Sarah Jones Portrait

Sarah Jones

Labour - Croydon Central

First elected: 8th June 2017

Shadow Minister (Industry and Decarbonisation)

(since September 2023)

Shadow Minister (Home Office)
10th Apr 2020 - 5th Sep 2023
Public Order Bill
25th May 2022 - 21st Jun 2022
Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
12th May 2021 - 24th Jun 2021
Shadow Minister (Housing, Communities and Local Government) (Housing)
15th May 2018 - 10th Apr 2020
Home Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 18th Jun 2018


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Ceasefire in Gaza
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 173 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 20 Noes - 212
Speeches
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Steel Industry: Wales
It is a pleasure to serve under your chairmanship, Sir Gary. I am delighted that my hon. Friend the Member …
Written Answers
Thursday 1st February 2024
Reoffenders
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders who went on to commit a serious further offence …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 10th July 2023
4. Visits outside the UK
Name of donor: The Antisemitism Policy Trust
Address of donor: BM 5369, London WC1N 3XX
Estimate of the probable value …
EDM signed
Tuesday 16th November 2021
Town and Country Planning
That the Town and Country Planning (Napier Barracks) Special Development Order 2021 (SI, 2021, No. 962), dated 26 August 2021, …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 19th July 2017
Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Act 2018
To make provision about the oversight and management of the appropriate use of force in relation to people in mental …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Sarah Jones has voted in 680 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

6 Dec 2022 - NHS Workforce - View Vote Context
Sarah Jones voted No - against a party majority - in line with the party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour No votes vs 154 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 226 Noes - 0
View All Sarah Jones Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Kit Malthouse (Conservative)
(131 debate interactions)
Victoria Atkins (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
(39 debate interactions)
Sarah Champion (Labour)
(34 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(452 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(34 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(26 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Sarah Jones's debates

Croydon Central Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Revoke all licences (PEL) for commercial breeders of laboratory animals. Require all Project Licences (PPLs) applications be reviewed by an independent Non Animal Methods (NAMs) specialist committee. Revise s24 ASPA 1986 to allow review. Urge International Regulators to accept & promote NAMs.

The right to peaceful assembly and protest are fundamental principles of any democracy and the proposed part of this bill that gives the police new powers to tackle disruptive peaceful protests should be removed from The Policing, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill.

The Government's manifesto stated “we will make intentional trespass a criminal offence”: an extreme, illiberal & unnecessary attack on ancient freedoms that would threaten walkers, campers, and the wider public. It would further tilt the law in favour of the landowning 1% who own half the country.


Latest EDMs signed by Sarah Jones

16th November 2021
Sarah Jones signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 16th November 2021

Town and Country Planning

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That the Town and Country Planning (Napier Barracks) Special Development Order 2021 (SI, 2021, No. 962), dated 26 August 2021, a copy of which was laid before this House on 27 August 2021, be revoked.
18 signatures
(Most recent: 24 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Liberal Democrat: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 1
Green Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
19th April 2021
Sarah Jones signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 19th April 2021

Public Health

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That the Health Protection (Coronavirus, International Travel) (England) (Amendment) (No. 7) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 150), dated 12 February 2021, a copy of which was laid before this House on 12 February 2021, be revoked.
10 signatures
(Most recent: 19 Apr 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Green Party: 1
View All Sarah Jones's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Sarah Jones, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Sarah Jones

Thursday 3rd November 2022

1 Adjournment Debate led by Sarah Jones

Monday 20th September 2021

Sarah Jones has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

1 Bill co-sponsored by Sarah Jones

Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Act 2018
Sponsor - Steve Reed (LAB)


191 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
19th Jul 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what steps he is taking to further develop financial support to help prevent loss and damage as a result of climate change ahead of the COP26 summit.

The UK Presidency is clear about the importance of developed countries meeting and surpassing the commitment to jointly mobilise $100bn of climate finance per year through to 2025, from a range of public and private sources.

At COP25, countries highlighted that existing sources of funds from a wide variety of sources, including disaster reduction and response funds, respond to loss and damage. They also urged donors and these other funds to scale up support relevant to averting, minimising and addressing loss and damage in the most vulnerable countries. At COP26 and in the run up, we will push for progress on these actions and renew calls for coherent action using climate, development and disaster preparedness and response finance.

Through the COP26 Presidency, we are also calling for greater quantity, quality and access to finance and for responses to be joined up. The Taskforce on Access to Finance aims to align support behind the national climate action plans of developing countries to improve access to climate finance. The outcomes will be to agree a new approach to access, marshalling coherent, programmatic support for countries’ own, nationally-determined climate priorities, alongside specific, implementable recommendations to address the system of climate finance as a whole which includes enabling them to better prepare, build resilience and respond to disasters - averting, minimising and addressing loss and damage.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions have been made under the Night Poaching Act 1828 in each year since 2010.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not hold any data which shows the number of defendants charged with and prosecuted for offences created by the Night Poaching Act 1828. However, management information is held showing the number of offences of charged by way of the Night Poaching Act 1828 in which a prosecution commenced from each year from 2010/11. The table below shows the number of these offences to the latest available year, 2021/22.

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

Night Poaching Act 1828

49

56

74

58

75

64

46

17

22

14

21

28

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

The figures relate to the number of offences and not the number of individual defendants and it can be the case that an individual defendant is charged with more than one offence.

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Government response to the Intelligence and Security Committee report entitled Extreme Right-Wing Terrorism, published on 30 March 2023, in what circumstances a person who is a member of a proscribed organisation could have their application for vetting clearance approved.

It is an offence under Section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000 to belong to, or profess to belong to a proscribed organisation in the UK or overseas.

United Kingdom Security Vetting (UKSV) provides national security clearances to government, including certain posts in policing. As part of this, UKSV assesses an individual’s vetting application and any related risks. Where an individual is known to have or has declared affiliations or membership to a proscribed organisation, their application for national security vetting will not be approved.

UKSV and government organisations have ongoing controls in place to manage staff and review their security clearances. These include annual reviews of security clearances for higher level clearance holders, change of circumstances forms, and additional reporting mechanisms through which concerns may be raised for all clearance holders. If subsequently there are security concerns relating either to an individual’s involvement with, or connections to proscribed organisations, their clearance will be withdrawn.

22nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that energy suppliers promptly remunerate customers who sell renewable energy back to the grid.

Suppliers make payments to householders in line with their Smart Export Guarantee contract terms and conditions. Whilst some suppliers have chosen to make payments on a yearly basis to minimise the administrative costs associated with the very small amounts of export involved, there are other suppliers that offer more frequent renumeration.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many homes in Croydon Central constituency were installed with solar power panels by 31 January 2023.

At the end of January 2023, there were 815 domestic installations of solar panels recorded in Croydon Central constituency.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that members of the public who sell solar powered energy back to the state are reimbursed in a timely way.

Under the market-led Smart Export Guarantee (SEG), it is for suppliers to determine the frequency of payments they make to householders exporting excess electricity to the grid. Suppliers are required to have a process in place to deal with complaints relating to their SEG obligations.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what funding his Department plans to allocate to local authorities to enable (a) the development of local retrofit supply chains and (b) insulation of local authority housing stock.

In 2020 and 2021, the Government spent almost £6 million on the BEIS Skills Training Competition scheme which delivered around 7000 training opportunities for energy efficiency and low carbon heating supply chains. The Government is exploring options for further funding but at present has no plans to directly fund local authorities for supply chain development.

The Government has allocated £800m to Wave 2 of the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund, which is planned to be open to all registered providers of social housing, including private and local authority providers.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will establish an insulation programme that offers grant funding for people who are not able to afford the up-front costs of home insulation.

The Government is investing over £6.6 billion over this parliament to improve energy efficiency, supporting schemes such as the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund, Home Upgrade Grant, and Local Authority Delivery scheme.

The Government also published the consultation response for the next Energy Company Obligation, helping low-income households across Great Britain benefit from insulation and heating measures.

For those not eligible for funding, the Government recognises long-term finance will be essential. The Government is working with mortgage lenders to support homeowners improve the energy performance of their properties, and with the UK Infrastructure Bank as it considers investment opportunities including those to improve energy efficiency.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to make funding available to local councils to (a) insulate council housing stock and (b) invest in developing local supply chains able to retrofit home insulation.

The 2019 Conservative Manifesto committed to a £3.8billion Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund (SHDF) over a 10-year period to improve the energy performance of social homes. Around £240million has been awarded to social landlords through the SHDF Demonstrator and Wave 1 schemes. A further £800million was secured for SHDF in the 2021 Spending Review.

BEIS has spent nearly £6million on skills training, delivering around 7000 training opportunities for the energy-efficiency and low-carbon-heating supply chains. BEIS will continue to monitor the market and is considering options on how to work with industry to support training to increase capacity and reduce shortages.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to support the insulation of privately owned homes in order that they may achieve EPC band C by 2035.

The Government’s Heat and Buildings Strategy sets out the actions being taken to reduce emissions from homes and buildings, including investing an additional £3.9 billion to support people to make energy efficiency changes, including insulation.

This funding will support the Home Upgrade Grant which will provide grants to low-income households to upgrade the energy performance of the worst quality, off gas grid homes in England.

Alongside this, the Green Home Grants Local Authority Delivery Scheme (LAD) is also providing financial support to those in low-income households to install measures such as solid wall insulation, cavity wall insulation, loft insulation and underfloor insulation.

In addition, the Energy Company Obligation scheme, launched in 2013, is an obligation that the Government has placed on larger energy suppliers to install energy efficiency and heating measures to low income and vulnerable households across Great Britain. This scheme has delivered around 3.29m measures in 2.31m homes, up to the end of July 2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department's policy is on changing market rules to enable community energy groups to supply renewable energy on a local basis; and what steps his Department is taking to support local renewable electricity generation as a way of meeting the UK's Carbon Budget.

The current Ofgem regulatory regime allows for a company to supply a specified geographic area, and small scale electricity operations may be able to operate without being regulated by Ofgem.

We are supporting community energy through the Rural Community Energy Fund and there are already mechanisms in the market to allow local supply. We will work with Ofgem to ensure that local communities can play their role in delivering Net Zero and a Green Recovery.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the G7 Climate and Environment: Ministers’ Communiqué, published on 21 May 2021, when the long-term strategy for the UK’s pathway to zero greenhouse emissions by 2050 will be published.

The Net Zero Strategy will be published before COP26, and will build on my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution. This will be our Long-Term Low Emission Development Strategy to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in our information to facilitate clarity, transparency and understanding that accompanied the UK’s new nationally determined contribution back in December.

A number of sector strategies are also being published this year, as well as the Net Zero Strategy, including the Heat and Buildings Strategy and the Hydrogen Strategy.

We have also recently published the Transport Decarbonisation Plan – the first such Plan in the world – setting transport on the path to net zero by 2050.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what policies his Department (a) has proposed and (b) plans to propose to help the Government meet the 2050 net zero target. ​

My Rt. Hon. Friemd the Prime Minister has set out his Ten Point Plan for the UK to lead the world into a Green Industrial Revolution. This innovative programme sets out ambitious policies and £12 billion government investment to support up to 250,000 green jobs, accelerate our path to reaching net zero by 2050 and lay the foundations for our green recovery by building back greener from COVID-19.

The Energy White Paper sets out our plans for the transformation of our energy system, including actions to fully decarbonise electricity generation by 2050. This drives forward the Ten Point Plan commitments, reaffirming how clean energy means jobs and economic growth for the whole country, moving on from COVID-19 to build back better, support green jobs, and accelerate our path to net zero.

In March this year we published the Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy, the first by a major economy which sets out how industry can decarbonise in line with net zero while remaining competitive and without pushing emissions abroad. The strategy includes ambitions and expectations such as emissions in industry needing to fall by around two thirds by 2035, as well as policy priorities for the next ten years and seeks to provide industry with the long-term certainty it needs to invest in decarbonisation. We also recently published the Transport Decarbonisation Plan – the first such Plan in the world – setting transport on the path to net zero by 2050.

Through the above plans, we have set out the concrete steps that we will take to build back greener from the pandemic and reach net zero emissions by 2050. Ahead of COP26, we will bring forward further bold proposals, including a Net Zero Strategy, to cut emissions and create new jobs and industries across the whole country.

We are also publishing a number of sector strategies this year, as well as the Net Zero Strategy, including the Heat and Buildings Strategy and a Hydrogen Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many home owners have applied successfully to the Green Home Grants scheme from Croydon Central constituency, to date.

Official statistics for the Green Homes Grant (Voucher) Scheme were released on 18 March. From this release, 64 applications were received from households in the Croydon Central Parliamentary Constituency, up to the end of February.

The next statistical release will be published on 22 April.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent progress has been made on (a) removing and (b) replacing fossil fuel boilers in (i) public sector and (ii) private sector homes.

BEIS have been supporting the installation of renewable heating systems in public and private sector homes and buildings via the Renewable Heat Incentive. The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive has supported 84,707 installations as of December 2020 and the Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive has supported 20,673 installations as of December 2020.

The Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme aims to deliver energy efficiency and clean heat upgrades to 600,000 homes across England. Clean heat measures (including heat pumps, solar thermal panels and biomass boilers) are one of the groups of primary measures funded through the scheme.

The £1 billion Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme provides grants for public sector bodies to fund energy efficiency and heat decarbonisation measures, including low carbon heating. My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s Ten Point Plan included a commitment for further funding for the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme in the 2021/22 financial year, with more information to be announced in due course.

In addition to this, BEIS’ Heat Networks Investment Project has awarded over £125m for the development and construction of heat networks in England and Wales since its launch in 2018. This will enable greater deployment of heat networks as an alternative to domestic boilers.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what progress has been made on banning the installation of fossil fuel boilers by 2025 in new build homes.

The Government is committed to achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. We are clear that the continued use of fossil fuels for heating is not compatible with that ambition.

When it is implemented in 2025, the Future Homes Standard will ensure that all new build homes are zero carbon ready. While building regulations themselves do not mandate or ban the use of any specific technologies, we intend to set the performance standard at a level which means that new homes will not be built with fossil fuel heating.

In line with that ambition, the 2020 Energy White Paper committed to consulting on whether it is appropriate to end gas grid connections to new build homes from 2025, in favour of clean energy alternatives. We will provide more detail on the Government’s approach in our Heat and Buildings Strategy, which we will publish in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will ensure that insulation products used in the public sector decarbonisation scheme are aligned with the Government ban on combustible materials.

The Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme will invest £1 billion by giving grants to public sector bodies to fund energy efficiency and low carbon heat measures, supporting up to 30,000 skilled jobs.

All measures installed using the scheme must comply with all relevant legislation.

6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to support hydrogen development as a sustainable energy resource in order to meet the Government's pledge to become carbon neutral by 2050.

The Government is committed to exploring the development of hydrogen as a strategic decarbonised energy carrier, alongside electricity and other decarbonised gases. We are investing in innovation, with up to £108m supporting a range of projects to explore and develop the potential of low carbon hydrogen across the value chain from production to end use. We are investing in production at scale through the development of the £100m Low Carbon Hydrogen Production Fund, announced in 2019, and developing sustainable business models to support low carbon hydrogen production at scale. Alongside this we are working with a range of stakeholders to develop opportunities for scale up of UK hydrogen, notably through the Industrial Clusters Mission and the Offshore Wind Sector Deal.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of changes to Level 3 Qualifications on the education of 16 to 18 year-olds.

The department has published impact assessments to reflect the potential effect of reforms to Level 3, post-16 qualifications in England on the education of 16 to 19 year olds.

The most recent impact assessment, published in March 2023, provides an overview of the potential effects on students aged 16 to 19 resulting from the proposed removal of public funding approval from those qualifications that have been assessed as overlapping with T Levels. This can be accessed here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1146228/EIA_updated_final_wave_1_2_T_Level_overlap_inc_Health_and_Science.pdf.

A further impact assessment, published in July 2022, which reflects all planned reforms to qualifications at Level 3, is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1091841/Revised_Review_of_post-16_qualifications_at_level_3_in_England_impact_assessment.pdf.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has plans to review statutory guidance on school uniforms in the context of increases in the cost of living.

Schools must regard the statutory guidance when they are developing and implementing their uniform policy. This demonstrates the Government’s commitment to keeping the cost of school uniform reasonable. The Department will monitor the impact of the guidance on an ongoing basis.

It is important that schools carefully consider the cost of their uniform and comply with the guidance, which is designed to ensure the cost of uniforms is reasonable and secures best value for money for parents.

Headteachers know their school communities best and can make decisions on the branded items that are most appropriate to their school. Branded items create a sense of common identity and prevent pupils from competing against one another in the latest fashion trends. The guidance requires headteachers to carefully consider the overall cost implications of their chosen approach, including whether requiring a branded item is the most cost-effective way of achieving the desired result for their uniform. To ensure that school uniform acts as a social leveller, optional branded items should be kept to a minimum.

Schools should be compliant with the majority of the guidance by September 2022, except where this would mean breaching a pre-existing contract, or where they need time to put a contract in place.

There are currently no plans to review the statutory guidance on the cost of school uniforms, published in November 2021, in the context of current increases in the cost of living. The guidance comes into force this month and requires schools to ensure their uniform is affordable.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of offering more support to families on low incomes with school uniform costs.

Schools must regard the statutory guidance when they are developing and implementing their uniform policy. This demonstrates the Government’s commitment to keeping the cost of school uniform reasonable. The Department will monitor the impact of the guidance on an ongoing basis.

It is important that schools carefully consider the cost of their uniform and comply with the guidance, which is designed to ensure the cost of uniforms is reasonable and secures best value for money for parents.

Headteachers know their school communities best and can make decisions on the branded items that are most appropriate to their school. Branded items create a sense of common identity and prevent pupils from competing against one another in the latest fashion trends. The guidance requires headteachers to carefully consider the overall cost implications of their chosen approach, including whether requiring a branded item is the most cost-effective way of achieving the desired result for their uniform. To ensure that school uniform acts as a social leveller, optional branded items should be kept to a minimum.

Schools should be compliant with the majority of the guidance by September 2022, except where this would mean breaching a pre-existing contract, or where they need time to put a contract in place.

There are currently no plans to review the statutory guidance on the cost of school uniforms, published in November 2021, in the context of current increases in the cost of living. The guidance comes into force this month and requires schools to ensure their uniform is affordable.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will issue guidance limiting the amount of branded clothing that schools may require pupils to wear as part of school uniform, in order to reduce the financial burden on low-income families.

In November last year, the department published statutory guidance on the cost of school uniforms, to which schools must have regard when designing and implementing their uniform policies. The guidance, which comes into effect this month, requires schools to ensure that their uniform is affordable and secures best value for money for parents, including keeping branded items to a minimum and limiting them to low-cost or long-lasting items.

It also requires schools to:

  • Give the highest priority to cost and value for money in their supply arrangements.
  • Make second-hand uniform available for parents to acquire.
  • Publish their uniform policy on their website and ensure that this is easily understood.
  • Engage with parents and pupils on cost issues when they are developing their uniform policy.

School leaders know their pupils and the community they serve best and can make decisions on the branded items that are most appropriate to their school. Branded items create a sense of common identity and prevent pupils from competing against one another in the latest fashion trends. The guidance requires school leaders to consider carefully the overall cost implications of their chosen approach, including whether requiring a branded item is the most cost-effective way of achieving the desired result for their uniform.

The guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cost-of-school-uniforms/cost-of-school-uniforms.

5th May 2020
What steps he is taking to ensure that the attainment gap between disadvantaged children and their peers does not widen during the covid-19 outbreak.

The government has already committed over £100 million to boost remote education, including by providing devices and internet access to vulnerable children who need it most.

Schools also continue to receive the pupil premium – worth around £2.4 billion annually – to help them support their disadvantaged pupils.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to help ensure that Ofwat effectively challenges water companies for breaches of their responsibilities.

The Government has established a robust system of independent economic regulation for the purpose of ensuring the public receive value for money from their water companies. The Government’s Strategic Policy Statement for Ofwat makes it clear that we expect Ofwat to work with other regulators and wider stakeholders to ensure security of supply and protect and enhance the environment.

Through the Environment Act 2021, the Government has given Ofwat improved powers to modify water company licenses without consent. On Monday 20 March 2023, Ofwat announced a new measure that will enable it to take enforcement action against water companies that do not link dividend payments to performance for both customers and the environment.

Where companies fail to meet their obligations, regulators have not hesitated to act. Ofwat’s annual performance assessment process, and the automatic penalties that apply to companies who underperform, represents an excellent example of strong economic and environmental regulation. In November 2022, Ofwat announced financial penalties of £132 million applying to 11 water companies, in response to underperformance in areas such as water supply interruptions, pollution incidents and internal sewer flooding. Money from Ofwat’s penalties will rightly be returned to customers through water bills in 2023-24.

Ofwat is currently undertaking the largest ever civil investigations into over two thousand wastewater treatment works.

The Government will continue to work with water sector regulators to hold water companies to account on poor performance and drive improvements which benefit customers and the environment.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions she has had with local government leaders on water and river quality.

The Secretary of State frequently holds meetings with key stakeholders on water and river quality.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions she has had with representatives of local government on water quality.

On drinking water quality there have been no recent discussions with local government. Local authorities are the regulators of private drinking water supplies and are responsible for identifying risks to the quality of drinking water with comprehensive monitoring programmes in place. In England, in 2021, private water supply compliance with the drinking water regulations was 96.9% which has been steadily improving (96.4% in 2020, 96.6% in 2019 and 95.2% in 2018).

The Chief Inspector of the Drinking Water Inspectorate publishes an annual report that provides an overview of the quality of private water in supplies in England. https://www.dwi.gov.uk/what-we-do/annual-report/.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department has plans to monitor the volume of storm overflow events.

Using powers in the landmark Environment Act, we will significantly improve transparency by requiring companies to make discharge data available in near real time to the public and monitor water quality upstream and downstream of their assets.

The Environment Agency has instructed water companies to install flow monitors at 2000 wastewater treatment works. These provide important data on the volume of treated final effluent discharges to the environment.

Earlier this month, the Government launched our consultation on Continuous Water Quality Monitoring and Event Duration Monitoring. This outlines the Government’s proposals to enhance the monitoring of storm overflow and final effluent discharges.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will take steps with Ofwat to help ensure that water companies deliver year-on-year reductions in the number of pollution incidents with a target of zero serious incidents by 2030.

Our Strategic Policy Statement (SPS) for Ofwat sets clear priorities for the water sector in England. This includes an expectation that Ofwat will challenge water companies to demonstrate how they will achieve zero serious pollution incidents by 2030 and we will continue to work with the regulator to ensure this happens.

The Environment Act 2021 gave Ofwat increased powers to modify water company licence conditions to improve water companies’ performance. This means Ofwat can modify company licenses.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ban the (a) export of plastic waste and (b) most polluting single use plastics as part of its plans to tackle the causes of plastic pollution.

(a) The Government has committed to banning the export of plastic waste to countries that are not members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). We will consult before the end of 2022 on options to deliver the ban.

(b) The Resources and Waste Strategy for England sets out the Government's plans to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste throughout the life of the 25 Year Environment Plan. For the most problematic plastics we are going faster - which is why we have committed to work towards all plastic packaging placed on the market being recyclable, reusable, or compostable by 2025. We have made significant progress, introducing one of the world's toughest bans on microbeads in rinse-off personal care products and significantly reducing the use of single-use carrier bags use with our 5p charge. In May we increased the charge to 10p and extended it to all retailers.

In general, we prefer to help people and companies make the right choice, rather than banning items outright. It is ultimately for businesses to decide what materials they use to supply products to customers. There may, however, be times when a ban is appropriate as part of a wider strategic approach. In October 2020, we introduced a restriction on the supply of plastic drinking straws, cotton buds and drink stirrers, and we are currently in the process of preparing a public consultation on banning the supply of single-use plastic plates, cutlery and expanded polystyrene drinks containers. We will continue to review the latest evidence on problematic products and/ or materials to take a systematic approach to reducing the use of unnecessary single-use plastic products.

We have included a number of measures in the Environment Bill to enable us to tackle plastics and plastic waste. These include measures to impose charges on single-use plastic items; introduce a Deposit Return Scheme for drinks containers; and make producers cover the costs of collecting and managing plastic packaging waste. As well as this, the Bill gives us powers to provide consistent recycling services for household and businesses; ensure all packaging is labelled either 'recyclable' or 'not recyclable'; set requirements regarding design and material usage for products; and will allow us to better control the export of plastic waste.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Government's commitment to increase tree planting across the UK to 30,000 hectares per year by 2025 set out in the England Tree Strategy consultation document published in June 2020, how many trees have been planted to date; whether those trees are (a) whips or (b) adult trees; where he plans to plant trees in the future; whether he plans to plant trees in Croydon; who will be responsible for maintaining those trees; and which Minister is accountable for that programme.

The Forestry Commission produces statistics on new planting of woodland for the UK. These are Official Statistics produced to meet the standards of the Code of Practice for Statistics and can be found on the Forest Research web site together with background information at: https://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/tools-and-resources/statistics/forestry-statistics/. The statistics are produced annually and show recorded new planting from administrative records and grant schemes with estimates for planting without grant aid. It is assumed nearly all the trees newly planted are whips with small stems or relatively small planting stock rather than larger trees.

The most recent statistics show there was 13,660 hectares of new planting (woodland creation) in the UK in 2019-20, of which 2,340 hectares were in England. At least a further 842 hectares have been reported as newly planted between 1 April 2020 and 31 December 2020 in England.

In addition, the Urban Tree Challenge Fund supports the planting of larger, ‘standard’, trees outside of woodlands in England. The Fund supported the planting of 7,630 standard trees in 2019-20 and 11,839 standard trees in 2020-21. Of these, 734 were planted in Croydon.

Grant schemes are demand led so it is not generally possible to state where the trees will be newly planted, although a range of sensitivities will prevent permission to plant being granted in some locations. We are aware of plans to plant a further 66 standards trees in 2021-22 in Croydon supported by the Urban Tree Challenge Fund. Additional planting will be dependent on future applications.

The maintenance of new trees and woodland is usually the responsibility of the grant agreement holder and the grant award includes a contribution to costs to ensure successful establishment of the newly planted trees.

The Minister who has forestry in his portfolio and is accountable for the programme is Lord Goldsmith.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking with Cabinet colleagues to support local authorities' delivery of the Transport decarbonisation plan.

The Department is supporting local authorities to decarbonise with funding and tools, helping them to build their capacity and capability. Key programmes include the £5.7 billion City Region Sustainable Transport Settlements and the £4.8 billion Levelling Up Fund, which supports local delivery of transport decarbonisation alongside other government objectives.

The Government has also established Active Travel England to help local authorities deliver high quality walking and cycling schemes and last month announced an additional £56 million of public and industry funding to support the rollout of local electric vehicle chargepoints across the country.

The Government will shortly be consulting on new Local Transport Plan (LTP) guidance that will support better and more integrated strategic planning and provide new guidance to authorities in quantifying the carbon impact of their plans. This is in addition to work underway to update its Local Authority Transport Decarbonisation Toolkit on a range of interventions.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if she will make an assessment of (a) the results of Germany's recent rail ticket subsidy scheme and (b) the potential merits of applying a similar approach to public transport in the United Kingdom.

In considering any new rail fare discounts, the Government would need to carefully consider the potential benefits to passengers, costs to taxpayers and impact on the operation of the railway.

On 3 September, the Government announced plans to provide up to £60 million to help bus operators cap single fares on most services in England, outside London, at £2 per journey. The fare cap will run for three months from January to March 2023 and could help millions save on travel costs.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if she will take steps to encourage people to choose to travel by rail instead of by car in order to reduce demand for petrol and diesel and lower vehicle emissions.

As set out in the Transport Decarbonisation Plan, supporting people to choose sustainable travel choices, including rail, has the potential to reduce carbon emissions and fuel demand, whilst also improving congestion and air quality.

We are continuing to work with the sector to tackle the challenges that continue to face the railway as it recovers from the pandemic. We remain committed to reforming our railways, improving journeys for passengers and creating a better, more modern UK rail industry.

15th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his planned timetable is for publication of the independent evaluation of the NHS England special schools eye care service.

The NHS Long Term Plan made a commitment to ensure that children and young people with a learning disability and/or autism in special residential schools have access to sight checks in school. To fulfil that commitment, NHS England commenced a proof-of-concept programme in 2021, piloting sight testing and the dispensing of glasses in special schools.

This programme is currently subject to independent evaluation, which includes engagement with a wide range of parents, special schools and other stakeholders with an interest. We expect the evaluation to have concluded by May 2023. The evaluation of and learning from this work will inform decisions about how the eye care needs of people with learning disabilities should be commissioned.

The Department will also be hosting a roundtable currently scheduled for 28 March 2023, to discuss eye care services for people with learning disabilities.

15th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to conduct a public consultation to inform the (a) structure, (b) funding and (c) commissioning of a potential model of eye care in special schools.

The NHS Long Term Plan made a commitment to ensure that children and young people with a learning disability and/or autism in special residential schools have access to sight checks in school. To fulfil that commitment, NHS England commenced a proof-of-concept programme in 2021, piloting sight testing and the dispensing of glasses in special schools.

This programme is currently subject to independent evaluation, which includes engagement with a wide range of parents, special schools and other stakeholders with an interest. We expect the evaluation to have concluded by May 2023. The evaluation of and learning from this work will inform decisions about how the eye care needs of people with learning disabilities should be commissioned.

The Department will also be hosting a roundtable currently scheduled for 28 March 2023, to discuss eye care services for people with learning disabilities.

15th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to improve access to eye care for people with learning disabilities.

The NHS Long Term Plan made a commitment to ensure that children and young people with a learning disability and/or autism in special residential schools have access to sight checks in school. To fulfil that commitment, NHS England commenced a proof-of-concept programme in 2021, piloting sight testing and the dispensing of glasses in special schools.

This programme is currently subject to independent evaluation, which includes engagement with a wide range of parents, special schools and other stakeholders with an interest. We expect the evaluation to have concluded by May 2023. The evaluation of and learning from this work will inform decisions about how the eye care needs of people with learning disabilities should be commissioned.

The Department will also be hosting a roundtable currently scheduled for 28 March 2023, to discuss eye care services for people with learning disabilities.

7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding is spent on providing glasses for patients with the myopia nystagmus condition annually.

The information requested is not held centrally.

7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many individuals are provided with publicly-funded support for glasses associated with the Myopia Nystagmus condition as of 6 December 2022.

The information requested is not held centrally.

24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Legionnaires Disease (a) cases and (b) deaths in hospitals there have been since the beginning of the covid-19 pandemic; what steps hospitals have taken to protect people with that condition from additional harm during the pandemic; and whether this will be investigated as part of the covid-19 Inquiry.

The data is not available in the format requested. The COVID-19 infection prevention and control guidance aimed to support healthcare organisations to maintain the safety of patients and staff. Organisations continue to be responsible for managing the risks associated with infectious agents, such as legionnaires, by completing risk assessments approved through local governance procedures.

The recommended terms of reference for the COVID-19 Inquiry include examining the management of the pandemic in hospitals, including infection prevention and control and the consequences of the pandemic on provision for non-COVID-19 related conditions and needs. The Government will consider these recommendations and publish the Inquiry's final terms of reference in due course.

16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his Department's policy is on how the £50 million for targeted motor neurone disease research through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Motor Neurone Disease Research Unit can be accessed.

The Government delivers research on motor neurone disease (MND) through the Department of Health and Social Care, via the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and through the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, via UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). The Government has committed to make £50 million available for MND research over the next five years through NIHR and UKRI. The Government has also committed to establish an NIHR MND research unit to coordinate innovative research applications. The NIHR and UKRI rely on researchers submitting high-quality applications to access funding. All applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the importance of the topic to patients and health and care services, value for money and scientific quality.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether money allocated to people under the Windrush Compensation Scheme is exempted from consideration in means testing for social care.

Where a local authority charges a person for their care and support, they may take most of the income and benefits people receive into account when determining how much they should pay. This is unless it is specifically required to be disregarded by The Care and Support (Charging and Assessment of Resources) Regulations 2014 or the associated statutory guidance. The Windrush Compensation Scheme is not currently disregarded, although we are keeping this under active review.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the validity of reports that the NHS track and trace app will not work in (a) Croydon, (b) London and (c) other densely populated areas.

Following rigorous field testing and a trial on the Isle of Wight, we have chosen to bring forward a solution that brings together the work that NHSX and Google/Apple have carried out separately. This is an important step that will bring together the necessary functionality required to carry out contact tracing across all parts of the United Kingdom.

7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether it is her policy to recognise the importance of loss and damage finance as a pillar of wider climate finance; and what plans her Department has to increase the international availability of such funds.

The UK provided £9.8 billion of International Climate Finance (ICF) between 2011/12 and 2020/21, and we are committed to providing a further £11.6 billion between 2021/22 and 2025/26 (a doubling of our ICF spend in the previous five years), with an extra £1 billion in 2025 if the economy grows as forecast. Between 2016 and 2019, the UK spent £2 billion of ICF on adaptation and investments in areas needed to address loss and damage directly linked to climate change, including over £200 million on humanitarian assistance, £283 million on social protection and £115 million on financial protection and risk management.

In addition, we are using our COP Presidency to drive greater action on adaptation and loss and damage having given these issues more prominence at COP26 than at any other COP, including by hosting a Presidency event on Loss and Damage. We are delighted that this COP recognised the need for money to be provided to tackle loss and damage through existing sources, agreed the functions and funding arrangements for the Santiago Network and founded the Glasgow Dialogue, where Parties, civil society and technicians will come together to discuss how to increase the funds applied to loss and damage and how Parties in need can access these funds.

13th Oct 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps HMRC is taking to help reduce the risk of a (a) major IT failure and (b) security breach.

HMRC continually upgrades IT systems as part of ongoing maintenance.

HMRC has 24/7 support operation in place with established processes for early identification of incidents and respond to these appropriately.

Customer data is subject to high levels of protection and HMRC takes data protection seriously.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of a windfall tax on North Sea oil and gas producers on the cost of living.

The Government recognises the challenges many are facing with pressures on household budgets. We are providing support worth over £20 billion across this financial year and next that will help families with the cost of living. This includes cutting the Universal Credit taper rate and increasing work allowances to make sure work pays, freezing alcohol and fuel duties to keep costs down, as well as the £9.1 billion package announced in February 2022 to help households with rising energy bills.

The Government places additional taxes on the extraction of oil and gas, with companies engaged in the production of oil and gas on the UK Continental Shelf subject to headline tax rates on their profits that are currently more than double those paid by other businesses. To date, the sector has paid more than £375 billion in production taxes.

All taxes are kept under review and any changes are considered and announced by the Chancellor.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to support an extension of the Debt Service Suspension Initiative and cancelling debts with the aim of enabling countries to respond more effectively to climate change.

The UK has supported significant action on debt through the G20-Paris Club Debt Service Suspension Initiative (DSSI). Preliminary estimates suggest the DSSI has suspended over $12.7 billion in debt service repayments due by the poorest countries in the world. In April 2021, the G20 and Paris Club endorsed a final extension of the DSSI to the end of 2021.

The DSSI was designed as a short-term initiative to tackle the immediate financing needs of eligible countries. To deliver a longer-term, more sustainable approach to dealing with debt vulnerabilities the UK, along with the G20, also agreed a new Common Framework for Debt Treatments beyond the DSSI, designed to provide more efficient, equitable and effective debt treatments. The UK is fully committed to implementing the Common Framework in coordination with our international partners. This will support those countries who request a debt treatment in returning to a more fiscally sustainable path and support their development goals, including responding to climate change.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent steps the Government has taken on spending £9.2 billion on energy efficiency measures over the course of the 2019 Parliament.

We have so far invested over £2.5bn to support both low-income households and public sector organisations to install energy efficiency measures, while also expanding the Energy Company Obligation to £1bn per year. This is significantly above the £1.28bn originally included in the 2019 manifesto covering the first two years of this Parliament.

The recent spending review committed further funding to improve the energy efficiency of buildings. This included £950 million for the Home Upgrade Grant, £800 million for the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund £1.4 billion to help decarbonise the public sector estate.

We are also introducting important non-spending policies to support the uptake of energy efficiency, as set out in the Heat and Building Strategy.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the level of spending required in 2021-22 for the transition to achieve net zero.

The Spending Review 2020 allocated funding for 2021/22, and the full settlement can be found: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/spending-review-2020-documents. Spending Review 2021 is currently ongoing and is due to be published on the 27th October. This will include allocation of spending up to 2024/25.

At Spending Reviews, departments follow Green Book guidance to both understand the wider strategic context of their policies, including their contribution to Net Zero, and assess all costs and benefits of their bids, including climate and environmental impacts. At the Treasury we consider these impacts when we assess the value for money of different spending programmes and the benefits they would deliver.

At Spending Review 2020, we required departments to improve the information they provided about the impact on greenhouse gas emissions from their spending bids. We have written out to departments with our expectations to improve data collection on emissions for Spending Review 2021.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if she will include a review of the police allocation formula in the Comprehensive Spending Review.

The Government is alive to the concerns held by many in the policing sector over the police funding formula, and Home Office Ministers have agreed that the current arrangements are out of date. We are considering the police funding formula as part of our long-term vision for policing. Our priority for the Spending Review is continuing to support police forces with the required resources to tackle crime. At the 2019 Spending Review the Government agreed a total police funding settlement of up to £15.2 billion in 2020/21, which is an increase of up to £1.1 billion compared to 2019/20 and the biggest increase in funding for the policing system since 2010.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to page 101 of the Central Government Supply Estimates 2021-22: Supplementary Estimates, published on 22 February 2022, how the additional £404,116,000 funding for asylum support was spent.

The Home Office does not routinely publish data breaking down the additional expenditure spent on asylum support or illegal migration.

Home Office expenditure is detailed in the Home Office Annual Report and Accounts, with the most recent Annual Report and Accounts for 2021 to 2022 published on 14 July 2022 and available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2021-to-2022.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to page 96 of the Central Government Supply Estimates 2022-23: Supplementary Estimates, published on 21 February 2023, how the additional £334,820,000 funding to tackle illegal immigration was spent.

The Home Office does not routinely publish data breaking down the additional expenditure spent on asylum support or illegal migration.

Home Office expenditure is detailed in the Home Office Annual Report and Accounts, with the most recent Annual Report and Accounts for 2021 to 2022 published on 14 July 2022 and available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2021-to-2022.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to page 96 of the Central Government Supply Estimates 2022-23: Supplementary Estimates, published on 21 February 2023, how the additional £116,000,000 funding to tackle illegal immigration was spent.

The Home Office does not routinely publish data breaking down the additional expenditure spent on asylum support or illegal migration.

Home Office expenditure is detailed in the Home Office Annual Report and Accounts, with the most recent Annual Report and Accounts for 2021 to 2022 published on 14 July 2022 and available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2021-to-2022.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to page 96 of the Central Government Supply Estimates 2022-23: Supplementary Estimates, published on 21 February 2023, how the additional £1,614,856,000 for asylum support costs was spent.

The Home Office does not routinely publish data breaking down the additional expenditure spent on asylum support or illegal migration.

Home Office expenditure is detailed in the Home Office Annual Report and Accounts, with the most recent Annual Report and Accounts for 2021 to 2022 published on 14 July 2022 and available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2021-to-2022.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to page 95 of the Central Government Supply Estimates 2022-23: Supplementary Estimates, published on 21 February 2023, how the additional £269,000,000 funding to tackle illegal immigration was spent.

Funding drawn down to cover illegal migration spend across the illegal migration portfolio was used for both: a range of measures announced during the financial year 22/23; and additional asylum support costs. The £269,000,000 referenced was principally used for two areas: the Migration and Economic Development Partnership (MEDP) with Rwanda Factsheet: Migration and Economic Development Partnership - Home Office in the media (blog.gov.uk); and to cover increasing asylum support costs.

Asylum Support costs represent spending to meet our statutory obligations for providing support to destitute asylum seekers in the UK, which includes the provision of accommodation, transportation, and support services to the Supported Population. We also fund Local Authorities for their costs incurred in supporting Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children & Care Leavers.

6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much was provided to police forces through (a) the DCLG grant, (b) the Welsh grant and (c) other grants in 2010/11.

The information requested is available online, on the Government website, at the link listed below. The tables show police forces’ funding allocations for 2010-11 which contain information on the DCLG grant, Welsh grant and other grants.

https://hansard.parliament.uk/lords/2009-11-26/debates/09112628000414/PoliceGrants

It is not possible to make direct comparisons between current police funding figures and police funding in the years before 2015-16 due to a number of significant changes in the structure of police funding and the structure of policing over the period.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much the new Emergency Services Network (a) was originally projected to cost and (b) is currently projected to cost as of 19 October 2022.

The estimated cost of providing critical emergency services communications between 2015/16 and 2036/37 is £11.3bn, as per the plan agreed in the July 2021 Full Business Case.

Within this total, the cost of the programme to deliver ESN is £1.6bn, compared with the original estimate of £1.2bn. The £11.3bn also includes Airwave and Legacy contracts, and the ongoing costs of the replacement ESN service.

This assumed Airwave and Legacy system costs of approximately £450m annually (before any impact from the CMA findings), compared with ESN at around £250m per annum.

There are a number of elements that may impact the overall delivery cost and time.

This includes but is not limited to the recent provisional CMA findings into Motorola’s dual role as owner of Airwave and supplier on the programme and any extension to the Airwave shutdown date beyond the end of 2026, as well as contract negotiations for both Lot 2 and 3 as these are due to end in 2024.

Our goal is to work to deliver ESN as swiftly and safely as possible.

19th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what is the planned completion date for the Emergency Services Network.

In 2021 the Business Case for ESN set out the expectation that transition to ESN would take place in 2024 with Airwave shut down by 2026.

However, recent changes in our commercial arrangements with one of our key suppliers means that we are exploring future options for the delivery of the ‘user services’ contract with ESN.

This activity will have an impact on the timetable for ESN delivery and we will know more once any re-procurement activity concludes and integrated delivery plans are built. We will share more information when it is known.

Our goal is to work to deliver ESN as swiftly and safely as possible.

19th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what was the (a) daily, (b) monthly and (c) yearly cost for the use of the airwave service since 2017.

From 2016/17 to 2021/22 the Airwave System has averaged approximately £370m per annum, which includes network and devices for the three emergency services. With the impact of inflation, the projected annual costs for the Airwave System were anticipated to be approximately £450m per year in the July 2021 Full Business Case. To note that there are other Airwave users beyond the three emergency services that are invoiced directly, and are not captured in these costs.

There are a number of elements that may impact the overall delivery cost and time. This includes but is not limited to the recent provisional CMA findings into Motorola’s dual role as owner of Airwave and supplier on the programme and any extension to the Airwave shutdown date beyond the end of 2026, as well as negotiations for both Lot 2 and 3 as both of these contracts are due to end in 2024. Our goal is to work to deliver ESN as swiftly and safely as possible.

17th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to ensure that the provisions of the Public Service Pensions and Judicial Offices Act 2022 will apply to police officers who retire after 1 October 2023.

The Government is taking steps to remove discrimination on the grounds of age, associated with the transitional protection arrangements linked to the 2015 pension reforms, which was subsequently identified by the courts.

The Public Service Pensions and Judicial Offices Act (PSPJOA) received Royal Assent on 10 March, establishing the legal framework to provide this remedy. The Police and Firefighters’ Pension Schemes (Amendment) Regulations 2022 (‘the Regulations’) provided the first, prospective, element of the remedy in respect of police pensions.

The second, retrospective, part of the remedy is more complex and will require further detailed changes to scheme regulations using the powers in the PSPJOA. These changes will be in force by 1 October 2023, in line with the Government’s commitments under that Act.

5th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the cost to the public purse was of (a) heating and (b) electricity for police stations in England and Wales in each of the last five years.

The Home Office does not collect data on the cost of heating or electricity for police stations in England and Wales.

Decisions on how to use funding and resources are an operational matter for Chief Constables, and Police and Crime Commissioners are best placed to make decisions on the management of the police estate.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason her Department does not measure levels of anti-social behaviour in a standardised national format.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has plans to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of anti-social behaviour.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to encourage the use of the community trigger in relation to anti-social behaviour.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which (a) public bodies, (b) private bodies and (c) individuals were consulted on the development of the Anti-social behaviour principles.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether additional resources have been provided to support the delivery of the Anti-social Behaviour Strategic Board's principles, published on 20 July 2022.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the minutes of the Anti-social Behaviour Strategic Board's meetings held since its establishment.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether there will be sanctions against (a) Police forces, (b) local authorities, (c) relevant agencies and (d) individuals that do not follow the Anti-social Behaviour principles, published on 20 July 2022.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish (a) working, (b) background, (c) justification and (d) other documents produced by her Department as part of the development of the Anti-social Behaviour Strategic Board's principles.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish a list of meetings held by the Anti-social Behaviour Strategic Board since its establishment.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with relevant stakeholders in the (a) public and (b) private sectors on encouraging the use of the community trigger in relation to anti-social behaviour in local authorities.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what (a) civil, (b) statutory and (c) criminal powers are available to relevant agencies to support the delivery of the Anti-social Behaviour Strategic Board principles, published on 20 July 2022.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish a list of attendees at Anti-social Behaviour Strategic Board meetings held since its establishment.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has had discussions with (a) Cabinet colleagues and (b) relevant stakeholders on the potential merits of introducing standardised national measuring of levels of anti-social behaviour.

The Government is committed to tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour (ASB). As set out in the Beating Crime Plan, we are working with local areas to ensure the powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the Community Trigger, are being implemented effectively and have recently updated Home Office statutory guidance, which supports local areas to make effective use of the powers.

The Home Office chairs the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategic Board which brings together key partners from relevant bodies across policing, local government and NGOs, and other Government departments, to discuss any arising ASB issues and share best practice. We do not routinely publish the dates of meetings, minutes nor names of those who attend this board.

We have recently published multi-agency principles which seek to describe a consistent approach to addressing ASB in local communities. The principles are intended to act as a guide in seeking to deliver the best possible outcomes for victims of ASB and we encourage local assessment on how processes and practices compare to the standard outlined in the principles. The principles were drafted and endorsed by the ASB Strategic Board who also wrote out to relevant organisations including police forces, local authorities and housing associations for feedback on the draft principles. We have provided partners with a Q&A document to support implementation of the ASB Principles. In line with usual practice, we do not propose to publish drafts of documents or other material prepared as part of the development of the Principles.

No additional funding will be available for implementing the principles however, the Safer Streets Fund aims to support local areas in preventing and tackling neighbourhood crime, ASB and violence against women and girls. Bidding for the fourth round has now closed but we look forward to seeing how relevant successful projects incorporate the principles into their activity.

We monitor the national statistics on ASB through the police recorded crime incident data and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), which presents people’s perception of the levels of ASB. Given the localised nature of ASB, we do not currently plan to introduce standardised national measuring of levels of ASB, however the multi-agency principles included local reporting and referral pathways. Recommendations from Part Two of the Police and Crime Commissioner Review were published on Monday 7 March 2022. The overall package strengthens and expands the role of PCCs. We want to ensure that PCCs have sufficient tools and levers to more effectively scrutinise and challenge partnership activity on ASB. To do this, PCCs should be able to bring partners together on ASB, direct local ASB strategy and request local data on ASB.

12th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether data exists on the number of police warrant cards unaccounted for in police forces in England and Wales.

The Home Office does not centrally collect or hold information on the number of police warrant cards that are unaccounted for in police forces in England & Wales.

Policies on the return of force equipment, including warrant cards, are an operational matter.

25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish data on the number of strip-searches carried out on children by police forces in England and Wales in each of the last five years.

The Home Office have recently introduced a data collection on strip searches to the Annual Data Requirement. Police forces will be providing this data for 2021/22 on a voluntary basis, and it is due for publication towards the end of 2022. The data collection will include details on the age of persons strip searched by the police in England and Wales.

However, prior to April 2021 we do not hold data on strip searches

22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether data exists on the number of police warrant cards currently unaccounted for in Police Forces in England and Wales.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to introduce new guidance on the use of strip-searches on children.

The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) Codes of Practice govern how the police should undertake a strip search. The College of Policing’s Authorised Professional Practice (APP) on Stop and Search provides further guidance for the police on the use of strip search.

We expect officers to follow the law and the best practice guidance set by the College of Policing in its APP. Any concerns about the use of strip searches should be raised with the relevant force or the Independent Office of Police Conduct (IOPC), who investigate serious matters involving the police. We will consider all recommendations made for the Home Office as a result of these investigations very carefully.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether data is available on the number of strip-searches carried out on children by police forces in England and Wales.

The information requested is not held.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on stop and search on an annual basis as part of the ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical publication. The most recent data are available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-other-pace-powers-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2021

The Home Office have recently introduced a data collection on strip searches to the Annual Data Requirement. Police forces will be providing this data for 2021/22 on a voluntary basis, and it is due for publication towards the end 2022. The data collection will include details on the age, sex and ethnicity of persons strip searched by the police in England and Wales.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether data is available on the number of strip searches of children, broken down by (a) age, (b) ethnicity, (c) sex and (d) gender.

The information requested is not held.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on stop and search on an annual basis as part of the ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical publication. The most recent data are available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-other-pace-powers-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2021

The Home Office have recently introduced a data collection on strip searches to the Annual Data Requirement. Police forces will be providing this data for 2021/22 on a voluntary basis, and it is due for publication towards the end 2022. The data collection will include details on the age, sex and ethnicity of persons strip searched by the police in England and Wales.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether there are police officers working in positions classified as sensitive who do not have the required level of clearance to work in those positions.

The Home Office does not hold information on police officers’ level of vetting clearances or number of sensitive posts in each force, or on those officers waiting for clearance. Vetting and recruitment matters are handled independently, and on a case-by-case basis, by each force. Vetting decisions should be made in accordance with the statutory Vetting Code issued by the College of Policing.

The Government does recognise public concern around police vetting and is aware that Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary & Fire and Rescue Services (HMICFRS), as part of their inspection which the Home Secretary commissioned after the findings of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel (DMIP), provided criticisms of the Metropolitan Police Services’ ability to detect whether those occupying sensitive posts had been vetted to the correct level. We expect the MPS and the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC) to take immediate action to address this.

The Home Secretary has separately commissioned HMICFRS to carry out an urgent thematic inspection of vetting and counter-corruption procedures in policing across England and Wales. We expect any recommendations from this to be fully considered by all forces.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether data is available on the number of police warrant cards that are unaccounted for in police forces in England and Wales.

The Home Office does not hold information on the number of police warrant cards that are unaccounted for in police forces in England & Wales.

Policies on the return of force equipment, including warrant cards, are an operational matter.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether data is available on the number of strip searches undertaken on children by police forces in England and Wales.

The information requested is not held.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on stop and search on an annual basis as part of the ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical publication. The most recent data are available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-other-pace-powers-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2021

The Home Office have recently introduced a data collection on strip searches to the Annual Data Requirement. Police forces will be providing this data for 2021/22 on a voluntary basis, and it is due for publication towards the end 2022. The data collection will include details on the age, sex and ethnicity of persons strip searched by the police in England and Wales.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether data is available on the number of police officers waiting for (a) a vetting decision and (b) security clearance to work in roles classified as sensitive.

The Home Office does not hold information on police officers’ level of vetting clearances or number of sensitive posts in each force, or on those officers waiting for clearance. Vetting and recruitment matters are handled independently, and on a case-by-case basis, by each force. Vetting decisions should be made in accordance with the statutory Vetting Code issued by the College of Policing.

The Government does recognise public concern around police vetting and is aware that Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary & Fire and Rescue Services (HMICFRS), as part of their inspection which the Home Secretary commissioned after the findings of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel (DMIP), provided criticisms of the Metropolitan Police Services’ ability to detect whether those occupying sensitive posts had been vetted to the correct level. We expect the MPS and the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC) to take immediate action to address this.

The Home Secretary has separately commissioned HMICFRS to carry out an urgent thematic inspection of vetting and counter-corruption procedures in policing across England and Wales. We expect any recommendations from this to be fully considered by all forces.

22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to tackle the illegal supply of drugs purchased on (a) the darkweb and (b) elsewhere on the internet.

Drugs devastate lives, ruin families and damage communities. The Government is committed to driving down drugs supply in the UK through tough law enforcement against the sale of drugs online, including on the dark web.

We work closely with the National Crime Agency, which in partnership with policing colleagues across the UK and internationally is mapping and targeting key offenders operating online, including the dark net markets themselves. Dedicated teams use a range of tools and techniques generally unavailable to most investigators and we make sure they have the resources and powers they need to keep our country safe.

We are clear that online companies must not allow their platforms to be used to sell illegal drugs and our Online Safety Bill will force them to remove this content or face large fines, with drugs-related offences to be included as a priority offence within the bill. This will require companies to identify, mitigate and effectively manage the risk of illegal activity on user-to-user services, services that allow user generated content to be shared and search services.

The Online Safety Bill is expected to be introduced to Parliament later this year.

21st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of people with a county lines flag in the National Referral Mechanism system (a) go on to commit a serious criminal offence and (b) are subsequently charged with an offence.

In 2020, 1,544 referrals were flagged as county lines referrals, accounting for 15% of referrals received and an increase of 31% from 2019. The majority (81%; 1,247) of these referrals were for male children. Although the Home Office does hold data on potential victims referred to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) with a county lines flag, this is not currently linked to data on offences/ offenders.

The UK is committed to ensuring victims of modern slavery are identified quickly and provided with the support they require to start to rebuild their lives. More potential victims are being identified and protected than ever before. NRM referrals more than doubled between 2017 and 2020 from 5,135 to 10,613. There is more information on referrals available at: Modern Slavery: National Referral Mechanism and Duty to Notify statistics UK, end of year summary 2020 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

This Government is determined to crack down on the county lines gangs who are exploiting our children and have a devastating impact on our communities. Since November 2019, through our County Lines Programme, police have closed more than 1,500 lines, made over 7,400 arrests and engaged with more than 4,000 people through safeguarding interventions.

Given the increase in county lines activity, the Home Office has significantly increased investment in specialist support for county lines victims this year. This financial year we are investing up to £1m to provide specialist support to under 25s from London, the West Midlands and Merseyside who are criminally exploited through county lines, to help them safely reduce and exit their involvement.

In addition, this financial year we are continuing to fund Missing People’s SafeCall service. This national service provides specialist advice and support to young people and a range of support options to their parents/carers who are affected by county lines exploitation.

21st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 28 July 2021 to Question 36809 and with reference to page 22 of From Harm to Hope: a 10-year drugs plan to cut crime and save lives published in December 2021, what evidence his Department holds that close down deal lines have not been re-opened.

Since November 2019, through our County Lines Programme, police have closed more than 1,500 lines, made over 7,400 arrests and engaged with more than 4,000 people through safeguarding interventions. The National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) determines a line to be closed where there is evidence that the controlling line holder is no longer capable of distributing drugs using that telephone number.

Information on geographic breakdown of lines is held by NCLCC and not publicly available due to operational sensitivities, however NCLCC do publish a strategic assessment of county lines which sets out the latest threat. The latest NCLCC strategic assessment (published in April 2021) shows a reduction in the total number of potentially active lines per month, with numbers reported to have fallen between 800-1,100 in 2019/20 to 600 in 2020/21. The reduction in potentially active lines is believed to be linked to a change in reporting and enhanced operational activity, the latter of which indicates the positive outcomes from the investment in addressing the county lines drug supply model.

We do not centrally collect the information requested on vulnerable people safeguarded through the Programme.

21st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to page 22 of From Harm to Hope: a 10-year drugs plan to cut crime and save lives published in December 2021 and the Government's statement that it has closed down more than 1,500 deal lines, how the Government defines a deal line being closed down; and if she will publish a breakdown of the geographical locations of the lines which that have been closed down.

Since November 2019, through our County Lines Programme, police have closed more than 1,500 lines, made over 7,400 arrests and engaged with more than 4,000 people through safeguarding interventions. The National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) determines a line to be closed where there is evidence that the controlling line holder is no longer capable of distributing drugs using that telephone number.

Information on geographic breakdown of lines is held by NCLCC and not publicly available due to operational sensitivities, however NCLCC do publish a strategic assessment of county lines which sets out the latest threat. The latest NCLCC strategic assessment (published in April 2021) shows a reduction in the total number of potentially active lines per month, with numbers reported to have fallen between 800-1,100 in 2019/20 to 600 in 2020/21. The reduction in potentially active lines is believed to be linked to a change in reporting and enhanced operational activity, the latter of which indicates the positive outcomes from the investment in addressing the county lines drug supply model.

We do not centrally collect the information requested on vulnerable people safeguarded through the Programme.

21st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to page 22 of From Harm to Hope: a 10-year drugs plan to cut crime and save lives, published in December 2021, how many and what proportion of the 4,000 vulnerable people safeguarded through the County Lines Programme are children who (a) are in care, (b) are on the register, (c) have a protection order, (d) are at risk, (e) already had a referral through the NRM and (f) have previously been through the NRM.

Since November 2019, through our County Lines Programme, police have closed more than 1,500 lines, made over 7,400 arrests and engaged with more than 4,000 people through safeguarding interventions. The National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) determines a line to be closed where there is evidence that the controlling line holder is no longer capable of distributing drugs using that telephone number.

Information on geographic breakdown of lines is held by NCLCC and not publicly available due to operational sensitivities, however NCLCC do publish a strategic assessment of county lines which sets out the latest threat. The latest NCLCC strategic assessment (published in April 2021) shows a reduction in the total number of potentially active lines per month, with numbers reported to have fallen between 800-1,100 in 2019/20 to 600 in 2020/21. The reduction in potentially active lines is believed to be linked to a change in reporting and enhanced operational activity, the latter of which indicates the positive outcomes from the investment in addressing the county lines drug supply model.

We do not centrally collect the information requested on vulnerable people safeguarded through the Programme.

21st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how long the average waiting period is for a conclusive grounds judgment through the National Referral Mechanism.

The Home Office publishes quarterly and annual statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM). These include the average time taken to make a Conclusive Grounds Decision. The latest published NRM statistics can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/modern-slavery-national-referral-mechanism-and-duty-to-notify-statistics-uk-quarter-3-2021-july-to-september

12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether money allocated to people under the Windrush Compensation Scheme is exempted from consideration in means tested financial assessments.

Payments made under the Windrush Compensation Scheme are disregarded in the calculation of Universal Credit and other DWP means-tested benefits.

This means that the money paid to claimants in compensation will not be taken into account when eligibility for these benefits is assessed.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many weapons have been handed in under the surrender scheme as part of the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 by (a) type of weapon and (b) the amount paid out in compensation.

The Government ran the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 surrender and compensation scheme from 10 December 2020 to 9 March 2021 to allow members of the public to surrender to the police those weapons covered by the scheme and to claim compensation from the Home Office. The weapons concerned were specific knives, offensive weapons, rapid firing rifles and bump stocks, as specified in the Act. The total number of weapons surrendered by weapon type and by the amount of compensation paid is set out in the tables below.

Following the successful completion of the scheme, the Government commenced the provisions in the Offensive Weapons Act relating to the possession of these weapons on 14 July.

FIREARMS

Weapon Type

Total number surrendered

Total compensation paid

Lever release rifles

1,000

£2,783,859.46

MARS rifles

133

£262,470.25

Bump stock

1

£0

FIREARMS ANCILLARY EQUIPMENT

Total number surrendered

Total compensation paid

Ancillary equipment

32,348

£781,766.40

OFFENSIVE WEAPONS

Weapon type

Total number surrendered

Total compensation paid

Flick knife

719

£16,852.50

Gravity knife

53

£2,916.85

Zombie knife

224

£2,299.82

Cyclone knife

9

£173.74

Curved sword

255

£13,536.33

Baton

2,991

£30,377.09

Stealth knife

17

£51

Disguised knife

41

£205

Knuckle Duster

959

£2,290.06

Swordstick

27

£3,227.91

Handclaw

3

£27

Belt buckle knife

8

£40

Push dagger

865

£1,781

Hollow kubotan

23

£98

Footclaw

1

£7

Shuriken

94

£405

Balisong

68

£1,538

Telescopic truncheon

8,504

£170,110

Blowpipe

61

£854

Kusari gama

4

£105

Kusari

38

£380

Kyoketsu shoge

1

£20

Source: the information has been drawn from the Offensive Weapons Act surrender and compensation scheme casework tool using the Claimed Weapons by Coding (numbers of weapons) and Weapons by Coding (compensation values) reports.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she consulted groups representing or supporting suspects on the change from in-person to remote legal service (a) before and (b) after that change was implemented.

The Joint Interim Interview Protocol was developed by the CPS, NPCC, Law Society, Criminal Law Solicitor’s Association and the London Criminal Courts Solicitors’ Association as a temporary requirement at the start of the pandemic to ensure the functioning of the criminal justice system was maintained. An exit strategy from the protocol is ongoing and will continue to be reviewed in accordance with the Government’s ‘road map’ for removing national restrictions. It is for the signatories to this protocol – the NPCC, CPS and solicitors’ organisations – to determine how this should progress. Since stage 3 of the roadmap out of lockdown on 17 May, solicitors have been required to attend interviews with children and vulnerable adults in person and ensure the most vulnerable in society receive in person support.

The Home Office has been chairing a weekly operational meeting with custody partners (Independent Custody Visiting Association, National Appropriate Adult Network, NPCC, Police Federation, Law Society and others) since March 2020. This has allowed for effective communication, feedback and learning to be embedded and the operational impact of the interview protocol to be assessed on a continuing basis.

The NPCC monitor compliance with the interview protocol across force areas to ensure that detainees are providing informed consent to receive remote legal advice. ICVA and NAAN additionally provide regular feedback to the weekly meeting on the implementation of the interview protocol.

Academic research into the long term impacts of remote advice in police custody is ongoing and the Government awaits its findings with interest.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to ensure that people who received remote legal advice in police custody gave informed consent to receive legal advice in that way.

The Joint Interim Interview Protocol was developed by the CPS, NPCC, Law Society, Criminal Law Solicitor’s Association and the London Criminal Courts Solicitors’ Association as a temporary requirement at the start of the pandemic to ensure the functioning of the criminal justice system was maintained. An exit strategy from the protocol is ongoing and will continue to be reviewed in accordance with the Government’s ‘road map’ for removing national restrictions. It is for the signatories to this protocol – the NPCC, CPS and solicitors’ organisations – to determine how this should progress. Since stage 3 of the roadmap out of lockdown on 17 May, solicitors have been required to attend interviews with children and vulnerable adults in person and ensure the most vulnerable in society receive in person support.

The Home Office has been chairing a weekly operational meeting with custody partners (Independent Custody Visiting Association, National Appropriate Adult Network, NPCC, Police Federation, Law Society and others) since March 2020. This has allowed for effective communication, feedback and learning to be embedded and the operational impact of the interview protocol to be assessed on a continuing basis.

The NPCC monitor compliance with the interview protocol across force areas to ensure that detainees are providing informed consent to receive remote legal advice. ICVA and NAAN additionally provide regular feedback to the weekly meeting on the implementation of the interview protocol.

Academic research into the long term impacts of remote advice in police custody is ongoing and the Government awaits its findings with interest.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the move to remote legal advice for suspects on the take up of legal advice by those detained and interviewed in police custody.

The Joint Interim Interview Protocol was developed by the CPS, NPCC, Law Society, Criminal Law Solicitor’s Association and the London Criminal Courts Solicitors’ Association as a temporary requirement at the start of the pandemic to ensure the functioning of the criminal justice system was maintained. An exit strategy from the protocol is ongoing and will continue to be reviewed in accordance with the Government’s ‘road map’ for removing national restrictions. It is for the signatories to this protocol – the NPCC, CPS and solicitors’ organisations – to determine how this should progress. Since stage 3 of the roadmap out of lockdown on 17 May, solicitors have been required to attend interviews with children and vulnerable adults in person and ensure the most vulnerable in society receive in person support.

The Home Office has been chairing a weekly operational meeting with custody partners (Independent Custody Visiting Association, National Appropriate Adult Network, NPCC, Police Federation, Law Society and others) since March 2020. This has allowed for effective communication, feedback and learning to be embedded and the operational impact of the interview protocol to be assessed on a continuing basis.

The NPCC monitor compliance with the interview protocol across force areas to ensure that detainees are providing informed consent to receive remote legal advice. ICVA and NAAN additionally provide regular feedback to the weekly meeting on the implementation of the interview protocol.

Academic research into the long term impacts of remote advice in police custody is ongoing and the Government awaits its findings with interest.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to end the facility for lawyers to give advice remotely to suspects.

The Joint Interim Interview Protocol was developed by the CPS, NPCC, Law Society, Criminal Law Solicitor’s Association and the London Criminal Courts Solicitors’ Association as a temporary requirement at the start of the pandemic to ensure the functioning of the criminal justice system was maintained. An exit strategy from the protocol is ongoing and will continue to be reviewed in accordance with the Government’s ‘road map’ for removing national restrictions. It is for the signatories to this protocol – the NPCC, CPS and solicitors’ organisations – to determine how this should progress. Since stage 3 of the roadmap out of lockdown on 17 May, solicitors have been required to attend interviews with children and vulnerable adults in person and ensure the most vulnerable in society receive in person support.

The Home Office has been chairing a weekly operational meeting with custody partners (Independent Custody Visiting Association, National Appropriate Adult Network, NPCC, Police Federation, Law Society and others) since March 2020. This has allowed for effective communication, feedback and learning to be embedded and the operational impact of the interview protocol to be assessed on a continuing basis.

The NPCC monitor compliance with the interview protocol across force areas to ensure that detainees are providing informed consent to receive remote legal advice. ICVA and NAAN additionally provide regular feedback to the weekly meeting on the implementation of the interview protocol.

Academic research into the long term impacts of remote advice in police custody is ongoing and the Government awaits its findings with interest.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to provide additional support to Lincolnshire Police following the expiry of its contract with G4S and its transition to insourcing services.

All contractual matters between a police force and any third-party service provider are operational and financial decisions that are the responsibility of the force and locally accountable Police and Crime Commissioner.

If a force faces financial instability then they are able to make a Police Special Grant application. Guidance for Special Grant applications can be found on gov.uk and all applications meeting the criteria set within the guidance will be considered and a funding decision made in due course.

26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what dates police forces received Violence Reduction Unit allocations in previous years.

Programme level Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) funding was initially announced in April 2019. Police and Crime Commissioners were then advised in August of the individual amounts that they, working in partnership with other VRU representatives, would be eligible to apply for. The date at which individual VRU awards were confirmed varied, as this was dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. The following year (20/21), programme level VRU funding and the amounts that Violence Reduction Unit partnerships would be eligible to apply for via Police and Crime Commissioners was confirmed in December 2019. Again, the date at which individual VRU awards were confirmed varied, as this was dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. Programme level funding for 21/22 was announced in February 2021 and, as in previous years, the funding will be dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. Officials are in touch with the VRUs in relation to the applications for the 2021/22 funding round. We expect that the information on the applications will be shared in the near future. The applications will be accompanied by bespoke support from the Home Office, in order to enable VRUs to provide the strongest possible application.

26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the earliest date is that police forces can expect to receive 2021-22 Violence Reduction Unit allocations.

Programme level Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) funding was initially announced in April 2019. Police and Crime Commissioners were then advised in August of the individual amounts that they, working in partnership with other VRU representatives, would be eligible to apply for. The date at which individual VRU awards were confirmed varied, as this was dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. The following year (20/21), programme level VRU funding and the amounts that Violence Reduction Unit partnerships would be eligible to apply for via Police and Crime Commissioners was confirmed in December 2019. Again, the date at which individual VRU awards were confirmed varied, as this was dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. Programme level funding for 21/22 was announced in February 2021 and, as in previous years, the funding will be dependent on successful completion of an application process and individual agreement of grant agreements. Officials are in touch with the VRUs in relation to the applications for the 2021/22 funding round. We expect that the information on the applications will be shared in the near future. The applications will be accompanied by bespoke support from the Home Office, in order to enable VRUs to provide the strongest possible application.

26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reasons a response has not been provided to Question 123677, tabled by the hon. Member for Croydon Central on 1 December 2020.

With apologies for the delay, Question 123677 has now been responded to.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times Drug Dealing Telecommunications Restriction Orders have been issued since those orders came into force.

The Home Office does not collect data on the number of DDTROs issued nationally. However, through our County Lines programme we are supporting targeted operational activity against county lines which includes the use of DDTROs. Through this programme, the West Midlands ROCU, have issued 91 DDTROs to date since November 2019.

In addition, through the County Lines programme, we are also funding the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) to co-ordinate the national law enforcement response which includes establishing a civil and criminal orders team to ensure effectiveness and maximise the use of the range of civil orders to tackle county lines, with a particular focus on DDTROs. This includes working with forces and Regional Organised Crime Units (ROCU) to develop and disseminate best practice to raise awareness of these orders and their potential for disruption of county lines gangs.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effectiveness of Drug Dealing Telecommunications Restriction Orders.

The Home Office does not collect data on the number of DDTROs issued nationally. However, through our County Lines programme we are supporting targeted operational activity against county lines which includes the use of DDTROs. Through this programme, the West Midlands ROCU, have issued 91 DDTROs to date since November 2019.

In addition, through the County Lines programme, we are also funding the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) to co-ordinate the national law enforcement response which includes establishing a civil and criminal orders team to ensure effectiveness and maximise the use of the range of civil orders to tackle county lines, with a particular focus on DDTROs. This includes working with forces and Regional Organised Crime Units (ROCU) to develop and disseminate best practice to raise awareness of these orders and their potential for disruption of county lines gangs.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether all Violence Reduction Units have complete interoperability of data.

Over two financial years the Home Office has invested a total of £70m into the development of 18 Violence Reduction Units (VRUs) in the areas worst affected by serious violence. VRUs bring together local partners to identify the drivers of serious violence and agree a multi-agency response to them, including sharing data to strengthen their understanding. On the 8 February the Home Office announced a further £35.5m investment into VRUs for 21/22.

Our independent evaluation found that in their first year of delivery (19/20) VRUs have made positive progress in embedding a local multi-agency approach including their use and access to data. You can read more of their first year of progress here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/910822/process-evaluation-of-the-violence-reduction-units-horr116.pdf?mc_cid=ec12552fcc&mc_eid=25c35f94a1

Over the past year VRUs have made further progress in gaining access to partners’ data, establishing Memoranda of Understanding and improving the quality of the data collected. We are working closely with VRUs to support further data sharing and have established a VRU data sharing and analysis network to further share best practice.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what activity her Department has participated in to prevent county lines gangs connecting with looked after children in children’s homes.

The Home Office is working closely with colleagues across government, including with the Department for Education, to ensure children in care homes are kept safe from grooming and exploitation.

The Government wants to make sure that all homes are providing high quality care that meets each child’s individual needs, keeps them safe and enables them to fulfil their full potential. Ofsted inspects all children’s homes at least once per year and at present, 80% of homes are rated good or outstanding. In April 2015, DfE introduced the Children’s Homes Regulations (England) which included Quality Standards for children’s homes, specifying the outcomes that children must be supported to achieve while living in children’s homes.

We are currently supporting the Independent Review of Children’s Social Care, which is taking a fundamental look at what is needed to make a real difference to the needs, experiences and outcomes of the children supported by children’s social care, including those in children’s homes.

Through our county lines programme the Home Office has provided up to £860,000 to provide specialist one-to-one support in London, the West Midlands and Merseyside to under 25’s and their families who are criminally exploited through county lines. Through this investment we are also delivering awareness sessions to care home staff to increase their understanding of criminally exploited children and young people.

We have also funded the Prevention Programme to deliver targeted virtual training sessions focussing on child sexual abuse and exploitation to children’s homes in the North East and North West and have worked alongside the British Transport Police to provide intelligence-led interventions to children’s homes to ensure appropriate safeguarding actions are taken in response.

The Department for Education is also funding the Tackling Child Exploitation Support Programme to help safeguarding partners in local areas develop a strategic response to child exploitation and risk of harm from outside the family home, in particular child sexual exploitation and child criminal exploitation, including county lines drug trafficking and modern slavery.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what work streams there are in her Department and the Department of Education to coordinate both Departments' response to tackling grooming in care homes.

The Home Office is working closely with colleagues across government, including with the Department for Education, to ensure children in care homes are kept safe from grooming and exploitation.

The Government wants to make sure that all homes are providing high quality care that meets each child’s individual needs, keeps them safe and enables them to fulfil their full potential. Ofsted inspects all children’s homes at least once per year and at present, 80% of homes are rated good or outstanding. In April 2015, DfE introduced the Children’s Homes Regulations (England) which included Quality Standards for children’s homes, specifying the outcomes that children must be supported to achieve while living in children’s homes.

We are currently supporting the Independent Review of Children’s Social Care, which is taking a fundamental look at what is needed to make a real difference to the needs, experiences and outcomes of the children supported by children’s social care, including those in children’s homes.

Through our county lines programme the Home Office has provided up to £860,000 to provide specialist one-to-one support in London, the West Midlands and Merseyside to under 25’s and their families who are criminally exploited through county lines. Through this investment we are also delivering awareness sessions to care home staff to increase their understanding of criminally exploited children and young people.

We have also funded the Prevention Programme to deliver targeted virtual training sessions focussing on child sexual abuse and exploitation to children’s homes in the North East and North West and have worked alongside the British Transport Police to provide intelligence-led interventions to children’s homes to ensure appropriate safeguarding actions are taken in response.

The Department for Education is also funding the Tackling Child Exploitation Support Programme to help safeguarding partners in local areas develop a strategic response to child exploitation and risk of harm from outside the family home, in particular child sexual exploitation and child criminal exploitation, including county lines drug trafficking and modern slavery.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children flagged with county lines markers on the police national computer have social care status.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested which is operational and owned by police forces.

Through our County Lines programme we are funding the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) to improve the intelligence picture and to co-ordinate the national law enforcement response.

Since it was established, the NCLCC has coordinated five weeks of intensive action against county lines gangs and the most recent week, in September 2020, which included all forces, including Police Scotland resulted in over 1,000 arrests, drugs worth more than £1m seized and over 1,500 vulnerable individuals safeguarded.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children on the PNC database have a county lines flag as at 22 February 2021.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested which is operational and owned by police forces.

Through our County Lines programme we are funding the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) to improve the intelligence picture and to co-ordinate the national law enforcement response.

Since it was established, the NCLCC has coordinated five weeks of intensive action against county lines gangs and the most recent week, in September 2020, which included all forces, including Police Scotland resulted in over 1,000 arrests, drugs worth more than £1m seized and over 1,500 vulnerable individuals safeguarded.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children in each police force area have a county lines flag as at 22 February 2021.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested which is operational and owned by police forces.

Through our County Lines programme we are funding the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) to improve the intelligence picture and to co-ordinate the national law enforcement response.

Since it was established, the NCLCC has coordinated five weeks of intensive action against county lines gangs and the most recent week, in September 2020, which included all forces, including Police Scotland resulted in over 1,000 arrests, drugs worth more than £1m seized and over 1,500 vulnerable individuals safeguarded.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times the County Lines Working Group has met to date.

In October 2019 the Home Office established the County Lines Task and Finish Group to oversee delivery of the £25m County Lines Programme. The Task and Finish Group meets regularly to drive forward progress, monitor the impact of the funding, and identify challenges. The Group has met 26 times to date and will continue to meet and oversee delivery of the County Lines programme in 21/22.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many handsets or phones from victims of child criminal exploitation seized by police have been subject to forensic analysis of digital evidence in the latest period for which figures are available.

Police forces do not currently gather the number of digital exhibits submitted for forensic examination by age of device owner.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police analysts are employed in each Violence Reduction Unit by her Department.

The Home Office does not regularly review the number of police analysts employed in each Violence Reduction Unit (VRU). VRUs decide locally on how many analysts are employed to ensure delivery of their VRU.

22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of how much the (a) delay of the Emergency Services Network and (b) extended use of the Airwave system will cost each police force.

The direct cost to police forces, is minimal since Airwave is funded centrally rather than by individual police forces.

The direct costs that forces will have to pay is estimated to be £1.5B compared to the £0.9B included in the 2015 business case.

The additional cost to the police, of running Airwave due to ESN delivery delays is estimated at £1.4B, or, with contingency factored in, £1.6B. This is funded centrally and does not currently impact individual forces.

Despite delays, the strategic and investment case for the ESN remains strong.

22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many covid-19 related (a) fines and (b) fixed penalty notices have been imposed by each police force.

On 8 January the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) published its latest report on the number of Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) issued under Covid regulations. The data showed that in total, 33,880 FPNs have been issued by police forces in England and Wales under Covid regulations between 27 March and 20 December. The latest information including a breakdown of the number of FPNs issued by each force can be found here:

https://cdn.prgloo.com/media/500ef4a4076446d1baa41a2e6a2bb5ae.pdf

Information on fixed penalty notices paid in each police force area is not currently available.

22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many covid-19 related (a) fines and (b) fixed penalty notices have been paid in each police force area.

On 8 January the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) published its latest report on the number of Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) issued under Covid regulations. The data showed that in total, 33,880 FPNs have been issued by police forces in England and Wales under Covid regulations between 27 March and 20 December. The latest information including a breakdown of the number of FPNs issued by each force can be found here:

https://cdn.prgloo.com/media/500ef4a4076446d1baa41a2e6a2bb5ae.pdf

Information on fixed penalty notices paid in each police force area is not currently available.

1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Answer of 27 June 2017 to Question 581 on Police: Per Capita Costs, what recent estimate she has made of the average annual cost to a police authority of employing a (a) police officer and (b) police community support officer; and what estimate she has made of that cost in each year from 2020-21 to 2024-25.

The salary scales as recommended by the Police Remuneration and Review Body for England and Wales from 1st September 2020 are set out in the Police Remuneration Review Body (PRRB) 6th report under Annex D.

30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect of the public sector pay freeze above £24,000 on the retention and recruitment of (a) police officers, (b) PCSOs and (c) police staff.

The Police Remuneration Review Body (PRRB) provides independent advice to the Government on pay and conditions for police officers. The number of officers earning less than £24,000 per annum will be considered by the PRRB in the 2021/22 pay round.

Following the 2020 Spending Review, at least £400m additional funding has been allocated for police forces next year to continue the Police Uplift Programme. This will enable the recruitment of up to 6,000 additional officers next year, continuing the progress on recruitment to date. All forces are well on track to meet their year one allocation and over 5,000 officers have already been recruited as a result of this Government drive.

The retention of experienced police officers is a priority for the Home Office. We are working alongside the National Police Chiefs’ Council to maximise opportunities to retain police officers who have valuable skills and policing experience.

The Government has no statutory role in determining the pay and conditions for police staff, including Police Community Support Officers, which are agreed locally by Chief Constables in consultation with trade unions.

30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the number of (a) officers, (b) PCSOs and (c) police staff who earn less than £24,000 per annum.

The Police Remuneration Review Body (PRRB) provides independent advice to the Government on pay and conditions for police officers. The number of officers earning less than £24,000 per annum will be considered by the PRRB in the 2021/22 pay round.

Following the 2020 Spending Review, at least £400m additional funding has been allocated for police forces next year to continue the Police Uplift Programme. This will enable the recruitment of up to 6,000 additional officers next year, continuing the progress on recruitment to date. All forces are well on track to meet their year one allocation and over 5,000 officers have already been recruited as a result of this Government drive.

The retention of experienced police officers is a priority for the Home Office. We are working alongside the National Police Chiefs’ Council to maximise opportunities to retain police officers who have valuable skills and policing experience.

The Government has no statutory role in determining the pay and conditions for police staff, including Police Community Support Officers, which are agreed locally by Chief Constables in consultation with trade unions.

30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for a new business plan for the Emergency Services Network to be signed off by the Treasury.

The Home Office’s Emergency Services Mobile Communications Programme (ESMCP) will be presenting its updated full business case to the Major Projects Review Authority in May 2021. The plan is that the business case will then be presented to Her Majesty’s Treasury in June 2021 for approval.

30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to ensure that police forces are reimbursed for any additional costs arising as a result of the time taken to implement the Emergency Services Network programme.

Changes to the delivery schedules for the Emergency Services Network (ESN) mean that the majority of costs budgeted for local police forces for ESN implementation will be delayed in line with the revised programme plan, but significant additional costs are not envisaged. The costs to the police of the Airwave system (that ESN will ultimately replace) continue to be split between direct costs (borne centrally before Police Allocations are made) and indirect costs that fall to the forces, and this arrangement is not changing. Once implemented, ESN will result in significant savings in the overall costs of providing emergency services communications to the police and all other services.

9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the gap in funding for police precepts as a result of people being unable to pay council tax during covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has been clear that the police will get the financial support they need to see them through the COVID-19 pandemic, and that they are listening to what the police needs.

Future police funding, including costs for the remaining years of the Police Uplift Programme and precept referendum limits, will be agreed as part of the 2020 Spending Review.

9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent estimate she has made of the average annual cost to a police authority of employing a (a) police officer and (b) police community support officer; and what estimate she has made of that cost in each year from 2020-21 to 2024-25.

The Government has been clear that the police will get the financial support they need to see them through the COVID-19 pandemic, and that they are listening to what the police needs.

Future police funding, including costs for the remaining years of the Police Uplift Programme and precept referendum limits, will be agreed as part of the 2020 Spending Review.

20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to support the mentoring of new officers by experienced officers in the police force.

Training and development for new officers, including mentoring programmes, are carried out in forces in line with national standards set by the College of Policing. We are making £700m additional funding available for PCCs in 2020-21, with a further £50m to be spent on national programmes supporting Police Uplift Programme. This includes the cost of training and induction for new officers to ensure they receive the right level of support on joining

We welcome the work being done by the College of Policing to strengthen leadership and supervision standards at all levels, particularly in support of officers on the frontline – this includes mentoring programmes and a tutor constable programme to ensure new officers receive the support they need.

20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much has been spent from the public purse on encouraging under-represented groups to join the police through media outlets that serve BAME communities in the last 10 months.

Attracting a broad range of talent, cultures and backgrounds to a career in policing is a core ambition in our drive to recruit 20,000 extra police officers, therefore reaching under-represented audiences is a key element of the Police Recruitment campaign strategy.

The national advertising campaign is planned and bought to reach a wide range of people from all backgrounds. Evaluation of campaign activity in May and June 2020 suggests that campaign messages reached almost 94% of 18-54 year olds from ethnic minority communities.

Campaign activity includes TV and radio advertising on channels which serve minority ethnic communities, such as BET, Brit Asia TV and Colourful Radio. To date, over £38k has been invested in these channels. In addition, £74K has been set aside to date for reaching under-represented groups through partnerships with media outlets which specifically serve minority ethnic communities.

We also continue to work with Police Associations to encourage under-represented audiences from their communities to consider a career in policing. This is includes working with them to develop new communications content for them to use on their no-cost channels which will also be used to support new individual tailored web pages for each Police Association on the www.joiningthepolice.co.uk campaign website.

20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will conduct a review into the reasons for the increased number of assaults on police officers.

Any assault on a police officer is completely unacceptable. In order to improve the accuracy of data on assaults on police officers, from 2017, police forces have included the number of assaults with injury on a police officer as part of their recorded crime data. This has been an important step towards obtaining a much better picture of the total number of assaults on police officers. We also welcome the recent publication of the National Police Chiefs’ Council’s Officer and Staff Safety Review and will continue to work closely with policing partners to consider the recommendations in the report.

Assaults specifically against emergency workers, including police officers, are punishable by up to 12 months in prison and could be charged as common assault. This Government recently announced our intention to double the maximum sentence for assaults on emergency workers, showing our commitment to ensuring these attacks are not tolerated.

We have also accelerated our work to introduce a Police Covenant, recognising the service and sacrifice of those who work, or have worked, in policing and to deliver the practical support they need. The key areas of focus will be physical protection, health and wellbeing and support for families.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Queen's Speech of 19 December 2019, what her timescale is for bringing forward legislative proposals to establish a Police Covenant and ensure the police are able to fully conduct their duties by providing them with additional support and protection.

The Government will bring forward legislation later this session to place the Police Covenant on a statutory footing.

We are fully committed to recognising the bravery, commitment and sacrifices of those who work or have worked in policing.

We have accelerated work on the Police Covenant and, following the recent public consultation, published the Government’s response on 8 September. The Home Office continues to work across government and with partners in policing to establish the Covenant and prepare the necessary legislative provisions. This work focuses on the three themes of health and wellbeing, physical protection and support for families.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to ensure that data is collated on police (a) traffic stops and (b) vehicle searches.

The Home Office already collates data on vehicle searches as part of the stop and search data collection.

In 2018/19, there were a total of 8,041 vehicle stops, with 7,949 stops under Section 1 of PACE and its associated legislation, and 92 stops under Section 60 of CJPOA. Data was published in 'Police powers and procedures, England and Wales year ending 31 March 2019', available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019.

The Home Office collects ethnicity data on all stop and searches of an individual, under Section 1 of PACE and its associated legislation and Section 60 of CJPOA. Additionally, data is collected on the number of searches of unattended vehicles. It is not possible from the data currently collected to identify the ethnicity of those involved in vehicle searches. Overall ethnicity data on stop and search was published in 'Police powers and procedures, England and Wales year ending 31 March 2019', available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019.

Figures for the year ending 31 March 2020 will be published on 27 October 2020.

There are currently no plans to require police forces to collect data for vehicle stops under section 163 of the Road Traffic Act 1988.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to ensure that data is collated on the ethnicity of those involved in police (a) traffic stops and (b) vehicle searches.

The Home Office already collates data on vehicle searches as part of the stop and search data collection.

In 2018/19, there were a total of 8,041 vehicle stops, with 7,949 stops under Section 1 of PACE and its associated legislation, and 92 stops under Section 60 of CJPOA. Data was published in 'Police powers and procedures, England and Wales year ending 31 March 2019', available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019.

The Home Office collects ethnicity data on all stop and searches of an individual, under Section 1 of PACE and its associated legislation and Section 60 of CJPOA. Additionally, data is collected on the number of searches of unattended vehicles. It is not possible from the data currently collected to identify the ethnicity of those involved in vehicle searches. Overall ethnicity data on stop and search was published in 'Police powers and procedures, England and Wales year ending 31 March 2019', available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019.

Figures for the year ending 31 March 2020 will be published on 27 October 2020.

There are currently no plans to require police forces to collect data for vehicle stops under section 163 of the Road Traffic Act 1988.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to improve police force retention rates.

Relatively few police officers choose to leave their job before retirement, compared to other public and private sector workforces. Voluntary resignations remain low at 2% of the workforce.

The retention of experienced police officers is a priority for the Home Office. We are working alongside the National Police Chiefs’ Council to maximise opportunities to retain police officers who have valuable skills and policing experience.

This Government takes the issue of policing wellbeing very seriously and has invested in programmes which offer help directly to officers and staffincluding the National Police Wellbeing Service.. We have also accelerated work to introduce a Police Covenant, which will be enshrined in law to ensure our police get the support they need. The Covenant will focus on health and wellbeing, physical protection and support for families.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what strategies have been put in place to encourage under-represented groups to join the police.

The police officer workforce is more diverse than ever before. The most recently published Police Officer Uplift data show that as at 30 June 2020 Black Asian and Minority Ethnic officers represented 7.4% of all police officers.

The Home Secretary has been clear that forces must do more to become representative of the communities they serve. Attracting a broad range of talent, cultures and backgrounds to a career in policing is a core ambition in our drive to recruit 20,000 extra police officers.

We are supporting forces with a variety of attraction and recruitment strategies, whilst delivering a campaign that’s been designed to reach the widest and most diverse audience possible including those who have never considered a policing career.

Sharing best practice, engagement with police associations, upskilling recruitment teams and enhanced data capture are just some of the efforts being made to improve police diversity as part of the police uplift.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to encourage people of a broad age range to apply to join the police.

The Government is delivering on the people’s priorities by recruiting an additional 20,000 police officers over the next three years.

The 20,000 officer uplift is a once in a generation opportunity to enable all forces become more representative of the communities they serve. We are already seeing applications from a wide range of candidates with diverse backgrounds and from a range of ages who are bringing unique skillsets and experience to the police service.

We are supporting forces with a variety of attraction and recruitment strategies, whilst delivering a campaign that’s been designed to reach the widest and most diverse audience possible including those who have never considered a policing career. Sharing best practice, engagement with police associations, upskilling recruitment teams and enhanced data capture are just some of the efforts being made to improve police diversity.

Amendments to Police Regulations made this year mean that individuals can apply to join the police at 17 years of age for appointment on reaching 18 years, opening the way for candidates wishing to apply to join the police.

8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the number of calls made to the police to report breaches of the covid-19 Rule of six.

The National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) provides the Home Office with data on the police use of Covid-19 enforcement notices issued under all emergency health protections.

The report contains data related to the number of Fixed Penalty Notices (FPN) issued to those individuals who contravene requirements to not participate in a gathering of more than six people, the ‘Rule of six.’ Data related to the number of calls made to the police to report breaches of this rule is not provided by the NPCC and is not held centrally by the Home Office.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers have retired as a result of injury received on duty in each of the last three years.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of police officers that have left the service through ‘medical retirement’ in the annual ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

However, data on how many of those medical retirements that are due to injury are not available from the data held centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of assaults on police officers and these are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics. The latest figures, for the year ending March 2020, can be accessed on the ONS website (available here):

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

However, it not possible to identify the ethnicity of victims, nor is it possible to identify whether or not a weapon was used in the assault.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers have been assaulted by a deadly weapon while on duty in each of the last three years.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of police officers that have left the service through ‘medical retirement’ in the annual ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

However, data on how many of those medical retirements that are due to injury are not available from the data held centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of assaults on police officers and these are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics. The latest figures, for the year ending March 2020, can be accessed on the ONS website (available here):

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

However, it not possible to identify the ethnicity of victims, nor is it possible to identify whether or not a weapon was used in the assault.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of the number of police officers assaulted while on duty are BAME, in each of the last three years.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of police officers that have left the service through ‘medical retirement’ in the annual ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

However, data on how many of those medical retirements that are due to injury are not available from the data held centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of assaults on police officers and these are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics. The latest figures, for the year ending March 2020, can be accessed on the ONS website (available here):

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

However, it not possible to identify the ethnicity of victims, nor is it possible to identify whether or not a weapon was used in the assault.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers have been subject to unarmed physical attacks while on duty in each of the last three years.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of police officers that have left the service through ‘medical retirement’ in the annual ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

However, data on how many of those medical retirements that are due to injury are not available from the data held centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of assaults on police officers and these are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics. The latest figures, for the year ending March 2020, can be accessed on the ONS website (available here):

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

However, it not possible to identify the ethnicity of victims, nor is it possible to identify whether or not a weapon was used in the assault.

15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with the (a) Secretary of State for Education and (b) Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on ensuring that vulnerable children are not exposed to greater risk of county lines recruitment when not in education due to the covid-19 lockdown.

The Home Secretary attends a regular ministerial group, also attended by the Department for Education (DfE) and Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, which discusses a range of issues related to COVID-19 including the impact on vulnerable cohorts.? The Home Office Minister for Safeguarding also has regular discussions with DfE about the impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable children, including those at risk of criminal exploitation through county lines.

In addition, the Home Office is working closely with law enforcement partners and charities to monitor the ongoing threat to young people from county lines exploitation.? This year, we are investing £20m to uplift the law enforcement response and increase the support available to those affected.? This is in addition to continuing to the fund the Missing People SafeCall service which provides specialist advice and support to young people and families who are concerned about county lines exploitation.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many county line phone numbers have been shut down in each month since December 2019.

The National Crime Agency’s most recent strategic assessment of serious and organised crime found that more than 3,000 unique county lines deal line numbers were identified in 2019, of which 800 to 1,100 lines were estimated to be active during a given month.

The Home Office collects and publishes statistics on the number of arrests conducted by each police force in England and Wales on an annual basis. Data are held at the offence group level only (for example ‘Drug offences’). Information on the number of arrests that have been made in operations targeting county lines gangs in each month are not held centrally. The latest bulletin can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019

We are investing £20m of dedicated funding in 2020/21 to further increase activity against these ruthless gangs. This builds on the £5m programme of work delivered in 19/20 to uplift the law enforcement response. Initial assessment of the outcomes of £5m investment in 19/20 demonstrate it has had a direct impact in disrupting county lines.

15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many arrests have been made in operations targeting county lines gangs in each month since December 2019.

The National Crime Agency’s most recent strategic assessment of serious and organised crime found that more than 3,000 unique county lines deal line numbers were identified in 2019, of which 800 to 1,100 lines were estimated to be active during a given month.

The Home Office collects and publishes statistics on the number of arrests conducted by each police force in England and Wales on an annual basis. Data are held at the offence group level only (for example ‘Drug offences’). Information on the number of arrests that have been made in operations targeting county lines gangs in each month are not held centrally. The latest bulletin can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019

We are investing £20m of dedicated funding in 2020/21 to further increase activity against these ruthless gangs. This builds on the £5m programme of work delivered in 19/20 to uplift the law enforcement response. Initial assessment of the outcomes of £5m investment in 19/20 demonstrate it has had a direct impact in disrupting county lines.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the final guidance on the (a) operation of and (b) application for, Knife Crime Prevention Orders.

The Government has announced that Knife Crime Prevention Orders will be piloted in London for a period of 14 months from 6 April this year. We have consulted on guidance to support the introduction of the pilot and we will be publishing final guidance, along with the Government response to the public consultation, shortly.

During the pilot, we will be working closely with the Metropolitan Police, the Crown Prosecution Service and Courts in London to monitor the use of Knife Crime Prevention Orders. This is likely to include data on numbers of Orders issued, their length, information about those who are made subject to the Orders, when they are reviewed, whether any of the Orders are breached and any other relevant information to allow for an assessment to be made of the success of the Orders in preventing offending.

As required by the Offensive Weapons Act 2019, we will lay a report on the pilot before Parliament in advance of wider rollout of Knife Crime Prevention Orders across England and Wales.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what (a) data collection and (b) monitoring the Government plans to carry out over the course of the Knife Crime Prevention Orders pilot scheme.

The Government has announced that Knife Crime Prevention Orders will be piloted in London for a period of 14 months from 6 April this year. We have consulted on guidance to support the introduction of the pilot and we will be publishing final guidance, along with the Government response to the public consultation, shortly.

During the pilot, we will be working closely with the Metropolitan Police, the Crown Prosecution Service and Courts in London to monitor the use of Knife Crime Prevention Orders. This is likely to include data on numbers of Orders issued, their length, information about those who are made subject to the Orders, when they are reviewed, whether any of the Orders are breached and any other relevant information to allow for an assessment to be made of the success of the Orders in preventing offending.

As required by the Offensive Weapons Act 2019, we will lay a report on the pilot before Parliament in advance of wider rollout of Knife Crime Prevention Orders across England and Wales.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the upcoming pilot of Knife Crime Prevention Orders, what evaluation criteria will be used to assess the success of that pilot scheme prior to that scheme being rolled out nationally.

The Government has announced that Knife Crime Prevention Orders will be piloted in London for a period of 14 months from 6 April this year. We have consulted on guidance to support the introduction of the pilot and we will be publishing final guidance, along with the Government response to the public consultation, shortly.

During the pilot, we will be working closely with the Metropolitan Police, the Crown Prosecution Service and Courts in London to monitor the use of Knife Crime Prevention Orders. This is likely to include data on numbers of Orders issued, their length, information about those who are made subject to the Orders, when they are reviewed, whether any of the Orders are breached and any other relevant information to allow for an assessment to be made of the success of the Orders in preventing offending.

As required by the Offensive Weapons Act 2019, we will lay a report on the pilot before Parliament in advance of wider rollout of Knife Crime Prevention Orders across England and Wales.

5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that the trial in London of the Knife Crime Prevention Orders does not result in an increase in the number of 12 year olds being criminalised.

Knife Crime Prevention Orders have been introduced as a preventative civil measure to give the police the powers they need to prevent and tackle serious violence and knife crime. Given the seriousness of the issue, the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 makes breach of an Order a criminal offence.

Knife Crime Prevention Orders will be piloted in London and will be available to the courts to be applied to persons from age 12 upwards. The purpose of these Orders is to prevent those who are subject to them – those who are identified as being particularly at risk – from being drawn into knife crime and serious violence, through the inclusion of positive requirements and restrictions that can be attached to an Order. This will help more young people to avoid being drawn into violent lifestyles and serious offending.

Knife Crime Prevention Orders that apply to those under 18 years of age will be subject to more scrutiny and oversight than those issued to adults and will be subject to consultation with the relevant Youth Offending Team. The Government will shortly be publishing guidance on Knife Crime Prevention Orders which will set out the specific considerations that must be given to children and young people in applying these new Orders.

The Government is determined to tackle serious violence, and to give the police the powers and resources they need to do this. The piloting of Knife Crime Prevention Orders in London is an important part of the action we are taking.

23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much military equipment of each equipment type has been (a) lost and (b) stolen in each year since 2015.

The Ministry of Defence has historically responded to Freedom of Information Requests (FOIs), answering the following three questions:

1. How many weapons (by type) and explosive munitions for which the Department has responsibility have been recorded as (a) lost and (b) stolen in [year]?

2. Please provide a list of all stolen items, value and location of the theft of all items that were recorded stolen in the [year] calendar year.

3. How many department computers, laptops, memory sticks were lost/stolen by month since January [year]?

The responses have included military equipment reported lost/stolen in addition to other items but are limited to only those cases reported to the centralised reporting functions concerned with Security and Fraud/Theft, Bribery and Corruption.

The following are the links to those years that the published FOI requests can be located on GOV.UK:

FOI

Data Year

Link

FOI2018/03191

2017

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5b89127ae5274a3cc44ba296/2018-03191.pdf

FOI2019/03318

2018

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/6099775fe90e07357045b079/20190401-FOI2017-03318-Final-R.pdf

FOI2020/02137

2019

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/609977e5d3bf7f2888d18fa7/20200512-FOI2020-02137-Final-R.pdf

FOI2021/01721

2020

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/605b2a85d3bf7f2f146949e8/20210318-FOI2021-01721-Final-redacted.pdf

FOI2022/02198

2021

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/643fb97d8b86bb000cf1b4dd/FOI2022-02198_-_Request_for_data_on_stolen_or_lost_Military_weapons_and_equipment_in_2021.pdf

FOI2023/02522

2022

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/643fb89f8b86bb0013f1b4f5/FOI2023-02522_-_Request_for_data_on_stolen_or_lost_Military_weapons_and_equipment_in_2022.pdf

FOI requests were also responded to for calendar years 2015 and 2016 but the publication links are unavailable. The detail provided in those responses is therefore set out below:

FOI2016/02451 (data for 2015)

Weapons (by type):

Lost: 0

Stolen: 5 (1 x small arm (de-activated); 4 x Automatic weapons (3 de-activated))

Explosive munitions (interpreted as Ammunition):

Lost: 4086

Stolen: 2080

The table shows how many computers, laptops, memory sticks have been recorded in the MOD security incident management database as lost/stolen by month since Jan 11

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Jan

11

5

7

6

16

Feb

11

5

10

17

8

Mar

19

14

18

13

19

Apr

7

9

14

15

9

May

17

7

14

8

8

Jun

7

5

24

7

704*

Jul

5

29

10

10

9

Aug

8

5

7

15

10

Sep

20

7

8

298*

3

Oct

7

31

9

2

5

Nov

13

7

11

6

17

Dec

12

12

70

0

20

*These figures record the suspected loss of ICT as a result of an accounting error; investigation is on-going which will likely significantly reduce any ‘actual’ loss.

All stolen items from 1st January 2015 to 31st December 2015 (Confidential Hotline data)

Items stolen

Location

Alleged Offence Value where recorded

Items recovered or partial recovery

4 X Magazines

Oxfordshire

£0

No

Bike

Chatham

£625

No

Military eqpt

Warminster

£0

Yes

compass, binoculars

Larkhill

£0

No

money

South Cerney, Gloucs

£410

No

19 vehicle tools

Monmouth

£769

No

day sack, boots

Bulford

£0

No

MFO box and contents

Catterick

£0

No

Multimeter

HMS Illustrious

£106

No

Multimeter

HMS Illustrious

£106

No

Body armour, sleeping bag, smock

Wimbish

£812

No

Chainsaw

Aldershot

£0

No

43 x transceivers

Taunton

£24,247

No

Webbing

Gloucester

£300

No

boots, vacuum

RAF Halton

£0

No

Military eqpt

Tidworth

£0

No

helmet, webbing

Germany

£0

No

artefacts

Dover

£0

No

sat nav

Blandford

£96

No

Military eqpt

Bulford

£0

No

gym eqpt

Bulford

£0

No

Military eqpt

Bulford

£0

No

welder, sand shot blaster, electric saw, electric drills, aluminium sheet metal

Bovington

£0

No

Military eqpt

Tidworth

£0

No

respirator

Tidworth

£0

No

projector

Sierra Leone

£450

No

Military eqpt

Wiltshire

£9,500

No

day sack, night vision system, body armour, helmet, various items of deployable tactical engagement simulation kit

Kenya

£0

No

Climbing eqpt

RAF Valley

£12,000

No

toolkit

Tidworth

£797

No

insulation test kit, oil

HMS Illustrious

£0

No

helmet mounting bracket

eBay

£0

No

weapon sight

Lisburn, NI

£1,812

No

adaptor

Tidworth

£1,170

No

2 x chainsaw, PPE eqpt

Tidworth

£1,773

No

money

Germany

£0

No

2 x washing machines

Innsworth

£416

No

bearskin, respirator, drum sling, regimental crest, medal bar

eBay

£856

No

clothing, bearskin, sword

Windsor

£0

No

welding eqpt

Colchester

£573

No

hydraulic fluid level indicator

eBay

£0

No

weapon sight, bi pod downgrip

Germany

£0

No

Diagnostic kit, retaining ring pliers, riveter, extractor screw set, brake adaptor, spanner wrench, socket wrench, 2 x mechanical puller, machinist vice, socket wrench set, impact wrench, thread insert kit, 2 x threading set, compression tester set, optical battery tester, liquid measure

Canada

£9,494

No

Military eqpt

Tidworth

£1,500

No

land rover, spare tyres

Warminster

£0

No

toolbox

Canada

£0

No

Military eqpt

Bulford

£3,258

No

Military eqpt

Larkhill

£0

No

Military eqpt

Tidworth

£0

No

bike

Bulford

£950

No

tools

Tidworth

£0

No

Military eqpt

Bulford

£0

No

tools

Germany

£0

No

day sack

Catterick

£170

No

2 x sleeping bags, jacket, trousers, helmet

Morocco

£337

No

2 x smock, poncho, sleeping bag

Colchester

£0

No

Military eqpt

Catterick

£0

No

bivie bag, jacket

Colchester

£0

No

boots, webbing

Colchester

£299

No

2 x screwdriver, bar extension, tool bag

Cottesmore

£0

No

toolbox and tools

Wattisham

£0

No

Military eqpt, clothing

Larkhill

£0

No

Military eqpt

Larkhill

£0

No

generator

Larkhill

£1,000

No

Xbox

Warminster

£400

No

Military eqpt, clothing

Larkhill

£1,030

No

Military eqpt

Winterbourne Gunner

£0

No

fuel

Bulford

£0

No

4 x lightweight chemical agent detectors

eBay

£180

Yes

helmet, 2 x respirator filter, field pack

Bulford

£301

No

5 x magazines

Afghanistan

£75

No

sleeping bag, sleeping mat, side pouch, rucksack, compression sack, sleeping bag cover, long back rucksack

Aldershot

£0

No

laminator

Catterick

£0

No

Military eqpt

eBay

£0

No

10 x 12-hour ration packs

eBay

£4,000

Yes

Blackberry

Innsworth

£0

No

fridge

HMS Collingwood

£294

No

webbing, helmet, jacket, smock, shirt, boots, thermal jacket, bergen, trousers, sleeping bag, exercise kit

Colerne

£435

No

technogym run 700, 3 x treadmill, 2 x static bike, 2 x X stepper, cross trainer, 2 x exercise bike, 2 x race bike, 2 x cycle gym machine

Catterick

£18,202

No

Landrover, 6 x machine bolt, 3 x carrier clamp, 3 x pneumatic wheel, 3 x pneumatic vehicle tyre, 3 x bracket, 3 x tyre valve extension

Wiltshire

£108,503

No

meat

Worthy Down

£0

No

2 x training defibrillators

HMS Excellent

£615

No

3 x binoculars, 3 x club batons

Bulford

£621

No

vacuum

Blandford

£89

No

2 x drill

RAF Leeming

£180

No

night vision system, night image intensifier

Kenya

£6,978

No

Military clothing

Armagh

£9,918

No

helmet, radio

eBay

£0

No

money

Germany

£2,144

No

Military eqpt

Tidworth

£0

No

picture, flag, clock

Chippenham

£70

No

30 x ink cartridge

HMS Vengeance

£8,660

No

boots, daysack

Stafford

£300

No

various medals

London

£0

No

night vision system

Pirbright

£4,500

No

12 x vehicle batteries

Abingdon, Oxfordshire

£2,376

No

military eqpt

Afghanistan

£0

No

camelbak, jet boil, poncho, jumper, tent pegs, respirator, respirator haversack, bungee's, canoe sacks, headover, jacket

Germany

£255

No

respirator

Cyprus

£0

No

laptop power pack and cable

Cyprus

£42

No

83 pieces of vehicle toolkit

Germany

£0

No

9 x Landrover spare wheels

Kenya

£0

No

stationery items

RAF Marham

£0

No

2 x off road tyres

Kenya

£0

No

travel docs, 4 x magazine, bottle, 2 x simulation vest, 3 x daysacks, night vision sight, helmet

Kenya

£326

No

laptop

Bulford

£0

No

9 x Landrover parts

Kenya

£950

No

night vision system

Kenya

£2,500

No

projector

RAF Brize Norton

£200

No

alcohol

Chippenham

£0

No

freight containing tools

RAF Brize Norton

£10,000

No

3 x indoor footballs

RAF High Wycombe

£30

No

2 x brown leather armchairs

Odiham

£880

No

drill

Odiham

£50

No

fuel

RAF Coningsby

£0

No

sat nav, watch, bergen, compass, boots, map

RAF Wittering

£250

No

body armour

RAF Leuchars

£0

No

day sack

RAF Waddington

£0

No

money

Perham Down

£520

No

Day sack, containing military eqpt

Larkhill

£0

No

projector

Tidworth

£0

No

iPad4

Germany

£450

No

2 x HM forces railcards

Aldershot

£30

No

bike

Germany

£500

No

Personal load carrying eqpt

Germany

£0

No

Personal load carrying eqpt

Germany

£0

No

2 x bike

Aldershot

£260

No

docking station

Germany

£89

No

fuel

Larkhill

£183

No

night vision system

Canada

£1,911

No

diving eqpt

RMA Sandhurst

£1,022

No

digital camera

Afghanistan

£285

No

helmet

Germany

£209

No

2 x jacket

Strensall

£189

No

TV

Thatcham

£329

No

2 x TV

Germany

£0

No

3 x Night vision systems

Cyprus

£7,500

No

fuel

Preston

£127

No

2 x vacuum

RAF Wyton

£178

No

Medals

EBay

£0

No

night vision goggles

HMS Excellent

£0

Yes

ration packs

Catterick

£0

Yes

ration packs

EBay

£0

No

night vision system

Germany

£2,500

No

strimmer, car buffer

Germany

£315

No

Dell Base unit

Abingdon, Oxfordshire

£375

No

amazon voucher

Andover

£10

No

TV

Cirencester

£439

No

minibus

London

£11,177

No

tent, 3 x chair, 6 x camouflage net, 112 x tent liner tensioner

York

£2,734

No

4 x generator

Thorney Island

£10,000

No

respirator, field pack

Germany

£110

No

gym weights

RAF Valley

£294

No

generator

RAF Valley

£720

No

dummy rifle trg aid

RMA Sandhurst

£171

No

rowing machine

Torpoint

£1,350

No

mobile phone

Lisburn, NI

£85

No

diving eqpt

Bahrain

£50,243

No

night vision system

Pirbright

£2,500

No

clarinet

HMS Raleigh

£1,909

No

thermal sight

York

£15,556

No

2 x Laser light modules

Woolwich

£1,824

No

bike

Bulford

£321

No

FOI2017/03293 (data for 2016)

Small Arms (Interpreted as the category type of weapons)

Total reported as unaccounted for: 14 (lost and stolen)

Explosive Munitions (interpreted as ammunition)

Total reported as unaccounted for: 82877 (lost and stolen)

Using the incident types of ‘Loss’ and ‘Theft’ the table shows how many computers, laptops, memory sticks have been recorded in the MOD security incident management database as lost/stolen by month since Jan 16

Source - ISS Defence Assurance and Information Security (DAIS)

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Computers

1

1

1

2

1

5

Laptops

1

5

1

1

10

2

1

6

4

2

4

4

Memory Sticks

1

5

13

11

2

2

8

1

6

6

4

3

All items centrally reported stolen in the 2016 calendar year source - Fraud Defence (Confidential Hotline)

Items stolen

Location

Alleged Offence Value where recorded

Items recovered or partial recovery

19 x boxes of printer toners

Blandford

£1,752

No

Military Eqpt

Catterick

£0

No

Grinder, Drill Port, 2 x Drill Hammer Port

Paderborn, Germany

£680

No

3 x Body Armour, Radiacmeter, Hunting knife, Torch, Stopwatch, Toolbox, Wiring harness, 10 x Multi tool.

HMNB Clyde

£2,334

No

2 x Cylinder assembly unit

HMNB Clyde

£602

No

Boots

Fareham

£150

No

Generator

Bury

£100

No

Diesel

Bournemouth

£0

No

ECBA

Kenya

£110

No

Night Vision System

Kenya

£2,251

No

Night vision system

Kenya

£3,240

No

Rucksack

Kenya

£195

No

Money

Plymouth

£200

No

Drum

Bulford

£1,175

No

68 x Skirting plates

Bovington Park

£19,328

No

Speaker

Kenya

£271

No

Transmitter set

Kenya

£8,490

No

Cordless jigsaw, Cordless drill

HMNB Devenport

£619

No

Sight Kit

Belfast

£150

No

Fuel

Ewyas Harold

£0

No

Swimming passes

Blandford

£500

No

Military Eqpt

Lulworth

£1,655

No

Ration packs

Pudsey

£0

No

TV

HMNB Portsmouth

£250

No

Night Vision goggles, Body Armour Plates, Head mounted Night Vision sights

Dyfed Powys

£0

No

Night Vision System

Tidworth

£2,500

No

TV

Hyde Park

£504

No

Clothing

Faslane

£0

No

Fuel

Holywood

£0

No

3 x bike

Tidworth

£1,620

No

Scrap metal

Leconfield

£0

No

Binoculars

Tidworth

£151

No

Collimator, 21 x Compass, 14 x Watch

Stafford

£4,537

No

Respirator, Field pack, 2 x Helmet, 2 x Filter

Abingdon

£230

No

3 x Storm case, 2 x Camera, 3 x Gopro Touch Bacpac, 3 x GoPro Battery Bacpac Hero, 3 x GoPro wall charger, 6 x GoPro cable, 3 x GoPro storage case, 1 x GoPro bobber

Corsham

£1,719

No

Compass, 4 x Magazine, Blank Firing attachment

Chester

£236

No

20 x plate protection, 30 x Body armour, 10 x helmet

Hohne Garrison, Germany

£4,944

No

Bike spinner

Hohne Garrison, Germany

£500

No

TV

Wrexham

£341

No

Replica weapon

Wolverhampton

£480

No

2 x Fuel key, Fuel

Colerne

£175

No

2 x Radio system, BMRC, Control Radio set, 4 x Battery

Kenya

£24882.06

No

2 x iPad

Aldershot

£187

No

Pressure washer

Arbroath

£107

No

Fan heater

Anglesey

£288

No

TV

Anglesey

£350

No

Vacuum Cleaner

Anglesey

£117

No

Rucksack

Anglesey

£0

No

2 x vehicle

Sleaford

£51,600

partial recovery

4 x Binocular, 4 x Compass, 4 x Case

Larkhill

£1,153

No

2 x Hoover Bags

Marchwood

£18

No

Sat Nav

Wrexham

£135

No

3 x generator, Fuel, 3 x cable, 3 x GLS light

Warminster

£26,939

No

Toolkit

Hounslow

£654

No

Work bench

Warminster

£950

No

Fuel

Salisbury

£1,694

No

Fuel

Salisbury

£1,042

No

2 x 5.56mm rounds

Abingdon

£0

No

Boots

Aldershot

£0

No

Steam cleaner

Oxford

£1,703

No

2 x Power pack, 3 x Mechanics creeper, Wiring harness, 3 x Wrench, Screw set, 2 x Drill, Toolkit, Balance Spring

Alberta, Canada

£2,838

No

2 x telescopic ladder

Arbroath

£190

No

3 x Aircraft container, 3 x Folding cot, 4 x Chair, 23 x Water can, 14 x Helmet

Arbroath

£2,545

No

Parachute system

Cambridge

£90

No

Money

Gosport

£350

No

Night Vision System, Transmitter, single switch

Chester

£3,147

No

6 x Exercise bike

Catterick

£13,380

No

Webbing, Water bottle, mug, 2 x mess tin

Croydon

£90

No

Helmet, Waterproof jacket, Waterproof trousers

Croydon

£270

No

TV

Helston

£499

No

Generator

Monkton

£1,000

No

Clothing

Arbroath

£230

No

Document

Ebay

£0

No

Body armour

Scotland

£504

No

TRX kit

Cranwell

£656

No

Fan heater

Cranwell

£218

No

2 x Fan heater

Cranwell

£436

No

Night vision system

Catterick

£2,490

No

Bike trailer, Kayak

Inverness

£839

No

2 x night vision system, Weapon sight

Cotesmore

£7,080

No

Fuel

Gibraltar

£50,000

No

Fuel

Holywood

£106

No

2 x Helmet, Body armour, Webbing , Daysack

Chester

£994

No

Body Armour

Catterick

£109

No

2 x Fuel card

Fareham

£0

No

Med Ball, Kettleball

York

£70

No

5 x ancillary item

Portsmouth

£0

No

2 x Camp bed

Ebay

£98

No

1 x Helmet

London

£1,641

No

Respirator

Scampton

£129

No

Thermal Imager

Newcastle Upon Tyne

£7,848

No

Exercise bike

Reading

£2,250

No

Money

Portsmouth

£20

Yes

Money

South Ruislip

£311

No

7x Field pack

Plymouth

£707

No

Missile Epack

Corsham

£0

No

Laptop

Waddington

£500

No

Projector

Wattisham

£274

No

2 x Body Armour

Wattisham

£164

No

Clothing

Anglesey

£80

No

iPad

Salisbury

£399

No

72 x Battery Storage, Laptop

Kenya

£17,169

No

Money

Kenya

£13,333

No

Money

Kenya

£1,364

No

4 x Disc clutch

Kenya

£237

No

Vehicle component

Colchester

£798

No

Sim card

Taunton

£518

No

2 x computer monitors

Wolverhampton

£166

No

The most recent FOI request responded to in December 2023 has yet to be published on GOV.UK. The detail provided is set out below:

FOI2023/13989 (data for 2023 – up to 02/11/2023)

For 01/01/2023 – 02/11/2023 I can confirm the following:

1. Weapons – lost / stolen: Source - Defence Security

Weapons: Type

Quantity

Lost/Stolen

Deactivated WWII Sten Gun SMG (on display in Mess)

1

Lost

Deactivated WWII Luger Pistol (on display in Mess)

Lost

SA80 Rifle (lost on a training area)

Lost & Found

Deactivated WWI German Machine Gun (lost on display outside Mess

Lost & Found

Explosive Munitions: Type

Quantity

Lost/Stolen

5.56mm

84

Lost

7.62mm

145

Lost

9mm

47

Lost

4.6mm

0

Lost

12.7mm

0

Lost

Source - ISS Defence Assurance and Information Security (DAIS)

Month

Computers

Laptops

USBs

Jan - 2023

0

13

2

Feb - 2023

0

10

0

Mar - 2023

0

38

2

Apr - 2023

0

10

0

May - 2023

0

8

2

Jun - 2023

0

10

1

Jul - 2023

0

9

6

Aug - 2023

0

51

3

Sep - 2023

0

12

4

Oct - 2023

0

8

2

Nov (Up to 2nd Nov)

0

0

0

Total

0

169

22

All items centrally reported stolen in the 2023 calendar year (up to 02/11/2023)

Source: Fraud Defence

Items stolen

Location

Alleged offence value where recorded

Items recovered

Body Armour, Helmet

Yeovilton

£0

No

Helmet

Yeovilton

£0

No

Respirator, Body Armour, Helmet

Yeovilton

£0

No

Helmet

Not Known

£450

No

Helmet

Devon

£0

No

Body Armour, Helmet

Yeovilton

£0

No

Helmet

Yeovilton

£0

No

WATT bike trainer monitor

Birmingham

£0

No

Bergen, Respirator, Helmet, Webbing, Scalable vest

Bulford Camp

£0

No

12 x Jerry cans of Diesel

Larkhill Camp

£0

No

Helmet

Bulford Camp

£0

No

2 x silver ornaments

Blandford Camp

£0

No

Scalable vest

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

Cash

Swinton Barracks

£112

No

Helmet, Scalable vest, Laptop

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

Bike

Larkhill Camp

£0

No

65 x tools

MOD Lyneham

£0

No

Laptop

Yeovilton

£54.69

No

Helmet

Buckley Barracks

£0

No

9 x laptops, 2 x docking stations, 2 x handheld device batteries, 2 x printer

in transit between Kenya and Brize Norton

£21426.68

No

4 x Ear defenders

Tidworth Garrison

£4400

No

2 x laser range finders

HMNB Devonport

£359.98

No

Daysack, laptop, vehicle keys, webbing, helmet, jacket, bivi bag, poncho

Kenya

£2000

No

Military issued equipment

Bulford Camp

£0

No

Helmet

Catterick Garrison

£0

No

Webbing, Scalable Vest

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

Daysack

Tidworth Garrison

£58

No

Helmet

Gloucestershire

£370

No

Helmet

Maidstone

£0

No

Webbing, scalable vest, helmet, bag

Not Known

£0

No

Mandible, webbing, daysack

Tidworth Garrison

£1535

No

Scalable vest

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

Respirator

Thiepval Barracks

£102.91

No

TV

Chester

£1

No

2 x Daysacks, 12 x initiator safety fuses, safety fuse

Kenya

£187.69

No

Respirator, filter

Bristol

£98.23

No

Helmet

Texas, USA

£339.85

No

Fuel

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

Tools

Tidworth Garrison

£2184.51

No

Body Armour

Germany

£0

No

Respirator

Swinton Barracks

£0

No

2 x X-Box controllers

Fife

£0

No

Gas detector, Helmet, endoscope camera

HMNB Portsmouth

£0

No

5 x Land Rover Tyre rims

Middle Wallop

£1135

No

Helmet, Daysack

Bassingbourn Barracks

£0

No

SA80 Rifle, 30 x Blank rounds, Laser Light Module, Lightweight Day sight

Kenya

£0

Yes

Helmet, Body Armour

Catterick Garrison

£0

No

Outboard motor, 2 x Propeller

HMNB Devonport

£3440.47

No

Vest, Helmet, Respirator

In transit between Oman and Middle Wallop

£544.19

No

iPad Pro21, Cash

Bicester

£1500

No

Military equipment

not Known

£0

No

Office supplies

Kenya

£0

No

3 x Bergens, Compass

Edinburgh

£0

No

Air Fryer

Penicuik

£0

No

Helmet

Yeovilton

£347.50

No

Gym equipment

Cottesmore

£0

No

Helmet

Bovington Camp

£58.95

No

Scalable vest

Bovington Camp

£0

No

Helmet, respirator, scalable vest

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

Scalable vest, Nape protections, Respirator filters

Pirbright

£0

No

Fridge

Bulford Camp

£0

No

6 x Medals, 6 x miniature medals

Cirencester

£0

No

4 x Bowman cable assemblies

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

2 x dDrills

Bulford Camp

£0

No

Helmet

Bovington Camp

£0

No

Scalable vest, helmet, respirator

Haverfordwest

£0

No

Helmet, emergency release strap

Swinton Barracks

£0

No

Tools

Kenya

£0

No

Canbus terminator

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

Ear defenders

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

White goods

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

2 x 9mm drill rounds

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

4 x torque wrench, sliding tee bar

HMS Bulwark

£0

No

Tool kit

HMNB Devonport

£1111.28

No

iPad mini

Catterick Garrison

£329

No

Mobile Phone

Holywood, NI

£190

No

Bike

Gloucestershire

£0

No

toolbox

York

£600.87

No

Decommissioned Baker Rifle

Bulford Camp

£0

No

Bergen several items

Buckley Barracks

£0

No

Bike

Bulford Camp

£0

No

2 x Generator airlines

Swinton Barracks

£0

No

1 x decommissioned Heavy Machine Gun

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

Daysack, laptop charger

Normandy Barracks

£0

No

Tools

HMS Bulwark

£0

No

Binoculars

Catterick Garrison

£233.34

No

Exercise equipment

Catterick Garrison

£0

No

Respirator, boots

Catterick Garrison

£0

No

Under Body Armour Combat shirt and Trousers

Pirbright

£0

No

Tumble dryer

Tidworth Garrison

£300

No

Helmet, shoulder pads

Tidworth Garrison

£0

No

TV

Gloucestershire

£0

No

Powerbank

HMNB Clyde

£950

No

The status of the items provided in the FOI responses were correct at the point of responding to the FOIs where items may have since been recovered and accounted for.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much ammunition of each ammunition type has been stolen in each year since 2015.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to 10876 on 30 January 2024.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) recruitment target and (b) actual number of joiners was to the Ranger Regiment for each year since its creation.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the hon. Member's questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the headcount was of the Ranger Regiment on every 1 January since its creation.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the hon. Member's questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish a list of all (a) vehicles and (b) heavy weapons that have been reported missing from his Department's facilities in each year since 2015.

I will write to the hon. Member, and a copy of my letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much of each ammunition type was lost from his Department's facilities in each year since 2015.

The security of ammunition is taken very seriously within the Ministry of Defence (MOD), and we have robust procedures in place to deter and prevent loss and theft.

Given the frequency and dynamic nature of military training, exercises and operations it is very difficult to mitigate against all risk of loss. When losses of ammunition are identified, a search will be conducted, and the loss is reported upwards. All losses and thefts of ammunition are investigated, in partnership with Ministry of Defence Police, Service Police and Home Office Police Forces as appropriate.

The below table details ammunition lost and stolen from MOD Facilities from 2017-2023. This includes military establishments, ranges, training areas and on operations. It has not been possible to validate data prior to 2017 without incuring disproportionate cost.

Year

Ammunition: Type

Quantity

Lost/Stolen

2023

5.56mm

90

Lost

7.62mm

145

Lost

9mm

47

Lost

2022

5.56mm

167

Lost

7.62mm

625

Lost

9.mm

40

Lost

4.6mm

13

Lost

12.7mm

1

Lost

2021

5.56mm

884

Lost

7.62mm

99

Lost

9mm

117

Lost

2020

5.56mm

2421

Lost

7.62mm

1031

Lost

9mm

76

Lost

4.6mm

2

Lost

.22

19

Lost

2019

5.56mm

285

Lost

7.62mm

1703

Lost

9mm

76

Lost

4.6mm

42

Lost

12.7mm

10

Lost

.22

1000

Stolen

2018

5.56mm

5

Lost

9mm

17

Lost

4.6mm

20

Lost

2017

5.56mm

247

Lost

5.56mm

1

Stolen

7.62mm

1

Lost

4.6mm

21

Lost

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when was the last (a) division level and (b) brigade level manoeuvre exercise in the field that was not a CAS exercise.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 19 December 2023 to Question 6475 to the hon. Member for Easington (Grahame Morris).

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
19th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people applied to join the (a) Intelligence Corps, (b) Parachute Regiment and (c) Royal Marine Commando Forces in each of the last eight years.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the hon. Member's questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the recruitment targets were for the (a) Intelligence Corps, (b) Parachute Regiment and (c) Royal Marine Commando Forces in each of the last eight years; and how many people were recruited to each body in the same period.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the hon. Member's questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people left the (a) Intelligence Corps, (b) Parachute Regiment and (c) Royal Marine Commando Forces in each of the last eight years.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the hon. Member's questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the headcount was of the (a) Intelligence Corps, (b) Parachute Regiment and (c) Royal Marine Commando Forces in each of the last eight years.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the hon. Member's questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many service personnel were living in grade four single living accommodation in each local authority area on 10 January 2024.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the hon. Member's Question. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, when the new funding scheme for remediation or mitigation of the fire safety risks linked to external wall system defects on medium rise (11–18 metres) buildings will be extended to all buildings.

Schemes to cover buildings over 18m have been in place for some time; an increasing number of properties are undergoing and completing remediation. A pilot for 11-18m buildings has been underway since late 2022, and has recently been expanded in scope; we anticipate a full opening in the months ahead.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if he will (a) increase the remit of local leaders to enable them to implement ambitious local home insulation schemes in the context of rising energy bills and (b) take steps with the Chancellor of the Exchequer to allocate further funding for those schemes.

The Government believes that strong and dynamic local leadership, that can understand how complex issues come together in a place, tailor policy to local priorities, attract investment and seize each area’s opportunities, is critical to levelling up.

This is why we set out a 'devolution framework' in the Levelling Up White Paper. The framework provides a clear menu of options for places in England that wish to unlock the benefits of devolution, including by giving places the opportunity to adopt innovative local proposals to deliver action on climate change and the UK’s net zero targets.

We will continue to explore whether additional functions or roles could support local areas to achieve their local net zero priorities.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what steps the Leasehold Advisory Service takes to identify specialist mental health organisations that leaseholders could be signposted to.

The Government funds the Leasehold Advisory Service (LEASE) to provide free and independent advice to leaseholders, including those affected by building safety issues. This aims to help them make informed decisions on next steps and engage confidently with freeholders, developers and managing agents. Advice is open to all and there is no limit on the amount of advice an individual can seek to support their chances of achieving the best possible outcome in their case.

LEASE give this practical legal advice through their website but also through one-to-one calls with dedicated building safety advisers, and online resources such as tailored articles, FAQs and factsheets. Calls are used to help individuals work through the issues and next steps in what can be very distressing circumstances.

LEASE takes its role in supporting them very seriously and staff have received training from ‘The Samaritans’ to equip them to identify where individuals are suffering mental health issues. LEASE staff are aware of the need to take action to safeguard customers as needed and where appropriate individuals are encouraged to contact The Samaritans or their GP. All aspects of the service are kept under review to ensure funding delivers what leaseholders need.

Government is working to make sure that all people, regardless of their residential situation, get the help and support they need with their mental health. Where residents of buildings with fire safety issues need mental health support, they should make contact with their GP to discuss these issues so they may be referred to mental health services as appropriate.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if his Department will urgently review the remit and role of LEASE for the purposes of ensuring that it adequately supports the needs of people affected by cladding and fire safety issues.

The Government funds the Leasehold Advisory Service (LEASE) to provide free and independent advice to leaseholders, including those affected by building safety issues. This aims to help them make informed decisions on next steps and engage confidently with freeholders, developers and managing agents. Advice is open to all and there is no limit on the amount of advice an individual can seek to support their chances of achieving the best possible outcome in their case.

LEASE give this practical legal advice through their website but also through one-to-one calls with dedicated building safety advisers, and online resources such as tailored articles, FAQs and factsheets. Calls are used to help individuals work through the issues and next steps in what can be very distressing circumstances.

LEASE takes its role in supporting them very seriously and staff have received training from ‘The Samaritans’ to equip them to identify where individuals are suffering mental health issues. LEASE staff are aware of the need to take action to safeguard customers as needed and where appropriate individuals are encouraged to contact The Samaritans or their GP. All aspects of the service are kept under review to ensure funding delivers what leaseholders need.

Government is working to make sure that all people, regardless of their residential situation, get the help and support they need with their mental health. Where residents of buildings with fire safety issues need mental health support, they should make contact with their GP to discuss these issues so they may be referred to mental health services as appropriate.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what steps (a) his Department and (b) the Leasehold Advisory Service is taking to support residents affected by cladding and fire safety issues to access (i) legal advice and (ii) mental health support.

The Government funds the Leasehold Advisory Service (LEASE) to provide free and independent advice to leaseholders, including those affected by building safety issues. This aims to help them make informed decisions on next steps and engage confidently with freeholders, developers and managing agents. Advice is open to all and there is no limit on the amount of advice an individual can seek to support their chances of achieving the best possible outcome in their case.

LEASE give this practical legal advice through their website but also through one-to-one calls with dedicated building safety advisers, and online resources such as tailored articles, FAQs and factsheets. Calls are used to help individuals work through the issues and next steps in what can be very distressing circumstances.

LEASE takes its role in supporting them very seriously and staff have received training from ‘The Samaritans’ to equip them to identify where individuals are suffering mental health issues. LEASE staff are aware of the need to take action to safeguard customers as needed and where appropriate individuals are encouraged to contact The Samaritans or their GP. All aspects of the service are kept under review to ensure funding delivers what leaseholders need.

Government is working to make sure that all people, regardless of their residential situation, get the help and support they need with their mental health. Where residents of buildings with fire safety issues need mental health support, they should make contact with their GP to discuss these issues so they may be referred to mental health services as appropriate.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what criteria the Government will use to determine eligibility for membership of the Building Advisory Committee.

The provisions in the draft Building Safety Bill place a duty on the Building Safety Regulator to establish a new committee of experts to give advice and information to the Regulator on its building functions. The process to set up and recruit the committee and its members will follow in due course.

24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the composition of the Building Advisory Committee will be subject to Parliamentary scrutiny.

The provisions in the draft Building Safety Bill place a duty on the Building Safety Regulator to establish a new committee of experts to give advice and information to the Regulator on its building functions. The process to set up and recruit the committee and its members will follow in due course.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many rough sleepers have been offered safe accommodation during the covid-19 outbreak by (a) region and (b) local authority area.

Yesterday, the Government published the management information that supports the announcements from Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Rt Hon Robert Jenrick MP, and Dame Louise Casey that 15,000 people have been accommodated by local authorities in response to Covid-19.

We have collected management information from 302 local authorities nationally. We are continuing to work with local authorities to understand the work they are doing to help the most vulnerable in our society.

13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to his statement of 20 January 2020 on Building Safety, Official Report, column 23, if he will publish the names of the 43 private residential tower block owners who according to the government's latest Building Safety Programme data release have not put a plan in place to remove unsafe ACM cladding by February 2020.

Where building owners are failing to make acceptable progress, those responsible should expect further action to be taken – including naming and shaming and enforcement.

11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what data his Department is collecting on the cost of interim fire safety measures in high rise buildings being borne by (a) leaseholders, (b) councils and (c) housing associations; and if he will publish that data.

The Department does not hold this information.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 5 February 2020 to Question 10387 on Buildings: Insulation, whether his Department is collecting information on buildings below 18 metres in height with unsafe ACM cladding system.

Information on the external wall systems for residential buildings below 18 metres in height is not currently being collected by the Department while the data collection on external wall systems for residential buildings 18 metres or over in height is being undertaken. It is important to gain accurate information on these higher risk buildings first. We will consider further collections in due course.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Government's consolidated advice on building safety, published 20 January 2020, what estimate he has made of the number of residential buildings which (a) require an EWS1 form and (b) have been issued a completed EWS1 form.

The EWS1 form is a form produced and owned by industry (the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, UK Finance and the Building Societies Association) to assist in the valuation of high rise residential buildings for mortgage purposes. Any requirement to use it is a lender decision. Industry is monitoring its use.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what correspondence he has sent to owners of buildings with ACM cladding where remediation had not started by the start of February 2020; and if he will publish that correspondence.

The Secretary of State has written to all building owners where the remediation of unsafe ACM cladding is not complete, pressing for progress. For the safety of residents in the buildings concerned, we are unable to publish correspondence as this could identify individual buildings.

The Department has regular engagement with a named contact from each building to ensure progress with remediation is being made. Where building owners are failing to make acceptable progress, those responsible should expect further action to be taken – including naming and shaming and enforcement.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number of residential buildings between 11 and 18 metres high.
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Answer of 8 October 2019 to Question 290851 on Buildings: Insulation, for what reasons the Government has not yet published the results of the analysis of bespoke non-ACM tests.

The results of this research will be published in the Spring. This is to allow for further tests on additional cladding materials including timber cladding and Class D High Pressure Laminates of various thicknesses and manufacturers.  So far, the results show that none of the materials tested present a significant fire hazard like that of Aluminium Composite Material with unmodified polyethylene core and other metal composites. If any of the additional tests suggest an immediate public safety concern, the Government will consult the Independent Expert Advisory Panel urgently, consider appropriate action, and inform the House and public accordingly.

Esther McVey
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to figure five in his Department's publication entitled Data update 30, Building Safety Programme: monthly data release, November 2019, how many and which of the 74 private residential buildings had remediation work funded by the (a) developer and (b) freeholder.

Out of the 74 private residential buildings which are being funded by the building owner, 64 are by the developer and 10 by the freeholder.

Esther McVey
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 7 January 2020 to Question 120 on High Rise Flats: Insulation, how many local authorities have provided (a) fully complete data, (b) partially complete data and (c) no data on high rise residential buildings in their area.

The Department has commenced a data collection exercise which will enable us to build a picture of external wall systems in use on high rise residential buildings. The exercise will collect data on residential buildings 18 metres and over covering private and social buildings, student accommodation and hotels in England. We will publish appropriate summary information from the data collection in our monthly Building Safety Programme data release in due course. Local authorities and housing associations are working to complete the collection by the end of March 2020.

Esther McVey
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many Prison Transfer Agreements were in place in each year since 2010.

The removal of Foreign National Offenders is a Government priority and my department continues to work closely with the Home Office to maximise the number of deportations.

The total number of voluntary and compulsory Prisoner Transfer Agreements agreed since 2010 is set out below. For PTAs, the receiving country and their judiciary needs to consider and accept each individual transfer case.

Year:

Total PTA agreements

2010

99

2011

99

2012

100

2013

100

2014

101

2015

102

2016

103

2017

103

2018

104

2019

106

2020

106

2021

107

2022

108

2023

110

2024

110

We are looking to negotiate new Prisoner Transfer Agreements with key EU Member States and wider-world countries. We signed a Prisoner Transfer Agreement with the Philippines in October 2023, and made a new arrangement with Albania in May 2023 to increase the number of transfers under the agreement signed in May 2022.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders who went on to commit a serious further offence were classified as (a) high risk, (b) medium risk and (c) low risk in each year since 2010.

The table below sets out the total number of convictions, where an offender subject to probation supervision was charged with a serious further offence (SFO), which resulted subsequently in a conviction for an SFO, for all cases notified to what is now HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) between 1 January 2010 and 31 March 2022, listed by their highest classification of risk of serious harm during the period of supervision for the index sentence (though not necessarily the classification at the point they were charged with the SFO).

Year

Highest risk of serious harm during the index sentence

Very High / High

Medium

Low

Unknown

2010

100

128

34

12

2011

93

129

25

23

2012

117

92

25

29

2013

107

104

25

27

2014

124

97

17

24

2015

116

130

21

30

2016

148

119

31

11

2017

191

139

36

19

2018

137

141

33

17

2019

165

129

21

17

2020

154

104

23

12

2021

162

92

13

9

2022 (Jan-Mar)

37

23

10

3

1. Time period for conviction data relates to the date of SFO notification to HMPPS not the date of conviction.

2. Index sentence refers to the sentencing disposal imposed by the court which led to probation services supervision of the offender.

3.The risk of serious harm relates to the highest risk of harm assessed during the period of supervision on the index sentence, not at the time of the SFO.

4.The data concerning unknown risk of harm, may relate to cases where a formal risk assessment had not been completed during the index sentence, or was not captured at the point of notification, and has not been updated within the database.

5. The data includes cases where the SFO was committed within 28 days of the end of the supervision period.

6. Conviction data also includes cases where the offender committed suicide or died prior to the trial, where the judicial process concluded that they were responsible.

7. The data has been updated and may differ to any original publication due to data cleansing, re-categorising and re-grouping. Data in the annual SFO bulletin is shown in financial years not calendar years as above.

8. Data Sources and Quality. We have drawn these figures from administrative IT systems which, as with some large-scale recording systems, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Figures are published based on the date of SFO notification (charge) received by HMPPS. The lag between the date of publication and the conviction figures is to allow time for most cases to complete the criminal justice process. Figures for 2022/23 will be published in October 2024.

Serious further offences are incredibly rare, with fewer than 0.5% of offenders supervised by the Probation Service going on to commit serious further offences but each one is investigated fully so we can take action where necessary. We have also injected extra funding of more than £155 million a year into the Probation Service to deliver tougher supervision, reduce caseloads and recruit thousands more staff to keep the public safer.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
6th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders were subsequently convicted of murder by index sentence in each financial year between 2010-11 and 2015-16.

Serious Further Offences (SFOs) are rare. Fewer than 0.5% of offenders under statutory supervision are convicted of SFOs. Nonetheless, every single SFO is taken extremely seriously, and in all cases a review is carried out to identify any improvements that need to be made in the management of future cases.

We have increased funding for the Probation Service by an additional £155m a year to recruit staff, bring down caseloads and deliver better supervision of offenders in the community.

We have exceeded our recruitment targets for the last three years. As a result, over 4,000 trainee probation officers joined the Probation sService between 2020/21 and 2022/23, which we anticipate will start to reduce the number of cases held by a probation officer at any one time, with all the benefits which that brings in terms of the quality of risk assessment and risk management.

The table below sets out the total number of convictions where an offender subject to probation supervision was charged with a SFO which resulted in a conviction for murder, for all cases notified to HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2014.

Index Sentence

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

Community Supervision

31

42

30

28

Determinate Prison Sentence

17

24

21

27

Life Licence

2

1

0

3

IPP

0

0

0

1

Total

50

67

51

59

1. Time period for conviction data relates to the date of SFO notification to HMPPS not the date of conviction.

2. Index sentence refers to the sentencing disposal imposed by the court which led to probation services supervision of the offender.

3. The data only includes convictions for serious further offences of murder that have been notified to the national SFO Team, HMPPS.

4. The data includes cases where the SFO was committed within 28 days of the end of the supervision period.

5. Conviction data also includes cases where the offender committed suicide or died prior to the trial, where the judicial process concluded that they were responsible.

6. The data for has been updated and may differ to any original publication due to data cleansing, re-categorising and re-grouping.

7. Data Sources and Quality. We have drawn these figures from administrative IT systems which, as with some large-scale recording systems, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

The number of convictions where an offender subject to probation supervision was charged with a serious further offence which resulted in a conviction for murder, for all cases notified to HMPPS between 1 April 2014 and 31 March 2016 are published at the following link: Serious_Further_Offences_2023.ods (live.com).

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been prosecuted for criminal damage to memorials since that offence was introduced; and what sentences were issued to people prosecuted for that act.

For criminal damage offences, the specific target of the criminal damage is not recorded in the Court Proceedings Database and so it is not possible to distinguish criminal damage to memorials from wider criminal damage. This information may be held on court records but to examine individual court records would be of disproportionate costs.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
1st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been (a) charged and (b) prosecuted for heritage crimes in each year since 2010.

The Ministry of Justice publishes information on the number of defendants prosecuted for offences under the Salmon & Freshwater Fisheries Act 1975 (offence code 11606) between 2013 and 2021 across the following data tools:

The number of prosecutions for offences under the Salmon & Freshwater Fisheries Act 1975 between 2010 and 2012 has been provided in Table 1.

The Home Office collects information on charges for the number of offences under the Salmon & Freshwater Fisheries Act 1975. Data is available from April 2015 to September 2022 and has been provided in table 2. Charges are low as police recorded crime collection is largely restricted to indictable and triable either way offences and excludes those prosecuted by other authorities.

This is a subset of data (Wildlife crime) released in the quarterly Crime and Outcomes open data tables, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

Heritage crime is not specifically defined in legislation as a criminal offence and therefore is not centrally recorded in the Court Proceedings Database held by the Ministry of Justice. To obtain information on whether an offence was related to heritage assets would involve a manual interrogation of court records which would result in disproportionate cost to the department. The Home Office does not collect data on the number of charges for this offence.

Offences that may be of interest include:

09408 - Executing or causing the demolition or alteration or an extension which affects the character of a listed building

09409 - Failure to comply with a Listed Building enforcement notice

09406 - Contravening tree preservation order

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) charges and (b) prosecutions have been made under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 in each year since 2010.

For prosecutions under the Hunting Act 2004, please see response to PQ 105521.

The Ministry of Justice publishes information on the number of defendants prosecuted for offences under Section 30 of the Game Act 1831 between 2010 and 2021 across the following data tools:

Please note, ‘119 Day Poaching’ includes offences under both section 30 and section 31 of the Game Act 1831. However, no prosecutions were made under section 31 offences during this time period.

The Ministry of Justice publishes information on the number of defendants prosecuted for offences under the Deer Act 1991 and under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 between 2013 and 2021 across the following data tools:

The number of prosecutions for offences under the Deer Act 1991 between 2010 and 2012 has been provided in Table 1 and 2. The Home Office does not collect data on the number of charges for this offence.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) charges and (b) prosecutions have been made under the Deer Act 1991 in each year since 2010.

For prosecutions under the Hunting Act 2004, please see response to PQ 105521.

The Ministry of Justice publishes information on the number of defendants prosecuted for offences under Section 30 of the Game Act 1831 between 2010 and 2021 across the following data tools:

Please note, ‘119 Day Poaching’ includes offences under both section 30 and section 31 of the Game Act 1831. However, no prosecutions were made under section 31 offences during this time period.

The Ministry of Justice publishes information on the number of defendants prosecuted for offences under the Deer Act 1991 and under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 between 2013 and 2021 across the following data tools:

The number of prosecutions for offences under the Deer Act 1991 between 2010 and 2012 has been provided in Table 1 and 2. The Home Office does not collect data on the number of charges for this offence.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prosecutions have been made under Section 30 of the Game Act 1831 in each year since 2010.

For prosecutions under the Hunting Act 2004, please see response to PQ 105521.

The Ministry of Justice publishes information on the number of defendants prosecuted for offences under Section 30 of the Game Act 1831 between 2010 and 2021 across the following data tools:

Please note, ‘119 Day Poaching’ includes offences under both section 30 and section 31 of the Game Act 1831. However, no prosecutions were made under section 31 offences during this time period.

The Ministry of Justice publishes information on the number of defendants prosecuted for offences under the Deer Act 1991 and under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 between 2013 and 2021 across the following data tools:

The number of prosecutions for offences under the Deer Act 1991 between 2010 and 2012 has been provided in Table 1 and 2. The Home Office does not collect data on the number of charges for this offence.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prosecutions have been made under the Hunting Act 2004 in each year since 2010,

For prosecutions under the Hunting Act 2004, please see response to PQ 105521.

The Ministry of Justice publishes information on the number of defendants prosecuted for offences under Section 30 of the Game Act 1831 between 2010 and 2021 across the following data tools:

Please note, ‘119 Day Poaching’ includes offences under both section 30 and section 31 of the Game Act 1831. However, no prosecutions were made under section 31 offences during this time period.

The Ministry of Justice publishes information on the number of defendants prosecuted for offences under the Deer Act 1991 and under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 between 2013 and 2021 across the following data tools:

The number of prosecutions for offences under the Deer Act 1991 between 2010 and 2012 has been provided in Table 1 and 2. The Home Office does not collect data on the number of charges for this offence.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many Criminal Behaviour Orders were issued at all courts in each year since 2014.

The number of Criminal Behaviour Orders issued at all courts in England and Wales on an all offence, all disposal basis has been provided in Table 1; these show where Criminal Behaviour Orders were recorded in one of the four most severe disposals.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he is taking to steps to (a) minimise costs faced by claimants during an inquest when admissions of liability result in reasonable costs no longer being duty of the defendant and (b) allow bereaved families to further establish in law the principle of equality of arms between families and public bodies.

The Government is committed to ensuring that bereaved families are properly supported and are able to participate in the inquest process. An inquest is intended to be an inquisitorial, fact-finding event, and in the vast majority of cases, representation is not necessary. There is no question of liability nor defendants, only interested persons, and witnesses are not expected to present legal arguments.

In certain circumstances, legal representation for bereaved families at inquests may be funded through the Exceptional Case Funding (ECF) scheme. We believe that the process to access this support should be as straightforward as possible, which is why we removed the means test for ECF in relation to these matters.

Whilst we acknowledge the call for the provision for legal representation for all bereaved families at inquests to ensure “equality of arms” between families and public bodies, we believe that additional lawyers at an inquest will not provide an overall improvement for the bereaved or change the outcome of the conclusion of an inquest.

The refreshed Ministry of Justice Guide to Coroner Services for Bereaved People is better focused on the needs of bereaved people and is designed to support bereaved families and keep them at the heart of the inquest process. The Guide includes number of key principles that government departments and the lawyers it instructs will follow. These include the need to consider the number of lawyers instructed, bearing in mind the commitment to support an inquisitorial approach.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his timescale is for announcing the (a) Chair, (b) timetable and (c) terms of reference of the proposed Royal Commission on Criminal Justice announced in the Queen's Speech of December 2019.

The Royal Commission is an opportunity to undertake independent review of key issues in the criminal justice system. It is also an opportunity to learn from the experience of the coronavirus pandemic to ensure that the system is more resilient.

We are carefully considering the scope, timing and Terms of Reference for the Commission and will update the House in due course.

14th Jan 2020
What assessment he has made of trends in conviction rates for knife possession as a result of the increased use of stop and search.

Knife crime has devastating consequences on families, children and communities and this Government is determined to tackle it by whatever methods we can.

We are catching and prosecuting more people who carry a knife or offensive weapon. Those convicted of carrying knives and other weapons are more likely to go to prison and for longer than at any point in the last ten years.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)