Janet Daby Portrait

Janet Daby

Labour - Lewisham East

17,008 (38.0%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 14th June 2018

Shadow Minister (Youth Justice)

(since September 2023)

Justice Committee
29th Nov 2022 - 5th Dec 2023
Victims and Prisoners Bill
14th Jun 2023 - 11th Jul 2023
Justice Committee
22nd Feb 2021 - 5th Jan 2022
Approved Premises (Substance Testing) Bill
8th Dec 2021 - 15th Dec 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
27th Oct 2021 - 23rd Nov 2021
Shadow Minister (Equalities Office) (Faiths, Women and Equalities)
10th Jul 2020 - 7th Dec 2020
Shadow Minister (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Apr 2020 - 10th Jul 2020
Home Affairs Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Home Affairs Committee
8th May 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Justice Committee
19th Nov 2018 - 8th May 2019


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Janet Daby has voted in 800 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Janet Daby Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(32 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(17 debate interactions)
Edward Argar (Conservative)
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
(16 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Ministry of Justice
(61 debate contributions)
Home Office
(58 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(48 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(48 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Victims and Prisoners Act 2024
(9,515 words contributed)
Judicial Review and Courts Act 2022
(2,719 words contributed)
Illegal Migration Act 2023
(886 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Janet Daby's debates

Lewisham East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

The review should look at, but not be limited to, possible benefits and disbenefits they might have to the local and wider area where they are introduced. This should including pollution, road safety, mental wellbeing, effects on the vulnerable, and congestion. Both inside and outside an LTN.

The Government must make it MANDATORY to include in the DVLA Vehicle Registration Database, along with name & address of vehicle owner, an exemption marker for those with Blue Badges or life-threatening conditions, from Low Traffic Neighbourhoods and time restrictions without a clear justification.

The HMRC mileage rate for reimbursing the use of private cars (e.g. for employees but also volunteers) has been fixed at 45p/mile (up to 10,000 miles) since 2011. The lack of any increase since then is a serious disincentive to volunteer drivers particularly as fuel has gone up again recently.

The Home office is charging almost ten times the actual processing cost of indefinite leave to remain application fee from overseas health care workers. The Government should stop making profit from foreign health workers and instead seek to retain those foreign doctors and nurses in our NHS.

Join other nations in providing a route to safety for refugees. Waive all visa requirements for Ukrainian passport holders arriving in the UK.

Black Women in the U.K. are 5 times more likely to die during pregnancy and after childbirth compared to White Women (MBRRACE, 2019). We need more research done into why this is happening and recommendations to improve health care for Black Women as urgent action is needed to address this disparity.

Matthew was taken to, ‘a place of safety’, and died 7 days later.
24 others died by the same means, dating back to the year 2000. An indicator that little was done to address the growing problems.
Something went terribly wrong with the NHS Mental Health Services provided to my son.

The Government should explore using the new sanctions regime that allows individuals and entities that violate human rights around the world to be targeted, to impose sanctions on members of the Nigerian government and police force involved in any human rights abuses by the Nigerian police.


Latest EDMs signed by Janet Daby

15th November 2022
Janet Daby signed this EDM on Thursday 8th December 2022

Imprisonment for Public Protection sentences: Justice Committee report

Tabled by: Kim Johnson (Labour - Liverpool, Riverside)
That this House welcomes the Justice Committee's report on Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences, which were introduced under the Criminal Justice Act 2003 to detain people in prison who posed a significant risk of causing harm to the public; notes that IPP sentences were abolished prospectively, but not retrospectively, …
34 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Apr 2023)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 26
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
26th October 2021
Janet Daby signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 26th October 2021

The service of Oliver Denton Lieberman

Tabled by: Tulip Siddiq (Labour - Hampstead and Kilburn)
That this House recognises Oliver Denton Lieberman’s dedication and public service as an office manager during many turbulent years in politics; appreciates that he has coordinated the campaign within Parliament to free Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe and supported her family; acknowledges the role he has played in running an efficient office and …
17 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 14
Independent: 2
Scottish National Party: 1
View All Janet Daby's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Janet Daby, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Janet Daby has not been granted any Urgent Questions

2 Adjournment Debates led by Janet Daby

Monday 14th March 2022
Tuesday 26th January 2021

Janet Daby has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3 Other Department Questions
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether she is taking steps to implement the 18+1 ethnicity monitoring system for data collection across Government for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities.

The Cabinet Office’s Equality Hub encourages the use of Government Statistical Service harmonised standards for ethnicity data collection across government departments and other public bodies.

The current ethnicity harmonised standard is based on the 2011 Census questions across the UK. The ethnicity questions were adjusted so they could be used in the 2021 censuses for England and Wales, and Northern Ireland; and the 2022 Census for Scotland.

This means that the 2021 and 2022 census questions are, currently, the most up to date way of collecting data about ethnic groups.

The classification for England and Wales has 19 groups including the categories ‘Gypsy or Irish Traveller’ and ‘Roma’ (https://analysisfunction.civilservice.gov.uk/policy-store/ethnicity-harmonised-standard).

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
8th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to respond to the correspondence of 7 December 2022 from the hon. Member for Lewisham East, case reference JD31291.

A reply was issued on 9 March 2023.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
30th Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent steps the Government has taken to (a) reduce the gender pay gap and (b) help tackle (i) unequal pay and (ii) discrimination against women in the labour market.

The gender pay gap continues to fall, an increasing number of women are in full-time work, and there’s a higher percentage of women on FTSE 350 company boards than ever before.

There are strong protections against discrimination on the basis of sex in the Equality Act, including reaffirming equal pay protections.

Through mandatory gender pay gap reporting, we are motivating employers to improve workplace gender equality.

To accelerate this progress we’ve announced a pay transparency pilot, STEM returners programme, and a Taskforce on Women-Led High-Growth Enterprises.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Attorney General, with reference to the transparency data entitled AGO transparency data - January to March 2023, published on 21 July 2023, whether any matters related to the work of her Department were discussed during the hospitality she received from the Federalist Society on 9 February 2023.

Neil M. Gorsuch spoke at a lunch hosted by the Federalist Society on his role as a Supreme Court Justice. The Attorney attended, she did not speak at the lunch or discuss her role in detail.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
22nd Mar 2023
To ask the Attorney General, what recent assessment she has made of the potential impact of the Unduly Lenient Sentence scheme on allowing victims of crime to seek appeals of sentencing.

The Unduly Lenient Sentence scheme is an important mechanism to ensure that victims of crime can have confidence that justice will be served. The Victims’ Code entitles victims to be informed about the scheme, promptly after sentence, so that they may refer sentences for consideration by the Law Officers within the time limit. The Attorney General’s Office receives requests to review sentences from victims; their family members; the CPS; the police; MPs and members of the public. In 2022, 139 sentences were referred to the Court of Appeal and in 95 cases (68%), sentences were increased.

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
21st Mar 2023
To ask the Attorney General, what recent discussions she has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on funding for the Crown Prosecution Service in the next Spending Review.

In the 2021 Spending Review, the CPS secured a significant funding increase enabling it to respond to growing pressures in the criminal justice system. This settlement saw a significant investment in CPS funding, increasing its budget from £630m a year to £728m by 2024/25. That settlement has been maintained by the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
21st Mar 2023
To ask the Attorney General, what her Department's policy is on the parity of fees for prosecution and defence counsels.

Equality of arms between defence and prosecution is an important principle within the criminal justice system. Following last year’s increase to defence counsel fees, as recommended by the Independent Review of Criminal Legal Aid, this Government is providing additional funding to uplift the fees CPS pays to prosecution counsel. This funding restores parity between defence and prosecution counsel.

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent discussions he has had with the (a) Chancellor of the Exchequer, (b) Secretary of State for Health and Social Care and (c) other Cabinet colleagues on the provision of financial compensation to infected blood victims.

I refer the honourable members to the statement made on Wednesday April 19 2023, in response to the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry’s Second Interim Report.

We continue to work across Government to prepare our response to Sir Brian Langstaff’s report.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether it is his policy to provide financial compensation to infected blood victims.

I refer the honourable members to the statement made on Wednesday April 19 2023, in response to the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry’s Second Interim Report.

We continue to work across Government to prepare our response to Sir Brian Langstaff’s report.

22nd Mar 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many stabbings have been reported in (a) Lewisham East constituency and (b) the London Borough of Lewisham in each reporting year since 2018.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon. member’s Parliamentary Question of 22/03 is attached

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he has plans to provide a photo identification card for every British citizen free of charge as a form of identification for general purposes.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer given to PQ188127 on 29 April 2021.


Further information can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/news/voter-identification-faqs.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
29th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what recent discussions he has had with local authority trading standards departments on the safety of lithium-ion batteries in (a) e-bikes and (b) e-scooters.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) is part of the Department for Business and Trade and Ministers are actively engaged on this important safety issue. Just last month I wrote to major online food delivery businesses to highlight the Fire England guidance on safe charging of e-bikes and e-scooters. OPSS is part of cross Government activities to understand the root cause of fires related to Lithium-ion batteries so they, in conjunction with local authority enforcement teams, can take the action necessary to help ensure safety.

OPSS works closely with Local Authority Trading Standards on this and other product safety issues, including through a co-ordinated system of product safety checks at the border. Details of safety alerts and recalls of unsafe and non-compliant products are published on gov.uk. OPSS has published details of ten separate product recalls and nine other enforcement actions relating to unsafe or non-compliant e-bikes or e-scooters since March last year.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
29th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will make an estimate of how many lithium-ion batteries used in e-bikes and e-scooters have been found to be unsafe and removed from the market in the last 12 months.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) is part of the Department for Business and Trade and Ministers are actively engaged on this important safety issue. Just last month I wrote to major online food delivery businesses to highlight the Fire England guidance on safe charging of e-bikes and e-scooters. OPSS is part of cross Government activities to understand the root cause of fires related to Lithium-ion batteries so they, in conjunction with local authority enforcement teams, can take the action necessary to help ensure safety.

OPSS works closely with Local Authority Trading Standards on this and other product safety issues, including through a co-ordinated system of product safety checks at the border. Details of safety alerts and recalls of unsafe and non-compliant products are published on gov.uk. OPSS has published details of ten separate product recalls and nine other enforcement actions relating to unsafe or non-compliant e-bikes or e-scooters since March last year.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
29th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has had recent discussions with the Office for Product Safety and Standards on lithium-ion batteries in e-bikes and e-scooters.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) is part of the Department for Business and Trade and Ministers are actively engaged on this important safety issue. Just last month I wrote to major online food delivery businesses to highlight the Fire England guidance on safe charging of e-bikes and e-scooters. OPSS is part of cross Government activities to understand the root cause of fires related to Lithium-ion batteries so they, in conjunction with local authority enforcement teams, can take the action necessary to help ensure safety.

OPSS works closely with Local Authority Trading Standards on this and other product safety issues, including through a co-ordinated system of product safety checks at the border. Details of safety alerts and recalls of unsafe and non-compliant products are published on gov.uk. OPSS has published details of ten separate product recalls and nine other enforcement actions relating to unsafe or non-compliant e-bikes or e-scooters since March last year.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, when she plans to respond to correspondence of 4 October 2022 from the hon. Member for Lewisham East, case reference JD30155.

This correspondence was replied to on 19th April 2023.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when he plans to respond to correspondence of 31 May 2023 from the hon. Member for Lewisham East, case reference JD34425.

I wrote to the hon. Member on 7 June in response to case reference JD34425.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 17 April 2023 to Question 176722 on Members: Correspondence, when he plans to respond to the correspondence of 15 December 2022 from the hon. Member for Lewisham East, case reference JD31665.

I wrote to the hon. Member on 20 April 2023 about deforestation.

4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, if she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to help support the use of human-specific medical research.

The Government has no plans to bring forward legislative proposals in this area. We are committed to supporting advances to reduce reliance on the use of animals in research, including stem cell research, cell culture systems, imaging and computer modelling. The UK has a world leading reputation for the delivery of techniques that replace, reduce and refine the use of animals in research (3Rs). UK Research and Innovation provides funding for the National Centre for 3Rs (NC3Rs), which works to drive the uptake of 3Rs technologies and ensure that the 3Rs are reflected in policy, practice and regulations.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what recent discussions she has had with (a) domestic stakeholder organisations and (b) international partners regarding the use of human-specific medical research.

The Secretary of State has not had any meetings specifically on human-specific medical research. However, the Government is committed to reducing the reliance on the use of animals in research and officials in the department meet representatives from relevant stakeholder organisations and businesses, including the RSPCA, Unilever, LUSH and Animal Free Research.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what recent steps she has taken to improve access to (a) ultrafast full fibre and (b) superfast fibre to the cabinet broadband in Lewisham East constituency.

The Government is committed to delivering nationwide gigabit connectivity as soon as possible. By 2025, the Government is targeting a minimum of 85% gigabit-capable coverage. As per Ofcom’s “Connected Nations” data from May 2023, Lewisham East had 84% gigabit-capable coverage and 99% superfast coverage, as compared to the national average of 74% and 97%, respectively

We have introduced several pro-competition policies to encourage the market to connect urban areas such as Lewisham East. For example, we are removing barriers to rollout and working with Ofcom to promote competition and investment. As a result, there is now a thriving market of over 100 providers investing c.£40 billion rolling out gigabit broadband all over the UK. This approach is the fastest and best value for the taxpayer as it allows us to focus government funding on the areas that would not otherwise be connected.

In order to further improve connectivity in constituencies like Lewisham East, we have published the Digital Connectivity Portal - extensive guidance to help local authorities facilitate broadband deployment. This includes technical information on the application of telecoms legislation, as well as practical examples of best practice (such as the Street Works Toolkit for working in the country’s highways, and wayleave templates for telecoms operators to gain access to public sector land).

The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology officials regularly facilitate meetings and workshops between local government and the broadband industry, to build relationships that foster more frictionless deployment. The four sub-regional partnerships across London have been vital in coordinating this work.

12th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, pursuant to the Answer of 12 September 2023 to Question 196183 on Public Telephones, what recent discussions she has had with (a) BT and (b) Ofcom on repairs to dilapidated public telephone boxes which have been retained for use.

Ofcom, the UK’s telecommunications regulator, is responsible for the regulation of Public Call Boxes (PCBs). Under the Universal Service Conditions by Ofcom, KCOM and BT are required to ensure the adequate provision, repair and maintenance of Public Call Boxes (‘PCBs’). Ofcom has published this guidance on their website. DSIT does not engage with Ofcom nor BT on issues related to PCBs because it does not fall within the Department’s remit.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what recent discussions she has had with (a) BT and (b) Ofcom on the maintenance of public phone boxes.

I thank the Hon. Member for her question, and would like to refer her to the answer that I gave on 12th September to Questions 196183 and 196184

17th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made with Cabinet colleagues of the impact of the cost of living crisis on levels of fuel poverty.

The official fuel poverty statistics, including the impact of high energy prices on fuel poor households, are due to be published next month.

23rd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made a recent assessment of the adequacy of the Alternative Dispute Resolution for Consumer Disputes.

The Government published its response to the 2021 ‘Reforming Competition and Consumer Policy’ consultation in Spring 2022. This exercise set out the many benefits of consumer Alternative Dispute Resolution and collected evidence on how it might be improved.

The Government has committed to bring forward the Digital Markets, Competition and Consumer Bill in the third Parliamentary session. Building on the evidence collected in the consultation, the Bill will contain measures to improve the consistency and quality of Alternative Dispute Resolution services in consumer markets by strengthening the accreditation and monitoring framework.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to increase the number of heat pump installers registered under the Microgeneration Certification Scheme.

The Government's £6 million Home Decarbonisation Skills Training competition in 2020 and 2021 supported almost 7,000 training opportunities, including training for over 2,000 heat pump installers. On 20 September the Government launched the next phase of the competition with a further £10 million to fund training for people working in the energy efficiency, retrofit and low carbon heating sectors in England. It is expected that many of these installers will seek to register with the Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) or equivalent schemes.

28th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number of (a) air source and (b) ground source heat pumps installed in households in Lewisham East constituency in each year since 2018.

The Microgeneration Certification Scheme Installations Database shows that between 01 January 2018 and 31 October 2022, eight air source heat pump and no ground source heat pump installations were registered in the Lewisham East constituency.

The database does not include all heat pump installations. Those installed without Government funding support, such as in new buildings, are not typically recorded in the Microgeneration Certification Scheme Installations Database.

22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of electric vehicle use for decreasing air pollution in cities.

The transition to electric vehicles is expected to bring air quality, emissions, and economic benefits. The UK was the first G7 country to commit to phasing out the sale of petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2030.

9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of (a) the ability of Ofgem to effectively regulate prices of energy providers and (b) the potential merits of bringing all energy providers into public ownership.

The prices charged by energy providers are set by the market and are largely determined by the cost of internationally-traded electricity and gas. For default tariffs, where competition has less of an effect on price, Ofgem sets a price cap on suppliers, based on the efficient costs of supply. During its first year the default tariff price cap was estimated to have saved households £1 billion and continues to save consumers £75- £100 a year on average.

The Government sees competition as the best way of securing value and quality service for consumers. The number of domestic gas and electricity suppliers has increased from 10 in 2010 to around 50 now, and customers who switch can save up to £150 a year.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government has made an assessment of the potential implications for national security of (a) Amazon and (b) other companies based in the UK using technology from the Chinese-state linked company, Beijing Genomics Institute, to test their workforces; and whether the Government has had discussions with representatives of (i) Amazon and (ii) other companies on the potential risks of DNA harvesting by state-linked companies associated with such testing.

The Government takes the importance of public trust and security in the handling on genomic data seriously.

When an individual is swabbed for a Covid-19 test that specimen will contain human DNA. Any analysis of that DNA without consent from the individual would contravene the provisions of the Human Tissue Act 2004 and the individuals and companies, or agencies would be liable to criminal prosecution.

We are not aware of any discussions with Amazon or other companies on the potential risks of DNA harvesting by state linked companies.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an equality impact assessment of hair care products for Black hair being classed as non-essential items during the covid-19 lockdown; and what assessment he has made of the effect of that matter on (a) closure levels of businesses selling Black hair care products during covid-19 lockdowns and (b) the extent to which those products are stocked in major retailers.

Throughout the national restrictions, we have sought to keep as much of the retail sector open as possible, whilst balancing the need to reduce our day-to-day contact. In doing so, we have taken evidence from SAGE into account when making decisions.

Retailers have been permitted to sell their goods online and for click-and-collect (where possible) throughout the pandemic and, as of Monday 12th April, the retail sector is now open in its entirety. There has never been a defined list of essential and non-essential goods.

We continually review the impacts of the pandemic on all groups with protected characteristics.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing a work visa that professionals can use to travel to the 27 EU states with one document.

There is no precedent in a Free Trade Agreement for EU Member States offering a single visa for work.

However, in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA), the UK and EU did agree a range of facilitations for those travelling temporarily for work (Mode 4). The commitments agreed between the UK and the EU guarantee market access to business travellers in a wide number of sectors, waive work-permits for a range of short-term business visits, and provide for a minimum standard for how service providers should be treated when working in the other Party. We have also agreed commitments that will make it easier for professionals engaged in cross-border trade to apply for visas.

Commitments in the Mode 4 chapter are in addition to the EU already having legislated to allow UK nationals to travel visa-free for short stays of up to 90 days in any 180-day period. This will allow UK nationals travelling to, and within, the Schengen Area to undertake a limited range of activities, such as tourism, or attending business meetings, or cultural and sports events.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that electric vehicles are affordable.

The Government’s current intervention in the electric vehicle market aims to accelerate upfront price parity between electric and internal combustion engine equivalents, making electric vehicles more affordable for all consumers.

We are supporting R&D to ensure that technologies for electric vehicles are developed and brought to market as early as possible. This includes support for power electronics and motors, and the development of battery technology through the £274 million Faraday Battery Challenge.

We are also incentivising demand to allow those technologies to reach the mass market and scale as early as possible. In addition, government grants for plug-in vehicles continue to help reduce the upfront purchase price of electric vehicles.

Drivers of ultra-low emission vehicles also receive other benefits, including lower tax rates and grants towards the installation of chargepoints. For example, all zero emission models will pay no company car tax in 2020-21 and 1% in 2021-22, before returning to the planned 2% rate in 2022-23 – a significant tax saving for employees and employers.

Local authorities may also provide incentives, such as free parking or exemption from the congestion charge.

We stated in our Road to Zero Strategy that consumer incentives will continue to play a role beyond 2020.

17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to respond to correspondence of 9 June 2023 from the hon. Member for Lewisham East, case reference JD34532.

The department aims to reply to correspondence within 20 working days. A reply was issued on 29 June 2023, which was therefore within this target time frame.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to respond to correspondence of 15 March 2023 from the hon. Member for Lewisham East, case reference JD33004.

A reply was issued on 7 June 2023.

11th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions she has had with representatives of phone and broadband providers on potential in-contract price rises in the next financial year.

On November 29 2022, I convened a roundtable with the UK’s major mobile, broadband, and landline providers to discuss the affordability of connectivity services. I urged the industry to remain mindful of the impact any price rises on households, particularly when many are facing additional pressures on their finances due to the global rise in the cost of living.

Ofcom has a statutory duty to monitor the ongoing affordability of telecommunication services, and officials continue to engage regularly with both Ofcom and operators to explore ways we can support households in staying connected.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
27th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding her Department has provided through grants to art galleries in each financial year since 2017-18.

The table below shows the amount of grant funding DCMS and its delivery body Arts Council England (ACE) are estimated to have awarded to art galleries in each financial year from Financial Year 2017-18 to 21-22. These figures include an estimate of grants provided to arts galleries via Arts Council England, and DCMS direct Grant in Aid provided to the National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery and the Tate. We have not included individual art galleries part of other DCMS sponsored Arm’s Length Bodies as it is not possible to break down costs at this level.

These figures include estimates produced by ACE that include both exchequer and lottery funds. ACE does not have a method of calculating funding spent on art galleries specifically (beyond Museums, and Visual Arts, as high-level classifiers), but can determine funding for projects taking place in galleries, and can identify some galleries funding through name-searching for galleries in funding databases. This provides an estimate for ACE funding support for galleries and activity in galleries, but is not precise.

TOTAL (£m)

2017/18

£69.29*

2018/19

£156.23

2019/20

£168.30

2020/21

£203.66

2021/22

£206.42

TOTAL

£803.90

*There is no comparable funding data available from ACE for 2017/18, this therefore includes only DCMS direct Grant in Aid provided to the National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery and the Tate Galleries.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
26th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the depiction of women in artworks exhibited in art galleries in receipt of funding from her Department.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 28th October 2022 to Question UIN 71270.

Art galleries operate independently from the government. Decisions related to the content of exhibitions, such as curatorial decisions on the depiction of women in artworks, are operational matters for the galleries.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the BBC's reporting on Sir Cliff Richard in 2014 and the BBC's rehiring of Martin Bashir, if he will make an assessment of the BBC's effectiveness in delivery of reforms under the Charter.

The BBC has a duty to deliver impartial and accurate news coverage and content under its Royal Charter.

It is for the BBC Board to ensure that BBC output meets the highest standards the public expects and for Ofcom to hold the BBC to account on its delivery against the Mission and Public Purposes set out in 2017.

However, in light of the findings of the Dyson Report, the Secretary of State has said that the BBC needs to improve its culture to ensure similar events never happen again which means a new emphasis on accuracy, impartiality and diversity of opinion.

The government will therefore reflect on Lord Dyson’s thorough report and any changes made following the review being conducted. We will then consider whether further governance and regulatory reforms at the BBC are needed in the upcoming mid-term Charter review.

8th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking with social media companies to tackle fake social media profiles that spread misinformation and are operated from hostile states.

We take the issue of dis- and misinformation very seriously and DCMS leads work across Government to tackle it. We engage regularly with social media companies to encourage the introduction of systems and processes that promote authoritative sources of information, and to help them identify and take action to remove dis- and misinformation, in line with their terms and conditions.

It is a Government priority to protect the UK against foreign interference. We know that certain states routinely use disinformation as a foreign policy tool and have seen evidence of this happening in other countries. We monitor for disinformation campaigns so that we can be ready to respond to them quickly and effectively. We work closely with international partners to share information to better understand and then develop approaches to counter the threat from disinformation.

The Government is legislating on these issues. The Counter State Threats Bill will provide the Security Services and Law Enforcement Agencies with the tools they need to tackle the evolving threat from hostile activity by states and actors. The legislation will make the UK a harder environment for states to conduct hostile activity in, and increase the cost to them of doing so.

We have also published the draft Online Safety Bill, which will bring in a legal duty of care and give companies clear legal responsibilities to improve user safety. The new laws will have robust and proportionate measures to deal with disinformation that could cause significant physical or psychological harm to an individual, such as anti-vaccination content and falsehoods about COVID-19.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress has been made on the proposed arrangement for musicians to tour in the EU without needing individual visas for each country.

Regrettably we do not believe the sector’s visa waiver proposal is viable. The Commission would be likely to argue that any EU-wide visa waiver agreement can only be part of a wider package with a binding non-discrimination clause and a reciprocal visa waiver agreement covering all current and future Member States, as they proposed in negotiaions. This remains incompatible with our manifesto commitment to take control of our borders.

The UK took an ambitious approach during negotiations that would have ensured that touring artists and their support staff did not need work-permits to perform in the EU. Regrettably, our proposals were rejected by the EU, but our door remains open if the EU wants to reconsider its position.

UK performers, artists, and musicians are of course still able to tour and perform in the EU, and vice versa. As the Secretary of State has said, we have moved at pace and with urgency and have provided much greater clarity about the current position.

We have published guidance on GOV.UK, signposting to official information provided by EU countries about their business travel routes. And through our bilateral discussions with EU Member States, we have established that in at least 17 out of 27 Member States some touring activities are possible without visas or work-permits. The UK has significantly more generous arrangements for touring professionals than many Member States, and should they be willing to change their rules to more closely align with ours we will have those discussions and encourage them to do so.

7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of issuing mandatory diversity quotas for artists whose art is displayed by galleries which receive funding from his Department.

The Government is clear that it expects the cultural sectors to represent our diverse society in their artistic talent, workforce and audiences. As the national development agency for art and culture, Arts Council England (ACE) has a responsibility to ensure that public money benefits all of the public.

ACE ensures there is diversity in audiences, leaders, producers and creators of arts and culture. Their Inclusivity and Relevance principle sets out how organisations in receipt of public funding, including galleries, can work towards this objective across their workforce and governing bodies, the programmes they present, and the audiences they engage with.

ACE has also developed a set of accessible resources which are available online to support organisations to develop their ambitions of becoming more inclusive, including addressing any barriers faced for example by disabled people and those from lower socio-economic backgrounds.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent comparative assessment he made of the proportional representation of female artists and male artists in Britain’s major galleries.

DCMS does not play a role in the creative or curatorial decisions of Britain’s major galleries.

Major galleries present both male and female artists within their permanent collections and curators seek to increase representation where needed. Major galleries, including the National Gallery Tate, and National Portrait Gallery also run exhibitions focused on displaying female artists.

29th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect on access to BBC services of the decision by the BBC to stop supporting their output on devices running the Android 4.4.4 system.

The BBC is operationally and editorially independent from the government and the government cannot intervene in the BBC’s day-to-day operations. The assessment of the effect on access to BBC services from technical changes is therefore a matter for the BBC.

The BBC addresses the issue of device compatibility with BBC iPlayer on its website. More information can be found here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/help/questions/supported-devices/use-mobile-tablet

20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how the funding from the covid-19 financial support package for the arts and culture sector will be distributed; and whether his Department has conducted an equality impact assessment on the allocation of that funding.

On 5 July, the government announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of sectors, including performing arts and theatres, museums and galleries, heritage sites, live music venues and independent cinema.

In line with our obligations under the Public Sector Equality Duty, my department and its Arm’s Length Bodies have considered equalities impacts during the policy development process, and will continue to do so during delivery. Organisations in receipt of funding will also be expected to demonstrate progress in diversity and outreach over the coming years in return for this investment into their futures.

9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the level of financial support available to workers in the music industry, including (a) music managers, (b) artists, (c) promoters and (d) stage workers.

We appreciate that the Covid-19 pandemic presents a huge challenge to the music industry and the freelancers and the self-employed workers within it. The Government’s response has been one of the most generous and comprehensive in the world, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme, the Bounceback Loan Scheme and business rates reliefs. In addition, the Government has adapted the welfare system so that the self-employed can access Universal Credit in full, to help people get quicker and more generous support when they need it most.

On Sunday 5 July 2020, the Secretary of State announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of cultural and creative sectors, including music.

We are working closely with DCMS’ Arm’s Length Bodies to develop guidance indicating who can apply for the different elements of this funding, and we will publish detailed guidance as soon as possible.

17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made on the effect of the covid-19 on the financial sustainability of independent festivals.

In order to support the sustainability of the Arts sector, including independent festivals, DCMS has worked closely with Arts Council England (ACE) to provide a tailored package of financial support. In March, ACE announced a £160m emergency response package to complement the financial measures already announced by the Government, and provide financial support for Arts organisations and individuals so they can better sustain themselves, and their work, in the coming months. More than 9000 individuals and organisations have been successful in applying for this emergency funding.

The Secretary of State, myself and officials continue to consult the sector extensively to ensure we fully understand the financial impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on the sector. On the basis of that engagement, DCMS and ACE are continuing to work closely to consider the additional measures that are needed to ensure the long-term recovery and growth of the cultural sector.

Alongside this, I chair the Cultural Renewal Taskforce which is supported by 8 ministerially-chaired working groups that include representatives from key sector bodies and organisations. The working groups will produce sector-led guidance for the safe reopening of events and businesses across the arts and creative industries sectors.

Membership of the Entertainment and Events Working Group, chaired by the Minister for Digital and Culture, includes the Association of Independent Festivals and the National Outdoor Events Association.

13th May 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to increase access to 15 hours of childcare support for (a) single and (b) disabled parent families.

Working parent entitlements are aimed at supporting parents to get back into work, or to work more hours if they wish to. This is available to both two parent families and single parent families who meet the eligibility criteria.

The department is expanding the free childcare offer from September 2025 to enable eligible working parents in England to access 30 hours of free childcare per week for 38 weeks per year from the term after their child turns 9 months old to when they start school.

Since April 2024, eligible working parents of two year olds have been able to access 15 hours of free childcare per week over 38 weeks of the year from the term after the child’s second birthday. Over 210,000 two year olds are now confirmed to have places for 15 hours a week of free childcare, as part of the largest ever expansion of childcare in England. Applications are now open for the September phase of the expansion, which will see the offer extended to eligible working parents of children aged from 9 months.

The income eligibility criteria are applied on a per parent basis, so working parents who individually earn more than £9,518 but less than £100,000 adjusted net income per year will be eligible. For families with two parents, both must be working to meet the criteria, unless one is receiving certain benefits such as carers allowance, incapacity benefit and severe disablement allowance. Single parents in receipt of specified benefits will also need to be working and meet the income requirements in order to be eligible for the working parent entitlement.

Parents who claim Disability Living Allowance or Personal Independence Payment for themselves or their child may be eligible for this entitlement, if they are working and meet the income requirement. More information is available at https://www.gov.uk/check-eligible-free-childcare-if-youre-working.

However, parents who are already receiving some additional forms of government support can receive 15 hours of funded early education, including childcare, for two year olds. This is separate from the new entitlement for working parents and is available to parents whose child is entitled to Disability Living Allowance. All parents regardless of employment status or income levels are eligible for the universal 15 hours for three and four year olds.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)