000 after tax annually on top of their pay. This will double the existing Levelling Up Premium paid to school teachers and extend it to all FE colleges for the first time.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department is taking steps to help ensure that increases in Further Education funding are used to (a) address recruitment and retention and (b) support colleges’ abilities to deliver on skills policy.

Colleges and other further education (FE) providers are responsible for setting the pay of their teaching and support staff. The government plays no role in this process.

The department is investing an additional £185 million in the 2023/2024 financial year and £285 million in the 2024/25 financial year to drive forward skills delivery in the further education sector.

This funding is to help colleges and other providers to address their key priorities, particularly tackling recruitment and retention issues in high-value subject areas critical to the economy.

This investment is being delivered via core 16 to 19 funding, including through boosting programme cost weightings for higher-cost subject areas, as well as increasing the per-student funding rate.

This investment is additional to the £125 million of funding the department has made available in the 2023/24 financial year to boost the national 16 to 19 funding rate and subject-specific funding. This means 16 to 19 providers are seeing a larger than expected increase to funding rates.

For the 2023/24 academic year, there is a 8.3% increase in the average 16 to 19 programme funding per student funding compared to the 2022/23 academic year.

The department is also delivering a programme to directly support the sector to recruit excellent staff, which includes a national recruitment campaign. The department is also strengthening and incentivising the uptake of initial teacher education, for example through teacher training bursaries in priority subjects worth up to £29,000 each, tax free for 2023/24.

To boost recruitment and retention of teachers, the department will give early career teachers in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and technical shortage subjects, working in disadvantaged schools and colleges, up to £6,000 after tax annually on top of their pay. This will double the existing Levelling Up Premium paid to school teachers, and extend it to all FE colleges for the first time.

The Spending Review 2021 set out an investment of £3.8 billion in skills across this Parliament to enable learners to access the skills and training they need to transform their lives.

Each year, the department holds annual strategic conversations (ASCs) with each college in England where we meet the colleges senior leadership team. ASCs build upon the government’s response to the recommendations made in Dame Mary Ney’s Review of Financial Oversight of FE Colleges and the FE White Paper. Through the regular dialogue of ASCs and termly delivery conversations (TDCs), the department has established effective relationships with each of its statutory FE providers. This has enabled the department to develop a holistic view of each institution. With a clear focus on the priorities for development of skills provision, the ASCs and TDCs are informing both the department’s deployment of advice and practical support to colleges, and its wider policy and decision making.

Investment is also continuing in leadership and management development, which supports retention of staff. The Further Education Commissioner and her team are supporting the sharing of effective practice to enable delivery to be as efficient as possible whilst remaining high quality.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will take steps to ensure that additional funding for pay rises for support staff in further education colleges will be used for that purpose.

Colleges and other further education (FE) providers are responsible for setting the pay of their teaching and support staff. The government plays no role in this process.

The department is investing an additional £185 million in the 2023/2024 financial year and £285 million in the 2024/25 financial year to drive forward skills delivery in the further education sector.

This funding is to help colleges and other providers to address their key priorities, particularly tackling recruitment and retention issues in high-value subject areas critical to the economy.

This investment is being delivered via core 16 to 19 funding, including through boosting programme cost weightings for higher-cost subject areas, as well as increasing the per-student funding rate.

This investment is additional to the £125 million of funding the department has made available in the 2023/24 financial year to boost the national 16 to 19 funding rate and subject-specific funding. This means 16 to 19 providers are seeing a larger than expected increase to funding rates.

For the 2023/24 academic year, there is a 8.3% increase in the average 16 to 19 programme funding per student funding compared to the 2022/23 academic year.

The department is also delivering a programme to directly support the sector to recruit excellent staff, which includes a national recruitment campaign. The department is also strengthening and incentivising the uptake of initial teacher education, for example through teacher training bursaries in priority subjects worth up to £29,000 each, tax free for 2023/24.

To boost recruitment and retention of teachers, the department will give early career teachers in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and technical shortage subjects, working in disadvantaged schools and colleges, up to £6,000 after tax annually on top of their pay. This will double the existing Levelling Up Premium paid to school teachers, and extend it to all FE colleges for the first time.

The Spending Review 2021 set out an investment of £3.8 billion in skills across this Parliament to enable learners to access the skills and training they need to transform their lives.

Each year, the department holds annual strategic conversations (ASCs) with each college in England where we meet the colleges senior leadership team. ASCs build upon the government’s response to the recommendations made in Dame Mary Ney’s Review of Financial Oversight of FE Colleges and the FE White Paper. Through the regular dialogue of ASCs and termly delivery conversations (TDCs), the department has established effective relationships with each of its statutory FE providers. This has enabled the department to develop a holistic view of each institution. With a clear focus on the priorities for development of skills provision, the ASCs and TDCs are informing both the department’s deployment of advice and practical support to colleges, and its wider policy and decision making.

Investment is also continuing in leadership and management development, which supports retention of staff. The Further Education Commissioner and her team are supporting the sharing of effective practice to enable delivery to be as efficient as possible whilst remaining high quality.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
12th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Answer of 19 September 2023 to Question198717 on Free School Meals, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that schools continue to be able to provide healthy meals; and what discussions his Department has had with schools on whether they can provide these meals within the agreed budgets.

The department spends over £1 billion on the provision of free meals. Schools currently attract £480 annually through the free school meals (FSM) factor of the national funding formula, in respect of FSM-eligible pupils. This is increasing to £490 in 2024/25.

In addition to this, schools are currently plaid a meal rate of £2.53 to support the provision of Universal infant FSM.

The department continues to keep funding under review and regularly meet with stakeholders to monitor issues in this sector, including food industry representatives, school leaders and pupils.

Further to this, the department supports the provision of nutritious food in schools through ‘The Requirements for School Food Regulations’ (2014), which require schools to provide children with healthy food and drink options, and to make sure that children get the energy and nutrition they need across the school day. These regulations are available at: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/1603/contents/made.

The school food standards restrict foods high in fat, salt and sugar, as well as low quality reformed or reconstituted foods. Compliance with the school food standards is mandatory for all maintained schools, academies and free schools.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
11th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she plans to allow discretion in (a) grading and (b) OFSTED inspections for schools affected by RAAC.

An updated list of schools and colleges with confirmed cases of RAAC was published on 6 December, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reinforced-autoclaved-aerated-concrete-raac-management-information.

The department has committed to remove RAAC from the school estate. This will be delivered through capital grants or the School Rebuilding Programme. The department will set out further details in due course.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) is providing support to Responsible Bodies with revenue funding to cover a range of RAAC-related costs, including lost income due to cancelled lettings. Affected Responsible Bodies should contact their RAAC caseworker to discuss any revenue needs including lost income, so that support from the ESFA can be sought as soon as possible.

​​On grading, the department’s focus is on supporting schools and colleges to put in place suitable mitigations to minimise disruption to learning. Officials in the department have also been working hard to ensure that any school or college that is struggling to deliver particular assessments due to RAAC receives the support they need for their specific circumstances. Officials have asked awarding organisations to agree extensions to coursework and non-examined assessment deadlines with affected schools and colleges wherever possible within the confines of their processes and regulations.

Special consideration is only given to a candidate who has temporarily experienced illness, injury or some other event outside of their control at the time of the exam or assessment. Decisions on special consideration are made by exam boards on an individual basis. The Joint Council for Qualifications’ guidance is clear that students would not be eligible for special consideration on the grounds that teaching and learning has been disrupted by building work or a lack of facilities. This is important so that employers and/or further or higher education institutions can rely on the qualification outcomes as evidence of an individual’s abilities against the published content requirements.

The department has a robust offer of support for pupils including extra education support for those who need it. The department has made more than £1 billion available to support tutoring. Since the launch of the National Tutoring Programme in November 2020, nearly four million tutoring courses have been started.

The department is investing record amounts of pupil premium funding with £2.6 billion in 2022/23 and £2.9 billion this financial year. The department also offers wider support for pupils who are disadvantaged and may need more support, such as free school meals that support 1.9 million children and the holiday activities and food programme where the department investing over £200 million a year for the next 2 years and support for 2,500 breakfast clubs.

Ofsted is avoiding scheduling school inspections during this term for schools on the department’s published list of settings affected by RAAC. For schools impacted by RAAC, but not on the list, Ofsted will carefully consider any requests for a deferral of an inspection.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
11th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate her Department has made of the number of (a) school buildings and (b) sports facilities affected by RAAC; and whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of compensating schools for lost income due to their inability to rent out such buildings.

An updated list of schools and colleges with confirmed cases of RAAC was published on 6 December, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reinforced-autoclaved-aerated-concrete-raac-management-information.

The department has committed to remove RAAC from the school estate. This will be delivered through capital grants or the School Rebuilding Programme. The department will set out further details in due course.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) is providing support to Responsible Bodies with revenue funding to cover a range of RAAC-related costs, including lost income due to cancelled lettings. Affected Responsible Bodies should contact their RAAC caseworker to discuss any revenue needs including lost income, so that support from the ESFA can be sought as soon as possible.

​​On grading, the department’s focus is on supporting schools and colleges to put in place suitable mitigations to minimise disruption to learning. Officials in the department have also been working hard to ensure that any school or college that is struggling to deliver particular assessments due to RAAC receives the support they need for their specific circumstances. Officials have asked awarding organisations to agree extensions to coursework and non-examined assessment deadlines with affected schools and colleges wherever possible within the confines of their processes and regulations.

Special consideration is only given to a candidate who has temporarily experienced illness, injury or some other event outside of their control at the time of the exam or assessment. Decisions on special consideration are made by exam boards on an individual basis. The Joint Council for Qualifications’ guidance is clear that students would not be eligible for special consideration on the grounds that teaching and learning has been disrupted by building work or a lack of facilities. This is important so that employers and/or further or higher education institutions can rely on the qualification outcomes as evidence of an individual’s abilities against the published content requirements.

The department has a robust offer of support for pupils including extra education support for those who need it. The department has made more than £1 billion available to support tutoring. Since the launch of the National Tutoring Programme in November 2020, nearly four million tutoring courses have been started.

The department is investing record amounts of pupil premium funding with £2.6 billion in 2022/23 and £2.9 billion this financial year. The department also offers wider support for pupils who are disadvantaged and may need more support, such as free school meals that support 1.9 million children and the holiday activities and food programme where the department investing over £200 million a year for the next 2 years and support for 2,500 breakfast clubs.

Ofsted is avoiding scheduling school inspections during this term for schools on the department’s published list of settings affected by RAAC. For schools impacted by RAAC, but not on the list, Ofsted will carefully consider any requests for a deferral of an inspection.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
11th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her Department's timescale is for replacing (a) school buildings and (b) sports facilities affected by RAAC; and what criteria her Department plans to use when judging the suitability of replacement buildings.

An updated list of schools and colleges with confirmed cases of RAAC was published on 6 December, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reinforced-autoclaved-aerated-concrete-raac-management-information.

The department has committed to remove RAAC from the school estate. This will be delivered through capital grants or the School Rebuilding Programme. The department will set out further details in due course.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) is providing support to Responsible Bodies with revenue funding to cover a range of RAAC-related costs, including lost income due to cancelled lettings. Affected Responsible Bodies should contact their RAAC caseworker to discuss any revenue needs including lost income, so that support from the ESFA can be sought as soon as possible.

​​On grading, the department’s focus is on supporting schools and colleges to put in place suitable mitigations to minimise disruption to learning. Officials in the department have also been working hard to ensure that any school or college that is struggling to deliver particular assessments due to RAAC receives the support they need for their specific circumstances. Officials have asked awarding organisations to agree extensions to coursework and non-examined assessment deadlines with affected schools and colleges wherever possible within the confines of their processes and regulations.

Special consideration is only given to a candidate who has temporarily experienced illness, injury or some other event outside of their control at the time of the exam or assessment. Decisions on special consideration are made by exam boards on an individual basis. The Joint Council for Qualifications’ guidance is clear that students would not be eligible for special consideration on the grounds that teaching and learning has been disrupted by building work or a lack of facilities. This is important so that employers and/or further or higher education institutions can rely on the qualification outcomes as evidence of an individual’s abilities against the published content requirements.

The department has a robust offer of support for pupils including extra education support for those who need it. The department has made more than £1 billion available to support tutoring. Since the launch of the National Tutoring Programme in November 2020, nearly four million tutoring courses have been started.

The department is investing record amounts of pupil premium funding with £2.6 billion in 2022/23 and £2.9 billion this financial year. The department also offers wider support for pupils who are disadvantaged and may need more support, such as free school meals that support 1.9 million children and the holiday activities and food programme where the department investing over £200 million a year for the next 2 years and support for 2,500 breakfast clubs.

Ofsted is avoiding scheduling school inspections during this term for schools on the department’s published list of settings affected by RAAC. For schools impacted by RAAC, but not on the list, Ofsted will carefully consider any requests for a deferral of an inspection.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
24th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her planned timetable is for having replacement buildings and sports facilities for schools affected by reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete; and what criteria will be used to assess the suitability of replacement buildings.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

24th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she plans to instruct Ofqual to give special consideration for students whose schools have been affected by RAAC.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

24th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she has had discussions with Ofsted on the potential merits of taking into account disruption to schools affected by reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete when assessing their delivery of the National Curriculum.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

19th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department plans to implement a 20% reduction target for Education Health and Care Plans as part of the Delivering Better Value in SEND programme.

The department’s Delivering Better Value (DBV) programme has no targets to reduce the number of new Education, Health and Care (EHC) plans. Decisions about individual children and young people and whether they require EHC plans must be made on an individual basis, following the processes set out in the Children and Families Act 2014. The department is protecting every parent and family’s existing legal right to an EHC plan when they need one, and that will not change.

The DBV programme is part of the wider reform work set out in detail in the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan. DBV aims to put the SEND system on a more sustainable footing by funding system transformation in up to 55 local authorities with high dedicated schools grant deficits. It does so by providing diagnostic support to each local authority to engage with its stakeholders and identify opportunities to improve services and meet children’s needs at an early stage and with the right level of support.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of providing funding for exam remarks for students on the pupil premium.

If a pupil has concerns about their exam results, they should talk to their school or college who can request that the exam board reviews the marking of their exam script.

There may be a fee for a review of marking. Any fee paid to the awarding organisation will be refunded if a grade is changed following a review or appeal. It is for the school to decide whether they will pay for the review or whether the student should be charged for this service.

Schools are entitled to use pupil premium funding to pay for a review of marking, if they think it is appropriate.

Further information on how schools should use the pupil premium to raise the education attainment of disadvantaged pupils is set out in the government guidance here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1147853/Using_pupil_premium_guidance_for_school_leaders.pdf.

17th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether there has been a reduction in Education Health Care Plans at any of the Local Authorities in Tranche 1 and 2 of the Delivering Better Value in SEND Programme.

The department’s Delivering Better Value (DBV) programme has no targets to reduce the number of new Education, Health and Care (EHC) plans. Decisions about individual children and young people and whether they require EHC plans must be made on an individual basis, following the processes set out in the Children and Families Act 2014. The department is protecting every parent and family’s existing legal right to an EHC plan when they need one, and that will not change.

The DBV programme is part of the wider reform work set out in detail in the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan. DBV aims to put the SEND system on a more sustainable footing by funding system transformation in up to 55 local authorities with high dedicated schools grant deficits. It does so by providing diagnostic support to each local authority to engage with its stakeholders and identify opportunities to improve services and meet children’s needs at an early stage and with the right level of support.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of the level of the grant paid for free school meals.

The Department recognises the cost pressures that some schools and suppliers may be facing. The Department is holding regular meetings with other Government Departments and with food industry representatives, covering a variety of issues including public sector food supplies.

The Department keeps funding under review to ensure that schools continue to be able to provide healthy and nutritious meals. The funding for the free school meals programme is increasing in 2023/24, in line with the latest available gross domestic product deflator forecast when the National Funding Formula was published in July 2022.

Universal Infant Free School Meals are funded through a direct grant to schools. The funding rate for the 2023/24 academic years stands at £2.53. This represents a 5% increase on the previous year’s rate.

9th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, to confirm how many Mental Health Support Teams are in (a) the North West and (b) Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.

Mental Health Support Teams (MHSTs) are now in place in around 6,800 schools and colleges across the country, with 398 expert teams offering support to children experiencing anxiety, depression, and other common mental health issues. Information on the delivery of MHSTs can found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1156762/Transforming_CYPMH_implementation_programme__data_release_May_2023.pdf. MHSTs have achieved their NHS Long Term Plan coverage ambition a year early, and more teams are coming, with over 500 MHSTs planned to be up and running by April 2024.

Data from NHS England shows that there are currently 58 MHSTs in the North West of England. 50 MHSTs are operational and 8 will be fully operational by April 2024. The data can be found here: https://www.england.nhs.uk/mental-health/cyp/trailblazers/#_Mental_Health_Support. Data on the number of MHSTs specifically in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency is not currently available.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
9th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has held recent discussions with universities on student mental health.

It is a priority for the government that students are provided with the mental health support they need. The department engages regularly with universities and the broader higher education (HE) sector in pursuit of this goal.

We have made clear to the sector that our approach to supporting student mental health has three pillars:

  • Funding vital services and innovative projects via the Office for Students.
  • Spreading and implementing best practice consistently across providers.
  • Clear responsibilities for providers and protection for students, with solutions developed by the Student Support Champion.

I recently met with Universities UK (UUK), who represent 115 English Universities, to inform them of the department’s ambitions for the sector on mental health going forward. On 5 June 2023, I wrote to all university leaders, asking for their strongest possible commitment to the mental health of our students, including by showing ownership of mental health at an executive level. The department set a target for universities to sign up to the Mental Health Charter by September 2024, so universities take a whole-university approach to mental health and wellbeing and follow the principles set out in the Mental Health Charter.

We also made clear to the sector that we expect them to follow relevant best practice guidance shared with them by UUK and mental health experts.

The department will be engaging with the sector on implementation of best practice through the Higher Education Mental Health Taskforce. I have asked Student Support Champion, Professor Edward Peck to lead this, working with the sector, parents and students, and mental health experts. The Taskforce will set strong, clear, and measurable targets on which HE providers will report. The Taskforce will conclude its work with a final report in May next year, having produced an interim plan by the end of this year.

I will be chairing a roundtable with university and wider HE leaders to explore how the sector can make further improvements on mental health support, working alongside mental health experts and government.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will publish the criteria used by the Office for Students to assess the suitability of candidates for its new Director for Freedom of Speech and Academic Freedom post.

The role of Director of Freedom of Speech and Academic Freedom was advertised on the Times Higher Education website.

Officials at the department managed the recruitment process. The essential and desirable criteria against which applicants were assessed were included in the job advert, which can be sent to any members interested. The department received 16 applications for the role.

An interview panel was chaired by Hannah Sheehan (Director of Higher Education Quality in the department) and joined by Lord Wharton of Yarm (Chair of the Office for Students) and Robert Colvile (Director of the Centre for Policy Studies), who joined as an independent panellist.

The Director was appointed by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, in the same way that other board members of the Office for Students are appointed under the Higher Education and Research Act 2017.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, where the post of Director of Freedom of Speech in the Office for Students was advertised; who was involved in recruitment decisions for that post; and how many people applied for that post.

The role of Director of Freedom of Speech and Academic Freedom was advertised on the Times Higher Education website.

Officials at the department managed the recruitment process. The essential and desirable criteria against which applicants were assessed were included in the job advert, which can be sent to any members interested. The department received 16 applications for the role.

An interview panel was chaired by Hannah Sheehan (Director of Higher Education Quality in the department) and joined by Lord Wharton of Yarm (Chair of the Office for Students) and Robert Colvile (Director of the Centre for Policy Studies), who joined as an independent panellist.

The Director was appointed by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, in the same way that other board members of the Office for Students are appointed under the Higher Education and Research Act 2017.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has had recent discussions with schools on their ability to support pupils experiencing mental health difficulties.

The department is helping schools and colleges to develop effective approaches to promote and support mental wellbeing, including through offering funded senior mental health lead training to all state schools and colleges by 2025. Many schools and colleges have prioritised pupil and student wellbeing since COVID-19, and increased school budgets and recovery funding can be used to support wellbeing.

The department is also increasing the number of Mental Health Support Teams (MHSTs) working with schools and colleges from 287 in 2022 to 400 in 2023, covering around 35% of pupils in England. Around 500 MHSTs are planned to be up and running in 2024.

Understanding the experience of education staff promoting and supporting the mental wellbeing of children and young people is an integral part of how we have developed and are providing support to schools and colleges. The department has regular engagement with representative bodies including discussion on mental wellbeing. We also gather insight through school and college panels and other experience surveys, and visits, along with other specific engagement with the education sector. In the latest school and college panel survey in November 2022, 73% of school teachers that responded felt they knew how to help pupils with mental health issues access support offered by their school.

Insight directly from schools and colleges has been critical to informing the roll-out of MHSTs in partnership with the NHS. User research with schools and colleges has also shaped our offer of senior mental health lead training. The department is continuing to engage schools and colleges to understand what further support would help them to effectively meet the needs of children and young people. Officials work closely with our Mental Health and Wellbeing Partnership Group of national education stakeholders to shape further support.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
22nd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 3 March 2023 to Question 155153 on the Minimum Wage, what the total value of the contracts with the firms named in the list amount to.

The total contract value for the contracts referenced in the answer to Question 155153 on the minimum wage, is currently £118,151.32.

Details of Government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder, which can be found here: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search.

28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has contracted work to a business named in round 18 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme in the last 3 years.

The Department contracted with two businesses that were named in round 18 of the National Minimum Wage Naming Scheme, one in each of the past two years.

Details of Government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder at: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search.

24th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when the School Sport and Activity Action Plan will be published.

I refer the hon. Member for Ellesmere Port and Nelson to t