Sarah Jones Portrait

Sarah Jones

Labour - Croydon Central

Shadow Minister (Home Office)

(since April 2020)
Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
12th May 2021 - 24th Jun 2021
Shadow Minister (Housing, Communities and Local Government) (Housing)
15th May 2018 - 10th Apr 2020
Home Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 18th Jun 2018


Scheduled Event
Monday 20th September 2021
22:00
Adjournment - Main Chamber
20 Sep 2021, 10 p.m.
Tram safety
Save to Calendar
View calendar
Department Event
Monday 18th October 2021
14:30
Home Office
Oral questions - Main Chamber
18 Oct 2021, 2:30 p.m.
Home Office (including Topical Questions)
Save to Calendar
View calendar
Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Investing in Children and Young People
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 193 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 224 Noes - 0
Speeches
Wednesday 15th September 2021
Oral Answers to Questions

My constituents in Bridge House, Croydon live in flats covered in dangerous cladding that will cost millions to remove. They …

Written Answers
Thursday 16th September 2021
Carbon Emissions
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the level of spending required in …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
Thursday 16th September 2021
20:28
MP Financial Interests
Monday 17th May 2021
10. Family members engaged in lobbying the public sector
My son, Joseph Jones, is a Manager at Flint Global, advising clients on policy and political issues across a range …
EDM signed
Monday 19th April 2021
Public Health
That the Health Protection (Coronavirus, International Travel) (England) (Amendment) (No. 7) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 150), dated 12 February …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 19th July 2017
Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Act 2018
To make provision about the oversight and management of the appropriate use of force in relation to people in mental …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Sarah Jones has voted in 261 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Sarah Jones Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Victoria Atkins (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
(41 debate interactions)
Kit Malthouse (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(32 debate interactions)
Sarah Champion (Labour)
(29 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(201 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(16 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(8 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Sarah Jones's debates

Croydon Central Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

The right to peaceful assembly and protest are fundamental principles of any democracy and the proposed part of this bill that gives the police new powers to tackle disruptive peaceful protests should be removed from The Policing, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill.

The Government's manifesto stated “we will make intentional trespass a criminal offence”: an extreme, illiberal & unnecessary attack on ancient freedoms that would threaten walkers, campers, and the wider public. It would further tilt the law in favour of the landowning 1% who own half the country.


Latest EDMs signed by Sarah Jones

19th April 2021
Sarah Jones signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 19th April 2021

Public Health

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That the Health Protection (Coronavirus, International Travel) (England) (Amendment) (No. 7) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 150), dated 12 February 2021, a copy of which was laid before this House on 12 February 2021, be revoked.
10 signatures
(Most recent: 19 Apr 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Green Party: 1
9th March 2021
Sarah Jones signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 9th March 2021

Public Health

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Health Protection (Coronavirus, International Travel) (England) (Amendment) (No. 7) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 150), dated 12 February 2021, a copy of which was laid before this House on 12 February 2021, be annulled.
10 signatures
(Most recent: 23 Mar 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Green Party: 1
View All Sarah Jones's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Sarah Jones, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Sarah Jones has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Sarah Jones has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Sarah Jones has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


82 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
19th Jul 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what steps he is taking to further develop financial support to help prevent loss and damage as a result of climate change ahead of the COP26 summit.

The UK Presidency is clear about the importance of developed countries meeting and surpassing the commitment to jointly mobilise $100bn of climate finance per year through to 2025, from a range of public and private sources.

At COP25, countries highlighted that existing sources of funds from a wide variety of sources, including disaster reduction and response funds, respond to loss and damage. They also urged donors and these other funds to scale up support relevant to averting, minimising and addressing loss and damage in the most vulnerable countries. At COP26 and in the run up, we will push for progress on these actions and renew calls for coherent action using climate, development and disaster preparedness and response finance.

Through the COP26 Presidency, we are also calling for greater quantity, quality and access to finance and for responses to be joined up. The Taskforce on Access to Finance aims to align support behind the national climate action plans of developing countries to improve access to climate finance. The outcomes will be to agree a new approach to access, marshalling coherent, programmatic support for countries’ own, nationally-determined climate priorities, alongside specific, implementable recommendations to address the system of climate finance as a whole which includes enabling them to better prepare, build resilience and respond to disasters - averting, minimising and addressing loss and damage.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department's policy is on changing market rules to enable community energy groups to supply renewable energy on a local basis; and what steps his Department is taking to support local renewable electricity generation as a way of meeting the UK's Carbon Budget.

The current Ofgem regulatory regime allows for a company to supply a specified geographic area, and small scale electricity operations may be able to operate without being regulated by Ofgem.

We are supporting community energy through the Rural Community Energy Fund and there are already mechanisms in the market to allow local supply. We will work with Ofgem to ensure that local communities can play their role in delivering Net Zero and a Green Recovery.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Green Alliance's report entitled Getting the building blocks right Infrastructure priorities for a green recovery, published on 11 November 2020, whether the Government has made an assessment of whether there is an investment gap as cited in that report in helping the Government to reach its net-zero target; and if he will make a statement.

Delivering net zero requires the deep decarbonisation of all sectors – with the CCC estimating that low carbon investment should reach £50 billion a year by 2050. Financial services will be a critical enabler of green investment at the pace and scale required – and that is why green finance is a key priority for this Government. Our approach has seen the UK power sector attract over £93 billion of green investment since 2010.

Spanning clean energy, buildings, transport, nature and innovative technologies, the 10 Point Plan has committed £12 billion of government investment and will unlock three times as much from the private sector by 2030. The Government has also recently launched a new infrastructure bank for the UK which will co-invest alongside private sector investors and accelerate our ambitions for tackling climate change and levelling up. The UK Infrastructure Bank will have an initial £12 billion of capital to deploy and will be able to issue £10 billion of government guarantees, helping to unlock more than £40 billion of overall investment. This year the Government will also issue its first Sovereign Green Bond - subject to market conditions – helping to finance projects that will tackle climate change.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the G7 Climate and Environment: Ministers’ Communiqué, published on 21 May 2021, when the long-term strategy for the UK’s pathway to zero greenhouse emissions by 2050 will be published.

The Net Zero Strategy will be published before COP26, and will build on my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution. This will be our Long-Term Low Emission Development Strategy to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in our information to facilitate clarity, transparency and understanding that accompanied the UK’s new nationally determined contribution back in December.

A number of sector strategies are also being published this year, as well as the Net Zero Strategy, including the Heat and Buildings Strategy and the Hydrogen Strategy.

We have also recently published the Transport Decarbonisation Plan – the first such Plan in the world – setting transport on the path to net zero by 2050.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what policies his Department (a) has proposed and (b) plans to propose to help the Government meet the 2050 net zero target. ​

My Rt. Hon. Friemd the Prime Minister has set out his Ten Point Plan for the UK to lead the world into a Green Industrial Revolution. This innovative programme sets out ambitious policies and £12 billion government investment to support up to 250,000 green jobs, accelerate our path to reaching net zero by 2050 and lay the foundations for our green recovery by building back greener from COVID-19.

The Energy White Paper sets out our plans for the transformation of our energy system, including actions to fully decarbonise electricity generation by 2050. This drives forward the Ten Point Plan commitments, reaffirming how clean energy means jobs and economic growth for the whole country, moving on from COVID-19 to build back better, support green jobs, and accelerate our path to net zero.

In March this year we published the Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy, the first by a major economy which sets out how industry can decarbonise in line with net zero while remaining competitive and without pushing emissions abroad. The strategy includes ambitions and expectations such as emissions in industry needing to fall by around two thirds by 2035, as well as policy priorities for the next ten years and seeks to provide industry with the long-term certainty it needs to invest in decarbonisation. We also recently published the Transport Decarbonisation Plan – the first such Plan in the world – setting transport on the path to net zero by 2050.

Through the above plans, we have set out the concrete steps that we will take to build back greener from the pandemic and reach net zero emissions by 2050. Ahead of COP26, we will bring forward further bold proposals, including a Net Zero Strategy, to cut emissions and create new jobs and industries across the whole country.

We are also publishing a number of sector strategies this year, as well as the Net Zero Strategy, including the Heat and Buildings Strategy and a Hydrogen Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many home owners have applied successfully to the Green Home Grants scheme from Croydon Central constituency, to date.

Official statistics for the Green Homes Grant (Voucher) Scheme were released on 18 March. From this release, 64 applications were received from households in the Croydon Central Parliamentary Constituency, up to the end of February.

The next statistical release will be published on 22 April.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what progress has been made on banning the installation of fossil fuel boilers by 2025 in new build homes.

The Government is committed to achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. We are clear that the continued use of fossil fuels for heating is not compatible with that ambition.

When it is implemented in 2025, the Future Homes Standard will ensure that all new build homes are zero carbon ready. While building regulations themselves do not mandate or ban the use of any specific technologies, we intend to set the performance standard at a level which means that new homes will not be built with fossil fuel heating.

In line with that ambition, the 2020 Energy White Paper committed to consulting on whether it is appropriate to end gas grid connections to new build homes from 2025, in favour of clean energy alternatives. We will provide more detail on the Government’s approach in our Heat and Buildings Strategy, which we will publish in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will ensure that insulation products used in the public sector decarbonisation scheme are aligned with the Government ban on combustible materials.

The Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme will invest £1 billion by giving grants to public sector bodies to fund energy efficiency and low carbon heat measures, supporting up to 30,000 skilled jobs.

All measures installed using the scheme must comply with all relevant legislation.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to support hydrogen development as a sustainable energy resource in order to meet the Government's pledge to become carbon neutral by 2050.

The Government is committed to exploring the development of hydrogen as a strategic decarbonised energy carrier, alongside electricity and other decarbonised gases. We are investing in innovation, with up to £108m supporting a range of projects to explore and develop the potential of low carbon hydrogen across the value chain from production to end use. We are investing in production at scale through the development of the £100m Low Carbon Hydrogen Production Fund, announced in 2019, and developing sustainable business models to support low carbon hydrogen production at scale. Alongside this we are working with a range of stakeholders to develop opportunities for scale up of UK hydrogen, notably through the Industrial Clusters Mission and the Offshore Wind Sector Deal.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
5th May 2020
What steps he is taking to ensure that the attainment gap between disadvantaged children and their peers does not widen during the covid-19 outbreak.

The government has already committed over £100 million to boost remote education, including by providing devices and internet access to vulnerable children who need it most.

Schools also continue to receive the pupil premium – worth around £2.4 billion annually – to help them support their disadvantaged pupils.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Government's commitment to increase tree planting across the UK to 30,000 hectares per year by 2025 set out in the England Tree Strategy consultation document published in June 2020, how many trees have been planted to date; whether those trees are (a) whips or (b) adult trees; where he plans to plant trees in the future; whether he plans to plant trees in Croydon; who will be responsible for maintaining those trees; and which Minister is accountable for that programme.

The Forestry Commission produces statistics on new planting of woodland for the UK. These are Official Statistics produced to meet the standards of the Code of Practice for Statistics and can be found on the Forest Research web site together with background information at: https://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/tools-and-resources/statistics/forestry-statistics/. The statistics are produced annually and show recorded new planting from administrative records and grant schemes with estimates for planting without grant aid. It is assumed nearly all the trees newly planted are whips with small stems or relatively small planting stock rather than larger trees.

The most recent statistics show there was 13,660 hectares of new planting (woodland creation) in the UK in 2019-20, of which 2,340 hectares were in England. At least a further 842 hectares have been reported as newly planted between 1 April 2020 and 31 December 2020 in England.

In addition, the Urban Tree Challenge Fund supports the planting of larger, ‘standard’, trees outside of woodlands in England. The Fund supported the planting of 7,630 standard trees in 2019-20 and 11,839 standard trees in 2020-21. Of these, 734 were planted in Croydon.

Grant schemes are demand led so it is not generally possible to state where the trees will be newly planted, although a range of sensitivities will prevent permission to plant being granted in some locations. We are aware of plans to plant a further 66 standards trees in 2021-22 in Croydon supported by the Urban Tree Challenge Fund. Additional planting will be dependent on future applications.

The maintenance of new trees and woodland is usually the responsibility of the grant agreement holder and the grant award includes a contribution to costs to ensure successful establishment of the newly planted trees.

The Minister who has forestry in his portfolio and is accountable for the programme is Lord Goldsmith.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the validity of reports that the NHS track and trace app will not work in (a) Croydon, (b) London and (c) other densely populated areas.

Following rigorous field testing and a trial on the Isle of Wight, we have chosen to bring forward a solution that brings together the work that NHSX and Google/Apple have carried out separately. This is an important step that will bring together the necessary functionality required to carry out contact tracing across all parts of the United Kingdom.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the level of spending required in 2021-22 for the transition to achieve net zero.

The Spending Review 2020 allocated funding for 2021/22, and the full settlement can be found: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/spending-review-2020-documents. Spending Review 2021 is currently ongoing and is due to be published on the 27th October. This will include allocation of spending up to 2024/25.

At Spending Reviews, departments follow Green Book guidance to both understand the wider strategic context of their policies, including their contribution to Net Zero, and assess all costs and benefits of their bids, including climate and environmental impacts. At the Treasury we consider these impacts when we assess the value for money of different spending programmes and the benefits they would deliver.

At Spending Review 2020, we required departments to improve the information they provided about the impact on greenhouse gas emissions from their spending bids. We have written out to departments with our expectations to improve data collection on emissions for Spending Review 2021.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jun 2021
What recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the support available to businesses in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

Throughout the pandemic, the Government has sought to protect people’s jobs and livelihoods while also supporting businesses and public services across the UK.

We have put in place an economic package of support totalling £352 billion through the furlough and self-employed income support schemes, support for businesses through grants and loans, business rates and VAT relief.

At the Budget, the Chancellor extended this package of economic support to accommodate even the most cautious view about the time it might take to exit restrictions and to provide certainty and continuity to business. The Government continues to keep all impacts and policies under review.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if she will include a review of the police allocation formula in the Comprehensive Spending Review.

The Government is alive to the concerns held by many in the policing sector over the police funding formula, and Home Office Ministers have agreed that the current arrangements are out of date. We are considering the police funding formula as part of our long-term vision for policing. Our priority for the Spending Review is continuing to support police forces with the required resources to tackle crime. At the 2019 Spending Review the Government agreed a total police funding settlement of up to £15.2 billion in 2020/21, which is an increase of up to £1.1 billion compared to 2019/20 and the biggest increase in funding for the policing system since 2010.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many weapons have been handed in under the surrender scheme as part of the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 by (a) type of weapon and (b) the amount paid out in compensation.

The Government ran the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 surrender and compensation scheme from 10 December 2020 to 9 March 2021 to allow members of the public to surrender to the police those weapons covered by the scheme and to claim compensation from the Home Office. The weapons concerned were specific knives, offensive weapons, rapid firing rifles and bump stocks, as specified in the Act. The total number of weapons surrendered by weapon type and by the amount of compensation paid is set out in the tables below.

Following the successful completion of the scheme, the Government commenced the provisions in the Offensive Weapons Act relating to the possession of these weapons on 14 July.

FIREARMS

Weapon Type

Total number surrendered

Total compensation paid

Lever release rifles

1,000

£2,783,859.46

MARS rifles

133

£262,470.25

Bump stock

1

£0

FIREARMS ANCILLARY EQUIPMENT

Total number surrendered

Total compensation paid

Ancillary equipment

32,348

£781,766.40

OFFENSIVE WEAPONS

Weapon type

Total number surrendered

Total compensation paid

Flick knife

719

£16,852.50

Gravity knife

53

£2,916.85

Zombie knife

224

£2,299.82

Cyclone knife

9

£173.74

Curved sword

255

£13,536.33

Baton

2,991

£30,377.09

Stealth knife

17

£51

Disguised knife

41

£205

Knuckle Duster

959

£2,290.06

Swordstick

27

£3,227.91

Handclaw

3

£27

Belt buckle knife

8

£40

Push dagger

865

£1,781

Hollow kubotan

23

£98

Footclaw

1

£7

Shuriken

94

£405

Balisong

68

£1,538

Telescopic truncheon

8,504

£170,110

Blowpipe

61

£854

Kusari gama

4

£105

Kusari

38

£380

Kyoketsu shoge

1

£20

Source: the information has been drawn from the Offensive Weapons Act surrender and compensation scheme casework tool using the Claimed Weapons by Coding (numbers of weapons) and Weapons by Coding (compensation values) reports.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she consulted groups representing or supporting suspects on the change from in-person to remote legal service (a) before and (b) after that change was implemented.

The Joint Interim Interview Protocol was developed by the CPS, NPCC, Law Society, Criminal Law Solicitor’s Association and the London Criminal Courts Solicitors’ Association as a temporary requirement at the start of the pandemic to ensure the functioning of the criminal justice system was maintained. An exit strategy from the protocol is ongoing and will continue to be reviewed in accordance with the Government’s ‘road map’ for removing national restrictions. It is for the signatories to this protocol – the NPCC, CPS and solicitors’ organisations – to determine how this should progress. Since stage 3 of the roadmap out of lockdown on 17 May, solicitors have been required to attend interviews with children and vulnerable adults in person and ensure the most vulnerable in society receive in person support.

The Home Office has been chairing a weekly operational meeting with custody partners (Independent Custody Visiting Association, National Appropriate Adult Network, NPCC, Police Federation, Law Society and others) since March 2020. This has allowed for effective communication, feedback and learning to be embedded and the operational impact of the interview protocol to be assessed on a continuing basis.

The NPCC monitor compliance with the interview protocol across force areas to ensure that detainees are providing informed consent to receive remote legal advice. ICVA and NAAN additionally provide regular feedback to the weekly meeting on the implementation of the interview protocol.

Academic research into the long term impacts of remote advice in police custody is ongoing and the Government awaits its findings with interest.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to ensure that people who received remote legal advice in police custody gave informed consent to receive legal advice in that way.

The Joint Interim Interview Protocol was developed by the CPS, NPCC, Law Society, Criminal Law Solicitor’s Association and the London Criminal Courts Solicitors’ Association as a temporary requirement at the start of the pandemic to ensure the functioning of the criminal justice system was maintained. An exit strategy from the protocol is ongoing and will continue to be reviewed in accordance with the Government’s ‘road map’ for removing national restrictions. It is for the signatories to this protocol – the NPCC, CPS and solicitors’ organisations – to determine how this should progress. Since stage 3 of the roadmap out of lockdown on 17 May, solicitors have been required to attend interviews with children and vulnerable adults in person and ensure the most vulnerable in society receive in person support.

The Home Office has been chairing a weekly operational meeting with custody partners (Independent Custody Visiting Association, National Appropriate Adult Network, NPCC, Police Federation, Law Society and others) since March 2020. This has allowed for effective communication, feedback and learning to be embedded and the operational impact of the interview protocol to be assessed on a continuing basis.

The NPCC monitor compliance with the interview protocol across force areas to ensure that detainees are providing informed consent to receive remote legal advice. ICVA and NAAN additionally provide regular feedback to the weekly meeting on the implementation of the interview protocol.

Academic research into the long term impacts of remote advice in police custody is ongoing and the Government awaits its findings with interest.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the move to remote legal advice for suspects on the take up of legal advice by those detained and interviewed in police custody.

The Joint Interim Interview Protocol was developed by the CPS, NPCC, Law Society, Criminal Law Solicitor’s Association and the London Criminal Courts Solicitors’ Association as a temporary requirement at the start of the pandemic to ensure the functioning of the criminal justice system was maintained. An exit strategy from the protocol is ongoing and will continue to be reviewed in accordance with the Government’s ‘road map’ for removing national restrictions. It is for the signatories to this protocol – the NPCC, CPS and solicitors’ organisations – to determine how this should progress. Since stage 3 of the roadmap out of lockdown on 17 May, solicitors have been required to attend interviews with children and vulnerable adults in person and ensure the most vulnerable in society receive in person support.

The Home Office has been chairing a weekly operational meeting with custody partners (Independent Custody Visiting Association, National Appropriate Adult Network, NPCC, Police Federation, Law Society and others) since March 2020. This has allowed for effective communication, feedback and learning to be embedded and the operational impact of the interview protocol to be assessed on a continuing basis.

The NPCC monitor compliance with the interview protocol across force areas to ensure that detainees are providing informed consent to receive remote legal advice. ICVA and NAAN additionally provide regular feedback to the weekly meeting on the implementation of the interview protocol.

Academic research into the long term impacts of remote advice in police custody is ongoing and the Government awaits its findings with interest.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to end the facility for lawyers to give advice remotely to suspects.

The Joint Interim Interview Protocol was developed by the CPS, NPCC, Law Society, Criminal Law Solicitor’s Association and the London Criminal Courts Solicitors’ Association as a temporary requirement at the start of the pandemic to ensure the functioning of the criminal justice system was maintained. An exit strategy from the protocol is ongoing and will continue to be reviewed in accordance with the Government’s ‘road map’ for removing national restrictions. It is for the signatories to this protocol – the NPCC, CPS and solicitors’ organisations – to determine how this should progress. Since stage 3 of the roadmap out of lockdown on 17 May, solicitors have been required to attend interviews with children and vulnerable adults in person and ensure the most vulnerable in society receive in person support.

The Home Office has been chairing a weekly operational meeting with custody partners (Independent Custody Visiting Association, National Appropriate Adult Network, NPCC, Police Federation, Law Society and others) since March 2020. This has allowed for effective communication, feedback and learning to be embedded and the operational impact of the interview protocol to be assessed on a continuing basis.

The NPCC monitor compliance with the interview protocol across force areas to ensure that detainees are providing informed consent to receive remote legal advice. ICVA and NAAN additionally provide regular feedback to the weekly meeting on the implementation of the interview protocol.

Academic research into the long term impacts of remote advice in police custody is ongoing and the Government awaits its findings with interest.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what dates police forces received Violence Reduction Unit allocations in previous years.

Programme level Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) funding was initially announced in April 2019. Police and Crime Commissioners were then advised in August of the individual amounts that they, working in partnership with other VRU representatives, would be eligible to apply for. The date at which individual VRU awards were confirmed varied, as this was dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. The following year (20/21), programme level VRU funding and the amounts that Violence Reduction Unit partnerships would be eligible to apply for via Police and Crime Commissioners was confirmed in December 2019. Again, the date at which individual VRU awards were confirmed varied, as this was dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. Programme level funding for 21/22 was announced in February 2021 and, as in previous years, the funding will be dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. Officials are in touch with the VRUs in relation to the applications for the 2021/22 funding round. We expect that the information on the applications will be shared in the near future. The applications will be accompanied by bespoke support from the Home Office, in order to enable VRUs to provide the strongest possible application.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the earliest date is that police forces can expect to receive 2021-22 Violence Reduction Unit allocations.

Programme level Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) funding was initially announced in April 2019. Police and Crime Commissioners were then advised in August of the individual amounts that they, working in partnership with other VRU representatives, would be eligible to apply for. The date at which individual VRU awards were confirmed varied, as this was dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. The following year (20/21), programme level VRU funding and the amounts that Violence Reduction Unit partnerships would be eligible to apply for via Police and Crime Commissioners was confirmed in December 2019. Again, the date at which individual VRU awards were confirmed varied, as this was dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. Programme level funding for 21/22 was announced in February 2021 and, as in previous years, the funding will be dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. Officials are in touch with the VRUs in relation to the applications for the 2021/22 funding round. We expect that the information on the applications will be shared in the near future. The applications will be accompanied by bespoke support from the Home Office, in order to enable VRUs to provide the strongest possible application.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reasons a response has not been provided to Question 123677, tabled by the hon. Member for Croydon Central on 1 December 2020.

With apologies for the delay, Question 123677 has now been responded to.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times the County Lines Working Group has met to date.

In October 2019 the Home Office established the County Lines Task and Finish Group to oversee delivery of the £25m County Lines Programme. The Task and Finish Group meets regularly to drive forward progress, monitor the impact of the funding, and identify challenges. The Group has met 26 times to date and will continue to meet and oversee delivery of the County Lines programme in 21/22.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many handsets or phones from victims of child criminal exploitation seized by police have been subject to forensic analysis of digital evidence in the latest period for which figures are available.

Police forces do not currently gather the number of digital exhibits submitted for forensic examination by age of device owner.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police analysts are employed in each Violence Reduction Unit by her Department.

The Home Office does not regularly review the number of police analysts employed in each Violence Reduction Unit (VRU). VRUs decide locally on how many analysts are employed to ensure delivery of their VRU.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times Drug Dealing Telecommunications Restriction Orders have been issued since those orders came into force.

The Home Office does not collect data on the number of DDTROs issued nationally. However, through our County Lines programme we are supporting targeted operational activity against county lines which includes the use of DDTROs. Through this programme, the West Midlands ROCU, have issued 91 DDTROs to date since November 2019.

In addition, through the County Lines programme, we are also funding the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) to co-ordinate the national law enforcement response which includes establishing a civil and criminal orders team to ensure effectiveness and maximise the use of the range of civil orders to tackle county lines, with a particular focus on DDTROs. This includes working with forces and Regional Organised Crime Units (ROCU) to develop and disseminate best practice to raise awareness of these orders and their potential for disruption of county lines gangs.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effectiveness of Drug Dealing Telecommunications Restriction Orders.

The Home Office does not collect data on the number of DDTROs issued nationally. However, through our County Lines programme we are supporting targeted operational activity against county lines which includes the use of DDTROs. Through this programme, the West Midlands ROCU, have issued 91 DDTROs to date since November 2019.

In addition, through the County Lines programme, we are also funding the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) to co-ordinate the national law enforcement response which includes establishing a civil and criminal orders team to ensure effectiveness and maximise the use of the range of civil orders to tackle county lines, with a particular focus on DDTROs. This includes working with forces and Regional Organised Crime Units (ROCU) to develop and disseminate best practice to raise awareness of these orders and their potential for disruption of county lines gangs.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether all Violence Reduction Units have complete interoperability of data.

Over two financial years the Home Office has invested a total of £70m into the development of 18 Violence Reduction Units (VRUs) in the areas worst affected by serious violence. VRUs bring together local partners to identify the drivers of serious violence and agree a multi-agency response to them, including sharing data to strengthen their understanding. On the 8 February the Home Office announced a further £35.5m investment into VRUs for 21/22.

Our independent evaluation found that in their first year of delivery (19/20) VRUs have made positive progress in embedding a local multi-agency approach including their use and access to data. You can read more of their first year of progress here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/910822/process-evaluation-of-the-violence-reduction-units-horr116.pdf?mc_cid=ec12552fcc&mc_eid=25c35f94a1

Over the past year VRUs have made further progress in gaining access to partners’ data, establishing Memoranda of Understanding and improving the quality of the data collected. We are working closely with VRUs to support further data sharing and have established a VRU data sharing and analysis network to further share best practice.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what activity her Department has participated in to prevent county lines gangs connecting with looked after children in children’s homes.

The Home Office is working closely with colleagues across government, including with the Department for Education, to ensure children in care homes are kept safe from grooming and exploitation.

The Government wants to make sure that all homes are providing high quality care that meets each child’s individual needs, keeps them safe and enables them to fulfil their full potential. Ofsted inspects all children’s homes at least once per year and at present, 80% of homes are rated good or outstanding. In April 2015, DfE introduced the Children’s Homes Regulations (England) which included Quality Standards for children’s homes, specifying the outcomes that children must be supported to achieve while living in children’s homes.

We are currently supporting the Independent Review of Children’s Social Care, which is taking a fundamental look at what is needed to make a real difference to the needs, experiences and outcomes of the children supported by children’s social care, including those in children’s homes.

Through our county lines programme the Home Office has provided up to £860,000 to provide specialist one-to-one support in London, the West Midlands and Merseyside to under 25’s and their families who are criminally exploited through county lines. Through this investment we are also delivering awareness sessions to care home staff to increase their understanding of criminally exploited children and young people.

We have also funded the Prevention Programme to deliver targeted virtual training sessions focussing on child sexual abuse and exploitation to children’s homes in the North East and North West and have worked alongside the British Transport Police to provide intelligence-led interventions to children’s homes to ensure appropriate safeguarding actions are taken in response.

The Department for Education is also funding the Tackling Child Exploitation Support Programme to help safeguarding partners in local areas develop a strategic response to child exploitation and risk of harm from outside the family home, in particular child sexual exploitation and child criminal exploitation, including county lines drug trafficking and modern slavery.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what work streams there are in her Department and the Department of Education to coordinate both Departments' response to tackling grooming in care homes.

The Home Office is working closely with colleagues across government, including with the Department for Education, to ensure children in care homes are kept safe from grooming and exploitation.

The Government wants to make sure that all homes are providing high quality care that meets each child’s individual needs, keeps them safe and enables them to fulfil their full potential. Ofsted inspects all children’s homes at least once per year and at present, 80% of homes are rated good or outstanding. In April 2015, DfE introduced the Children’s Homes Regulations (England) which included Quality Standards for children’s homes, specifying the outcomes that children must be supported to achieve while living in children’s homes.

We are currently supporting the Independent Review of Children’s Social Care, which is taking a fundamental look at what is needed to make a real difference to the needs, experiences and outcomes of the children supported by children’s social care, including those in children’s homes.

Through our county lines programme the Home Office has provided up to £860,000 to provide specialist one-to-one support in London, the West Midlands and Merseyside to under 25’s and their families who are criminally exploited through county lines. Through this investment we are also delivering awareness sessions to care home staff to increase their understanding of criminally exploited children and young people.

We have also funded the Prevention Programme to deliver targeted virtual training sessions focussing on child sexual abuse and exploitation to children’s homes in the North East and North West and have worked alongside the British Transport Police to provide intelligence-led interventions to children’s homes to ensure appropriate safeguarding actions are taken in response.

The Department for Education is also funding the Tackling Child Exploitation Support Programme to help safeguarding partners in local areas develop a strategic response to child exploitation and risk of harm from outside the family home, in particular child sexual exploitation and child criminal exploitation, including county lines drug trafficking and modern slavery.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children flagged with county lines markers on the police national computer have social care status.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested which is operational and owned by police forces.

Through our County Lines programme we are funding the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) to improve the intelligence picture and to co-ordinate the national law enforcement response.

Since it was established, the NCLCC has coordinated five weeks of intensive action against county lines gangs and the most recent week, in September 2020, which included all forces, including Police Scotland resulted in over 1,000 arrests, drugs worth more than £1m seized and over 1,500 vulnerable individuals safeguarded.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children on the PNC database have a county lines flag as at 22 February 2021.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested which is operational and owned by police forces.

Through our County Lines programme we are funding the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) to improve the intelligence picture and to co-ordinate the national law enforcement response.

Since it was established, the NCLCC has coordinated five weeks of intensive action against county lines gangs and the most recent week, in September 2020, which included all forces, including Police Scotland resulted in over 1,000 arrests, drugs worth more than £1m seized and over 1,500 vulnerable individuals safeguarded.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children in each police force area have a county lines flag as at 22 February 2021.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested which is operational and owned by police forces.

Through our County Lines programme we are funding the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) to improve the intelligence picture and to co-ordinate the national law enforcement response.

Since it was established, the NCLCC has coordinated five weeks of intensive action against county lines gangs and the most recent week, in September 2020, which included all forces, including Police Scotland resulted in over 1,000 arrests, drugs worth more than £1m seized and over 1,500 vulnerable individuals safeguarded.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of how much the (a) delay of the Emergency Services Network and (b) extended use of the Airwave system will cost each police force.

The direct cost to police forces, is minimal since Airwave is funded centrally rather than by individual police forces.

The direct costs that forces will have to pay is estimated to be £1.5B compared to the £0.9B included in the 2015 business case.

The additional cost to the police, of running Airwave due to ESN delivery delays is estimated at £1.4B, or, with contingency factored in, £1.6B. This is funded centrally and does not currently impact individual forces.

Despite delays, the strategic and investment case for the ESN remains strong.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many covid-19 related (a) fines and (b) fixed penalty notices have been imposed by each police force.

On 8 January the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) published its latest report on the number of Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) issued under Covid regulations. The data showed that in total, 33,880 FPNs have been issued by police forces in England and Wales under Covid regulations between 27 March and 20 December. The latest information including a breakdown of the number of FPNs issued by each force can be found here:

https://cdn.prgloo.com/media/500ef4a4076446d1baa41a2e6a2bb5ae.pdf

Information on fixed penalty notices paid in each police force area is not currently available.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many covid-19 related (a) fines and (b) fixed penalty notices have been paid in each police force area.

On 8 January the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) published its latest report on the number of Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) issued under Covid regulations. The data showed that in total, 33,880 FPNs have been issued by police forces in England and Wales under Covid regulations between 27 March and 20 December. The latest information including a breakdown of the number of FPNs issued by each force can be found here:

https://cdn.prgloo.com/media/500ef4a4076446d1baa41a2e6a2bb5ae.pdf

Information on fixed penalty notices paid in each police force area is not currently available.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Answer of 27 June 2017 to Question 581 on Police: Per Capita Costs, what recent estimate she has made of the average annual cost to a police authority of employing a (a) police officer and (b) police community support officer; and what estimate she has made of that cost in each year from 2020-21 to 2024-25.

The salary scales as recommended by the Police Remuneration and Review Body for England and Wales from 1st September 2020 are set out in the Police Remuneration Review Body (PRRB) 6th report under Annex D.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect of the public sector pay freeze above £24,000 on the retention and recruitment of (a) police officers, (b) PCSOs and (c) police staff.

The Police Remuneration Review Body (PRRB) provides independent advice to the Government on pay and conditions for police officers. The number of officers earning less than £24,000 per annum will be considered by the PRRB in the 2021/22 pay round.

Following the 2020 Spending Review, at least £400m additional funding has been allocated for police forces next year to continue the Police Uplift Programme. This will enable the recruitment of up to 6,000 additional officers next year, continuing the progress on recruitment to date. All forces are well on track to meet their year one allocation and over 5,000 officers have already been recruited as a result of this Government drive.

The retention of experienced police officers is a priority for the Home Office. We are working alongside the National Police Chiefs’ Council to maximise opportunities to retain police officers who have valuable skills and policing experience.

The Government has no statutory role in determining the pay and conditions for police staff, including Police Community Support Officers, which are agreed locally by Chief Constables in consultation with trade unions.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the number of (a) officers, (b) PCSOs and (c) police staff who earn less than £24,000 per annum.

The Police Remuneration Review Body (PRRB) provides independent advice to the Government on pay and conditions for police officers. The number of officers earning less than £24,000 per annum will be considered by the PRRB in the 2021/22 pay round.

Following the 2020 Spending Review, at least £400m additional funding has been allocated for police forces next year to continue the Police Uplift Programme. This will enable the recruitment of up to 6,000 additional officers next year, continuing the progress on recruitment to date. All forces are well on track to meet their year one allocation and over 5,000 officers have already been recruited as a result of this Government drive.

The retention of experienced police officers is a priority for the Home Office. We are working alongside the National Police Chiefs’ Council to maximise opportunities to retain police officers who have valuable skills and policing experience.

The Government has no statutory role in determining the pay and conditions for police staff, including Police Community Support Officers, which are agreed locally by Chief Constables in consultation with trade unions.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for a new business plan for the Emergency Services Network to be signed off by the Treasury.

The Home Office’s Emergency Services Mobile Communications Programme (ESMCP) will be presenting its updated full business case to the Major Projects Review Authority in May 2021. The plan is that the business case will then be presented to Her Majesty’s Treasury in June 2021 for approval.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to ensure that police forces are reimbursed for any additional costs arising as a result of the time taken to implement the Emergency Services Network programme.

Changes to the delivery schedules for the Emergency Services Network (ESN) mean that the majority of costs budgeted for local police forces for ESN implementation will be delayed in line with the revised programme plan, but significant additional costs are not envisaged. The costs to the police of the Airwave system (that ESN will ultimately replace) continue to be split between direct costs (borne centrally before Police Allocations are made) and indirect costs that fall to the forces, and this arrangement is not changing. Once implemented, ESN will result in significant savings in the overall costs of providing emergency services communications to the police and all other services.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the gap in funding for police precepts as a result of people being unable to pay council tax during covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has been clear that the police will get the financial support they need to see them through the COVID-19 pandemic, and that they are listening to what the police needs.

Future police funding, including costs for the remaining years of the Police Uplift Programme and precept referendum limits, will be agreed as part of the 2020 Spending Review.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent estimate she has made of the average annual cost to a police authority of employing a (a) police officer and (b) police community support officer; and what estimate she has made of that cost in each year from 2020-21 to 2024-25.

The Government has been clear that the police will get the financial support they need to see them through the COVID-19 pandemic, and that they are listening to what the police needs.

Future police funding, including costs for the remaining years of the Police Uplift Programme and precept referendum limits, will be agreed as part of the 2020 Spending Review.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much has been spent from the public purse on encouraging under-represented groups to join the police through media outlets that serve BAME communities in the last 10 months.

Attracting a broad range of talent, cultures and backgrounds to a career in policing is a core ambition in our drive to recruit 20,000 extra police officers, therefore reaching under-represented audiences is a key element of the Police Recruitment campaign strategy.

The national advertising campaign is planned and bought to reach a wide range of people from all backgrounds. Evaluation of campaign activity in May and June 2020 suggests that campaign messages reached almost 94% of 18-54 year olds from ethnic minority communities.

Campaign activity includes TV and radio advertising on channels which serve minority ethnic communities, such as BET, Brit Asia TV and Colourful Radio. To date, over £38k has been invested in these channels. In addition, £74K has been set aside to date for reaching under-represented groups through partnerships with media outlets which specifically serve minority ethnic communities.

We also continue to work with Police Associations to encourage under-represented audiences from their communities to consider a career in policing. This is includes working with them to develop new communications content for them to use on their no-cost channels which will also be used to support new individual tailored web pages for each Police Association on the www.joiningthepolice.co.uk campaign website.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will conduct a review into the reasons for the increased number of assaults on police officers.

Any assault on a police officer is completely unacceptable. In order to improve the accuracy of data on assaults on police officers, from 2017, police forces have included the number of assaults with injury on a police officer as part of their recorded crime data. This has been an important step towards obtaining a much better picture of the total number of assaults on police officers. We also welcome the recent publication of the National Police Chiefs’ Council’s Officer and Staff Safety Review and will continue to work closely with policing partners to consider the recommendations in the report.

Assaults specifically against emergency workers, including police officers, are punishable by up to 12 months in prison and could be charged as common assault. This Government recently announced our intention to double the maximum sentence for assaults on emergency workers, showing our commitment to ensuring these attacks are not tolerated.

We have also accelerated our work to introduce a Police Covenant, recognising the service and sacrifice of those who work, or have worked, in policing and to deliver the practical support they need. The key areas of focus will be physical protection, health and wellbeing and support for families.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to support the mentoring of new officers by experienced officers in the police force.

Training and development for new officers, including mentoring programmes, are carried out in forces in line with national standards set by the College of Policing. We are making £700m additional funding available for PCCs in 2020-21, with a further £50m to be spent on national programmes supporting Police Uplift Programme. This includes the cost of training and induction for new officers to ensure they receive the right level of support on joining

We welcome the work being done by the College of Policing to strengthen leadership and supervision standards at all levels, particularly in support of officers on the frontline – this includes mentoring programmes and a tutor constable programme to ensure new officers receive the support they need.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to encourage people of a broad age range to apply to join the police.

The Government is delivering on the people’s priorities by recruiting an additional 20,000 police officers over the next three years.

The 20,000 officer uplift is a once in a generation opportunity to enable all forces become more representative of the communities they serve. We are already seeing applications from a wide range of candidates with diverse backgrounds and from a range of ages who are bringing unique skillsets and experience to the police service.

We are supporting forces with a variety of attraction and recruitment strategies, whilst delivering a campaign that’s been designed to reach the widest and most diverse audience possible including those who have never considered a policing career. Sharing best practice, engagement with police associations, upskilling recruitment teams and enhanced data capture are just some of the efforts being made to improve police diversity.

Amendments to Police Regulations made this year mean that individuals can apply to join the police at 17 years of age for appointment on reaching 18 years, opening the way for candidates wishing to apply to join the police.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Queen's Speech of 19 December 2019, what her timescale is for bringing forward legislative proposals to establish a Police Covenant and ensure the police are able to fully conduct their duties by providing them with additional support and protection.

The Government will bring forward legislation later this session to place the Police Covenant on a statutory footing.

We are fully committed to recognising the bravery, commitment and sacrifices of those who work or have worked in policing.

We have accelerated work on the Police Covenant and, following the recent public consultation, published the Government’s response on 8 September. The Home Office continues to work across government and with partners in policing to establish the Covenant and prepare the necessary legislative provisions. This work focuses on the three themes of health and wellbeing, physical protection and support for families.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to ensure that data is collated on police (a) traffic stops and (b) vehicle searches.

The Home Office already collates data on vehicle searches as part of the stop and search data collection.

In 2018/19, there were a total of 8,041 vehicle stops, with 7,949 stops under Section 1 of PACE and its associated legislation, and 92 stops under Section 60 of CJPOA. Data was published in 'Police powers and procedures, England and Wales year ending 31 March 2019', available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019.

The Home Office collects ethnicity data on all stop and searches of an individual, under Section 1 of PACE and its associated legislation and Section 60 of CJPOA. Additionally, data is collected on the number of searches of unattended vehicles. It is not possible from the data currently collected to identify the ethnicity of those involved in vehicle searches. Overall ethnicity data on stop and search was published in 'Police powers and procedures, England and Wales year ending 31 March 2019', available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019.

Figures for the year ending 31 March 2020 will be published on 27 October 2020.

There are currently no plans to require police forces to collect data for vehicle stops under section 163 of the Road Traffic Act 1988.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to ensure that data is collated on the ethnicity of those involved in police (a) traffic stops and (b) vehicle searches.

The Home Office already collates data on vehicle searches as part of the stop and search data collection.

In 2018/19, there were a total of 8,041 vehicle stops, with 7,949 stops under Section 1 of PACE and its associated legislation, and 92 stops under Section 60 of CJPOA. Data was published in 'Police powers and procedures, England and Wales year ending 31 March 2019', available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019.

The Home Office collects ethnicity data on all stop and searches of an individual, under Section 1 of PACE and its associated legislation and Section 60 of CJPOA. Additionally, data is collected on the number of searches of unattended vehicles. It is not possible from the data currently collected to identify the ethnicity of those involved in vehicle searches. Overall ethnicity data on stop and search was published in 'Police powers and procedures, England and Wales year ending 31 March 2019', available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019.

Figures for the year ending 31 March 2020 will be published on 27 October 2020.

There are currently no plans to require police forces to collect data for vehicle stops under section 163 of the Road Traffic Act 1988.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to improve police force retention rates.

Relatively few police officers choose to leave their job before retirement, compared to other public and private sector workforces. Voluntary resignations remain low at 2% of the workforce.

The retention of experienced police officers is a priority for the Home Office. We are working alongside the National Police Chiefs’ Council to maximise opportunities to retain police officers who have valuable skills and policing experience.

This Government takes the issue of policing wellbeing very seriously and has invested in programmes which offer help directly to officers and staffincluding the National Police Wellbeing Service.. We have also accelerated work to introduce a Police Covenant, which will be enshrined in law to ensure our police get the support they need. The Covenant will focus on health and wellbeing, physical protection and support for families.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what strategies have been put in place to encourage under-represented groups to join the police.

The police officer workforce is more diverse than ever before. The most recently published Police Officer Uplift data show that as at 30 June 2020 Black Asian and Minority Ethnic officers represented 7.4% of all police officers.

The Home Secretary has been clear that forces must do more to become representative of the communities they serve. Attracting a broad range of talent, cultures and backgrounds to a career in policing is a core ambition in our drive to recruit 20,000 extra police officers.

We are supporting forces with a variety of attraction and recruitment strategies, whilst delivering a campaign that’s been designed to reach the widest and most diverse audience possible including those who have never considered a policing career.

Sharing best practice, engagement with police associations, upskilling recruitment teams and enhanced data capture are just some of the efforts being made to improve police diversity as part of the police uplift.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the number of calls made to the police to report breaches of the covid-19 Rule of six.

The National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) provides the Home Office with data on the police use of Covid-19 enforcement notices issued under all emergency health protections.

The report contains data related to the number of Fixed Penalty Notices (FPN) issued to those individuals who contravene requirements to not participate in a gathering of more than six people, the ‘Rule of six.’ Data related to the number of calls made to the police to report breaches of this rule is not provided by the NPCC and is not held centrally by the Home Office.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers have retired as a result of injury received on duty in each of the last three years.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of police officers that have left the service through ‘medical retirement’ in the annual ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

However, data on how many of those medical retirements that are due to injury are not available from the data held centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of assaults on police officers and these are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics. The latest figures, for the year ending March 2020, can be accessed on the ONS website (available here):

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

However, it not possible to identify the ethnicity of victims, nor is it possible to identify whether or not a weapon was used in the assault.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers have been assaulted by a deadly weapon while on duty in each of the last three years.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of police officers that have left the service through ‘medical retirement’ in the annual ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

However, data on how many of those medical retirements that are due to injury are not available from the data held centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of assaults on police officers and these are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics. The latest figures, for the year ending March 2020, can be accessed on the ONS website (available here):

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

However, it not possible to identify the ethnicity of victims, nor is it possible to identify whether or not a weapon was used in the assault.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of the number of police officers assaulted while on duty are BAME, in each of the last three years.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of police officers that have left the service through ‘medical retirement’ in the annual ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

However, data on how many of those medical retirements that are due to injury are not available from the data held centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of assaults on police officers and these are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics. The latest figures, for the year ending March 2020, can be accessed on the ONS website (available here):

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

However, it not possible to identify the ethnicity of victims, nor is it possible to identify whether or not a weapon was used in the assault.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers have been subject to unarmed physical attacks while on duty in each of the last three years.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of police officers that have left the service through ‘medical retirement’ in the annual ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

However, data on how many of those medical retirements that are due to injury are not available from the data held centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of assaults on police officers and these are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics. The latest figures, for the year ending March 2020, can be accessed on the ONS website (available here):

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

However, it not possible to identify the ethnicity of victims, nor is it possible to identify whether or not a weapon was used in the assault.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with the (a) Secretary of State for Education and (b) Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on ensuring that vulnerable children are not exposed to greater risk of county lines recruitment when not in education due to the covid-19 lockdown.

The Home Secretary attends a regular ministerial group, also attended by the Department for Education (DfE) and Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, which discusses a range of issues related to COVID-19 including the impact on vulnerable cohorts.? The Home Office Minister for Safeguarding also has regular discussions with DfE about the impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable children, including those at risk of criminal exploitation through county lines.

In addition, the Home Office is working closely with law enforcement partners and charities to monitor the ongoing threat to young people from county lines exploitation.? This year, we are investing £20m to uplift the law enforcement response and increase the support available to those affected.? This is in addition to continuing to the fund the Missing People SafeCall service which provides specialist advice and support to young people and families who are concerned about county lines exploitation.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many county line phone numbers have been shut down in each month since December 2019.

The National Crime Agency’s most recent strategic assessment of serious and organised crime found that more than 3,000 unique county lines deal line numbers were identified in 2019, of which 800 to 1,100 lines were estimated to be active during a given month.

The Home Office collects and publishes statistics on the number of arrests conducted by each police force in England and Wales on an annual basis. Data are held at the offence group level only (for example ‘Drug offences’). Information on the number of arrests that have been made in operations targeting county lines gangs in each month are not held centrally. The latest bulletin can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019

We are investing £20m of dedicated funding in 2020/21 to further increase activity against these ruthless gangs. This builds on the £5m programme of work delivered in 19/20 to uplift the law enforcement response. Initial assessment of the outcomes of £5m investment in 19/20 demonstrate it has had a direct impact in disrupting county lines.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many arrests have been made in operations targeting county lines gangs in each month since December 2019.

The National Crime Agency’s most recent strategic assessment of serious and organised crime found that more than 3,000 unique county lines deal line numbers were identified in 2019, of which 800 to 1,100 lines were estimated to be active during a given month.

The Home Office collects and publishes statistics on the number of arrests conducted by each police force in England and Wales on an annual basis. Data are held at the offence group level only (for example ‘Drug offences’). Information on the number of arrests that have been made in operations targeting county lines gangs in each month are not held centrally. The latest bulletin can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019

We are investing £20m of dedicated funding in 2020/21 to further increase activity against these ruthless gangs. This builds on the £5m programme of work delivered in 19/20 to uplift the law enforcement response. Initial assessment of the outcomes of £5m investment in 19/20 demonstrate it has had a direct impact in disrupting county lines.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the final guidance on the (a) operation of and (b) application for, Knife Crime Prevention Orders.

The Government has announced that Knife Crime Prevention Orders will be piloted in London for a period of 14 months from 6 April this year. We have consulted on guidance to support the introduction of the pilot and we will be publishing final guidance, along with the Government response to the public consultation, shortly.

During the pilot, we will be working closely with the Metropolitan Police, the Crown Prosecution Service and Courts in London to monitor the use of Knife Crime Prevention Orders. This is likely to include data on numbers of Orders issued, their length, information about those who are made subject to the Orders, when they are reviewed, whether any of the Orders are breached and any other relevant information to allow for an assessment to be made of the success of the Orders in preventing offending.

As required by the Offensive Weapons Act 2019, we will lay a report on the pilot before Parliament in advance of wider rollout of Knife Crime Prevention Orders across England and Wales.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what (a) data collection and (b) monitoring the Government plans to carry out over the course of the Knife Crime Prevention Orders pilot scheme.

The Government has announced that Knife Crime Prevention Orders will be piloted in London for a period of 14 months from 6 April this year. We have consulted on guidance to support the introduction of the pilot and we will be publishing final guidance, along with the Government response to the public consultation, shortly.

During the pilot, we will be working closely with the Metropolitan Police, the Crown Prosecution Service and Courts in London to monitor the use of Knife Crime Prevention Orders. This is likely to include data on numbers of Orders issued, their length, information about those who are made subject to the Orders, when they are reviewed, whether any of the Orders are breached and any other relevant information to allow for an assessment to be made of the success of the Orders in preventing offending.

As required by the Offensive Weapons Act 2019, we will lay a report on the pilot before Parliament in advance of wider rollout of Knife Crime Prevention Orders across England and Wales.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the upcoming pilot of Knife Crime Prevention Orders, what evaluation criteria will be used to assess the success of that pilot scheme prior to that scheme being rolled out nationally.

The Government has announced that Knife Crime Prevention Orders will be piloted in London for a period of 14 months from 6 April this year. We have consulted on guidance to support the introduction of the pilot and we will be publishing final guidance, along with the Government response to the public consultation, shortly.

During the pilot, we will be working closely with the Metropolitan Police, the Crown Prosecution Service and Courts in London to monitor the use of Knife Crime Prevention Orders. This is likely to include data on numbers of Orders issued, their length, information about those who are made subject to the Orders, when they are reviewed, whether any of the Orders are breached and any other relevant information to allow for an assessment to be made of the success of the Orders in preventing offending.

As required by the Offensive Weapons Act 2019, we will lay a report on the pilot before Parliament in advance of wider rollout of Knife Crime Prevention Orders across England and Wales.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that the trial in London of the Knife Crime Prevention Orders does not result in an increase in the number of 12 year olds being criminalised.

Knife Crime Prevention Orders have been introduced as a preventative civil measure to give the police the powers they need to prevent and tackle serious violence and knife crime. Given the seriousness of the issue, the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 makes breach of an Order a criminal offence.

Knife Crime Prevention Orders will be piloted in London and will be available to the courts to be applied to persons from age 12 upwards. The purpose of these Orders is to prevent those who are subject to them – those who are identified as being particularly at risk – from being drawn into knife crime and serious violence, through the inclusion of positive requirements and restrictions that can be attached to an Order. This will help more young people to avoid being drawn into violent lifestyles and serious offending.

Knife Crime Prevention Orders that apply to those under 18 years of age will be subject to more scrutiny and oversight than those issued to adults and will be subject to consultation with the relevant Youth Offending Team. The Government will shortly be publishing guidance on Knife Crime Prevention Orders which will set out the specific considerations that must be given to children and young people in applying these new Orders.

The Government is determined to tackle serious violence, and to give the police the powers and resources they need to do this. The piloting of Knife Crime Prevention Orders in London is an important part of the action we are taking.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when he plans to publish his Department's response to the Review of the ban on the use of combustible materials in and on the external walls of buildings, which closed for consultation on 25 May 2020.

I refer the Hon Member to the answer I gave to Question UIN 100277 on 12 October 2020.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what criteria the Government will use to determine eligibility for membership of the Building Advisory Committee.

The provisions in the draft Building Safety Bill place a duty on the Building Safety Regulator to establish a new committee of experts to give advice and information to the Regulator on its building functions. The process to set up and recruit the committee and its members will follow in due course.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the composition of the Building Advisory Committee will be subject to Parliamentary scrutiny.

The provisions in the draft Building Safety Bill place a duty on the Building Safety Regulator to establish a new committee of experts to give advice and information to the Regulator on its building functions. The process to set up and recruit the committee and its members will follow in due course.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many rough sleepers have been offered safe accommodation during the covid-19 outbreak by (a) region and (b) local authority area.

Yesterday, the Government published the management information that supports the announcements from Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Rt Hon Robert Jenrick MP, and Dame Louise Casey that 15,000 people have been accommodated by local authorities in response to Covid-19.

We have collected management information from 302 local authorities nationally. We are continuing to work with local authorities to understand the work they are doing to help the most vulnerable in our society.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to his statement of 20 January 2020 on Building Safety, Official Report, column 23, if he will publish the names of the 43 private residential tower block owners who according to the government's latest Building Safety Programme data release have not put a plan in place to remove unsafe ACM cladding by February 2020.

Where building owners are failing to make acceptable progress, those responsible should expect further action to be taken – including naming and shaming and enforcement.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number of residential buildings between 11 and 18 metres high.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 5 February 2020 to Question 10387 on Buildings: Insulation, whether his Department is collecting information on buildings below 18 metres in height with unsafe ACM cladding system.

Information on the external wall systems for residential buildings below 18 metres in height is not currently being collected by the Department while the data collection on external wall systems for residential buildings 18 metres or over in height is being undertaken. It is important to gain accurate information on these higher risk buildings first. We will consider further collections in due course.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Government's consolidated advice on building safety, published 20 January 2020, what estimate he has made of the number of residential buildings which (a) require an EWS1 form and (b) have been issued a completed EWS1 form.

The EWS1 form is a form produced and owned by industry (the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, UK Finance and the Building Societies Association) to assist in the valuation of high rise residential buildings for mortgage purposes. Any requirement to use it is a lender decision. Industry is monitoring its use.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what correspondence he has sent to owners of buildings with ACM cladding where remediation had not started by the start of February 2020; and if he will publish that correspondence.

The Secretary of State has written to all building owners where the remediation of unsafe ACM cladding is not complete, pressing for progress. For the safety of residents in the buildings concerned, we are unable to publish correspondence as this could identify individual buildings.

The Department has regular engagement with a named contact from each building to ensure progress with remediation is being made. Where building owners are failing to make acceptable progress, those responsible should expect further action to be taken – including naming and shaming and enforcement.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Answer of 8 October 2019 to Question 290851 on Buildings: Insulation, for what reasons the Government has not yet published the results of the analysis of bespoke non-ACM tests.

The results of this research will be published in the Spring. This is to allow for further tests on additional cladding materials including timber cladding and Class D High Pressure Laminates of various thicknesses and manufacturers.  So far, the results show that none of the materials tested present a significant fire hazard like that of Aluminium Composite Material with unmodified polyethylene core and other metal composites. If any of the additional tests suggest an immediate public safety concern, the Government will consult the Independent Expert Advisory Panel urgently, consider appropriate action, and inform the House and public accordingly.

13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to figure five in his Department's publication entitled Data update 30, Building Safety Programme: monthly data release, November 2019, how many and which of the 74 private residential buildings had remediation work funded by the (a) developer and (b) freeholder.

Out of the 74 private residential buildings which are being funded by the building owner, 64 are by the developer and 10 by the freeholder.

13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 7 January 2020 to Question 120 on High Rise Flats: Insulation, how many local authorities have provided (a) fully complete data, (b) partially complete data and (c) no data on high rise residential buildings in their area.

The Department has commenced a data collection exercise which will enable us to build a picture of external wall systems in use on high rise residential buildings. The exercise will collect data on residential buildings 18 metres and over covering private and social buildings, student accommodation and hotels in England. We will publish appropriate summary information from the data collection in our monthly Building Safety Programme data release in due course. Local authorities and housing associations are working to complete the collection by the end of March 2020.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his timescale is for announcing the (a) Chair, (b) timetable and (c) terms of reference of the proposed Royal Commission on Criminal Justice announced in the Queen's Speech of December 2019.

The Royal Commission is an opportunity to undertake independent review of key issues in the criminal justice system. It is also an opportunity to learn from the experience of the coronavirus pandemic to ensure that the system is more resilient.

We are carefully considering the scope, timing and Terms of Reference for the Commission and will update the House in due course.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Jan 2020
What assessment he has made of trends in conviction rates for knife possession as a result of the increased use of stop and search.

Knife crime has devastating consequences on families, children and communities and this Government is determined to tackle it by whatever methods we can.

We are catching and prosecuting more people who carry a knife or offensive weapon. Those convicted of carrying knives and other weapons are more likely to go to prison and for longer than at any point in the last ten years.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)