David Davis Portrait

David Davis

Conservative - Haltemprice and Howden

First elected: 10th July 2008


1 APPG membership (as of 24 Jan 2024)
Trafficked Britons in Syria
5 Former APPG memberships
Deliberative Democracy, Drones, Future of Work, Responsible Tax, Social Integration
Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union
13th Jul 2016 - 8th Jul 2018
Shadow Secretary of State (Home Office)
10th Nov 2003 - 12th Jun 2008
Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice (also Shadow Minister for London)
23rd Jul 2002 - 10th Nov 2003
Shadow Minister without Portfolio
18th Sep 2001 - 23rd Jul 2002
Liaison Committee (Commons)
30th Oct 1997 - 11th May 2001
Public Accounts Committee
25th Jul 1997 - 11th May 2001
Minister of State (Foreign and Commonwealth Office)
20th Jul 1994 - 2nd May 1997
Parliamentary Secretary (Duchy of Lancaster Office)
27th May 1993 - 19th Jul 1994
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
3rd Dec 1990 - 27th May 1993


Oral Question
Wednesday 6th March 2024
12:00
Cabinet Office
Oral Question No. 11
If he will list his official engagements for Wednesday 6 March.
Division Votes
Monday 5th February 2024
Finance Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 276 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 283 Noes - 39
Speeches
Wednesday 28th February 2024
British Justice System and International Corruption Cases
This is the third debate on oligarchs and lawfare that I have led in the past two years. It is …
Written Answers
Friday 15th December 2023
Health Services
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the letter from the Parliamentary Under …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 10th March 2020
Automation and the future of work
That this House welcomes the Government’s commitment to level up; notes that a co-ordinated, cross-departmental approach to creating the conditions …
Bills
Tuesday 19th January 2021
Freedom of Speech (Universities) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to place a duty on universities to promote freedom of speech; to make provision for fining universities that …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 30th October 2023
2. (b) Any other support not included in Category 2(a)
Name of donor: Paul Sykes
Address of donor: private
Amount of donation or nature and value if donation in kind: …
EDM signed
Monday 4th December 2023
Sixth year of detention of Jagtar Singh Johal
That this House notes that Friday 4 November 2023 marked the sixth anniversary of the arbitrary detention in India of …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 10th January 2024
Scottish Law Officers (Devolution) Bill 2023-24
A Bill to amend the Scotland Act 1998 to grant to the Scottish Parliament legislative competence in respect of the …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, David Davis has voted in 663 divisions, and 68 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Mar 2021 - Coronavirus - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 35 Conservative No votes vs 305 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 484 Noes - 76
22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 29 Conservative Aye votes vs 318 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 300 Noes - 318
22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 297
22 Mar 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 253
10 Feb 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 327 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 526 Noes - 24
9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 341 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 351 Noes - 276
9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 303
9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 354 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 363 Noes - 267
27 Jan 2021 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 354 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 363 Noes - 267
27 Jan 2021 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 353 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 361 Noes - 267
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 344 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 353 Noes - 277
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative No votes vs 319 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 308
30 Dec 2020 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 328 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 335 Noes - 212
1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
10 Nov 2020 - Committee on Standards - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 334 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 261 Noes - 334
4 Nov 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 330 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 333 Noes - 264
3 Nov 2020 - Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 335 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 266 Noes - 336
3 Nov 2020 - Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 336 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 335
3 Nov 2020 - Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 333 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 269 Noes - 334
19 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative No votes vs 324 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 327 Noes - 264
19 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 326 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 328 Noes - 264
15 Oct 2020 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 314 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 256 Noes - 317
15 Oct 2020 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 312 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 256 Noes - 316
15 Oct 2020 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 310 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 311
15 Oct 2020 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 310 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 255 Noes - 314
13 Oct 2020 - Public Health: Coronavirus Regulations - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 82
2 Sep 2020 - Recall of MPs (Change of Party Affiliation) - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 41 Conservative No votes vs 47 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 52
1 Jul 2020 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative Aye votes vs 317 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 232 Noes - 321
1 Jul 2020 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 316 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 254 Noes - 317
30 Jun 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 332 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 252 Noes - 332
20 May 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 345 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 352
20 May 2020 - Liaison (Membership) - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative Aye votes vs 316 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 323
10 Mar 2020 - Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 301 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 306
27 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 256
28 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 321 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 256
20 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative No votes vs 265 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 268 Noes - 204
7 Dec 2021 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Conservative Aye votes vs 305 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 245 Noes - 309
7 Dec 2021 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Conservative Aye votes vs 289 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 251 Noes - 296
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 60 Conservative No votes vs 258 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 385 Noes - 100
17 Jan 2022 - Elections Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 315 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 234 Noes - 327
7 Mar 2022 - Economic Crime (Transparency and Enforcement) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 296 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 234 Noes - 300
22 Mar 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 305 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 223
22 Mar 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 296 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 302 Noes - 232
22 Mar 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Conservative No votes vs 296 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 313 Noes - 227
20 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 304 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 311 Noes - 231
20 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 291 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 294 Noes - 242
20 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 236
20 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 234
18 Oct 2022 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 282 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 235 Noes - 302
18 Oct 2022 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 276 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 283 Noes - 234
16 Nov 2022 - National Security Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 280 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 283
16 Nov 2022 - National Security Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 275 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 212 Noes - 283
16 Nov 2022 - National Security Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 275 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 56 Noes - 282
5 Dec 2022 - Online Safety Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 308 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 242 Noes - 308
18 Jan 2023 - Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 286 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 242 Noes - 295
16 Jan 2023 - Strikes (Minimum Service Levels) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority - in line with the party majority and in line with the House
One of 299 Conservative No votes vs 18 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 49 Noes - 482
14 Dec 2022 - Asylum Seekers (Removal to Safe Countries) - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 67 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 69 Noes - 188
14 Dec 2022 - Architects - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 295 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 42
12 Dec 2022 - Council Tax - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 292 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 199
12 Dec 2022 - Standards: Code of Conduct and Guide to the Rules - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 234 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 135 Noes - 239
22 Mar 2023 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 288 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 296 Noes - 229
7 Mar 2023 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 107 Conservative Aye votes vs 109 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 299
7 Mar 2023 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 269 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 281 Noes - 236
7 Mar 2023 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 271 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 280 Noes - 232
24 Apr 2023 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 263 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 270 Noes - 200
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Conservative No votes vs 279 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 284 Noes - 242
29 Nov 2023 - Data Protection and Digital Information Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 265 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 209 Noes - 275
View All David Davis Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Priti Patel (Conservative)
(24 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(24 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(22 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(91 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(88 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(70 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
National Security Act 2023
(3,120 words contributed)
Online Safety Act 2023
(2,872 words contributed)
Nationality and Borders Act 2022
(2,586 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all David Davis's debates

Haltemprice and Howden Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Haltemprice and Howden signature proportion
Petitions with most Haltemprice and Howden signatures
David Davis has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by David Davis

7th November 2023
David Davis signed this EDM on Monday 4th December 2023

Sixth year of detention of Jagtar Singh Johal

Tabled by: Martin Docherty-Hughes (Scottish National Party - West Dunbartonshire)
That this House notes that Friday 4 November 2023 marked the sixth anniversary of the arbitrary detention in India of Jagtar Singh Johal, a Sikh activist and son of the Rock of Dumbarton held since being abducted from the street during his honeymoon by unidentified assailants who turned out to …
54 signatures
(Most recent: 7 Dec 2023)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 35
Labour: 7
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Liberal Democrat: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
Conservative: 1
13th July 2023
David Davis signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 13th July 2023

Debate on the Intelligence and Security Committee's report on China

Tabled by: Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative - Chingford and Woodford Green)
That this House ensures that the Intelligence and Security Committee Report on China, published on 13 July 2023, is debated on the floor of the House of Commons before the House rises on Thursday 20 July 2023.
4 signatures
(Most recent: 18 Jul 2023)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All David Davis's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by David Davis, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


2 Urgent Questions tabled by David Davis

Wednesday 10th January 2024

9 Adjournment Debates led by David Davis

Thursday 29th June 2023
Monday 17th October 2022
Thursday 24th June 2021
Thursday 21st January 2021
Thursday 14th January 2021
Thursday 23rd January 2020

6 Bills introduced by David Davis


A Bill to repeal the European Communities Act 1972 and make other provision in connection with the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the EU.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 26th June 2018 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to confer power on the Prime Minister to notify, under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union, the United Kingdom’s intention to withdraw from the EU.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 16th March 2017 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to make provision about the handling of complaints by the Health Service Commissioner for England; to require the Commissioner to notify a complainant of the reason for the delay if the investigation of the complaint is not concluded within a twelve month period; to require the Commissioner to lay before Parliament an annual report giving details of how long investigations of complaints have taken to be concluded and progress towards meeting a target of concluding investigations within a twelve month period; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 26th March 2015 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to place a duty on universities to promote freedom of speech; to make provision for fining universities that do not comply with that duty; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 19th January 2021
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to make provision about obligations on wind farm operators in respect of financial cover for potential liabilities arising from cause of public nuisance; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 21st July 2015

A Bill to amend the Employment Rights Act 1996 to provide that disclosures of information about malpractice to a Member of Parliament where the disclosure is in the public interest be included as protected disclosures; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 19th November 2013

362 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
30th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Minister or official authorised the Rapid Response Unit to collect of data related to public statements, social media and internet activity as part of that unit's work.

The Rapid Response Unit was launched, initially as a six-month pilot in April 2018; its formation having received approval at Ministerial level in January 2018. During the pandemic, the Cabinet Office expanded the team to monitor disinformation about Covid. The Rapid Response Unit used only publicly available data, including material shared on social media platforms, to assess UK disinformation trends and narratives.

5th Sep 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 21 April 2022 to Question 153746, on Coronavirus: Surveys, if he will publish the timetable for sharing information on polling commissioned by the Government at the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Cabinet Office is working with suppliers to finalise campaign evaluation reports. This is a complex process given the amount of data generated during the Covid-19 pandemic and we want to avoid any misleading publication of findings. We aim to begin publishing reports by the end of the year.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 September 2021 to Question 45797, on Coronavirus: Surveys, if he will publish information on polling commissioned by the Government at the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

COVID-19 polling was conducted to help develop and drive the optimisation of campaign messaging. This enabled the maximum effectiveness of messaging and ensured vital public health information reached as many people as possible.

Due to the unprecedented scope of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, polling was conducted regularly for approximately two years. This represents a significant volume of information that requires review.

The Cabinet Office is committed to conducting a review of the polling information that it holds. A timetable for sharing the appropriate information will be released by Spring 2022.

14th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government on public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 14 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQ45797 on 14 September 2021.

14th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government on public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 13 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQ45797 on 14 September 2021.

14th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government on public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 11 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQ45797 on 14 September 2021.

14th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government on public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 10 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQ45797 on 14 September 2021.

9th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 9 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 8 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 7 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 6 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 5 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 4 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 3 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 2 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 1 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the results of 16 polls on public opinion on covid-19 conducted or commissioned by his Department which took place on Sundays between March and July 2020, which covered public opinion on Covid-19.

I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the answer given to PQs 82315 and 82316 on 9 September 2020, and PQ 156454 on 2 March 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Cabinet Office to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.



Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which companies the Cabinet Office's Insight and Evaluation Team commissioned to carry out covid-19 polling on behalf of the Government.

I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the answer given to PQs 82315 and 82316 on 9 September 2020, and PQ 156454 on 2 March 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Cabinet Office to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.



Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the (a) contents and (b) results of the 265 covid-19 polling files held by his Department's Insight and Evaluation Team.

I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the answer given to PQs 82315 and 82316 on 9 September 2020, and PQ 156454 on 2 March 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Cabinet Office to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.



Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the (a) dates and (b) results of covid-19 polling undertaken by Hanbury Strategy on behalf of the Government.

I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the answer given to PQs 82315 and 82316 on 9 September 2020, and PQ 156454 on 2 March 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Cabinet Office to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.



Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, on what dates between 1 January 2020 and 28 July 2020 covid-19 polling was undertaken by (a) his Department's Insight and Evaluation Team and (b) companies on behalf of his Department.

I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the answer given to PQs 82315 and 82316 on 9 September 2020, and PQ 156454 on 2 March 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Cabinet Office to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.



Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff have undertaken work in the Cabinet Office Freedom of Information Clearing House in each of the last 10 years; and what the annual budget was for the Cabinet Office Freedom of Information Clearing House in that time period.

This Government is fully committed to transparency, and ensuring all requests for Freedom of Information (FOI) are handled appropriately. All requests are considered in an applicant-blind manner, regardless of - for example - the occupation of the applicant. The Cabinet Office FOI process complies with relevant protections under the Data Protection Act 2018.

Under section 45 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 the Cabinet Minister issues a Code of Practice, available on gov.uk, which provides guidance and advice to public authorities on the handling of Freedom of Information Requests. In addition, and in line with practice since 2005, the Cabinet Office provides advice to Departments, to ensure cases are handled consistently, and sensitive material handled appropriately. A Clearing House was established in 2004 and has operated in different forms since the FOI Act came into force in January 2005 as an advice centre to coordinate complex requests across Whitehall. There is now no stand alone Clearing House team, but coordination functions are carried out by a number of staff members who have a range of wider responsibilities. Policy responsibility for Freedom of Information transferred from the Ministry of Justice to the Cabinet Office in 2015.

25th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what criteria are used to determine whether a Freedom of Information Request is sufficiently sensitive to be referred to the Cabinet Office Freedom of Information Clearing House.

This Government is fully committed to transparency, and ensuring all requests for Freedom of Information (FOI) are handled appropriately. All requests are considered in an applicant-blind manner, regardless of - for example - the occupation of the applicant. The Cabinet Office FOI process complies with relevant protections under the Data Protection Act 2018.

Under section 45 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 the Cabinet Minister issues a Code of Practice, available on gov.uk, which provides guidance and advice to public authorities on the handling of Freedom of Information Requests. In addition, and in line with practice since 2005, the Cabinet Office provides advice to Departments, to ensure cases are handled consistently, and sensitive material handled appropriately. A Clearing House was established in 2004 and has operated in different forms since the FOI Act came into force in January 2005 as an advice centre to coordinate complex requests across Whitehall. There is now no stand alone Clearing House team, but coordination functions are carried out by a number of staff members who have a range of wider responsibilities. Policy responsibility for Freedom of Information transferred from the Ministry of Justice to the Cabinet Office in 2015.

28th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that the introduction of voter identification cards does not affect an individual's civil rights.

Voter ID is part of a body of work this Government is delivering to strengthen the integrity of our electoral system and give the public confidence that our elections are secure and fit for the 21st century.

Electors will be required to show an approved form of photographic ID before casting their vote in a polling station across Great Britain at national UK-wide elections, and at local elections in England.

The list of approved photographic ID will not be limited to passports and driving licences, a broad range of documents already in use will be accepted, including, for example, concessionary travel passes, PASS scheme cards, Ministry of Defence identity cards and photocard parking permits issued as part of the Blue Badge scheme.

Any voter who does not have an approved form of ID will be able to apply, free of charge, for a local elector ID from their local authority.

The provision of local elector ID will be the exception rather than the norm, evidenced by the published evaluations of the pilots:

https://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/our-views-and-research/our-research/voter-identification-pilots/may-2019-voter-identification-pilot-schemes/our-findings

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/819404/2019_Voter_ID_Pilots_Evaluation.pdf

7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment she has made of the (a) adequacy of the work of the Counter Disinformation Unit and (b) impact of that work on freedom of speech.

The Counter Disinformation Unit (CDU), now called the National Security Online Information Team (NSOIT), is focused exclusively on risks to national security and public safety.

Preserving freedom of expression is an extremely important principle underpinning the team’s work. The Government believes that people must be allowed to discuss and debate issues freely.

The NSOIT does not monitor the social media accounts of individuals and does not take any action that could impact anyone’s ability to discuss and debate issues freely. When the NSOIT identifies content which is within one of the areas of focus ministers have agreed, is assessed to pose a risk to national security or public safety and which is assessed to breach the terms and conditions of the relevant platform it may share that content with the platform. No action is mandated by the Government, it is entirely up to the platform to determine whether or not to take any action in line with their terms of service. Under no circumstances is content from Parliamentarians or journalists ever referred to platforms. Ministers continue to keep the work of the NSOIT under review and the approach to sharing any content with platforms.

14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether online content flagged for removal by the Counter Disinformation Unit can include lawful expression.

Preserving freedom of expression is an extremely important principle underpinning the Counter Disinformation Unit’s (CDU) work. The CDU does not monitor political debate and the CDU does not refer any content from journalists, politicians or political parties to social media platforms.

The CDU works closely with the major social media platforms to understand their terms of service and to encourage them to promote authoritative sources of information.

Where the unit encounters content which poses a demonstrable risk to public health, safety or national security and is assessed to breach the platform’s terms of service, content may be referred to the platform concerned for their consideration.

No action is mandated by the Government and it is up to the platform to independently decide whether or not to take any action in line with their terms of service.

A fact sheet providing further information on the work of the CDU can be found here.

7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of her Department's counter-disinformation unit on freedom of expression.

The Counter Disinformation Unit (CDU) leads HMG’s operational and policy response to understand and counter disinformation and attempts to manipulate the information environment, with the potential to impact domestic audiences. In addition to the Russian invasion of Ukraine and COVID-19, the CDU has considered disinformation relating to key national events such as Operation London Bridge and elections.

Freedom of expression and the media are essential qualities of any functioning democracy; people must be allowed to discuss and debate issues freely. The CDU’s work is consistent with the government’s principles and values on protecting freedom of expression and promoting a free, open, and secure internet.

7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what policy areas the Counter Disinformation Unit focuses on in addition to Covid-19 and Ukraine.

The Counter Disinformation Unit (CDU) leads HMG’s operational and policy response to understand and counter disinformation and attempts to manipulate the information environment, with the potential to impact domestic audiences. In addition to the Russian invasion of Ukraine and COVID-19, the CDU has considered disinformation relating to key national events such as Operation London Bridge and elections.

Freedom of expression and the media are essential qualities of any functioning democracy; people must be allowed to discuss and debate issues freely. The CDU’s work is consistent with the government’s principles and values on protecting freedom of expression and promoting a free, open, and secure internet.

26th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made an assessment with the Competition and Markets Authority of the implications for their policies of mobile phone policies that (a) remove functionality when using third party components and (b) other potentially anti-competitive practices by (i) Apple and (ii) other companies in the technology sector.

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) is the independent non-Ministerial department responsible for investigating competition issues in the UK. The Government has ensured that the CMA has significant powers to investigate and act if it finds that companies are behaving anti-competitively in a market.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to prevent printer manufacturers from locking devices to only being able to use approved printer cartridges.

The Government is committed to tackling consumer rip-offs and bad business practices. The Government has ensured that the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has significant powers and expertise to investigate such issues.

Under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008, it is a criminal offence to provide consumers with misleading information or omit important details about a product they are purchasing.

Under competition law, the CMA is responsible for investigating individual and market-wide competition issues. Consumers and businesses should report concerns about competition issues to the CMA.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what additional manufacturing capacity there is in the UK for manufacturing a vaccine for covid-19 once one is developed.

The Vaccines Taskforce is working with the BioIndustry Association Taskforce to review existing domestic capability to manufacture vaccines, in response to Covid-19. The Taskforce is also reviewing options for increasing this capacity. The Business Secretary recently announced that the government will accelerate building the UK’s first Vaccine Manufacturing and Innovation Centre, which is based at Harwell in Oxfordshire. The government will invest up to a further £93 million in the Centre, ensuring that it opens in summer 2021 – a full 12 months ahead of schedule. The Centre – which is already under construction – will have capacity to produce enough vaccine doses to serve the entire UK population in as little as 6 months. While the Centre is being built, the government will establish a rapid deployment facility thanks to a further investment of £38 million to begin coronavirus vaccine manufacturing at scale from this summer. This facility will support efforts to ensure a vaccine is widely available to the public as soon as possible.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to increase employment in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency, (b) Yorkshire and the Humber and (c) the UK.

As of 12th March, employment rates in the UK are at a record high at 76.5% and unemployment is at a near record low at 3.9%. 33 million people are now in work, which is 271,000 more than last year. The growth in employment has largely been driven by an increase in female full-time employment.

The Government is investing over £1.3 billion through Yorkshire and Humber Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) Growth Deals. This includes over £141 million through the Humber LEP that is providing financial assistance to local businesses, as well as improving infrastructure and skills. We have also established Enterprise Zones across the UK including in the Humber, which is the largest Enterprise Zone award in the country. The Zone has attracted business investment and new jobs to the area, such as at the Humber Enterprise Park in Brough in the Hon Gentleman’s constituency.

The Government-backed British Business Bank’s Start-Up Loans programme provides loans to entrepreneurs seeking to start and grow their own businesses. Since 2012, 5,930 loans have been issued in the Yorkshire and the Humber region, totalling over £50 million. In the Haltemprice and Howden constituency, 110 loans have been issued, totalling over £1 million (as at end-December 2019).

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to to improve productivity in each region of the UK.

The Government is committed to levelling up all regions of the UK. We are working with local leaders and businesses on Local Industrial Strategies to boost productivity and living standards, whilst increasing investment in science, research, and development across the country.

These long-term strategies are based on robust evidence, providing an in-depth understanding of?local economies. Local Industrial Strategies explicitly focus on driving productivity by setting out the spatial impacts of national and local policy across our cities, towns, and rural areas.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department has taken to support the tidal energy sector.

Renewable electricity generation has more than quadrupled since 2010. A record 52.6% of electricity came from low-carbon sources in 2018.   We have the world’s largest offshore wind capacity at 9.8GW with CfD auction prices for offshore wind falling by two-thirds between 2015 and 2019.

Tidal energy could still have a potentially important role in the long-term decarbonisation of the UK. It has to reduce its costs sufficiently, however, to compete with other renewable technologies.

9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support small businesses in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber.

The Government is committed to supporting all entrepreneurs to start and grow a business, to create jobs and spread prosperity.

In the North Yorkshire and Humber regions businesses can access support through www.gov.uk, the Business Support Helpline (0300 456 3565) and their local Growth Hubs (York, North Yorkshire and East Riding Growth Hub and Humber Growth Hub). These are led and governed by the York, North Yorkshire and East Riding and the Humber Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs). Growth Hubs provide a free, impartial, ‘single point of contact’ to help businesses in these areas identify and access the right support for them at the right time no matter their size or sector. In 2018-2019 the two Growth Hubs supported 14,939 businesses and helped 81 new businesses to start up.

In addition, within the Humber LEP area, the ‘Growing the Humber’ business investment programme has supported the creation of over 2,800 jobs to date. This signposts anyone interested to a range of business support information, as well as to organisations that provide a wide variety of services, including funding, support, advice, mentoring and business services who can help business start-up, survive and thrive.

The Department for International Trade in Yorkshire and the Humber works with a network of International Trade Advisers and partners across the region to enable local businesses to showcase their products and services overseas, with their Northern Powerhouse team running bespoke Trade missions. Since April 2016, there have been 68 Northern Powerhouse missions to 19 countries, supporting 1,252 companies. As we leave the EU, they will be working to deepen our trading ties with overseas markets to maximise export opportunities for small businesses.

The British Business Bank (BBB) with a consortia of LEPs manages the £400m Northern Powerhouse Investment Fund (NPIF), which celebrated the milestone of having invested £100m in 385 Northern-based SMEs. This support addresses the disparity in availability of regional finance was further bolstered last autumn, with a £100m Business Angel investment programme was launched to support clusters of business angels outside London.

The BBB has also established a UK-wide Network of regional managers working with business support partners, delivering advice tailored to local needs.

The Government-backed British Business Bank’s Start-Up Loans programme provides loans to entrepreneurs seeking to start and grow their own businesses. Since 2012, 5,875 loans have been issued in the Yorkshire and the Humber region, totalling over £49m, and with an average loan amount of £8,459. In the Haltemprice and Howden constituency, 108 loans have been issued, totalling over £974,000 (as at end-December 2019).

30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, which Minister or official authorised the Counter Disinformation Unit to collect data related to public statements, social media and internet activity as part of the unit's work.

The Counter Disinformation Unit was established in 2019 as part of DCMS’s departmental responsibility for counter-disinformation, and as part of the government's manifesto commitment to make the UK the safest place in the world to be online while defending freedom of expression.

The monitoring of harmful disinformation narratives and trends, using publicly available information online, is an essential part of DCMS’ role in understanding the information environment and working with partners across government and with social media companies to counter narratives that have the potential to cause real world harm. The CDU reports regularly to ministers who have full oversight of the team’s work.

14th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many applications to de-list a listed building were (a) made and (b) successful in each year since 2010.

(a) The total number of applications received each year for the de-listing of a Listed Building is not recorded.

(b) The number of Listed Buildings de-listed each year since 2010 is detailed below:

Year

Number of Listed Buildings de-listed

2010

138

2011

116

2012

131

2013

235

2014

207

2015

250

2016

306

2017

203

2018

258

2019

185

2020

83

2021

46

2022*

114*

* Up to 15th December 2022.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the answer of 11 October to Question 53272 on Social Media: Disinformation, how many times the Counter Disinformation Unit team has referred content to social media platforms in each year since the Unit was set up; and to which companies the content was referred.

The primary purpose of the Counter Disinformation Unit is not to spot every instance of disinformation across all social media platforms, but rather to understand overall trends and coordinated attempts to artificially manipulate the information environment. When the Unit does identify particular pieces of harmful content which may violate platforms’ terms of service these are referred to the relevant platform for consideration, who in turn decide what action to take.

As an operational matter it is not appropriate for the government to publicly provide details of content reported to platforms as doing so would give malign actors insight into our capabilities.

21st Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will publish a list of the occasions when her Department's Counter Disinformation Cell has requested social media platforms remove posts from their platforms and what the grounds were for classifying the posted information as disinformation.

The Government takes the issue of disinformation very seriously. The Counter Disinformation Unit team, based in DCMS, works to understand the scope, scale and reach of disinformation and works with a range of partners, including social media platforms, to tackle it.

The primary purpose of the team is not to spot every instance of disinformation across all social media platforms, but rather to understand overall trends and coordinated attempts to artificially manipulate the information environment. When the Unit does identify particular pieces of harmful content which may violate platforms’ terms of service these are referred to the relevant platform for consideration, who in turn decide what action to take.

As an operational matter it is not appropriate for the government to publicly provide details of content reported to platforms as doing so would give malign actors insight into our capabilities.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether volunteers in the Samaritans will be eligible for the Queen's Platinum Jubilee Medal.

To qualify for The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Medal recipients must be in an eligible public sector role in a frontline emergency service. This does not include volunteers in the Samaritans. Equally, volunteers in the UK vaccination effort are not eligible for the Medal.

The Government does however recognise the extraordinary contributions made by people across communities in response to the pandemic, and notes the outstanding work of Samaritans’ volunteers.

The Prime Minister has announced that the government will establish a UK Commission on COVID Commemoration to consider the appropriate way to remember those who have lost their lives and to recognise those involved in the unprecedented response across all critical sectors. The Government will set out the Commission membership and terms of reference in due course.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether volunteers in the Royal National Lifeboat Institution will be eligible for the Queen's Platinum Jubilee Medal.

Of the volunteers you ask about, only Royal National Lifeboat Institute volunteers are eligible for the Platinum Jubilee Medal.

To qualify for The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Medal recipients must be in an eligible public sector role in a frontline emergency service accessed via a call to the 999 emergency telephone number, or equivalent.

Individual departments, the Devolved Administrations and Crown Dependencies are responsible for applying the criteria and making eligibility decisions regarding the award of the Medal to their staff and other organisations that fall under their sponsorship. The criteria are in line with that of the Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether volunteers in the St Andrew's First Aid will be eligible for the Queen's Platinum Jubilee Medal.

Of the volunteers you ask about, only Royal National Lifeboat Institute volunteers are eligible for the Platinum Jubilee Medal.

To qualify for The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Medal recipients must be in an eligible public sector role in a frontline emergency service accessed via a call to the 999 emergency telephone number, or equivalent.

Individual departments, the Devolved Administrations and Crown Dependencies are responsible for applying the criteria and making eligibility decisions regarding the award of the Medal to their staff and other organisations that fall under their sponsorship. The criteria are in line with that of the Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether volunteers in the St John Ambulance will be eligible for the Queen's Platinum Jubilee Medal.

Of the volunteers you ask about, only Royal National Lifeboat Institute volunteers are eligible for the Platinum Jubilee Medal.

To qualify for The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Medal recipients must be in an eligible public sector role in a frontline emergency service accessed via a call to the 999 emergency telephone number, or equivalent.

Individual departments, the Devolved Administrations and Crown Dependencies are responsible for applying the criteria and making eligibility decisions regarding the award of the Medal to their staff and other organisations that fall under their sponsorship. The criteria are in line with that of the Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether volunteers in the Princess Royal's Volunteer Corps will be eligible for the Queen's Platinum Jubilee Medal.

Of the volunteers you ask about, only Royal National Lifeboat Institute volunteers are eligible for the Platinum Jubilee Medal.

To qualify for The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Medal recipients must be in an eligible public sector role in a frontline emergency service accessed via a call to the 999 emergency telephone number, or equivalent.

Individual departments, the Devolved Administrations and Crown Dependencies are responsible for applying the criteria and making eligibility decisions regarding the award of the Medal to their staff and other organisations that fall under their sponsorship. The criteria are in line with that of the Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether volunteers in the Red Cross will be eligible for the Queen's Platinum Jubilee Medal.

Of the volunteers you ask about, only Royal National Lifeboat Institute volunteers are eligible for the Platinum Jubilee Medal.

To qualify for The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Medal recipients must be in an eligible public sector role in a frontline emergency service accessed via a call to the 999 emergency telephone number, or equivalent.

Individual departments, the Devolved Administrations and Crown Dependencies are responsible for applying the criteria and making eligibility decisions regarding the award of the Medal to their staff and other organisations that fall under their sponsorship. The criteria are in line with that of the Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has plans in place for allocating the cost of removing and replacing Huawei equipment in the event that its installation is prohibited.

On 28 January, the Government announced the final conclusions of the Telecoms Supply Chain Review in relation to high risk vendors. It was announced that equipment from high risk vendors should be excluded from the core parts of the 5G and full fibre networks that are critical to security, and their presence limited to 35% in the rest of the network. We expect the cost of meeting restrictions on the presence of equipment from high risk vendors to be met by the operators using that equipment.

24th Feb 2020
5G
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the announcement by his Department on 20 February 2020 of a £65 million package for 5G trials, what the Government's policy is on security in the telecommunications supply chain in respect of those trials; and what decisions have been made in respect of the identity of the suppliers that will provide the infrastructure for those trials.

The recent announcement of a new £65 million package of 5G trials forms part of the DCMS £200 million 5G Testbeds and Trials programme. That included £35 million for nine winning projects from our rural and industrial 5G competitions, and a new £30 million open competition - 5G Create - that will launch in due course.

The Programme ensures that each of our projects has a security strategy in place that identifies and mitigates security risks and is proportionate for R&D environments. Testbeds are encouraged to employ nationally recognised standards and best practice security approaches. This includes identifying and mitigating supply chain risks and taking steps to manage High Risk Vendors. None of the successful projects announced as part of Industrial 5G and Rural Connected Communities will use equipment from high risk vendors. We will publish guidance in due course for our 5G Create competition when it launches.

13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much Huawei equipment analysis has been installed by UK 5G carriers since March 2019.

Huawei’s presence in the UK is subject to detailed, formal oversight through the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre and its oversight board. The recent conclusions of the Telecoms Supply Chain Review set out clear limits on the role of Huawei, as a High Risk Vendor, in the UK telecoms market. The Government examined the full range of threats and risks when making its decision on the use of high risk vendors in the UK telecoms networks.

28th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he has taken to help ensure that (a) website owners' and (b) providers' compliance with GDPR protects the privacy of their (i) customers and (ii) users.

The Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA) and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) strengthen the obligations on organisations to process individuals’ data fairly, lawfully and transparently and to keep it safe and secure. It also strengthens individuals’ rights to seek to access, rectify or delete their data.

This legislation is regulated and enforced by the independent Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). The ICO has issued comprehensive guidance for organisations on how to comply with the legislation and is also working closely with specific sectors to address areas of risk.

If individuals have concerns about the way online services are processing their data, they may wish to complain to the ICO. The ICO has a range of corrective powers and sanctions to enforce the GDPR, including:

  • issuing warnings and reprimands;

  • imposing a temporary or permanent ban on data processing;

  • ordering the rectification, restriction or erasure of data; and

  • suspending data transfers to third countries.

21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans his Department has in place for the oversight of private companies' use of live facial recognition technology.

The use of biometric data (including facial images) by private companies to identify individuals is regulated by the General Data Protection Regulation and the Data Protection Act 2018. Under the legislation, data processing must be fair, lawful and transparent. Individuals who consider their data has been misused can make complaints to the Information Commissioner's Office, the independent regulator of the legislation.

To ensure a safe use of facial recognition technology (FRT) in all sectors, the government tasked the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation (CDEI) to produce a Snapshot briefing paper looking at the uses and potential implications of facial recognition technology’s deployment in the UK. The paper was published on 28 May and we are considering its findings.

19th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to Answer of 15 November 2022 to Question 82174 on Gambling: Children, who authorised (a) the disclosure to Trustopia and (b) the contract terms of that disclosure; who was responsible for monitoring the management of that data; and whether disciplinary action has been taken following that incident.

The disclosure to Trust Systems Software UK Limited (trading name Trustopia) resulted from access given to a predecessor organisation that was a legitimate provider. The Department received a change of name request form and the amendment form which required Trustopia to sign a new learning provider agreement which set out terms of use for the Learning Records Service.

There is a dedicated team who manage the Learning Records Service. A signed copy of the agreement will be placed in the House of Commons Library in January 2023. The Department has worked closely with the ICO following this incident. Procedures for monitoring unusual activity have been strengthened, as have wider practices around Data Protection in the Department.

The Department’s legal advice at the time was not to pursue breach of contract pending the ICO investigation. The company has since ceased trading.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has undertaken an investigation into the adequacy of the safeguarding of Kadiza Sultana.

Following reports of pupils from Bethnal Green Academy travelling to Syria, the department provided support to the school through the Regional Director (previously Regional Schools Commissioners), in addition to the support being provided by the local authority and police.

The department is clear in its statutory guidance, ‘Working Together to Safeguard Children’ (2018), that it is for local authorities to assess and consider safeguarding concerns of individual cases working with their statutory partners (police and health) where necessary. This includes considering risks outside the home such as exploitation by organised crime groups, including county lines, trafficking and influences of extremism leading to radicalisation.

Through their regulatory powers, Ofsted inspects local authority children’s social care services to check that the department's minimum standards are being met and takes proportionate enforcement action to ensure children are safe and well looked after.

When a serious incident becomes known to safeguarding partners, they must consider whether the case meets the criteria for a local review. Meeting the criteria does not mean that safeguarding partners must automatically carry out a local child safeguarding practice review. It is for them to determine whether a review is appropriate, taking into account that the overall purpose of a review is to identify improvements to practice. This was also the case in 2015 when previous local children’s safeguarding boards were in operation.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has undertaken an investigation into the adequacy of the safeguarding of Amira Abase.

Following reports of pupils from Bethnal Green Academy travelling to Syria, the department provided support to the school through the Regional Director (previously Regional Schools Commissioners), in addition to the support being provided by the local authority and police.

The department is clear in its statutory guidance, ‘Working Together to Safeguard Children’ (2018), that it is for local authorities to assess and consider safeguarding concerns of individual cases working with their statutory partners (police and health) where necessary. This includes considering risks outside the home such as exploitation by organised crime groups, including county lines, trafficking and influences of extremism leading to radicalisation.

Through their regulatory powers, Ofsted inspects local authority children’s social care services to check that the department's minimum standards are being met and takes proportionate enforcement action to ensure children are safe and well looked after.

When a serious incident becomes known to safeguarding partners, they must consider whether the case meets the criteria for a local review. Meeting the criteria does not mean that safeguarding partners must automatically carry out a local child safeguarding practice review. It is for them to determine whether a review is appropriate, taking into account that the overall purpose of a review is to identify improvements to practice. This was also the case in 2015 when previous local children’s safeguarding boards were in operation.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on what legal basis the personal information and exam results of up to 28 million children were made available to gambling firms; who made the decision to make this information available; and what the legal limitations are on the provision of such information.

Examination result information was not made available to gambling firms. A third party made the decision to use their lawful access to the Learning Records Service without discussion with, or the agreement of, the Department. This was outside their conditions of use. The third party used the system to verify the age that individuals had given to gambling firms. When their actions became known, the Department immediately removed their access to the system. The Department reported itself to the Information Commissioner’s Office and has continued to work with them since to improve Departmental processes.

2nd Mar 2020
What progress he has made on implementing the recommendations of the Augar review of post-18 education and funding.

The Augar report recommended 53 changes to address some of the challenges and tensions in our higher education and further education systems. It is imperative that we get any such decisions rights. I can reassure my right hon. Friend that this government will conclude the review alongside the next Spending Review.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to support farmers in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber.

Farmers currently have access to a range of support measures, including direct payments under the CAP. We have published the Agriculture Bill that sets out how we will support the industry as we leave the EU and this includes rewarding farmers for delivering public goods.

We would expect farmers in Yorkshire and Humber to participate in the scheme and to be able to apply for the wider support we intend to make available to farmers through the Bill.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what plans her Department has to open trade negotiations with Taiwan.

The UK remains committed to strengthening its rich and wide-ranging trading relationship with Taiwan. Total trade in goods and services between the UK and Taiwan was £6.1 billion in 2020. The UK is working with Taiwan to deepen its relationship, including through the annual Trade Talks and associated dialogues, ministerial engagement, and through engagements by the Prime Minister’s Trade Envoy to Taiwan.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps her Department has taken to ensure that (a) farmers and (b) food producers in (a) East Riding of Yorkshire and (b) Haltemprice and Howden constituency can benefit from a free trade agreement with Australia.

An ambitious free trade deal with Australia will benefit businesses and producers across the UK – this will include greater access for UK agri-food goods to the Australian market through the removal of tariffs.

A deal with Australia is also a gateway to joining the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), a high-standards free trade agreement of 11 Pacific nations, which will mean lower tariffs for British exports to those markets. By 2030, two-thirds of the world’s middle class will be in Asia, which is creating unheralded new export opportunities for British farming. This is where the future opportunity lies for UK farmers.

Any deal the UK signs with Australia will include protections for the agriculture industry and will not undercut UK farmers or compromise the UK’s high standards.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of a free trade agreement with Australia on (a) the East Riding of Yorkshire and (b) Haltemprice and Howden constituency.

The Government’s economic analysis, published on 17 June 2020, seeks to identify the potential scale of the long-term additional benefit to the UK from having a deal with Australia.

Yorkshire and the Humber’s top goods export to Australia, general industrial machinery, equipment and machine parts, saw an increase from 2019 to 2020. Liberalisation of tariffs on these products (currently up to 5%) and reducing other non-tariff barriers to trade should further benefit this industry, and others.

Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published prior to implementation.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish maps of the (a) properties and (b) land purchased by HS2 Ltd for Phase 2b west of the HS2 project.

The ownership of properties by the Secretary of State for Transport is a matter of public record and available through the Land Registry.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish maps of the (a) properties and (b) land purchased by HS2 Ltd for Phase 2a of the HS2 project.

The ownership of properties by the Secretary of State for Transport is is a matter of public record and available through the Land Registry.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish a list of properties purchased by HS2 Ltd for Phase 2b east of the HS2 project.

The ownership of properties by the Secretary of State for Transport is a matter of public record and available through the Land Registry.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish a list of properties purchased by HS2 Ltd for Phase 2a of the HS2 project.

The ownership of properties by the Secretary of State for Transport is a matter of public record and available through the Land Registry.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish a list of properties purchased by HS2 Ltd for Phase 2b west of the HS2 project.

The ownership of properties by the Secretary of State for Transport is a matter of public record and available through the Land Registry.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether her Department is taking steps to help keep (a) Doncaster Sheffield Airport and (b) other regional transport hubs open.

The Government is strongly committed to regional airports. They provide key transport links to our local communities, support thousands of jobs in the regions and act as key gateways to international opportunities.

The Government recognise the importance of Doncaster Sheffield Airport to the region. We remain committed to a continued aviation future for the airport and continue to engage with and encourage stakeholders to develop a locally led solution to support this outcome.

13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of driving licence applications initiated with the DVLA were resolved within (a) two weeks, (b) four weeks, (c) eight weeks, (d) 12 weeks and (e) more than 12 weeks in the calendar year 2022.

The information requested is not readily available. Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) officials will write to the Honourable Member when the information is available.

13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of driving licence applications initiated with the DVLA were resolved within (a) two weeks, (b) four weeks, (c) eight weeks, (d) 12 weeks and (e) more than 12 weeks in each year between 2018 and 2022.

The information requested is not readily available. Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) officials will write to the Honourable Member when the information is available.

13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average time taken was for the DVLA to process a driving licence application in each of the last three years.

The information requested is not readily available. Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) officials will write to the Honourable Member when the information is available.

17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions officials in his Department have had with (a) representatives of the travel industry, (b) representatives of covid-19 test providers and (c) officials in the Her Majesty's Treasury on reducing the cost of covid-19 tests to the public when travelling abroad; and if he will make a statement.

The Department for Transport continues to work with other government departments, the travel industry and private testing providers to further reduce testing costs, while ensuring travel is as safe as possible.

The price of tests has reduced significantly over recent weeks, and several providers are offering Day 2 tests for green arrivals for under £50.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of British holidaymakers that are aware of the cost of covid-19 tests when travelling abroad; and if he will make a statement.

It is a matter for each country to decide on appropriate health measures.

It is therefore important for travellers to check the relevant Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office Travel Advice for their destination in advance of travel.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the financial impact of the UK tourism sector of the additional costs of covid-19 tests for holidaymakers travelling abroad; and if he will make a statement.

The government recognises that the tourism sector has been affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. That is why we have provided the tourism, leisure and hospitality sectors with £25 billion in support since the start of the pandemic. The Government has also recently published a Tourism Recovery Plan.

The price of tests has reduced significantly over recent weeks, with several providers offering Day 2 tests for green arrivals for under £50. The government continue to work with the travel industry and private testing providers to further reduce testing costs, while ensuring international travel is as safe as possible.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government has had discussions with (a) the travel industry and (b) private covid-19 testing providers on proposals for reducing the cost of covid-19 tests required for travel abroad.

The government continues to work with the travel industry and private testing providers to further reduce testing costs, while ensuring travel is as safe as possible.

The price of tests has reduced significantly over recent weeks, and several providers are offering Day 2 tests for green arrivals for under £50.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many Highways England road improvement projects have had their pedestrian element cancelled as a result of an estimated economy saving in each of the last five years.

Highways England includes provision for Non-Motorised Users, including pedestrians, cyclists and horse riders, as standard in all its scheme designs. The number of schemes that have had pedestrian elements removed can only be provided at a disproportionate cost for this answer.

18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, what the scientific basis is for the decision to discourage people from consuming food and drink on public transport.

Our guidance is designed to reduce the risk of transmission as far as possible. The science is clear that where people avoid touching their face, they make it less likely they will contract the virus. This is the reason for our advice. We do understand that there are situations where passengers may need to eat or drink – for example if they are feeling faint on a hot day, and this is reflected in our advice.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many road traffic collisions there have been on the A63 between the Ferensway Interchange (Central Hull) and North Cave Interchange in the last five; what the location was of those collisions; what serious injuries resulted from those collisions; and how many fatalities resulted from those collisions.

The number of personal injury reported road accidents, fatal casualties and seriously injured casualties on the A63 between the Ferensway Interchange (Central Hull) and North Cave Interchange between 2014 and 2018 can be found in the table below.

Reported road accidents and casualties on the A63 between the Ferensway Interchange (Central Hull) and North Cave Interchange, 2014-2018

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Personal injury accidents

46

55

44

44

44

Fatal casualties

0

0

1

0

2

Seriously injured casualties

5

8

7

14

6

Source: DfT, STATS19

Please note that the number of serious injuries provided is as reported by the police. Since 2016, changes in severity reporting systems for a large number of police forces (including for Humberside police force which covers the geographic area required) mean that serious injury figures, and to a lesser extent slight injuries, as reported by the police are not comparable with earlier years. Adjustments to account for the change have been produced for high level series in the Reported Road Casualties in Great Britain, annual report: 2018.

Injury descriptions are available from the CRASH system only since January 2016 for Humberside police force. The most severe injury description as reported by the police for seriously injured casualties on the A63 between the Ferensway Interchange (Central Hull) and North Cave Interchange between 2016 and 2018 can be found in the attached Table A. Please note that this information is as reported by the police and is not the result of a medical assessment.

The eastings and northings of each accident for the requested geographical area can be found in the attached Table B. The location of each accident can also be found in user-friendly online maps, for example on the THINK! website (https://www.think.gov.uk/thinkmap/).

9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of High Speed Two.

The Oakervee Review has been tasked with rigorously examining HS2 Ltd’s costs and schedule. The Review findings and Government’s assessment of the likely costs of High Speed 2 will be published in due course.

Paul Maynard
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to tackle issues raised in the Independent Case Examiner's Annual Report 2020 on the Child Maintenance Service, including the findings on the way that Service presents its accounts information.

Since the report was published in October 2020 the Child Maintenance Service has been running at a reduced level and has been focussed on frontline activity serving our customers due to the Coronavirus Pandemic.

However, we are now starting to increase that service and have introduced a Transformation Programme that will constantly review how we work and help to automate lots of processes.

We are continually improving our contact channels and we plan to improve our calculation letters in line with our online portal and system. This is so that all lines of communication between Child Maintenance Group and customers present information to customers in the same way to reduce confusion.

There are also proposed changes to our online portal that surround explaining the calculation and explaining the payment plan to our customers, these changes are planned for Quarter 3 of the financial year.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to ensure that complaints to the Independent Case Examiner are being promptly investigated.

In the current financial year the Department provided additional funding to the Independent Case Examiner’s Office, to allow it to increase its headcount from 89 to 112. The recruitment and rigorous training of additional Investigation Case Mangers, to reduce the time complaints wait to be brought into investigation, is underway.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average length of time is between a complaint being accepted by the Independent Case Examiner and the case being allocated to a caseworker; and what the average length of time is between a case being accepted by the Independent Case Examiner and the complainant receiving an outcome.

When the Independent Case Examiner’s Office accept a complaint for investigation, they will initially try to broker a solution between the complainant and the relevant department or supplier, without having to request evidence to inform an investigation – this is known as “resolution”. If it’s not possible to resolve the complaint, the evidence will be requested and the case will await allocation to an Investigation Case Manager (ICM). The cases that reach the Independent Case Examiner are the most complex and usually require investigation. Complainants are kept updated about the timings involved with their case and the vast majority are satisfied with the service they receive.

Based on the complaints that were allocated for investigation during the 2020 calendar year, the average length of wait between the complaint being accepted for examination and it being allocated to an Investigation Case Manager was 64.5 weeks.

During the 2020 calendar year, the average length of time between a case being accepted for examination by the Independent Case Examiner’s Office and the complainant receiving an outcome was 81.4 weeks (this total includes the 64.5 weeks average wait before being allocated to an Investigation Case Manager. It excludes those cases which are resolved without the need for a full investigation).

Whilst the Unit has received additional resource during the current financial year, to help reduce the time complaints wait to be brought into investigation, progress has been constrained by the effects of Covid, which included the redeployment of some staff, and the delay in recruitment of new staff.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the statutory basis is for the Child Maintenance Service to accept only verbal evidence, without supporting documentation, in relation to changes to the paying parent’s financial circumstances.

In these unprecedented times, we have seen a significant increase in the number of new claims to UC - it’s right that we look to streamline our operations, and ensure that people get the support they need. No one will get away with giving false information to avoid paying what they owe and all decisions carry rights of appeal, so either parent can dispute a decision.

Those found to be abusing the system at this difficult time will find themselves subject to the full extent of our enforcement powers – including prosecution through the courts.

The Government has been clear in its commitment to support families during this public health emergency and we have made a number changes to the welfare system to ensure people are receiving the support they need. These include increasing the standard rate of Universal Credit and working tax credit for this year by around £1000 per year. People who need money urgently continue to be able to access up to a month’s Universal Credit advance upfront by applying online. In addition, Statutory Sick Pay now applies from day one, rather than the fourth day of illness. In April, in response to Covid-19 we increased Local Housing Allowance rates for housing benefit and universal credit claimants to the 30th percentile of local rents, providing additional financial support for private renters. This significant investment of almost £1 billion, ensures over 1 million households will see an increase, on average, of £600 per year

Taken together, these measures represent an injection of over £6.5 billion into the welfare system and, along with the other job and business support programmes announced by the Chancellor, represent one of the most comprehensive packages of support introduced by an advanced economy in response to the coronavirus outbreak.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has directed the Child Maintenance Service to introduce greater flexibility in relation to evidence requirements during the covid-19 outbreak.

In these unprecedented times, we have seen a significant increase in the number of new claims to UC - it’s right that we look to streamline our operations, and ensure that people get the support they need. No one will get away with giving false information to avoid paying what they owe and all decisions carry rights of appeal, so either parent can dispute a decision.

Those found to be abusing the system at this difficult time will find themselves subject to the full extent of our enforcement powers – including prosecution through the courts.

The Government has been clear in its commitment to support families during this public health emergency and we have made a number changes to the welfare system to ensure people are receiving the support they need. These include increasing the standard rate of Universal Credit and working tax credit for this year by around £1000 per year. People who need money urgently continue to be able to access up to a month’s Universal Credit advance upfront by applying online. In addition, Statutory Sick Pay now applies from day one, rather than the fourth day of illness. In April, in response to Covid-19 we increased Local Housing Allowance rates for housing benefit and universal credit claimants to the 30th percentile of local rents, providing additional financial support for private renters. This significant investment of almost £1 billion, ensures over 1 million households will see an increase, on average, of £600 per year

Taken together, these measures represent an injection of over £6.5 billion into the welfare system and, along with the other job and business support programmes announced by the Chancellor, represent one of the most comprehensive packages of support introduced by an advanced economy in response to the coronavirus outbreak.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how financial support provided to small businesses through the Small Business Grant Scheme will be classified for the purposes of applications for universal credit made by the owners of those businesses.

During this difficult time for the country, we recognise the extreme disruption the necessary actions are having on people’s lives, their businesses, their jobs and the nation’s economy. And that’s why we have produced a huge and unprecedented programme of support both for workers and for business, and we’ll do everything we can to ensure people can pay their bills, stay in their home and put food on their table.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has been made of the effect of the roll out of universal credit on the number of people in employment in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber.

The Department successfully completed the rollout of Universal Credit in December 2018 and it is available in every Jobcentre across the country including those across the Haltemprice and Howden constituency and Yorkshire and the Humber. It is a modern, flexible, personalised system which has scrapped the ‘cliff edges’ featured across legacy benefits, where money was lost when working more than 16, 24 and 30 hours.

Universal Credit provides claimants with the support they need to better prepare for work, move into work, or to increase earnings. The Universal Credit Work Allowance has been increased by £1,000 and means that 2.4m households will keep an extra £630 of income each year.

The Department’s latest data for the Yorkshire and Humber region (to October 2019) shows there are over 200,000 more people in employment in the region compared with 2010.

The employment rate for the Haltemprice and Howden constituency for the year 2019 was 82.6% compared with 73.8% for the region of Yorkshire and the Humber overall. This can be compared to 2010 when the employment rate for the Haltemprice and Howden constituency was 79.2% compared with 68.9% for the region of Yorkshire and the Humber overall.

20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the letter from the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department of Health and Social Care to the Chair of the Health and Social Care on NHS Federated Data Platform (FDP) dated 30 August 2023, what the benefits are for each trust participating in the FDP pilot programme.

The Federated Data Platform will improve outcomes by bringing together the information needed to plan and deliver care and reduce administrative burden on staff. Pilot sites have seen the removal of patients from waiting lists and waiting times fall, meaning patients are treated faster; discharge delays have been reduced, enabling patients to leave hospital and get home sooner; and people have waited for less time to receive a diagnosis. Following are examples of benefits that have been reported within the Improving Elective Care Co-ordination for Patients (IECCP) and Optimised Patient Tracking and Intelligent Choices Application (OPTICA) pilots.

For IECCP, across trusts realising benefits, a total of 55,521 patients have been requested for removal from waitlists. There has also been a 5.7% increase in theatre utilisation per month on average compared to the six-month period before the pilot.

For OPTICA, following the implementation of the pilot in one trust, the trust realised a number of benefits including a 36% decrease in the average number of days patients are delayed from being discharged, for patients with a length of stay of 21 or more days, and a 22% reduction in average length of stay of pathway 0 patients, who do not need health support on discharge, freeing up capacity for the trust to care for patients with more complex needs.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the letter from Lord Markham, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, to the Chair of the Health and Social Care Select Committee, dated 30 August 2023, which are the 36 NHS trusts said in that letter to be participating in NHS England’s pilot programmes on improving elective care coordination for patients and care coordination solution.

Thirty-nine trusts signed Memoranda of Understanding indicating their intention to participate in the Improving Elective Care Co-ordination for Patients (IECCP) programme. 35 trusts are currently actively participating, with four trusts having withdrawn.

NHS England’s programmes also include the Optimised Patient Tracking and Intelligent Choices Application (OPTICA) pilot. OPTICA drives an efficient, shared way of working for health and social care teams, providing intelligence to help care teams properly plan for timely discharges.

The following table shows the 42 trusts actively participating in one or both of NHS England’s Pilot Programmes:

Trust

IECCP

OPTICA

Barts Health NHS Trust

X

Bolton NHS Foundation Trust

X

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

X

X

Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

X

X

Countess of Chester Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

X

X

County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust

X

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

X

East Suffolk and North East Essex NHS Foundation Trust

X

East Essex Healthcare NHS Trust

X

Gateshead Health NHS Foundation Trust

X

X

Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

X

Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

X

Harrogate & District NHS Foundation Trust

X

Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

X

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

X

X

James Paget University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

X

Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

X

Kettering General Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

X

Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust

X

Liverpool University Hospitals NHS Trust

X

London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust

X

X

Medway NHS Foundation Trust

X

Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

X

X

Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

X

North Cumbria Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust

X

North Tees and Hartlepool Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

X

X

Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust

X

Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

X

Queen Elizabeth Hospital Kings Lynn NHS Foundation Trust

X

Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust

X

Royal Surrey NHS Foundation Trust

X

Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust

X

Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust

X

Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust

X

South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

X

X

South Tyneside and Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust

X

X

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

X

X

United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust

X

University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust

X

X

University Hospitals Dorset NHS Foundation Trust

X

University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust

X

West Hertfordshire Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

X

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the letter from the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department of Health and Social Care to the Chair of the Health and Social Care on NHS Federated Data Platform dated 30 August 2023, which 24 NHS trusts are actively realising benefits from the Improving Elective Care Coordination for Patients and Care Coordination Solution programmes.

Following the information shared by the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Lord Markham) on 30 August 2023, NHS England has continued to work with sites to deliver the Improving Elective Care Co-ordination for Patients (IECCP) programme.


Overall, there are now 31 trusts who are realising waiting list and theatre benefits under IECCP. Some of these trusts are also realising discharge benefits using the Optimised Patient Tracking and Intelligent Choices Application pilot. The 31 trusts are listed below:

- Barts Health NHS Trust;

- Bolton NHS Foundation Trust;

- Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust;

- Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust;

- Countess of Chester Hospital NHS Foundation Trust;

- Croydon Health Services NHS Trust;

- East Suffolk and North Essex NHS Foundation Trust;

- East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust;

- Gateshead Health NHS Foundation Trust;

- Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust;

- Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust;

- Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust;

- Kettering General Hospital NHS Foundation Trust;

- Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust;

- London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust;

- Medway NHS Foundation Trust;

- Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust;

- North Cumbria Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust;

- North Tees and Hartlepool Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust;

- Northampton General Hospital Trust;

- Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust;

- Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust;

- Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust;

- Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust (now Mersey and West Lancashire);

- South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust;

- South Tyneside and Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust;

- The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust;

- United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust;

- University Hospitals of Derby & Burton NHS Foundation Trust;

- University Hospitals Dorset NHS Foundation Trust; and

- University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether her Department has made an assessment of the value for money of the Federated Data Platform contract and (b) the extent to which FDP procurement complies with the guidance entitled Managing public money.

The Federated Data Platform (FDP) business case includes an assessment of the investment, the benefits anticipated, and the return of investment anticipated over the lifetime of the programme. Benefits are provided for cash, non-cash, and societal benefits and throughout the approval process were assessed by several independent assessors from both NHS England, the Department and other Government departments to ensure that investments provide value. The FDP is a Tier A Government Major Projects Portfolio programme and therefore will be required to report on the return on investment and benefits realised throughout the lifetime of the programme, to the Infrastructure and Projects Authority.

NHS England has conducted a fair, open, and transparent procurement in line with Public Contracts Regulations 2015. They used the Competitive Dialogue Process, which is in line with both Cabinet Office guidance and HM Treasury guidance Managing Public Money. This process was open for any supplier to participate, subject to passing the standard selection criteria and minimum requirements. All bids were evaluated against the same objective evaluation criteria and scoring methodology which was shared with all suppliers. The evaluation criteria were developed to mitigate against unfair incumbent advantage. Over 30 independent evaluators were selected from across the National Health Service with a range of skills and experience relevant to the question they were evaluating.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions his Department has had with Cloudflare on removing the website linked to deaths by suicide reported on by the BBC on 24 October 2023.

Ministerial meetings are routinely published on gov.uk. We recognise the role of internet service providers in protecting people online. We are working with a range of organisations across the suicide prevention sector, and more widely, on this issue in order to enable better protection for individuals.

On 11 September, we published a new national suicide prevention strategy for England, with more than 100 actions to support our aim to reduce the suicide rate within two and a half years. This includes action across government and other organisations to tackle pro-suicide forums.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
8th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the cost effectiveness of the use of abiraterone as a treatment for prostate cancer by the NHS.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body that provides evidence-based guidance for the National Health Service on whether new medicines represent a clinically- and cost-effective use of resources. The NHS is legally required to fund medicines recommended by NICE, usually within three months of final guidance.

NICE has published guidance recommending abiraterone for the treatment of hormone-relapsed metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy is indicated and for the castration-resistant variant of that cancer previously treated with a docetaxel-containing regimen. NHS England funds abiraterone for these indications of prostate cancer in line with NICE’s recommendations, making it routinely available for the treatment of eligible patients.

Abiraterone is not licensed for the treatment of non-metastatic prostate cancer and has therefore not been appraised by NICE for such use. NHS England is considering a clinical policy proposal for abiraterone as a treatment option for patients newly diagnosed with high risk, non-metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, or in whom prostate cancer has relapsed after at least 12 months without treatment. This specific policy proposal is due to be discussed later in November 2023 and if supported by a clinical panel it will progress to stakeholder testing by January 2024.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward the planned review of abiraterone as a treatment for prostate cancer on the NHS.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body that provides evidence-based guidance for the National Health Service on whether new medicines represent a clinically- and cost-effective use of resources. The NHS is legally required to fund medicines recommended by NICE, usually within three months of final guidance.

NICE has published guidance recommending abiraterone for the treatment of hormone-relapsed metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy is indicated and for the castration-resistant variant of that cancer previously treated with a docetaxel-containing regimen. NHS England funds abiraterone for these indications of prostate cancer in line with NICE’s recommendations, making it routinely available for the treatment of eligible patients.

Abiraterone is not licensed for the treatment of non-metastatic prostate cancer and has therefore not been appraised by NICE for such use. NHS England is considering a clinical policy proposal for abiraterone as a treatment option for patients newly diagnosed with high risk, non-metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, or in whom prostate cancer has relapsed after at least 12 months without treatment. This specific policy proposal is due to be discussed later in November 2023 and if supported by a clinical panel it will progress to stakeholder testing by January 2024.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the potential impact of the level of availability of abiraterone on the NHS on the health of prostate cancer patients.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body that provides evidence-based guidance for the National Health Service on whether new medicines represent a clinically- and cost-effective use of resources. The NHS is legally required to fund medicines recommended by NICE, usually within three months of final guidance.

NICE has published guidance recommending abiraterone for the treatment of hormone-relapsed metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy is indicated and for the castration-resistant variant of that cancer previously treated with a docetaxel-containing regimen. NHS England funds abiraterone for these indications of prostate cancer in line with NICE’s recommendations, making it routinely available for the treatment of eligible patients.

Abiraterone is not licensed for the treatment of non-metastatic prostate cancer and has therefore not been appraised by NICE for such use. NHS England is considering a clinical policy proposal for abiraterone as a treatment option for patients newly diagnosed with high risk, non-metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, or in whom prostate cancer has relapsed after at least 12 months without treatment. This specific policy proposal is due to be discussed later in November 2023 and if supported by a clinical panel it will progress to stakeholder testing by January 2024.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 23 March 2023 to Question 160180 on NHS Trusts: Databases, whether any of the Trusts that had (a) paused and (b) suspended pilots of Palantir Foundry have (i) resumed and (ii) restarted their pilots since 23 March 2023.

There are currently two main Foundry pilots delivering benefits to trusts, namely the Improving Elective Care Coordination for Patients (IECCP) Programme which supports trusts to effectively deliver care through the implementation of the Care Coordination Solution (CCS); and the Dynamic Discharge programme to support effective hospital discharge.

The table below shows those trusts that are listed as either pausing or suspending these pilots in March 2023 and gives the reason why for each:

Trust

IECCP solution

Dynamic Discharge solution

Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Paused due to upgrade of supporting systems within the Trust; due to restart once upgrades are complete.

East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust

Declined offer following discussions as existing system provided current capabilities.

London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust

Paused temporarily due to impact of strike action within Trust.

Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Trust chose to address internal process change before participating in a digital transformation programme.

Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Paused whilst work is completed to enable Dynamic Discharge module.

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Paused due to operational pressures.

University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Foundation Trust

Trust chose to address internal process change before participating in a digital transformation programme.

University Hospitals Dorset NHS Foundation Trust

Paused due to other programmes of work within their IT department.

University Hospitals Sussex NHS Foundation Trust

Paused due to operational pressures, strike action and a recent EPR upgrade.

Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital

Following discussions, it was agreed that the pilot products were not designed to address the Trust’s particular issues.

University Hospital Plymouth NHS Trust

The Trust made the decision not to participate in the programme based on lack of capacity of Trust resources to engage with the programme.

Notes:

  1. There are no trusts where the Dynamic Discharge programme is live, but IECCP is paused. The IECCP programme is live in some Trusts where implementation of Dynamic Discharge was paused in March. These Trusts are as follows:

- East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust;

- London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust;

- Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust; and

- University Hospitals Dorset NHS Foundation Trust.

  1. The following trusts have re-engaged with the programme and are in the process of restarting with the Dynamic Discharge solution:

- Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust;

- London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust; and

- Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

  1. Discussions are ongoing with some other trusts about the best time to re-engage with the Dynamic Discharge programme.
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 23 March 2023 to Question 160180 on NHS Trusts: Databases, for what reason each NHS Trust paused or suspended pilots of Palantir Foundry.

There are currently two main Foundry pilots delivering benefits to trusts, namely the Improving Elective Care Coordination for Patients (IECCP) Programme which supports trusts to effectively deliver care through the implementation of the Care Coordination Solution (CCS); and the Dynamic Discharge programme to support effective hospital discharge.

The table below shows those trusts that are listed as either pausing or suspending these pilots in March 2023 and gives the reason why for each:

Trust

IECCP solution

Dynamic Discharge solution

Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Paused due to upgrade of supporting systems within the Trust; due to restart once upgrades are complete.

East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust

Declined offer following discussions as existing system provided current capabilities.

London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust

Paused temporarily due to impact of strike action within Trust.

Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Trust chose to address internal process change before participating in a digital transformation programme.

Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Paused whilst work is completed to enable Dynamic Discharge module.

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Paused due to operational pressures.

University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Foundation Trust

Trust chose to address internal process change before participating in a digital transformation programme.

University Hospitals Dorset NHS Foundation Trust

Paused due to other programmes of work within their IT department.

University Hospitals Sussex NHS Foundation Trust

Paused due to operational pressures, strike action and a recent EPR upgrade.

Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital

Following discussions, it was agreed that the pilot products were not designed to address the Trust’s particular issues.

University Hospital Plymouth NHS Trust

The Trust made the decision not to participate in the programme based on lack of capacity of Trust resources to engage with the programme.

Notes:

  1. There are no trusts where the Dynamic Discharge programme is live, but IECCP is paused. The IECCP programme is live in some Trusts where implementation of Dynamic Discharge was paused in March. These Trusts are as follows:

- East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust;

- London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust;

- Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust; and

- University Hospitals Dorset NHS Foundation Trust.

  1. The following trusts have re-engaged with the programme and are in the process of restarting with the Dynamic Discharge solution:

- Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust;

- London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust; and

- Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

  1. Discussions are ongoing with some other trusts about the best time to re-engage with the Dynamic Discharge programme.
7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much money from the public purse has been spent on the faster data flows pilots of Palantir Foundry to date; and if he will provide a breakdown of (a) spending on individual trusts’ implementation costs and (b) payments made to (i) Palantir and (ii) consultants.

The spend-to-date on the Faster Flows programme is £0.51 million. There are no additional costs to implement within trusts as the programme uses their existing resources and digital infrastructures. £0.15 million has been paid to Palantir within the spend-to-date. There have been no payments to external consultants for this pilot as it has been possible to support this development using Commissioning Support Unit (CSU) teams within the National Health Service. The costs of the internal consultants within the CSU are £0.36 million.

7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish his Department's internal assessments of the performance of the pilots of Palantir Foundry at (a) Chelsea and Westminster, (b) the Royal Free London, (c) Barts Health and (d) Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Trusts.

The Improving Elective Care Coordination for Patients Programme is one of the two main Foundry pilots. It supports trusts to effectively deliver care through care coordination.

The Chelsea and Westminster pilot has so far achieved these benefits:

- 79% of patients on waiting lists have been assessed for accuracy, leading to 27,200 patients being removed for example if they no longer need their procedure;

- 3,507 patients have been reprioritised to date;

- 3,279 theatre actions have been created to manage patients through the 6-4-2 process, a model to improve operating theatre productivity, safety, and patient experience;

- 4,372 booking requests have been completed;

- waiting lists for 392 consultants have been managed through care coordination;

- there has been a 55% reduction of bookings cancelled on the day due to missing Pre-Operative Assessment from, 2.89% to 1.29%; and

- patients with suspected cancer had their first appointment on average two days sooner.

The Royal Free London, Barts Health and Milton Keynes University Hospital Trusts pilots have not yet gone live.

7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which NHS trusts have paused or suspended pilots of Palantir Foundry.

These National Health Service trusts have paused pilots of Palantir Foundry:

- Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust;

- East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust;

- London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust;

- Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust;

- Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust;

- Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust;

- University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Foundation Trust;

- University Hospitals Dorset NHS Foundation Trust; and

- University Hospitals Sussex NHS Foundation Trust.

These NHS trusts have suspended pilots of Palantir Foundry:

- Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital; and

- University Hospital Plymouth NHS Trust.

7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the use of Foundry, a Palantir product, by NHS England as part of some of its pilots of the collection and dissemination of the Faster Data Flow Acute Data Set, how much money from the public purse has been spent on the elective care recovery pilots involving the use of Palantir Foundry to date; and if he will provide a breakdown of (a) spending on individual trusts’ implementation costs and (b) payments made to (i) Palantir and (ii) consultants.

The elective recovery programme aims to help trusts across England better plan, schedule and manage patients through the Elective pathway. The spend-to-date on the pilot is £20.2 million. This includes £11.2 million on implementation within individual trusts. The spend-to-date includes £1.2 million paid to Palantir to accelerate elective surgical waiting list validation, correctly prioritise patients awaiting treatment and improve theatre utilisation. This also includes £5.4 million to external consultants to help with the discovery stage, delivery, strategic direction, management and training within the programme. The remaining £2.4 million has been spent on internal consultant teams within the Commissioning Support Units.

31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what post-covid contracts are being negotiated by NHS England to manage health data as of 31 March 2022.

As of 31 March 2022, NHS England is planning to tender for a Federated Data Platform (FDP), which will be a system of technologies and services implemented in the National Health Service in England. NHS England is currently in pre-market engagement to consider the scope and nature of this procurement with potential suppliers.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether any negotiations are taking place between NHS England and Palantir for contracts to manage health data as of 31 March 2022.

NHS England has an existing agreement with Palantir Technologies UK Ltd. Regular discussions on service delivery under that contract take place. As with all its procurement, NHS England procures contracts for management of health data under the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 which may not require negotiation, such as where there may be call-off contracts from framework agreements.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what public consultation (a) has been undertaken and (b) is planned for contracts that will affect the management of health data.

The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement comply with the General Data Protection Regulation and undertake appropriate data protection impact assessments for all new products, systems and processing activities. Individual high-profile programmes, such as General Practice Data for Planning and Research also undertake engagement to inform the approach to health data management.

In 2021, the Department published a draft data strategy for health and social care for public and stakeholder engagement. A finalised strategy will be published shortly which will set out commitments to improve trust in the health and care system’s use of data, including engagement with the public and stakeholders on data programmes and projects.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government intends to repeal the Coronavirus Act 2020 in its entirety.

On 21 February 2022, the Government announced the intention to expire all remaining non-devolved temporary provisions from the Coronavirus Act 2020. Of the 20 remaining non-devolved temporary provisions, 16 will automatically expire on 24 March 2022. The remaining four provisions will be expired within six months and the powers transferred into alternative permanent legislation. However, there are also a number of permanent provisions within the Act, which would require primary legislation to repeal. The Government is committed to repealing unnecessary provisions as soon as possible and will look for opportunities to do so as the legislative programme proceeds.

13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much the NHS has spent on private hospital facilities since the start of March 2020 for booked procedures that have failed to take place.

The information request is not held centrally. Payments were made to independent providers on a cost recovery basis rather than by procedure or per bed, to use facilities as flexibly as needed.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many private hospital beds have been (a) booked by NHS providers, (b) used by NHS providers and (c) unused since the start of March 2020.

The information on the number of patients treated by private sector providers is not collected in the format requested. The following services and diagnostic tests were carried out by private sector providers:

  • Cardiology;

  • Cardiothoracic surgery;

  • Dermatology;

  • Ear, nose and throat;

  • Gastroenterology;

  • General medicine;

  • General surgery;

  • Gynaecology;

  • Neurology;

  • Neurosurgery;

  • Ophthalmology;

  • Oral surgery;

  • Plastic surgery;

  • Rheumatology;

  • Thoracic medicine;

  • Trauma and orthopaedics;

  • Urology;

  • Magnetic resonance imaging;

  • Computed tomography; and

  • Endoscopy.

Information on the number of private hospital beds which were booked, used or unused by National Health Service providers is not held centrally.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will provide a breakdown of the types of services and treatments provided by private sector providers to NHS patients during the covid-19 outbreak.

The information on the number of patients treated by private sector providers is not collected in the format requested. The following services and diagnostic tests were carried out by private sector providers:

  • Cardiology;

  • Cardiothoracic surgery;

  • Dermatology;

  • Ear, nose and throat;

  • Gastroenterology;

  • General medicine;

  • General surgery;

  • Gynaecology;

  • Neurology;

  • Neurosurgery;

  • Ophthalmology;

  • Oral surgery;

  • Plastic surgery;

  • Rheumatology;

  • Thoracic medicine;

  • Trauma and orthopaedics;

  • Urology;

  • Magnetic resonance imaging;

  • Computed tomography; and

  • Endoscopy.

Information on the number of private hospital beds which were booked, used or unused by National Health Service providers is not held centrally.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much NHS England has spent on purchasing hospital capacity and health services from private sector providers during the covid-19 outbreak since March 2020.

The information requested is not currently available while the reconciliation of these contracts is completed.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients were treated by private sector providers contracted by the NHS during the covid-19 outbreak in each month since March 2020, by hospital trust in England.

The information on the number of patients treated by private sector providers is not collected in the format requested. The following services and diagnostic tests were carried out by private sector providers:

  • Cardiology;

  • Cardiothoracic surgery;

  • Dermatology;

  • Ear, nose and throat;

  • Gastroenterology;

  • General medicine;

  • General surgery;

  • Gynaecology;

  • Neurology;

  • Neurosurgery;

  • Ophthalmology;

  • Oral surgery;

  • Plastic surgery;

  • Rheumatology;

  • Thoracic medicine;

  • Trauma and orthopaedics;

  • Urology;

  • Magnetic resonance imaging;

  • Computed tomography; and

  • Endoscopy.

Information on the number of private hospital beds which were booked, used or unused by National Health Service providers is not held centrally.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much the NHS has spent on private hospital facilities that have gone unused since the start of March 2020.

The information requested is not held centrally. Contracts for the bulk purchasing of hospital facilities on a cost recovery basis do not record unused capacity. The bulk purchasing of private hospital services ended on 31 March 2021.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has any plans to impose temporary lockdowns in October 2021.

The success of the vaccination programme means that stringent economic and social restrictions may not be needed to prevent unsustainable pressure on the National Health Service this autumn. The risk of COVID-19 is now being managed through pharmaceutical interventions like vaccines and antivirals, including vaccines for those aged 12 to 15 years old, continuing the Test, Trace and Isolate programme, and managing risks at the border.

5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his Department's timeframe is for the decision on refinancing proposals put forward by Hull Citycare Ltd Local Improvement Finance Trust.

Discussions are currently taking place between the Department and HM Treasury and we will provide further information on the timeframe for a decision in due course.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason a decision has yet to be taken by his Department on the refinancing proposals put forward by Hull Citycare Ltd Local Improvement Finance Trust.

Discussions are currently taking place between the Department and HM Treasury and we will provide further information on the timeframe for a decision in due course.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what checks his Department carries out on covid-19 testing providers before adding them to the Government approved list of providers; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the Rt hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Ellesmere Port and Neston (Justin Madders MP) on 21 May 2021 to Question 1099.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 testing providers his Department has removed from the Government list of providers for tests required for travel in response to customer feedback to NHS Test and Trace.

To date, seven providers have been removed from the GOV.UK list in response to customer feedback to NHS Test and Trace.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential benefits to public health of applying a costs cap to covid-19 testing services for British holidaymakers travelling abroad.

The Department has not made a specific assessment.

We are committed to working with the travel industry and private testing providers to reduce the cost of travel testing whilst also ensuring travel is as safe as possible. Since requirements were introduced for international travel testing, the costs of travel testing have fallen significantly. NHS Test and Trace tests are available at the market mid-point to ensure tests are available at an appropriate cost. We also offer deferred payment plans and hardship support.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the risks to public health of British holidaymakers failing to comply with covid-19 testing requirements after travelling abroad; and if he will make a statement.

We are unable to provide the information requested as it relates to the ongoing formulation of Government policy. However, an important part of the Government’s aim to see a safe and sustainable return to international travel is ensuring the inbound rules are being adhered to, including individuals entering England from both amber-list and green-list countries and territories.

We are working closely with the Home Office to ensure that our international travel regulations are robustly enforced. The Home Office has contracted Mitie (private security) to conduct door-step visits to those suspected of non-compliance. Any individuals suspected of non-compliance by Mitie officers are referred to the police for follow-up enforcement action, which can include issuing Fixed Penalty Notices.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of British holidaymakers travelling abroad who will choose not to comply with covid-19 testing requirements on their return.

We are unable to provide the information requested as it relates to the ongoing formulation of Government policy. However, an important part of the Government’s aim to see a safe and sustainable return to international travel is ensuring the inbound rules are being adhered to, including individuals entering England from both amber-list and green-list countries and territories.

We are working closely with the Home Office to ensure that our international travel regulations are robustly enforced. The Home Office has contracted Mitie (private security) to conduct door-step visits to those suspected of non-compliance. Any individuals suspected of non-compliance by Mitie officers are referred to the police for follow-up enforcement action, which can include issuing Fixed Penalty Notices.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the NHS app's storing of vaccination data on civil liberties.

When individuals use the NHS App to demonstrate their COVID-19 vaccine status, the data is not stored within the app, but is made available to the app temporarily without any access to their General Practitioner records. COVID-19 status data can be viewed during ‘live’ access, held temporarily for the duration of their login.

A Data Protection Impact Assessment has been completed on the COVID-19 vaccine status service, which is provided through the NHS App, to assess and mitigate privacy and data security risks, including risks to civil liberties.

In addition, a full Equalities and Health Impact Assessment was completed on the digital and non-digital routes for the certification service in advance of the national launch to assess the impact of the products on groups with protected characteristics.

The Data Protection and Equalities and Health Impact Assessments are both kept under review as the service is developed.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what NHS England's policy and guidelines are on applying Do Not Resuscitate orders to patients; and whether specific underlying health conditions are factors taken into account.

NHS England and NHS Improvement clinical leaders have emphasised to health and care providers that Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions should only ever be made on an individual basis. The Department remains clear that inappropriate or blanket application of DNACPR decisions is unacceptable, whether due to medical condition, disability or age.

Joint guidance for clinicians from the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council UK and Royal College of Nursing reflects that agreement to a DNACPR order is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether NHS England issue guidelines on when GPs should start discussions with their patients on end of life care; and whether age is the primary factor taken into account when starting those discussions.

Guidance on undertaking discussions with patients on end of life care is provided by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Identification of any person approaching the end of life and decisions on when to begin discussions on end of life care and support need to be considered on an individual basis.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether NHS England issue guidelines on when GPs should start discussions with their patients on end of life care; and whether (a) budgetary factors and (b) underlying health conditions are considered as part of the decision to begin those discussions.

Guidance on undertaking discussions with patients on end of life care is provided by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Identification of any person approaching the end of life and decisions on when to begin discussions on end of life care and support need to be considered on an individual basis.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what NHS England's policy and guidelines are on applying Do Not Resuscitate orders to patients; and whether age is the primary factor taken into account.

NHS England and NHS Improvement clinical leaders have emphasised to health and care providers that Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions should only ever be made on an individual basis. The Department remains clear that inappropriate or blanket application of DNACPR decisions is unacceptable, whether due to medical condition, disability or age.

Joint guidance for clinicians from the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council UK and Royal College of Nursing reflects that agreement to a DNACPR order is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what NHS England's policy and guidelines are on applying Do Not Resuscitate orders to patients; and what specific factors are taken into account when applying such an order.

NHS England and NHS Improvement clinical leaders have emphasised to health and care providers that Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions should only ever be made on an individual basis. The Department remains clear that inappropriate or blanket application of DNACPR decisions is unacceptable, whether due to medical condition, disability or age.

Joint guidance for clinicians from the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council UK and Royal College of Nursing reflects that agreement to a DNACPR order is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what NHS England's policy and guidelines are on applying Do Not Resuscitate orders to patients; and whether budgetary factors are taken into account.

NHS England and NHS Improvement clinical leaders have emphasised to health and care providers that Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions should only ever be made on an individual basis. The Department remains clear that inappropriate or blanket application of DNACPR decisions is unacceptable, whether due to medical condition, disability or age.

Joint guidance for clinicians from the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council UK and Royal College of Nursing reflects that agreement to a DNACPR order is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 16 November 2020 to Question 109164, whether the NHS plans to publish backdated data on critical care capacity from when publication ceased.

There is no intention of publishing backdated data on critical care capacity.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the NHS plans to resume the (a) collection and (b) publication of data on critical care bed capacity across the NHS.

NHS England and NHS Improvement will publish weekly critical care bed availability and occupancy this winter, although the date for when this will start has not yet been confirmed.

Data for previous winters can be accessed at the following link: https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/uec-sitrep/

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Pillar 2 covid-19 tests have been carried out in (a) Yorkshire and the Humber and (b) Haltemprice and Howden constituency in each month since February 2020.

The Government does not publish this data in this format. Weekly data for pillar 2 testing in England is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/nhs-test-and-trace-statistics-england-weekly-reports

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Pillar 3 covid-19 tests have been carried out in (a) Yorkshire and the Humber and (b) Haltemprice and Howden constituency in each month since February 2020.

We do not hold data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Pillar 1 covid-19 tests have been carried out in (a) Yorkshire and the Humber and (b) Haltemprice and Howden constituency in each month since February 2020.

We do not hold data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his response to the hon. Member for Ealing Central and Acton on 21 September 2020, Official Report, column 633, on Covid-19 Update, where he stated that Vitamin D is one of the many things that we have looked into, to see whether it reduces the incidence or impact of coronavirus, if he will publish the results of the trial to which he referred.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence published ‘Vitamin D for COVID-19: Evidence Review’ which is available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/advice/es28/evidence/evidence-review-pdf-8777674477

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition also published ‘Rapid review: Vitamin D and acute respiratory tract infections’ which is available at the following link:

https://app.box.com/s/g0ldpth1upfd7fw763ew3aqa3c0pyvky

These rapid evidence reviews, published in June 2020, concluded that there is currently no evidence to support taking vitamin D supplements to reduce the risk and severity of COVID-19. My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care was referring to these publications when he responded to the hon. Member for Ealing Central and Acton (Rupa Huq MP).

Public Health England will keep this topic under review and will consider updating this assessment if emerging high-quality evidence suggests a change to existing conclusions, and advise the Government accordingly.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what performance targets are in place for commercial providers of track and trace functions; what penalties can be imposed for failure to meet those targets; and what penalties have already been imposed for failure to meet those targets.

Contracts were awarded to Serco and Sitel to provide call handling services for the contact track and trace initiative. The contracts have been published and can be found at the following links:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/c23fdfaf-d1f2-4d8c-a0cd-6b6f35793ccd

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/7645e3ef-ce16-4cae-8932-1eb6521a50cb

Contractual penalties are often unenforceable under English law so they were not included in test and trace contracts with Serco or Sitel. Sitel and Serco are approved suppliers on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework and the contracts have standard performance and quality assurance processes in place. Some information on Key Performance Indicators and service levels has been redacted from these published contracts as it is considered to be commercially sensitive.

The contracts have break clauses in them, meaning if the company does not meet required service levels we may cancel the contract and reclaim our money.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish all contracts agreed between his Department and (a) Serco, (b) Sitel Group and (c) all other commercial providers of track and trace functions.

Contracts were awarded to Serco and Sitel to provide call handling services for the contact track and trace initiative. The contracts have been published and can be found at the following links:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/c23fdfaf-d1f2-4d8c-a0cd-6b6f35793ccd

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/7645e3ef-ce16-4cae-8932-1eb6521a50cb

Contractual penalties are often unenforceable under English law so they were not included in test and trace contracts with Serco or Sitel. Sitel and Serco are approved suppliers on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework and the contracts have standard performance and quality assurance processes in place. Some information on Key Performance Indicators and service levels has been redacted from these published contracts as it is considered to be commercially sensitive.

The contracts have break clauses in them, meaning if the company does not meet required service levels we may cancel the contract and reclaim our money.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the NHS plans to resume the (a) collection and (b) publication of data on critical care bed capacity across the NHS.

NHS England’s collection and publication of critical care bed capacity data was paused as part of the initial response to COVID-19. A date to restart collection and publication of this data has not yet been decided.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department made of the performance of bidders for the covid-19 test and trace contact tracing contract on previous Government contracts.

The contracts awarded to Serco and Sitel to provide call handling services for the contact tracing initiative were made using direct awards under Lot 2 of Crown Commercial Service’s Contact Centre Services framework which was varied under Public Contract Regulations (PCR) 2015 Regulation 72 to allow for direct awards for COVID-19 related procurements.

Crown Commercial Service undertook a pre-procurement exercise engaging with all suppliers on Lot 2 to understand which could establish the contract centre in the volumes required and the timescales needed. All suppliers on Lot 2 were engaged with, in order to ascertain capabilities to meet the contract output specifications.

Serco and Sitel are approved suppliers on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework. They gained their places through fair and open competition via an Official Journal of the European Union procurement. Value for money and capability were part of the assessment criteria. The Department has put in place arrangements to ensure robust contract management in terms of performance and quality standards in line with relevant guidance.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what criteria his Department used to determine whether the bidders for the covid-19 test and trace contract had the necessary competencies to carry out contact tracing.

The contracts awarded to Serco and Sitel to provide call handling services for the contact tracing initiative were made using direct awards under Lot 2 of Crown Commercial Service’s Contact Centre Services framework which was varied under Public Contract Regulations (PCR) 2015 Regulation 72 to allow for direct awards for COVID-19 related procurements.

Crown Commercial Service undertook a pre-procurement exercise engaging with all suppliers on Lot 2 to understand which could establish the contract centre in the volumes required and the timescales needed. All suppliers on Lot 2 were engaged with, in order to ascertain capabilities to meet the contract output specifications.

Serco and Sitel are approved suppliers on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework. They gained their places through fair and open competition via an Official Journal of the European Union procurement. Value for money and capability were part of the assessment criteria. The Department has put in place arrangements to ensure robust contract management in terms of performance and quality standards in line with relevant guidance.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which suppliers entered bids for the contract to provide contact tracers as part of the Government's covid-19 test and trace programme.

The contracts awarded to Serco and Sitel to provide call handling services for the contact tracing initiative were made using direct awards under Lot 2 of Crown Commercial Service’s Contact Centre Services framework which was varied under Public Contract Regulations (PCR) 2015 Regulation 72 to allow for direct awards for COVID-19 related procurements.

Crown Commercial Service undertook a pre-procurement exercise engaging with all suppliers on Lot 2 to understand which could establish the contract centre in the volumes required and the timescales needed. All suppliers on Lot 2 were engaged with, in order to ascertain capabilities to meet the contract output specifications.

Serco and Sitel are approved suppliers on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework. They gained their places through fair and open competition via an Official Journal of the European Union procurement. Value for money and capability were part of the assessment criteria. The Department has put in place arrangements to ensure robust contract management in terms of performance and quality standards in line with relevant guidance.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he made of the potential merits of using local providers of contact tracing as part of the Government's covid-19 test and trace programme.

We have always been clear that NHS Test and Trace must be local by default and that we do not operate alone – we work with and through partners across the country. Contact tracing happening at a local level is not separate to that happening at a national level – all the information provided feeds into NHS Test and Trace. This is a team effort – it will only work if national and local systems work together.

NHS Test and Trace is working, and local action to tackle outbreaks and keep people safe is a crucial part of the national service.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many do not resuscitate orders were put in place between (a) 1 February 2019 to 1 August 2019 and (b) 1 February 2020 to 1 August 2020.

The Department does not hold data on the numbers or assessment of Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decisions (DNACPR).

Agreement to a DNACPR is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates. There has not been a national instruction or directive issued for blanket DNACPR decisions to be put in place. We remain clear that the blanket application of DNACPRs is unacceptable and that standards and quality of care should be maintained even in pressurised circumstances.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many do not resuscitate orders were put in place in care homes where the person died (a) from any cause and (b) with covid-19 on the death certificate between 1 February 2020 to 1 August 2020.

The Department does not hold data on the numbers or assessment of Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decisions (DNACPR).

Agreement to a DNACPR is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates. There has not been a national instruction or directive issued for blanket DNACPR decisions to be put in place. We remain clear that the blanket application of DNACPRs is unacceptable and that standards and quality of care should be maintained even in pressurised circumstances.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, on what basis some care homes were chosen by the NHS to put do not resuscitate orders on all their residents during the height of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department does not hold data on the numbers or assessment of Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decisions (DNACPR).

Agreement to a DNACPR is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates. There has not been a national instruction or directive issued for blanket DNACPR decisions to be put in place. We remain clear that the blanket application of DNACPRs is unacceptable and that standards and quality of care should be maintained even in pressurised circumstances.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many care homes were instructed by the NHS to put in place do not resuscitate orders between 1 February 2020 to 1 August 2020; and how many people were placed under those orders.

The Department does not hold data on the numbers or assessment of Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decisions (DNACPR).

Agreement to a DNACPR is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates. There has not been a national instruction or directive issued for blanket DNACPR decisions to be put in place. We remain clear that the blanket application of DNACPRs is unacceptable and that standards and quality of care should be maintained even in pressurised circumstances.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the recommendations contained in the report published by Public Health England on 12 February 2020 entitled Recommendations on the continuing use of case-identification / contact-tracing / case and contact isolation (CCI) management to mitigate the impact of imported cases of Covid-19, which Minister in his Department considered those recommendations; and what decisions were made as a result of those recommendations.

Following the meeting of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) on 11 February 2020, Public Health England (PHE) identified a number of potential endpoints where it may be decided that contact tracing and isolation should be abandoned. PHE provided two papers which set out the potential endpoints which are available on GOV.UK at the following links:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/890217/s0018-when-to-stop-contact-tracing-developing-triggers-200220-sage9.pdf

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/890215/s0015-recommendations-on-continuing-use-cci-management-120220-sage9.PDF

Contact tracing and investigation of complex incidents have continued throughout the pandemic. Once there was clear evidence of widespread, sustained community transmission and the Prime Minister announced the move to the delay phase on 12 March, contact tracing was unlikely to control the outbreak alone. At this point, contact tracing was targeted where it could be most effective during this phase – focusing on the most vulnerable, for instance, carrying out contact tracing in care homes, hospitals and institutional environments. This decision to end the containment phase of the response, implement social distancing and enter the delay phase was a decision made by the Government.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of NHS patients were triaged under the Frailty Index mechanism in (a) March, (b) April and (c) May 2020.

NHS Digital publishes primary care data about the cumulative number of registered patients aged 65 years or over who have had a frailty assessment using the Electronic Frailty Index or any other appropriate assessment tool, up to the end of the reporting period. The data is reported quarterly on a cumulative basis as part of the General Medical Services / Personal Medical Services core contract data collection.

The latest available publication covers the reporting period up to 31 March 2020. This is available at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/gp-contract-services/2019-20

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the scientific basis is for the decision to close station waiting rooms rather than allow the partial use of the facilities with social distancing measures in place.

In the Government guidance to transport operators, there is no explicit ask for rail operators to close waiting rooms. However, it does ask for measures to be put in place to support social distancing e.g. by “rearranging, limiting or removing seating to try and ensure social distancing is observed” The ‘Coronavirus (COVID-19): Safer transport – guidance for operators’ can be found at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/884370/coronavirus-covid-19-safer-transport-guidance-for-operators.pdf

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) process was undertaken and (b) criteria used to award Serco the contract for putting in place contact tracers; whether that process an open competition; on what date the tendering process started; and which other companies submitted a bid to provide those contact tracers.

Serco are an approved supplier on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework. They gained their place through fair and open competition via an Official Journal of the European Union procurement. Value for money and capability were part of the assessment criteria. Crown Commercial Service undertook a pre-procurement exercise engaging with all suppliers under the framework to understand which could establish the contract centre in the volumes required and the timescales needed. The department has put in place arrangements to ensure robust contract management in line with relevant guidance.

12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the NHS plans to restart the (a) collection and (b) publication of data on critical care bed capacity across the NHS.

NHS England data sets are currently under review following communication from the NHS Chief Operating Officer to trusts on 28 March 2020. A date to restart collection and publication of this data has not yet been decided.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for not following the response of (a) South Korea, (b) Singapore, (c) Taiwan, (d) Hong Kong and other places with experience of coronavirus outbreaks.

We recognise that transparency is important in these unprecedented times. Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and papers are not generally published until after an emergency has ended. However, given the extended nature of the pandemic, we have already published some of the statements and the accompanying evidence. These publications can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

In addition, it is intended to further speed up the publication SAGE papers over the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for the decision to not cancel mass events at the start of March 2020 in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

We recognise that transparency is important in these unprecedented times. Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and papers are not generally published until after an emergency has ended. However, given the extended nature of the pandemic, we have already published some of the statements and the accompanying evidence. These publications can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

In addition, it is intended to further speed up the publication SAGE papers over the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for the decision not to require health checks and quarantine in response to the covid-19 outbreak for travellers entering the UK.

We recognise that transparency is important in these unprecedented times. Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and papers are not generally published until after an emergency has ended. However, given the extended nature of the pandemic, we have already published some of the statements and the accompanying evidence. These publications can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

In addition, it is intended to further speed up the publication SAGE papers over the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for the decision to close schools in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

We recognise that transparency is important in these unprecedented times. Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and papers are not generally published until after an emergency has ended. However, given the extended nature of the pandemic, we have already published some of the statements and the accompanying evidence. These publications can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

In addition, it is intended to further speed up the publication SAGE papers over the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for the decision to stop testing and tracking the contacts of people who potentially had covid-19 during the early phases of the covid-19 outbreak.

Contact tracing has been used throughout the COVID-19 response. It was not stopped.

At the start of the outbreak, when we were in the ‘contain’ phase, we traced the contacts of every case. This helped to delay community transmission and bought time for the National Health Service and country to prepare. As the virus became more widespread and the chains of transmission unclear, the country moved to the ‘delay’ phase, and the contact tracing approach changed. Rather than follow up every case, we focused on specific places such as care homes and prisons to control specific outbreaks and protect those most at risk of infection.

On testing, from the start of the pandemic, our first priority was patients. This was vital in helping clinicians to better understand their condition and ensure they received the best quality care. As our capacity increased, we then expanded testing to other groups.

As we move into the next phase of our response, both testing and contact tracing will play an increasingly important role – that is why we are developing an integrated test and trace programme. This includes a new app which will complement existing web-based and phone-based contact tracing approaches. Alongside this there will be swab testing for anyone reporting COVID-19 symptoms.

This programme will play an important role in helping to minimise the spread of the virus in the future.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) drugs and (b) therapies for covid-19 are being assessed by his Department.

Treatments for COVID-19 are currently being trialled in both large Phase III and smaller Phase II clinical trials. The Phase III trials underway include the PRINCIPLE, RECOVERY and REMAP-CAP trials which cover primary, acute and intensive care settings.

As of 13 May 2020, RECOVERY trial drugs included: dexamethasone, lopinavir/ritonavir; hydroxychloroquine; hydrocortisone; prednisolone; methylprednisolone; azithromycin; and tocilizumab. The PRINCIPLE trial drugs included hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin. The REMAP-CAP trial drugs included: Lopinavir/ritonavir; Hydroxychloroquine; corticosteroids; interferon-beta; anakinra; tocilizumab; sarilumab; and heparin. In addition, convalescent plasma is being trialled through REMAP-CAP.

As of 13 May 2020, drugs being tested through ACCORD, a Phase II clinical trial platform, included: bemcentinib; MEDI3506; ravuilizumab; baricitinib; and Gemtuzamab ozogamicin.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for the Government decision not to recommend that the public wear face masks in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

We recognise that transparency is important in these unprecedented times. Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and papers are not generally published until after an emergency has ended. However, given the extended nature of the pandemic, we have already published some of the statements and the accompanying evidence. These publications can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

In addition, it is intended to further speed up the publication SAGE papers over the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will publish the model and input parameters used by Imperial College London in their paper entitled Report 9: Impact of non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) to reduce COVID-19 mortality and healthcare demand, which informed Government policy on the covid-19 lockdown.

The model referred to in the question is not held by the Government. It is held by its creators, and we understand the code for the Imperial model has been made available online by the authors. The information it provides will be an element considered by Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling (SPI-M) when reaching its consensus statement to share with the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies. SPI-M consensus statements and supporting documents are published periodically and can be found on GOV.UK.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will publish statistics on the risk of death posed by covid-19, by gender, after removing co-morbidities.

Government statistics on the risk of death posed by COVID-19, by age group, ethnic group and gender, after removing co-morbidities, are not currently published.

We have asked Public Health England to review COVID-19 outcomes among different groups to better understand how factors such as ethnicity, deprivation, age, gender and obesity could impact on how people are affected, and to explore underpinning reasons for disparities.

We are also supporting the National Institute for Health Research’s call for rapid research proposals on COVID-19 and ethnicity.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will publish statistics on the risk of death posed by covid-19, by age group, after removing co-morbidities.

Government statistics on the risk of death posed by COVID-19, by age group, ethnic group and gender, after removing co-morbidities, are not currently published.

We have asked Public Health England to review COVID-19 outcomes among different groups to better understand how factors such as ethnicity, deprivation, age, gender and obesity could impact on how people are affected, and to explore underpinning reasons for disparities.

We are also supporting the National Institute for Health Research’s call for rapid research proposals on COVID-19 and ethnicity.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will publish statistics on the risk of death posed by covid-19, by ethnic group, after removing co-morbidities.

Government statistics on the risk of death posed by COVID-19, by age group, ethnic group and gender, after removing co-morbidities, are not currently published.

We have asked Public Health England to review COVID-19 outcomes among different groups to better understand how factors such as ethnicity, deprivation, age, gender and obesity could impact on how people are affected, and to explore underpinning reasons for disparities.

We are also supporting the National Institute for Health Research’s call for rapid research proposals on COVID-19 and ethnicity.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of changes to the NHS pension scheme on doctors' working hours.

The Government is aware that the annual allowance may contribute to decisions from senior clinicians to reduce their National Health Service commitments, although a precise estimate of the change in consultants’ working hours as a result of pension tax is not available. The Government is listening closely to concerns raised by senior doctors and NHS employers about the tapered annual allowance.

The NHS has implemented a short-term measure to compensate NHS clinicians at retirement for the effect on their pensions of annual allowance tax charges incurred in 2019/20. To address this issue for future years, the Government is holding an urgent review of the annual allowance taper. The review will report at Budget on 11 March and will also consider the findings from the Department’s recent consultation on a package of pension flexibility for NHS clinicians who face annual allowance charges.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps are being taken to reduce the levels of nitrates in meat products.

Nitrates and nitrites are used as preservatives and are important for inhibiting microbial growth, in particular Clostridium Botulinum in processed meat such as bacon and hams. They work against microorganisms that can spoil food, as well as those that cause foodborne disease, and are naturally present in certain vegetables such as swiss chard, celery and spinach.

Based on scientific evaluation, legislation specifies the maximum amount of nitrates and nitrites that can be added to various meat products to ensure that only safe levels of nitrates are used. The Food Standards Agency works closely with the meat industry to ensure that nitrates and nitrites are used at the lowest possible levels to achieve this necessary technological function, without jeopardising product safety.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, If he will make it his policy to provide consular support to British nationals detained in North East Syria.

The FCDO continues to advise against all travel to Syria. The Embassy closed in 2012 and therefore we have no consular presence within Syria.

This makes it extremely challenging to provide direct help to British nationals located there. But we carefully consider every request for consular assistance on a case-by-case basis, taking into account all relevant circumstances.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, which Minister or official authorised the Government Information Cell to collect data related to public statements, social media and internet activity as part of its work.

The Government Information Cell (GIC) was established in February 2022 to support the UK's response to Russian disinformation relating to their invasion of Ukraine. Overall responsibility for the GIC lies with the Foreign Secretary.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he holds any information on how many people traffickers operating in the English Channel the French authorities have (a) arrested and (b) charged in each of the last five years.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office is not the owner of this information and we are therefore unable to provide the requested details. However, if the French Government publishes these figures we will update the Rt. Hon David Davis MP separately.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether any (a) children with UK nationality and (b) other UK nationals are being detained in facilities other than Camp Roj and Camp Al Hol in North East Syria as on 10 October 2022.

We are aware that there may be British children in IDP camps in Syria, who because of their age, are innocent victims of the conflict. We cannot comment on locations or numbers of British nationals for security reasons.

There is no consular support available from within Syria to British nationals. However, the UK has been clear that we will consider requests for consular assistance on a case-by-case basis. The UK continues to facilitate the return of unaccompanied or orphaned children, where feasible, and subject to national security concerns and confirmation of nationality and identity.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much funding his Department will provide for detention facilities in North East Syria in the 2022-23 financial year.

The UK Government have robust processes in place to ensure that projects funded by the UK meet our human rights obligations and values. This includes publicly available HMG guidance that sets out the human rights risks that must be considered prior to providing justice or security sector assistance.

As said in the counter-Daesh statement to the House on 4 March 2021, as part of the Global Coalition's collective stabilisation efforts in the region, the UK has provided technical advice and funding for the improvement of detention facilities for Daesh fighters in NE Syria.

It would not be appropriate to comment further for reasons of operational security.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
6th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if she will make an assessment of the potential level of support required by Ukraine to rebuild and recover from Russia's invasion.

We must support Ukraine’s vision for rebuilding a sovereign, prosperous, democratic nation that is stronger than before Putin’s invasion. Significant support will be required for Ukraine to recover and rebuild from the damage wrought by this war. In early July, the former Foreign Secretary presented our vision to support a Ukraine-led effort for recovery and reconstruction at the Ukraine Recovery Conference in Lugano. We will host the Conference in 2023 to galvanise further international support. The priority now is to address Ukraine’s immediate economic needs and in the longer term, leverage UK private sector investment and work to support Ukraine’s future economic growth.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if she will publish a list of people sanctioned under the Russia (Sanctions) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019, broken down by those (a) resident in the UK, (b) having ever lived in the UK and (c) holding assets in the UK.

Details of all sanctioned individuals and entities are listed on the UK sanctions list, which can be found on gov.uk here [https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/financial-sanctions-consolidated-list-of-targets?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=govuk-notifications-topic&utm_source=3ca20436-bbb9-43c0-95c9-40e4a3b404ec&utm_content=immediately].

We cannot disclose information on residency status or information regarding UK assets of those on the sanctions list. The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) publishes an Annual Review which releases details of the total value of frozen funds held in the UK.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure families from the UK who are detained in North East Syria receive medical care, including in cases where there is a clear risk to life.

The UK has no consular presence within Syria, which makes it difficult to provide direct consular assistance, but we carefully consider whether and how we can help every British national who directly seeks our assistance. The provision of medical care within camps in North East Syria is a matter for the camp authorities, but UK aid is provided to those in acute need in these camps, including British nationals. For example, in Al Hol camp, we help fund a wide range of activities including basic, life-saving healthcare, food, hygiene products, child protection and shelter, in addition to informal education support. When the population substantially increased in early 2019, UK aid provided 1,300 tents to the camp. The UK's funding is flexible and allows partners on the ground to plan for spikes in need.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to facilitate welfare and proof of life checks for families from Britain who are detained in north-east Syria.

The UK has no consular presence within Syria from which to provide assistance. This makes it difficult to help but we take a case-by-case approach to any requests for assistance, which includes liaising with partners on the ground where feasible.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether it is his policy that the activities of Kurdish fighters in Syria constitute terrorism.

The UK sees a clear distinction between the aims of the PKK, which we proscribed as a terrorist organisation in 2001, and the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), the partner force of the Global Coalition against Daesh in Syria. We pay tribute to the courage and sacrifices made by SDF in the fight against Daesh. We continue to urge the Kurdish elements of the SDF to distance themselves from the PKK and its terrorist activity. The UK also calls on all parties to the conflict in Syria to respect international law.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what (a) financial, (b) logistical and (c) military support has been provided by the Government to Kurdish fighters in Syria.

As part of the Global Coalition the UK has provided military support, including airstrikes, to the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), of which the Kurdish YPG are a contingent part, in the campaign to remove Daesh from north-eastern Syria. We have also provided humanitarian and limited stabilisation support to address the immediate needs of the local population in areas under SDF control in north-eastern Syria. We maintain political and diplomatic contact with a number of Kurdish groups to work towards a political solution to the conflict.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether his Department has made an assessment of the lawfulness of actions taken by Turkish forces in Syria and whether they are in breach of the UN Charter in terms of (a) unilateral use of military force, (b) use of unlawful weapons including chemical weapons, (c) ethnic cleansing and forcible displacement, (d) violence and atrocities against civilians, (e) discrimination of Kurdish populations and (f) use of jihadist militias.

The UK made clear our opposition to the unilateral Turkish intervention in north-east Syria in October 2019. We welcome the ceasefire currently in place in the north-east and also acknowledge the important role Turkey has played in recent months to secure a ceasefire in Idlib. We consistently reiterate the importance of all parties to the Syrian conflict adhering to the current ceasefires and abiding by international law. The UK continues to raise concerns with Turkey over reports of violations of international law by Turkish backed forces in Syria, and to call for credible investigations into alleged violations of International Humanitarian Law in areas under the control of armed groups supported by Turkey.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with the Turkish government on British volunteers fighting with the Peoples Protection Forces, known as the YPG.

We have regular discussions with the Turkish authorities on the issue of stopping foreign fighters passing through Turkey to or from Syria. Since 2011, the FCO has advised against all travel to Syria. As we have made clear, where individuals travel to the region to participate in fighting and then return, they will be investigated. Any decision on whether to prosecute will be taken independently by the Crown Prosecution Service on a case by case basis.

8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with its Turkish counterpart on recent legal action in British courts against individuals returning to the UK following periods fighting with the Peoples Protection Forces known as the YPG.

We have regular discussions with the Turkish authorities on the issue of stopping foreign fighters passing through Turkey to or from Syria. Since 2011, the FCO has advised against all travel to Syria. As we have made clear, where individuals travel to the region to participate in fighting and then return, they will be investigated. Any decision on whether to prosecute will be taken independently by the Crown Prosecution Service on a case by case basis.

8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with the Turkish government on (a) the conflict in Northern Syria and (b) that country's policy towards YPG forces.

Ministers and officials regularly discuss the situation in northern Syria with the Government of Turkey. The Foreign Secretary discussed international efforts on Syria with Turkish Foreign Minister Çavusoglu during in his visit to London on 8 July.

We also regularly discuss our differences of views on the YPG, which is an important part of the Syrian Democratic Forces. We acknowledge Turkey's security concerns regarding the PKK. The UK sees a clear distinction between the PKK, which we proscribed as a terrorist organisation in 2001, and the SDF, the partner force of the Global Coalition against Daesh in Syria. We pay tribute to the courage and sacrifices made by SDF in the fight against Daesh. We continue to urge the Kurdish elements of the SDF to distance themselves from the PKK and its terrorist activity. The UK also calls on all parties to the conflict in Syria to respect international law.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answers of 18 May 2020 to Questions 44961 and 44962, if he will publish the results of the communications his Department has had with British Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates on covid-19.

FCO Ministers and officials in the UK and in Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates, constantly engage with our international partners to understand their approaches to tackling COVID-19; inform our policy-making; and agree international action in response to the crisis. The FCO does not routinely publish internal communications

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what analysis his Department has carried out on the response to covid-19 in (a) South Korea, (b) Taiwan, (c) Singapore, (d) Hong Kong and (e) Australia.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) officials are in regular communication with British Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates to monitor COVID-19 developments across the world. Furthermore, Ministers and senior officials engage their international counterparts regularly. The FCO is looking closely at what others across the world are doing to tackle COVID-19, and is harnessing the UK's diplomatic network to best understand the approaches taken by others.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what analysis his Department has carried out on the response to covid-19 in (a) Austria, (b) Germany, (c) Italy, (d) France, (e) Spain, (f) Sweden, (g) Norway and (h) United States.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) officials are in regular communication with British Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates to monitor COVID-19 developments across the world. Furthermore, Ministers and senior officials engage their international counterparts regularly. The FCO is looking closely at what others across the world are doing to tackle COVID-19, and is harnessing the UK's diplomatic network to best understand the approaches taken by others.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what processes he has in place for UK embassies, high commissions and consulates to provide his Department with information on how covid-19 is being handled throughout the world.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office officials are in regular communication with British Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates to monitor COVID-19 developments across the world. Ministers and senior officials also regularly engage with their international counterparts. This includes in multilateral fora such as G7 Foreign Ministers or NATO and bilaterally.

7th Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of a UK central bank digital currency on the right to privacy.

Individuals’ privacy, user control and the proper use of data in line with UK data protection laws are of paramount importance to the design of any digital currency.

A digital pound would be subject to rigorous standards of privacy and data protection. Neither the Government nor the Bank of England would have access to personal data, nor be able to see how consumers use their money.

The Government has committed to bring forward legislation in Parliament prior to any Digital Pound being introduced.

The Government and Bank of England consulted on these privacy features of the potential digital pound over February-June 2023, and are currently reviewing the feedback received. A consultation response will be published in due course.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
9th Jun 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the annual VAT revenue generated from companies installing business broadband in employee properties.

The information requested is not available. HMRC does not hold information on VAT revenue from specific products or services because businesses are not required to provide figures at a product level on their VAT returns, as this would impose an excessive administrative burden on them.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
9th Jun 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what revenues his Department received from taxes on businesses that provide their employees with business broadband for their residential properties in the latest period for which data is available.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) does not hold information on the revenue received from taxes on businesses that provide their employees with business broadband for their residential properties.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
9th Jun 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential financial merits of maintaining business broadband as a taxable benefit in kind.

The Government’s ambition is to connect at least 85 per cent of UK premises to gigabit-capable broadband by 2025, and for nationwide connectivity (at least 99 per cent) to be realised by 2030. Project Gigabit is the government’s £5 billion programme that will ensure the whole of the UK benefits from gigabit connectivity by providing subsidy to deliver gigabit-capable connectivity to uncommercial premises, which are typically in rural or remote locations. Over 75 per cent of UK premises can now access gigabit-capable broadband, a huge leap forward from July 2019, when coverage was just 8 per cent.

Regarding the tax treatment of home broadband, under long-standing rules, payments from employers reimbursing employees for reasonable additional costs they incur while having to work from home are exempt from taxation. This includes the cost of providing broadband to an employee where a connection was not already available, the employee requires broadband to work from home, and the broadband is used mainly for business purposes.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) does not hold information on the revenue received from taxes on businesses that provide their employees with business broadband for their residential properties.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
9th Jun 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has conducted a cost-benefit analysis of the impacts of treating business broadband as a benefit in kind.

The Government’s ambition is to connect at least 85 per cent of UK premises to gigabit-capable broadband by 2025, and for nationwide connectivity (at least 99 per cent) to be realised by 2030. Project Gigabit is the government’s £5 billion programme that will ensure the whole of the UK benefits from gigabit connectivity by providing subsidy to deliver gigabit-capable connectivity to uncommercial premises, which are typically in rural or remote locations. Over 75 per cent of UK premises can now access gigabit-capable broadband, a huge leap forward from July 2019, when coverage was just 8 per cent.

Regarding the tax treatment of home broadband, under long-standing rules, payments from employers reimbursing employees for reasonable additional costs they incur while having to work from home are exempt from taxation. This includes the cost of providing broadband to an employee where a connection was not already available, the employee requires broadband to work from home, and the broadband is used mainly for business purposes.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) does not hold information on the revenue received from taxes on businesses that provide their employees with business broadband for their residential properties.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
9th Jun 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of taxing upgrades to business broadband for non-business properties.

The Government’s ambition is to connect at least 85 per cent of UK premises to gigabit-capable broadband by 2025, and for nationwide connectivity (at least 99 per cent) to be realised by 2030. Project Gigabit is the government’s £5 billion programme that will ensure the whole of the UK benefits from gigabit connectivity by providing subsidy to deliver gigabit-capable connectivity to uncommercial premises, which are typically in rural or remote locations. Over 75 per cent of UK premises can now access gigabit-capable broadband, a huge leap forward from July 2019, when coverage was just 8 per cent.

Regarding the tax treatment of home broadband, under long-standing rules, payments from employers reimbursing employees for reasonable additional costs they incur while having to work from home are exempt from taxation. This includes the cost of providing broadband to an employee where a connection was not already available, the employee requires broadband to work from home, and the broadband is used mainly for business purposes.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) does not hold information on the revenue received from taxes on businesses that provide their employees with business broadband for their residential properties.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the confidence intervals are for the (a) Office for Budget Responsibility's and (b) Bank of England's economic forecasts.

The OBR is widely recognised as providing independent, credible and high-quality analysis and the OECD has described the OBR as a “model independent fiscal institution”.

The OBR is also required by legislation to annually evaluate its forecasts in a Forecast Evaluation Report (link). The OBR also began to publish fan charts demonstrating the confidence intervals around its forecasts for key fiscal metrics in the October 2021 Economic and Fiscal Outlook (link).

The Bank of England’s forecasting capability was reviewed by David Stockton in 2012 (link) and he found that “fundamentally, the forecast process and the associated forecasting tools employed by the Bank in support of its monetary policy decision making are sound.” It was reviewed again by the Bank’s Independent Evaluating Office in 2015 (link). The Bank also publishes confidence intervals summarising the Monetary Policy Committee’s collective judgement of the uncertainty around the forecasts for GDP, unemployment, and CPI inflation, in the Monetary Policy Report (link).

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether there is a statutory basis for HMRC's policy to promote among employers the use of statements on payslips supporting the National Insurance contributions rise in April 2022.

There is no statutory obligation on employers to include statements on payslips explaining the rise in National Insurance contributions (NICs).

The temporary increases to rates of NICs for the tax year 2022-23 precede the introduction of the Health and Social Care levy as a new, separate tax from April 2023. The legislation which introduces the Levy requires it to be separately identified on payslips, alongside NICs and Income Tax, from April 2023 onwards.

HMRC, as part of their role in promoting greater understanding of the tax system, have asked employers to include factual messaging on payslips in 2022-23 to highlight the temporary change in NICs rates before the new Levy begins in 2023-24, however this is not mandatory.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
26th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to tackle fraud in the covid-19 business support schemes.

The Government has consistently stated that fraud is unacceptable, and we are taking action on multiple fronts to recover money lost to error and fraud and, where necessary, take legal action on those who have sought to exploit the Covid support schemes. It was right to establish the schemes quickly and in a way that they could be accessed easily by the millions who needed support.

Given the unprecedented efforts that the Government have made to protect jobs and livelihoods during this pandemic, it would have been impossible to prevent all related fraud. However, we have taken reasonable steps, and will continue to do so, to deflect and combat that fraud, and we will continue to be vigilant.

Robust measures were put in place to control error and fraud in the key COVID-19 support schemes from their inception. For instance, to minimise the risk of fraud and error and unverified claims, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and Self-Employment Income Support Scheme were designed in a way to prevent ineligible claims being made up front, and made payments for employees and businesses using existing data held on HMRC’s systems. That included cut-off dates around scheme eligibility and the need for customers to be registered for pay-as-you-earn online or self-assessment.

To further bolster anti-fraud measures on HMRC-delivered covid support schemes, at the Spring Budget last year, the Government invested more than £100 million in a Taxpayer Protection Taskforce of more than 1,200 HMRC staff to combat Covid-related fraud. This Taskforce is expected to recover between £800 million and £1 billion from fraudulent or incorrect payments during 2021-22 and 2022-23. In addition, HMRC has so far stopped or recovered £743 million of overclaimed grants in 2020/21.

Regarding the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, the Government continues to work closely with the British Business Bank, lenders and enforcement agencies to tackle fraud and to recover as many fraudulent loans as possible. This is on top of the £2.2 billion worth of fraudulent applications that were prevented by upfront checks.

In addition, as part of the Spring Budget last year, we announced plans to significantly strengthen enforcement activity against fraudulent Bounce Back Loans, including new powers for the Insolvency Service to tackle rogue directors and investing in the National Investigation Service to investigate serious fraud.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has consulted representatives of (a) the travel industry and b) representatives of covid-19 test providers on the potential merits of removing VAT from the cost of covid-19 test services required for travel abroad; and if he will make a statement.

VAT is a broad-based tax on consumption and the standard rate of 20 per cent normally applies to most goods and services, including PCR tests. VAT makes a significant contribution towards the public finances, raising about £130 billion in 2019/20. This helped to fund the Government's priorities in key areas such as health, schools, and defence. Any loss in tax revenue would have to be balanced by a reduction in public spending, increased borrowing or increased taxation elsewhere.

Medical testing, where it is administered by registered health professionals, is exempt from VAT. The Government also continues to offer free COVID-19 testing for those with COVID-19 symptoms.

Competition among private providers in the market for COVID-19 tests has already worked to reduce the cost of PCR tests significantly, without Government intervention, and the Government expects these prices to continue to decrease over time. In order to reflect the recent reduction in the price of PCR tests that are available privately, NHS Test and Trace has already decreased the cost of the tests that they provide for international arrivals.

17th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the Exchequer of removing VAT from the price of covid-19 test services in each quarter in 2021-22.

VAT is a broad-based tax on consumption and the standard rate of 20 per cent normally applies to most goods and services, including PCR tests. VAT makes a significant contribution towards the public finances, raising about £130 billion in 2019/20. This helped to fund the Government's priorities in key areas such as health, schools, and defence. Any loss in tax revenue would have to be balanced by a reduction in public spending, increased borrowing or increased taxation elsewhere.

Medical testing, where it is administered by registered health professionals, is exempt from VAT. The Government also continues to offer free COVID-19 testing for those with COVID-19 symptoms.

Competition among private providers in the market for COVID-19 tests has already worked to reduce the cost of PCR tests significantly, without Government intervention, and the Government expects these prices to continue to decrease over time. In order to reflect the recent reduction in the price of PCR tests that are available privately, NHS Test and Trace has already decreased the cost of the tests that they provide for international arrivals.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion of loan charge cases remained unsettled after the 30 September deadline.

At the time of the independent review of the Loan Charge, about 12,000 employers and individuals had the opportunity to avoid the Loan Charge by concluding settlements, having provided all the relevant information to HMRC by 5 April 2019. Early indications are that as at 2 October about 60 percent of these taxpayers have either settled, informed HMRC that they had instead decided to report and pay the Loan Charge, or have been taken out of scope of the Loan Charge following the Government’s changes in response to the independent review.

HMRC are continuing settlement discussions with a relatively small number of taxpayers who were prevented from meeting the 30 September deadline by exceptional circumstances beyond their control, such as recent hospitalisation. HMRC’s criteria for continuing settlement discussions beyond the 30 September deadline are:

  • The taxpayer had actively engaged in the settlement process until the occurrence of a factor, and
  • The factor is entirely outside the control of the taxpayer, and
  • The factor prevented the taxpayer from settling by 30 September, and
  • Absent the factor, the taxpayer would have been able to settle by 30 September, and
  • The taxpayer will be able, and agrees, to settle within a defined period of no more than 3 months after the 30 September.

HMRC do not hold aggregate data on when individual taxpayers were issued with settlement offers.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what criteria HM Revenue and Customs use to decide whether individual Loan Charge settlement discussions can continue past the 30 September settlement deadline.

At the time of the independent review of the Loan Charge, about 12,000 employers and individuals had the opportunity to avoid the Loan Charge by concluding settlements, having provided all the relevant information to HMRC by 5 April 2019. Early indications are that as at 2 October about 60 percent of these taxpayers have either settled, informed HMRC that they had instead decided to report and pay the Loan Charge, or have been taken out of scope of the Loan Charge following the Government’s changes in response to the independent review.

HMRC are continuing settlement discussions with a relatively small number of taxpayers who were prevented from meeting the 30 September deadline by exceptional circumstances beyond their control, such as recent hospitalisation. HMRC’s criteria for continuing settlement discussions beyond the 30 September deadline are:

  • The taxpayer had actively engaged in the settlement process until the occurrence of a factor, and
  • The factor is entirely outside the control of the taxpayer, and
  • The factor prevented the taxpayer from settling by 30 September, and
  • Absent the factor, the taxpayer would have been able to settle by 30 September, and
  • The taxpayer will be able, and agrees, to settle within a defined period of no more than 3 months after the 30 September.

HMRC do not hold aggregate data on when individual taxpayers were issued with settlement offers.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people subject to the Loan Charge were offered settlements (a) four weeks, (b) three weeks, (c) two weeks, (d) one week and (e) less than one week before the 30 September settlement deadline.

At the time of the independent review of the Loan Charge, about 12,000 employers and individuals had the opportunity to avoid the Loan Charge by concluding settlements, having provided all the relevant information to HMRC by 5 April 2019. Early indications are that as at 2 October about 60 percent of these taxpayers have either settled, informed HMRC that they had instead decided to report and pay the Loan Charge, or have been taken out of scope of the Loan Charge following the Government’s changes in response to the independent review.

HMRC are continuing settlement discussions with a relatively small number of taxpayers who were prevented from meeting the 30 September deadline by exceptional circumstances beyond their control, such as recent hospitalisation. HMRC’s criteria for continuing settlement discussions beyond the 30 September deadline are:

  • The taxpayer had actively engaged in the settlement process until the occurrence of a factor, and
  • The factor is entirely outside the control of the taxpayer, and
  • The factor prevented the taxpayer from settling by 30 September, and
  • Absent the factor, the taxpayer would have been able to settle by 30 September, and
  • The taxpayer will be able, and agrees, to settle within a defined period of no more than 3 months after the 30 September.

HMRC do not hold aggregate data on when individual taxpayers were issued with settlement offers.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of his Department's decision not to extend the Loan Charge settlement deadline on the (a) mental health of and (b) risk of suicide in people subject to the Loan Charge.

The Government announced in December 2019 that it would extend the Loan Charge deadline from 31 January 2020 to 30 September 2020, for individuals due to pay the Loan Charge to submit their 2018/19 Self Assessment returns and pay the tax due or agree a time to pay arrangement.

The Government takes concerns over the physical and mental wellbeing of taxpayers very seriously. These cases are complex and typically involve many different factors.

HMRC have signposted the extra help available to taxpayers in correspondence and on calls. Their staff are trained to detect signs of stress, and look out for indications that a taxpayer may need extra support; and where appropriate will transfer them to an Extra Support adviser who has additional skills, knowledge and tools to help them. Where appropriate, HMRC also refer taxpayers to expert outside organisations that can provide further independent advice and support.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether any recipient of Loan Charge settlement letters has received letters containing confidential information belonging to other people.

HMRC take taxpayer confidentiality seriously. Of the tens of thousands of items of communication that HMRC have sent to taxpayers in recent months about their disguised remuneration usage, HMRC are aware of fewer than 10 occasions where confidential information was sent to the wrong taxpayer in error. In these circumstances HMRC follow the necessary processes to undertake corrective action.

HMRC issue settlement calculations to those who have come forward to settle their tax affairs based on the information they provided to HMRC. The settlement offer letter explains that they can ask HMRC to reconsider the calculations if they believe the figures set out in the letter are not correct.

To maintain a consistent approach, the terms of any settlement opportunity must fall within HMRC’s published Litigation and Settlement Strategy and apply equally to all those who may wish to take up the opportunity. As set out in the Litigation and Settlement Strategy, HMRC will only settle for an amount that is consistent with the law.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how HM Revenue and Customs calculates loan charge settlement offers; and what processes are in place to ensure all loan charge settlement offers are calculated consistently.

HMRC take taxpayer confidentiality seriously. Of the tens of thousands of items of communication that HMRC have sent to taxpayers in recent months about their disguised remuneration usage, HMRC are aware of fewer than 10 occasions where confidential information was sent to the wrong taxpayer in error. In these circumstances HMRC follow the necessary processes to undertake corrective action.

HMRC issue settlement calculations to those who have come forward to settle their tax affairs based on the information they provided to HMRC. The settlement offer letter explains that they can ask HMRC to reconsider the calculations if they believe the figures set out in the letter are not correct.

To maintain a consistent approach, the terms of any settlement opportunity must fall within HMRC’s published Litigation and Settlement Strategy and apply equally to all those who may wish to take up the opportunity. As set out in the Litigation and Settlement Strategy, HMRC will only settle for an amount that is consistent with the law.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what arrangements HM Revenue and Customs been put in place for people subject to the Loan Charge who are experiencing financial hardship as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

The Government and Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) are acutely aware of the current economic challenges facing taxpayers as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

HMRC have a strong, established approach to supporting those who are unable to pay the tax they owe in full, through payment arrangements for those who reach a settlement agreement with HMRC, and Time to Pay (TTP) arrangements which are available for those paying the Loan Charge. These are tailored to each individual’s financial circumstances.

Anyone worried about their ability to pay tax owed, as a result of a change in their financial circumstances, should get in touch with HMRC as soon as possible. A TTP arrangement is designed to be flexible and is not a fixed contract. It can be amended over time in order to enable HMRC to lengthen the arrangement if expenses increase or income decreases.

HMRC are also able to refer taxpayers to an external body to provide independent advice on options available to people who are unable to pay or are in difficulty with their debts.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people that have died by suicide as a result of the 2019 Loan Charge.

The Government takes concerns over the physical and mental wellbeing of taxpayers very seriously. These cases are complex and typically involve many different factors.

There are no cases in which suicide is known to have been the result of the Loan Charge. HMRC have referred five cases to the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) where HMRC have been notified that an individual has taken their life and had used a disguised remuneration scheme.

The IOPC has advised in two of these cases that they felt it was appropriate for HMRC to review the case internally. In the other three, it returned the matter to HMRC to proceed as appropriate.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what revenue has accrued to the public purse from taxation on the purchase of digital books.

The details that HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) collect from taxpayers on their VAT returns do not provide enough detail to be able to quantify precisely the revenue raised from these supplies. HMRC do not require detail on particular products and customer types because it would place a considerable administrative burden on businesses.
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much revenue has accrued to the public purse from IR35 in each year since it was implemented.

The off-payroll working rules (IR35) have been in place for nearly 20 years. They are designed to ensure that individuals working like employees but through their own company pay broadly the same tax and National Insurance contributions (NICs) as other employees who are directly employed.

HMRC do not have an annual breakdown of revenue received from the application of the off-payroll working rules. The Government estimates that only one in ten personal services companies (PSCs) who should be operating the rules are doing so. This non-compliance is projected to increase from £700 million per year in 2017/18 to £1.3 billion per year in 2023/24.

HMRC have measured the impact of reforming the off-payroll rules in the public sector and estimate that the reform has already raised an additional £550 million in income tax and NICs in the first 12 months since it was introduced.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of changes to IR35 on the number of people working as (a) freelancers and (b) contractors in the UK.

The Tax Information and Impact Note (TIIN) published in July 2019 sets out HMRC’s assessment that the reform to the off-payroll working rules is expected to affect 170,000 individuals. The TIIN can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/rules-for-off-payroll-working-from-april-2020/rules-for-off-payroll-working-from-april-2020.

HMRC are undertaking an extensive programme of education and support to help organisations and contractors prepare for the reform.

As a result of the review into the reform of the off-payroll working rules published on 27 February 2020, HMRC are ramping up communication, including webinars and guides, to support contractors in understanding the rules. This will complement the significant work already being taken to support businesses to prepare.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment the Government has made of the effect of funding allocated from the public purse to education in each region on the level of productivity in those regions.

When considering funding for public services, including education, the government considers a range of factors as a matter of course, including the impact on regional productivity. The Government is committed to uniting and levelling up, spreading opportunity across the whole of the UK - we are looking at how best to do this and I will set out more details in due course.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment the Government has been made of the effect of recent changes to Vehicle Excise Duty on the motorhome industry in (a) the UK, (b) Yorkshire and the Humber and (c) Haltemprice and Howden constituency.

The Government reformed VED for motorhomes to encourage the uptake of vehicles with lower carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to help us meet our legally binding climate change targets. It is right that under the reformed system motorhomes with high CO2 emissions pay greater first year VED than those with lower emissions.

However, I have met with representatives of the industry and I am sensitive to their concerns. The Government is committed to levelling up economic performance throughout the country, including in Yorkshire and the Humber.

As with all taxes, the Government keeps the VED treatment of motorhomes under review. Any changes will be considered by the Chancellor and announced at fiscal events.

9th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people who would remain within scope of the Loan Charge if the recommendations of the Independent Review into the Loan Charge are fully implemented.

The Government published Sir Amyas Morse’s independent review of the Loan Charge on 20 December, alongside the Government’s response to his recommendations.

The Government accepted all but one of Sir Amyas’s recommendations. This means that out of the estimated 50,000 individuals who used a loan scheme between 1999 and 2019 and did not settle with HMRC before March 2016, it is estimated that more than 30,000 people will benefit from the significant package of measures announced, 11,000 of whom will be taken out of scope of the charge altogether.

27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many warrants were (a) applied for, (b) granted and (c) rejected under section 26 of the Theft Act 1968 by each police force in each of the last five calendar years.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on use of police powers, as part of the ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical bulletin, available here: Police powers and procedures England and Wales statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

However, data is not collected on warrants under the Theft Act 1968.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to use data in the UK passport database for the (a) prevention and b) detection of crime.

The sharing of passport data with law enforcement agencies for the purpose of preventing and detecting crime is longstanding, and is provided for within His Majesty’s Passport Office’s Privacy Information Notice: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmpo-privacy-information-notice#full-publication-update-history

13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the implications for her policies on the storage by police of custody images of people who have not been convicted of the judgment in RMC and FJ v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis and Secretary of State for the Home Department [2012] EWHC 1681 (Admin).

It is police forces’ responsibility to comply with the judgment.

Since the judgment those not convicted of an offence have the right to request deletion of their custody image, with a presumption in favour, and the police have issued guidance for people in custody setting out those rights.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has received legal advice on the potential for using the UK passport database for the (a) prevention and (b) detection of crime.

The sharing of passport data with law enforcement agencies for the purpose of preventing and detecting crime is longstanding, and is provided for within His Majesty’s Passport Office’s Privacy Information Notice: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmpo-privacy-information-notice#full-publication-update-history

13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many custody images of people who have not been convicted of a crime are stored in the Police National Database.

The Police National Database (PND) hold custody records, including facial images, that are a copy of custody records held by forces. It does not process these records and has no mechanism to identify which custody records progressed to conviction or ‘No Further Action’ on the local force system as it does not hold information of how offences are subsequently disposed (this information resides on PNC, but not PND).

College of Policing Authorised Professional Practice sets our the basis upon which Police Forces retain custody images, which individual Forces then apply locally.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 6 May 2020 to Question 8948 on Tigray: Humanitarian Situation, how many people were extradited from the US to the UK for (a) violent and (b) non-violent crimes in each year since 2018.

Year

Total number extradited

Total number extradited for non-violent offences

Total number extradited for violent offences

2018

5

2

3

2019

3

0

3

2020

2

1

1

2021

7

2

5

2022

2

1

1

2023*

3

1

2

* Figures until 24 February 2023

For the above table, we have taken non-violent offences to include:

  • Fraud
  • Drug related offences
  • Theft
  • Forgery
  • Money laundering
  • Handling stolen goods
  • Obtaining property by deception
  • Tax evasion
  • Unlicensed exporting of goods
  • Obstruction of justice
  • Bribery

These figures provide updates on previously published statistics for 2018. All figures are from local management information and have not been quality assured to the level of published National Statistics. As such they should be treated as provisional and therefore subject to change. The figures do not include Scotland, which deals with its own extradition cases.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been extradited from the (a) UK to the US and (b) US to the UK in each year since 2003.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the Home Office’s response to Question 27510.

The table below provides a breakdown of extraditions between the UK and the US between 2022 and 2023 (Feb).

Year

UK to US

US to UK

2022

16

2

2023*

1

3

* Figures until 22 February 2023.

All figures are from local management information and have not been quality assured to the level of published National Statistics. As such they should be treated as provisional and therefore subject to change. The figures do not include Scotland, which deals with its own extradition cases.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people were extradited from the UK to the US for (a) violent and (b) non-violent crimes in each year since 2003.

To provide this information in the requested breakdown could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people were extradited from the US to the UK for (a) violent and (b) non-violent crimes in each year since 2003.

To provide this information in the requested breakdown could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which Minister or official authorised the Research, Information and Communication Unit to collect data related to public statements, social media and internet activity as part of that unit's work.

The Research, Information and Communications Unit (RICU) was established in 2007 under the Prevent strand of HMG’s CONTEST strategy. RICU aims to understand and counter terrorist and extremist ideologies to reduce the risk to the UK, its citizens, and its interests overseas.

RICU provides analysis on terrorist use of propaganda and exploitation of the internet to inform the UK’s counter-terrorism system. To support this crucial objective RICU undertakes open-source monitoring to better understand the media, online and communications environment as it relates to terrorism and extremism. All RICU data collection and analysis complies with relevant legislation.

The work of RICU is crucial to the delivery of Prevent and has helped to position the UK at the forefront of the battle against terrorist propaganda, particularly online terrorist content. Ministers have authorised RICU’s work since it was established in 2007, and through subsequent updates to the CONTEST strategy (in 2011 and 2018) and regularly receive RICU outputs.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department made an assessment of the level of risk of trafficking as part of its strategy to counter recruitment by (a) ISIS and (b) other groups in the period between 2013 and 2017.

The Government took a number of steps to address the serious risks associated with individuals travelling to Syria to fight for or otherwise support Daesh and other terrorist groups.

Since 2011, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office has advised against all travel to Syria. The police and local authorities distributed over 200,000 leaflets and 30,000 posters, outlining the danger of travel to Syria.

The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 enables police officers at ports to temporarily seize and retain travel documents to disrupt intended travel when they reasonably suspect that a person intends to travel to engage in terrorism-related activity outside the UK. This power was used on 55 occasions between 2015 and 2017 (15 in 2017), and in some cases, has led to longer-term disruptive action. The Royal Prerogative can also be used to refuse a passport application, or withdraw an existing passport, under the public interest criteria. The Royal Prerogative was exercised to deny access to British passport facilities to 84 individuals between 2013 and 2017.

Our Prevent strategy includes work to identify and support individuals at risk of radicalisation. Since the introduction of the Prevent duty in 2015, over 3,000 referrals have resulted in individuals identified as being susceptible to radicalisation receiving support to move away from violent ideologies that could have resulted in harm to themselves, or others.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department (a) issued and (b) used a standard operating procedure to help prevent the trafficking of vulnerable individuals from Britain to Syria by ISIS between 2013 and 2017.

The Government took a number of steps to address the serious risks associated with individuals travelling to Syria to fight for or otherwise support Daesh and other terrorist groups.

Since 2011, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office has advised against all travel to Syria. The police and local authorities distributed over 200,000 leaflets and 30,000 posters, outlining the danger of travel to Syria.

The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 enables police officers at ports to temporarily seize and retain travel documents to disrupt intended travel when they reasonably suspect that a person intends to travel to engage in terrorism-related activity outside the UK. This power was used on 55 occasions between 2015 and 2017 (15 in 2017), and in some cases, has led to longer-term disruptive action. The Royal Prerogative can also be used to refuse a passport application, or withdraw an existing passport, under the public interest criteria. The Royal Prerogative was exercised to deny access to British passport facilities to 84 individuals between 2013 and 2017.

Our Prevent strategy includes work to identify and support individuals at risk of radicalisation. Since the introduction of the Prevent duty in 2015, over 3,000 referrals have resulted in individuals identified as being susceptible to radicalisation receiving support to move away from violent ideologies that could have resulted in harm to themselves, or others.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
15th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she holds any information on how many people traffickers operating in the English Channel the French authorities have (a) arrested and (b) charged in each of the last five years.

The Home Office are not the owners of this information therefore we are unable to provide it.

29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites have been identified in Stratford-on-Avon constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites have been identified in Wyre and Preston North constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites have been identified in Tonbridge and Malling constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites have been identified in Richmond (Yorks) constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Central Devon constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Welwyn Hatfield constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Esher and Walton constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Horsham constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Banbury constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Portsmouth North constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Sutton Coldfield constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Plymouth, Moor View constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Chichester constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Newark constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Dumfries and Galloway constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites in South West Surrey constituency have been identified as temporary housing for asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Daventry constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites in Carmarthen West and South Pembrokeshire constituency have been identified for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites in Forest of Dean constituency have been identified for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites in Surrey Heath constituency have been identified for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites in Salisbury constituency have been identified for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites in Hertsmere constituency have been identified for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites in Chippenham constituency have been identified for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any sites in Monmouth constituency have been identified for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

25th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Suffolk Coastal constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

25th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Braintree constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

25th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Fareham constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

25th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in North East Cambridgeshire constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

25th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has identified any sites in Saffron Walden constituency for the temporary housing of asylum seekers.

Successive years of record numbers crossing the channel has placed our immigration system under substantial pressure. To meet our statutory obligation, we ask our accommodation providers to source accommodation in all areas.

When a site becomes available and meets the requirements of our accommodation standards, we follow our engagement process and notify the local MP as well as local authority officials in advance of using the location.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are housed in Stratford-on-Avon constituency as of 21 November 2022; and how many were housed in that constituency in (a) 2022, (b) 2021, (c) 2020 and (d) 2019.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in a reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are housed in Wyre and Preston North constituency as of 21 November 2022; and how many were housed in that constituency in (a) 2022, (b) 2021, (c) 2020 and (d) 2019.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in a reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are housed in Tonbridge and Malling constituency as of 21 November 2022; and how many were housed in that constituency in (a) 2022, (b) 2021, (c) 2020 and (d) 2019.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in a reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are housed in Richmond (Yorkshire) constituency as of 21 November 2022; and how many were housed in that constituency in (a) 2022, (b) 2021, (c) 2020 and (d) 2019.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in a reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are housed in Central Devon constituency as of 21 November 2022; and how many were housed in that constituency in (a) 2022, (b) 2021, (c) 2020 and (d) 2019.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in a reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are housed in Welwyn Hatfield constituency as of 21 November 2022; and how many were housed in that constituency in (a) 2022, (b) 2021, (c) 2020 and (d) 2019.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in a reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are housed in Esher and Walton constituency as of 21 November 2022; and how many were housed in that constituency in (a) 2022, (b) 2021, (c) 2020 and (d) 2019.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in a reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are housed in Horsham constituency as of 21 November 2022; and how many were housed in that constituency in (a) 2022, (b) 2021, (c) 2020 and (d) 2019.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in a reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are housed in Banbury constituency as of 21 November 2022; and how many were housed in that constituency in (a) 2022, (b) 2021, (c) 2020 and (d) 2019.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in a reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in Portsmouth North constituency (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in Sutton Coldfield constituency (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in Plymouth constituency (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in Chichester constituency (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in Newark constituency (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of Dumfries and Galloway (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of South West Surrey (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of Daventry (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of Carmarthen West and South Pembrokeshire (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of the Forest of Dean and how many were housed in that constituency (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of Surrey Heath (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers accommodated in the constituency of Salisbury (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated ain the constituency of Hertsmere (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of Chippenham (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of Monmouth (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of Suffolk Coastal (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of Braintree (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of Fareham (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in the constituency of North East Cambridgeshire (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers were accommodated in Saffron Walden constituency (a) on 17 November 2022, (b) in 2019, (c) in 2020, (d) in 2021 and (e) in 2022.

The Home Office has a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of how many asylum seekers are accommodated in each constituency. This is as these figures are not available in reportable format, and to provide the information could only be done at a disproportionate cost. However, the latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 25 August 2022, and the next quarterly figures are due to be released later this month.

1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions his Department has had with the Albanian government on the direct and expedited return of Albanian illegal migrants to Albania.

We continue to work extremely closely with our Albanian partners on a range of issues and are committed to building on our co-operation to date, including on tackling illegal migration. That includes the excellent operational collaboration with Albanian law enforcement, and our readmissions agreement signed last year. Since it was signed, we have seen over 1,000 Albanian foreign national offenders and immigration offenders removed from the UK, including some who crossed the channel illegally to come to the UK.

The UK and Albania pledged to fast track the removal of Albanians with no right to be in the UK wherever possible, and to send senior Albanian law enforcement to the UK to speed up processing and share information with our authorities. In co-operation with the Government of Albania, we are taking every opportunity to intercept the activities of organised criminal gangs and people smugglers, and speed up the removal of Albanians and other nationals with no right to be in the UK.

We do face complex challenges to our efforts to facilitate the entirely legitimate and legal return of people in the UK, such as travel documentation, late appeals and other legal challenges aimed at frustrating removals. Most individuals are managed outside of detention using a variety of contact methods, including frequent reporting, and tagging as a condition of immigration bail whilst these challenges are resolved, however detention can, and will also be used, where appropriate. We are looking to address some of these challenges through our Sovereign Borders plan, which aims to remove more easily those with no right to be in the UK.

1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions her Department has had with the French government on trends in the level of Albanian migrants crossing the Channel from France to England.

The UK maintains regular contact with the Government of France on our joint cooperation to tackle illegal migration in order to respond effectively to new and emerging migration challenges including the concerning increase in Albanian nationals arriving by small boat.

The UK is also working in tandem with the Government of Albania to urgently implement new measures to address the current crisis and also longer-term drivers.

We remain committed to engaging with international partners on a ‘whole of route’ approach to addressing the challenges of, and risks posed by, irregular migration.

31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an estimate with Cabinet colleagues of the total cost of providing housing for Albanian migrants in each of the last five years.

The information held is not in the correct format.

31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions her Department has had with police forces on the potential impact of Albanian migrants on crime rates in the UK.

My Rt Hon Friend, the Home Secretary, has regular discussions with senior leaders in the police covering the whole range of issues to do with crime.

The police are operationally independent, and we would expect them to investigate all allegations of crime thoroughly and proportionately.

How police forces spend resources is an operational matter for individual Chief Officers who will decide how to deploy available resources, taking into account any specific local problems and demands.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the National Crime Agency has had recent discussions with law enforcement agencies in Europe on the potential impact that Albanian migrants have had on levels of organised crime in Europe.

HMG’s approach to Western Balkans Serious and Organised Crime aims to limit the impact of high harm Western Balkan (including Albanian) crime groups on the UK and the region itself.

As part of this approach, we work bilaterally and with international partners to disrupt Western Balkans OCGs which operate across the region and transnationally.

The NCA has well established relationships with law enforcement partners across Europe, as well as with Europol and Interpol, which include regular exchanges on Albanian organised crime. The Agency’s International Liaison Officers help reduce the organised crime threat to the UK by working closely with host nation law enforcement and intelligence organisations.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
28th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department considers Albania to be a safe country for the return of illegal migrants.

Albanian Illegal migrants may claim they require international protection. The Home Office has designated Albania as ‘generally safe’ under Section 94 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002. This means that asylum / human rights decision-makers presume an applicant will be safe on return unless the person can show that this does not apply in their particular case.

28th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions her Department has had with its French counterparts on the increasing number of Albanian migrants crossing the Channel.

The UK maintains regular contact with the Government of France on our joint cooperation to tackle illegal migration in order to respond effectively to new and emerging migration challenges including the concerning increase in Albanian nationals arriving by small boat.

The UK is also working in tandem with the Government of Albania to urgently implement new measures to address the current crisis and also longer-term drivers.

We remain committed to engaging with international partners on a ‘whole of route’ approach to addressing the challenges of, and risks posed by, irregular migration.

28th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has had recent discussions with their Albanian counterparts on the return of Albanian illegal migrants to Albania.

We continue to work extremely closely with our Albanian partners on a range of issues and are committed to building on our co-operation to date, including on tackling illegal migration. That includes the excellent operational collaboration with Albanian law enforcement, and our readmissions agreement signed last year. Since it was signed, we have seen over 1,000 Albanian foreign national offenders and immigration offenders removed from the UK, including some who crossed the channel illegally to come to the UK.

The UK and Albania pledged to fast track the removal of Albanians with no right to be in the UK wherever possible, and to send senior Albanian law enforcement to the UK to speed up processing and share information with our authorities. In co-operation with the Government of Albania, we are taking every opportunity to intercept the activities of organised criminal gangs and people smugglers, and speed up the removal of Albanians and other nationals with no right to be in the UK.

We do face complex challenges to our efforts to facilitate the entirely legitimate and legal return of people in the UK, such as travel documentation, late appeals and other legal challenges aimed at frustrating removals. Most individuals are managed outside of detention using a variety of contact methods, including frequent reporting, and tagging as a condition of immigration bail whilst these challenges are resolved, however detention can, and will also be used, where appropriate. We are looking to address some of these challenges through our Sovereign Borders plan, which aims to remove more easily those with no right to be in the UK.

28th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how her Department plans to return Albanian migrants who are in the UK illegally when the movements of those migrants are not limited or tracked while in the UK.

We continue to work extremely closely with our Albanian partners on a range of issues and are committed to building on our co-operation to date, including on tackling illegal migration. That includes the excellent operational collaboration with Albanian law enforcement, and our readmissions agreement signed last year. Since it was signed, we have seen over 1,000 Albanian foreign national offenders and immigration offenders removed from the UK, including some who crossed the channel illegally to come to the UK.

The UK and Albania pledged to fast track the removal of Albanians with no right to be in the UK wherever possible, and to send senior Albanian law enforcement to the UK to speed up processing and share information with our authorities. In co-operation with the Government of Albania, we are taking every opportunity to intercept the activities of organised criminal gangs and people smugglers, and speed up the removal of Albanians and other nationals with no right to be in the UK.

We do face complex challenges to our efforts to facilitate the entirely legitimate and legal return of people in the UK, such as travel documentation, late appeals and other legal challenges aimed at frustrating removals. Most individuals are managed outside of detention using a variety of contact methods, including frequent reporting, and tagging as a condition of immigration bail whilst these challenges are resolved, however detention can, and will also be used, where appropriate. We are looking to address some of these challenges through our Sovereign Borders plan, which aims to remove more easily those with no right to be in the UK.

28th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential impact of the arrival of illegal Albanian migrants on organised crime in the UK.

The government and law enforcement agencies work tirelessly to tackle all organised criminal networks which target the UK. This includes regularly assessing the impact of organised crime on this country to ensure we are best able to meet the changing threats we face. In line with this, the Home Office and our law enforcement partners continually monitor the threat posed by organised crime groups in relation to illegal migration from Albania to support operational and policy decision making.

29th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been extradited from the (a) UK to the US and (b) US to the UK in each year since 2003.

The table below provides a breakdown of extraditions between the UK and the US between 2003 and 2022 (June).

Year

UK to US

US to UK

2003

6

2

2004

8

4

2005

14

1

2006

19

4

2007

9

6

2008

6

10

2009

16

7

2010

12

5

2011

8

5

2012

20

4

2013

11

4

2014

18

0

2015

6

2

2016

8

5

2017

9

2

2018

6

5

2019

10

3

2020

10

2

2021

7

7

2022

2

0

Figures until 30 June 2022.

These figures provide updates on previously provided statistics in respect of years 2006, 2015 and 2017. As previously stated, all figures are from local management information and have not been quality assured to the level of published national statistics. As such they should be treated as provisional.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the nationalities of individuals attempting to illegally cross the English Channel in each month since January 2022 to date.

The Home Office publishes data on small boat arrivals in the ‘Irregular migration to the UK’ release. Data on the top nationalities arriving by small boats is published in table Irr_02b of the ‘Irregular migration summary tables’. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data cover up to March 2022.

Data for April to June 2022 will be published on 25 August 2022. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Official statistics published by the Home Office are kept under review in line with the code of practice for statistics, taking into account a number of factors including user needs, as well as quality and availability of data.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average time taken is for UK Visas and Immigration to process a visa application.

UKVI offers a range of service levels for applications which include Standard service (15 working days), Priority service (5 working days), and Super Priority service (next day) after a customer has provided their biometrics.

UKVI made a decision to prioritise the Ukraine Schemes following the invasion of Ukraine by Russia. Resources are now being returned to focus on visa routes impacted by these prioritisation decisions which will reduce average processing times in due course.

We continue to prioritise any urgent compelling or compassionate cases across all workstreams and are working to reduce the current processing times as quickly as possible.

For Standard applications lodged outside the UK, the current average processing time is as follows:

  • Visitors – 6 weeks
  • Students – 5 weeks
  • Work – 5 weeks
  • Joining Family – up to 24 weeks

Further information can be found at Visa decision waiting times: applications outside the UK - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) and this is regularly updated.

For Standard applications lodged inside the UK, the current average processing times are not published though all routes are currently within the published service standards which are:

  • Switching/Extending a Student, Family, Ancestry, Work, Visitor, or Graduate Visa – 8 weeks
  • Switching/Extending a Hong Kong British National (Overseas) Visa – 12 weeks
  • Applying for Settlement - within 6 months

Further information is published at Visa decision waiting times: applications inside the UK - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of visa applications initiated with UK Visas and Immigration were resolved within (a) two weeks, (b) four weeks, (c) eight weeks, (d) 12 weeks and (e) more than 12 weeks in the calendar year 2022.

The Home Office does not publish data on which applications are resolved within two weeks, four weeks, eight weeks, 12 weeks or more than 12 weeks. To capture this data would exceed cost threshold.

It does publish data of its performance against its service level agreement, which can be found on the GOV.UK webpage: Migration transparency data - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of visa applications initiated with UK Visas and Immigration were resolved within (a) two weeks, (b) four weeks, (c) eight weeks, (d) 12 weeks and (e) more than 12 weeks in each year between 2018 and 2022.

The Home Office does not publish data on which applications are resolved within two weeks, four weeks, eight weeks, 12 weeks or more than 12 weeks. To capture this data would exceed cost threshold.

It does publish data of its performance against its service level agreement, which can be found on the GOV.UK webpage: Migration transparency data - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of cases initiated with the Passport Office were resolved within (a) two weeks, (b) four weeks, (c) eight weeks, (d) 12 weeks and (e) more than 12 weeks in each year between 2018 and 2022.

Since April 2021, people have been advised to allow up to ten weeks when applying for their British passport as more than 5 million people delayed applying due to the pandemic.

Between March and May, 98.5% of UK applications processed were completed within ten weeks.

13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of passport applications initiated with the Passport Office were resolved within (a) two weeks, (b) four weeks, (c) eight weeks, (d) 12 weeks and (e) more than 12 weeks in the calendar year 2022.

Prior to 6 April 2021, the published processing times for standard applications from the UK were six weeks for over-16s applying for their first British passport, and three weeks for all other application types.

Since this date, people have been advised to allow up to ten weeks when applying for their British passport as more than 5 million people delayed applying due to the pandemic.

Between March and May 2022, 98.5% of UK applications processed were completed within ten weeks.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to publish the review into Tier 1 Investor visas, announced on 26 March 2018.

On 17 February the Home Secretary laid a Statement of changes to the Immigration Rules closing the Tier 1 (Investor) route to new entrants with immediate effect.

The review of historic applications under the route is being finalised and it is our aim to publish it in the near future.

12th Jul 2021
What recent progress she has made with the Secretary of State for Defence on implementing the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy.

The Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy was implemented on 1 April this year.

We are working closely with the Ministry of Defence to accelerate the relocation of locally employed staff, and their families, from Afghanistan. A charter flight carrying 117 individuals arrived safely at the end of June, with more to follow this month.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment her Department has made of the eligibility of Humberside for funding for Violence Reduction Units.

We have invested £105.5m over three years into the Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) programme, establishing and developing 18 VRUs in the areas worst affected by serious violence. The minimum allocation any one VRU receives each financial year is £880,000. VRUs do not operate in a single form, therefore costs associated with their operations vary significantly; however, funding made available through the programme has been sufficient to allow for the establishment and sustainment of a range of VRU operating models.

These 18 areas have been selected for funding based on their volumes of hospital admissions relating to injury with a sharp object, which represents the most consistent and reliable data source for serious violence. Collectively, these areas have accounted for 80% of total relevant admissions, allowing VRU funding to focus on a significant majority of the serious violence problem across England and Wales.

A review of this data informed the most recent decisions about VRU funding made in February 2021. At this point, the available data demonstrated that the Humberside police force area, which includes the constituency of Haltemprice and Howden and county of East Riding of Yorkshire, did not feature in the ranked list of areas experiencing the greatest volume of hospital admissions for injury with a sharp object that collectively accounts for 80% of said admissions (i.e. the top 18 force areas, of which Humberside was not one, collectively accounted for 80% of relevant admissions). On this occasion, Ministers determined not to provide funding from the Serious Violence fund for Humberside.

Future VRU funding for currently eligible and ineligible areas, and any potential allocation models, will be carefully considered in the context of Departmental priorities through the upcoming Spending Review process.

Further information on the levels of police recorded crime within Haltemprice and Howden and/or East Riding of Yorkshire can be found in the Open Data Tables, available here: Police recorded crime and outcomes open data tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The Home Office collects and publishes this information at the CSP level; information on offences involving firearms or knives are available at the Police Force Area level from the same link.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment her Department has made of the level of serious violence in (a) Haltemprice and Howden, (b) East Riding of Yorkshire and (C) Humberside.

We have invested £105.5m over three years into the Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) programme, establishing and developing 18 VRUs in the areas worst affected by serious violence. The minimum allocation any one VRU receives each financial year is £880,000. VRUs do not operate in a single form, therefore costs associated with their operations vary significantly; however, funding made available through the programme has been sufficient to allow for the establishment and sustainment of a range of VRU operating models.

These 18 areas have been selected for funding based on their volumes of hospital admissions relating to injury with a sharp object, which represents the most consistent and reliable data source for serious violence. Collectively, these areas have accounted for 80% of total relevant admissions, allowing VRU funding to focus on a significant majority of the serious violence problem across England and Wales.

A review of this data informed the most recent decisions about VRU funding made in February 2021. At this point, the available data demonstrated that the Humberside police force area, which includes the constituency of Haltemprice and Howden and county of East Riding of Yorkshire, did not feature in the ranked list of areas experiencing the greatest volume of hospital admissions for injury with a sharp object that collectively accounts for 80% of said admissions (i.e. the top 18 force areas, of which Humberside was not one, collectively accounted for 80% of relevant admissions). On this occasion, Ministers determined not to provide funding from the Serious Violence fund for Humberside.

Future VRU funding for currently eligible and ineligible areas, and any potential allocation models, will be carefully considered in the context of Departmental priorities through the upcoming Spending Review process.

Further information on the levels of police recorded crime within Haltemprice and Howden and/or East Riding of Yorkshire can be found in the Open Data Tables, available here: Police recorded crime and outcomes open data tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The Home Office collects and publishes this information at the CSP level; information on offences involving firearms or knives are available at the Police Force Area level from the same link.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of updating the areas eligible for Violence Reduction Unit funding.

We have invested £105.5m over three years into the Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) programme, establishing and developing 18 VRUs in the areas worst affected by serious violence. The minimum allocation any one VRU receives each financial year is £880,000. VRUs do not operate in a single form, therefore costs associated with their operations vary significantly; however, funding made available through the programme has been sufficient to allow for the establishment and sustainment of a range of VRU operating models.

These 18 areas have been selected for funding based on their volumes of hospital admissions relating to injury with a sharp object, which represents the most consistent and reliable data source for serious violence. Collectively, these areas have accounted for 80% of total relevant admissions, allowing VRU funding to focus on a significant majority of the serious violence problem across England and Wales.

A review of this data informed the most recent decisions about VRU funding made in February 2021. At this point, the available data demonstrated that the Humberside police force area, which includes the constituency of Haltemprice and Howden and county of East Riding of Yorkshire, did not feature in the ranked list of areas experiencing the greatest volume of hospital admissions for injury with a sharp object that collectively accounts for 80% of said admissions (i.e. the top 18 force areas, of which Humberside was not one, collectively accounted for 80% of relevant admissions). On this occasion, Ministers determined not to provide funding from the Serious Violence fund for Humberside.

Future VRU funding for currently eligible and ineligible areas, and any potential allocation models, will be carefully considered in the context of Departmental priorities through the upcoming Spending Review process.

Further information on the levels of police recorded crime within Haltemprice and Howden and/or East Riding of Yorkshire can be found in the Open Data Tables, available here: Police recorded crime and outcomes open data tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The Home Office collects and publishes this information at the CSP level; information on offences involving firearms or knives are available at the Police Force Area level from the same link.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what data her Department uses in determining which areas receive funding for Violence Reduction Units.

We have invested £105.5m over three years into the Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) programme, establishing and developing 18 VRUs in the areas worst affected by serious violence. The minimum allocation any one VRU receives each financial year is £880,000. VRUs do not operate in a single form, therefore costs associated with their operations vary significantly; however, funding made available through the programme has been sufficient to allow for the establishment and sustainment of a range of VRU operating models.

These 18 areas have been selected for funding based on their volumes of hospital admissions relating to injury with a sharp object, which represents the most consistent and reliable data source for serious violence. Collectively, these areas have accounted for 80% of total relevant admissions, allowing VRU funding to focus on a significant majority of the serious violence problem across England and Wales.

A review of this data informed the most recent decisions about VRU funding made in February 2021. At this point, the available data demonstrated that the Humberside police force area, which includes the constituency of Haltemprice and Howden and county of East Riding of Yorkshire, did not feature in the ranked list of areas experiencing the greatest volume of hospital admissions for injury with a sharp object that collectively accounts for 80% of said admissions (i.e. the top 18 force areas, of which Humberside was not one, collectively accounted for 80% of relevant admissions). On this occasion, Ministers determined not to provide funding from the Serious Violence fund for Humberside.

Future VRU funding for currently eligible and ineligible areas, and any potential allocation models, will be carefully considered in the context of Departmental priorities through the upcoming Spending Review process.

Further information on the levels of police recorded crime within Haltemprice and Howden and/or East Riding of Yorkshire can be found in the Open Data Tables, available here: Police recorded crime and outcomes open data tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The Home Office collects and publishes this information at the CSP level; information on offences involving firearms or knives are available at the Police Force Area level from the same link.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment her Department has made of the adequacy of funding for Violence Reduction Units.

We have invested £105.5m over three years into the Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) programme, establishing and developing 18 VRUs in the areas worst affected by serious violence. The minimum allocation any one VRU receives each financial year is £880,000. VRUs do not operate in a single form, therefore costs associated with their operations vary significantly; however, funding made available through the programme has been sufficient to allow for the establishment and sustainment of a range of VRU operating models.

These 18 areas have been selected for funding based on their volumes of hospital admissions relating to injury with a sharp object, which represents the most consistent and reliable data source for serious violence. Collectively, these areas have accounted for 80% of total relevant admissions, allowing VRU funding to focus on a significant majority of the serious violence problem across England and Wales.

A review of this data informed the most recent decisions about VRU funding made in February 2021. At this point, the available data demonstrated that the Humberside police force area, which includes the constituency of Haltemprice and Howden and county of East Riding of Yorkshire, did not feature in the ranked list of areas experiencing the greatest volume of hospital admissions for injury with a sharp object that collectively accounts for 80% of said admissions (i.e. the top 18 force areas, of which Humberside was not one, collectively accounted for 80% of relevant admissions). On this occasion, Ministers determined not to provide funding from the Serious Violence fund for Humberside.

Future VRU funding for currently eligible and ineligible areas, and any potential allocation models, will be carefully considered in the context of Departmental priorities through the upcoming Spending Review process.

Further information on the levels of police recorded crime within Haltemprice and Howden and/or East Riding of Yorkshire can be found in the Open Data Tables, available here: Police recorded crime and outcomes open data tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The Home Office collects and publishes this information at the CSP level; information on offences involving firearms or knives are available at the Police Force Area level from the same link.

16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of people on pre-charge bail for over 12 months in 2019-20 are under investigation by the National Crime Agency.

The Home Office collect and publish data on the number of individuals on pre-charge bail and the length of pre-charge bail. The data are published as part of ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ publication, available in Annex B: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2020

However, data on the proportion of individuals on pre-charge bail under investigation by the National Crime Agency are not available.

13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to reduce the length of time that suspects are held on pre-charge bail.

Following public consultation, we are legislating in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill to adjust the timescales to better reflect operational realities, while retaining the important independent oversight of the court within the process. Magistrates will continue to make key decisions on more complex, lengthier cases.

The Government is committed to restoring confidence in the criminal justice system and there is significant activity under way to increase the speed, capacity, and efficiency of every stage of a case. The Crown Prosecution Service, National Police Chief’s Council and College of Policing have recently published the Case Progression Commitment which outlines the measures that will be taken to improve efficient case progression.

As part of the government’s recruitment drive which will increase the police’s capacity, police forces have already hired nearly 9,000 officers from its target to recruit 20,000 by 2023.

12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how long on average a National Crime Agency investigation takes before a charging decision is made in cases where a suspect has been released on bail.

The amount of time taken for an investigation and a charging decision to be reached can vary depending on the case and its complexity. The NCA will always look to complete work as quickly as possible. However, NCA cases are by their very nature complex and the new Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill specifically recognises this in Schedule 4 of the Bill. It makes amendments relating to pre-charge bail and several of the amendments have the effect of recognising NCA cases as ‘exceptionally complex’ and increasing the time limits on pre-charge detention before authorisation must be sought for extensions.

12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions individuals have been held on police bail for over five years in the last (a) one year, (b) two years, (c) three years, (d) four years and (e) five years.

The Home Office collect and publish data on use of various police powers, including pre-charge bail. Information has been collected on the number of individuals on pre-charge bail and the length of pre-charge bail since April 2017. The data are published as part of the annual ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical release, available in Annex B:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

However, data on other types of police bail are not available.

12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions individuals have been held on police bail for over three years in the last (a) one year, (b) two years, (c) three years, (d) four years and (e) five years.

The Home Office collect and publish data on use of various police powers, including pre-charge bail. Information has been collected on the number of individuals on pre-charge bail and the length of pre-charge bail since April 2017. The data are published as part of the annual ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical release, available in Annex B:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

However, data on other types of police bail are not available.

12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions individuals have been held on police bail for over 12 months in the last (a) one year, (b) two years, (c) three years, (d) four years, (e) five years and (f) six or more years.

The Home Office collect and publish data on use of various police powers, including pre-charge bail. Information has been collected on the number of individuals on pre-charge bail and the length of pre-charge bail since April 2017. The data are published as part of the annual ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical release, available in Annex B:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

However, data on other types of police bail are not available.

12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people currently being held on police bail have been so held for over (a) one year, (b) two years, (c) three years, (d) four years and (e) five or more years.

The Home Office collect and publish data on use of various police powers, including pre-charge bail. Information has been collected on the number of individuals on pre-charge bail and the length of pre-charge bail since April 2017. The data are published as part of the annual ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical release, available in Annex B:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

However, data on other types of police bail are not available.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding has been (a) allocated and (b) budgeted for trials collecting Internet Connection Records.

The acquisition and retention of Internet Connection Records (ICRs) is provided for in the Investigatory Powers Act 2016. ICRs are subject to restrictions set out in the Act and can only be acquired for the specific investigative purposes set out in Section 62.

Acquisition of ICRs in the vast majority of cases is subject to independent authorisation by the Office for Communications Data Authorisations. The use of communications data is subject to the oversight of the Investigatory Powers Commissioner (IPC).

It is longstanding government policy not to disclose the specific communications data (CD) acquired by public authorities or retained by telecommunications operators under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) and its predecessors. This would include details of any data to be acquired or retained and the details of any Telecommunications Operators involved in any trial.

It would be operationally and commercially sensitive to disclose the funding allocations for a trial or any other use of investigatory powers.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what data has been (a) collected and (b) stored as part of the two trials collecting Internet Connection Records.

The acquisition and retention of Internet Connection Records (ICRs) is provided for in the Investigatory Powers Act 2016. ICRs are subject to restrictions set out in the Act and can only be acquired for the specific investigative purposes set out in Section 62.

Acquisition of ICRs in the vast majority of cases is subject to independent authorisation by the Office for Communications Data Authorisations. The use of communications data is subject to the oversight of the Investigatory Powers Commissioner (IPC).

It is longstanding government policy not to disclose the specific communications data (CD) acquired by public authorities or retained by telecommunications operators under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) and its predecessors. This would include details of any data to be acquired or retained and the details of any Telecommunications Operators involved in any trial.

It would be operationally and commercially sensitive to disclose the funding allocations for a trial or any other use of investigatory powers.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the legal basis is for the trials recording the Internet Connection Records of their customers, including any relevant sections of applicable legislation.

The acquisition and retention of Internet Connection Records (ICRs) is provided for in the Investigatory Powers Act 2016. ICRs are subject to restrictions set out in the Act and can only be acquired for the specific investigative purposes set out in Section 62.

Acquisition of ICRs in the vast majority of cases is subject to independent authorisation by the Office for Communications Data Authorisations. The use of communications data is subject to the oversight of the Investigatory Powers Commissioner (IPC).

It is longstanding government policy not to disclose the specific communications data (CD) acquired by public authorities or retained by telecommunications operators under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) and its predecessors. This would include details of any data to be acquired or retained and the details of any Telecommunications Operators involved in any trial.

It would be operationally and commercially sensitive to disclose the funding allocations for a trial or any other use of investigatory powers.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish details of the two internet service providers that are reported to be conducting trials with her Department and National Crime Agency with the intention to collect Internet Connection Records.

The acquisition and retention of Internet Connection Records (ICRs) is provided for in the Investigatory Powers Act 2016. ICRs are subject to restrictions set out in the Act and can only be acquired for the specific investigative purposes set out in Section 62.

Acquisition of ICRs in the vast majority of cases is subject to independent authorisation by the Office for Communications Data Authorisations. The use of communications data is subject to the oversight of the Investigatory Powers Commissioner (IPC).

It is longstanding government policy not to disclose the specific communications data (CD) acquired by public authorities or retained by telecommunications operators under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) and its predecessors. This would include details of any data to be acquired or retained and the details of any Telecommunications Operators involved in any trial.

It would be operationally and commercially sensitive to disclose the funding allocations for a trial or any other use of investigatory powers.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to limit the use of child sources in criminal investigations.

Young people under 18 years of age are only deployed as Covert Human Intelligence Sources (CHIS) in extremely rare and exceptional circumstances and are authorised in very small numbers.

For example, the Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office (IPCO) confirmed that between January 2015 and December 2018, there were only 17 instances where law enforcement bodies deployed under 18s as CHIS.

In his response on this issue to the Joint Committee on Human Rights, the then Investigatory Powers Commissioner noted that in the “vast majority of cases” deployment of young people as CHIS is only considered “when the juvenile is already engaged in the relevant criminality or is a member of a criminal gang, and that they are not asked to participate in activity that they were not already undertaking.”

While investigators may wish to avoid the use of young people as CHIS, we must recognise that some young people are involved in serious crimes, as perpetrators and victims. Consequently, young people may have unique access to information that is important in preventing and prosecuting gang violence and terrorism. This includes the troubling ‘county lines’ phenomenon which, along with the associated violence, drug dealing and exploitation, has a devastating impact on young people, vulnerable adults and local communities.

Those operating these powers have a duty to ensure they promote the best interests of the young person as a primary consideration. Extensive guidance and enhanced safeguards exist to ensure that the powers are used appropriately, and that young people are suitably safeguarded.

13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the compliance rate for travel quarantine rules.

A robust system is in place for ensuring the compliance of those who should be self-isolating after travelling to the country. In the vast majority of cases, the public are complying with these measures. However, where we cannot confirm this is the case, referrals are made to the police who will follow up with the individuals directly.

On 30 September, the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) published its latest report on the police use of Covid-19 enforcement notices issued under all emergency health protections. The report showed that up to 22 September, 4,114 case referrals from public health authorities were accepted by police forces in England and Wales relating to the isolation status of a member of the public following travel, under the International Travel Regulations. Of these, 3,216 cases investigated by officers found the individual to be complying with the regulations, with no further action being necessary.

In addition, in the period from 8 June to 14 October, 18 Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) have been issued by Border Force for failure by individuals to provide information at the border.

21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with police forces on information and intelligence obtained from Uber.

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.

21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions Uber has provided information to police forces in (a) 2016, (b) 2017, (c) 2018, (d) 2019 and (e) 2020.

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.

21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the necessary warrants have been in place for the sharing of information between Uber and police forces in (a) 2016, (b) 2017, (c) 2018, (d) 2019 and (e) 2020.

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.

21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what role her Department has played in any data sharing agreements made between police forces and Uber.

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.

21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the legal basis is for the sharing of intelligence from Uber to police forces without the prior granting of a warrant.

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.

1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure appointments to the roles of the (a) Surveillance Camera Commissioner and (b) Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material are done so (a) fairly, openly and transparently and (b) within the other requirements set out by the Government’s Governance Code on Public Appointments.

The appointment of a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material is under consideration and will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and take account of any possible implications for legal proceedings.

We are committed to empowering the police to use technologies like biometrics within a strict legal framework and will update parliament on our plans shortly.

1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has for the future of the roles of (a) Surveillance Camera Commissioner and (b) Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material.

The appointment of a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material is under consideration and will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and take account of any possible implications for legal proceedings.

We are committed to empowering the police to use technologies like biometrics within a strict legal framework and will update parliament on our plans shortly.

1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has made an assessment of the implications for ongoing legal proceedings of a change in office holder for the Surveillance Camera Commissioner.

The appointment of a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material is under consideration and will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and take account of any possible implications for legal proceedings.

We are committed to empowering the police to use technologies like biometrics within a strict legal framework and will update parliament on our plans shortly.

29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions she has had with her officials on the recruitment process for the roles of the (a) Surveillance Camera Commissioner and (b) Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material.

The process to appoint a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material, will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and is under consideration including consultation with the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/578498/governance_code_on_public_appointments_16_12_2016.pdf

As set out in the Governance Code, Ministers are consulted about all the possible recruitment options.

29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she discussed the forthcoming appointments of the (a) Surveillance Camera Commissioner and (b) Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material with the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

The process to appoint a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material, will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and is under consideration including consultation with the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/578498/governance_code_on_public_appointments_16_12_2016.pdf

As set out in the Governance Code, Ministers are consulted about all the possible recruitment options.

29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to enable the appointments of the (a) Surveillance Camera Commissioner and (b) Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material when the current post holders terms conclude.

The process to appoint a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material, will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and is under consideration including consultation with the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/578498/governance_code_on_public_appointments_16_12_2016.pdf

As set out in the Governance Code, Ministers are consulted about all the possible recruitment options.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the Investigatory Powers Commissioner's Office's ability to effectively oversee the Intelligence Services.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner (IPC) recently published its annual report for 2018. The report includes comprehensive data on the IPC office’s structures and processes for overseeing the Intelligence Services.

It also includes specific chapters on each of the main UK intelligence agencies. The Prime Minister commended this report to both Houses on 5 March.

The report demonstrates the high quality of oversight of our intelligence and security agencies. The Home Office maintains regular contact with the IPC and his office at Ministerial and official level to ensure that they are resourced and equipped to carry out its statutory duties.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) Technical Capability Notices and (b) National Security Notices have been issued in each year since 2016.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 allows the Government to place obligations on telecommunications operators or postal operators through a Technical Capability Notice or National Security Notice.

The Act governs these notices and provides extensive privacy safeguards and a robust oversight regime, including approval of notices by an independent Judicial Commissioner.

For reasons of national security, it would be not be appropriate to disclose the number of Technical Capability Notices and National Security Notices issued.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to regulate the use of facial recognition technology by the Metropolitan Police.

The High Court found in September 2019 that there is a clear and sufficient legal framework for police use of live facial recognition technology. The framework includes police common law powers to protect the public, data protection and human rights legislation and the Surveillance Camera Code of Practice. This means they can only use it for a policing purpose where necessary and proportionate.

28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people were extradited from the US to the UK for (a) violent and (b) non-violent crimes in each year since 2003.

Since 2003, the following have been extradited from the US to the UK:

Year

Total number extradited

Total number extradited for non-violent offences

2003

2

1

2004

4

1

2005

1

1

2006

4

2

2007

6

3

2008

10

1

2009

7

1

2010

5

3

2011

5

1

2012

4

2

2013

4

0

2014

0

0

2015

2

0

2016

5

2

2017

2

0

2018

5

3

2019

3

0

2020

1

1

TOTAL

70

22

We have taken non-violent offences to include:

  • Fraud
  • Drug related offences
  • Theft
  • Forgery
  • Money laundering
  • Handling stolen goods
  • Obtaining property by deception
  • Tax evasion
  • Unlicensed exporting of goods
  • Obstruction of justice
  • Bribery
  • Robbery
  • Child Abduction

All figures are from local management information, and have not been quality assured to the level of published National Statistics. As such they should be treated as provisional and therefore subject to change. The figures do not include Scotland, which deals with its own extradition cases.

21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, under what circumstances the Government is able to remove the citizenship of a UK national who does not have access to a secondary citizenship.

Section 40 of the British Nationality Act (BNA) 1981 provides for the deprivation of British citizenship.

A decision to deprive British citizenship on the ground it is conducive to the public good can only be made if the person would not be left stateless. Where a deprivation decision is made on the ground it is conducive to the public good because the person has conducted themselves in a manner which is seriously prejudicial to the vital interests of the UK, the Secretary of State must have reasonable grounds for believing the person can become a national of another country.

There is no requirement for a person to have access to another citizenship where a decision to deprive British citizenship is made on the grounds it was obtained by means of fraud, false representation or concealment of a material fact.

UK deprivation legislation is compliant with the 1961 UN Convention on Statelessness.

21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been extradited from the (a) UK to the US and (b) US to the UK in each year since 2003.

The table below provides a breakdown of extraditions between the UK and the US between 2003 and 2019.

Year

UK to US

US to UK

2003

6

2

2004

8

4

2005

14

1

2006

15

4

2007

9

6

2008

6

10

2009

16

7

2010

12

5

2011

8

5

2012

20

4

2013

11

4

2014

18

0

2015

7

2

2016

8

5

2017

8

2

2018

6

5

2019

10

3

All figures are from local management information and have not been quality assured to the level of published National Statistics. As such they should be treated as provisional and therefore subject to change. The figures do not include Scotland, which deals with its own extradition cases.

16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what his Department's policy is on recording identify theft as a crime.

The theft of another person’s identity is often a pre-cursor to fraud. However, the use of that identity is not itself a recordable crime. A crime is recorded when a financial gain is made from the use of the person’s identity (i.e. when a fraud has taken place). This approach ensures that crimes are not double counted.

6th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the Government's counter-disinformation strategy.

I regularly discuss the Government’s counter-disinformation strategy with Ministerial colleagues as part of routine cross-Government meetings.

30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, which Minister or official authorised the 77th Brigade to collect data related to public statements, social media and internet activity as part of its work.

77th Brigade was created in 2015 and conducts information operations, including information activity and outreach, across a range of disciplines. This includes collecting, creating, and disseminating digital and wider media content in support of designated tasks. Like many Armed Forces units, 77th Brigade supported the national response to the COVID-19 pandemic and provided support to the Department for Culture, Media, and Sport, who were working to counter disinformation.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he is taking to improve his Department's guidance on the use and installation of Hikvision cameras to reduce their use by other government bodies.

The Ministry of Defence has not issued guidance to other Government Departments about the use of these surveillance cameras. As has been the case under successive Governments, it is not Defence policy to comment on our security arrangements on national security grounds (including details on which products or services are used).

7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the behavioural analysis capabilities are of the security camera systems installed across the defence estate.

As has been the case under successive Governments, it is not Defence policy to comment on our security arrangements on national security grounds (including details on which products or services are used).

7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the facial recognition capabilities are of the security camera systems installed across the defence estate.

As has been the case under successive Governments, it is not Defence policy to comment on our security arrangements on national security grounds (including details on which products or services are used).

21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he has taken to support employment at BAE Systems in Brough.

While employment at Brough is a matter for BAE Systems, the Ministry of Defence remains engaged with the company to understand its plans for the site. Export growth is particularly important for sustaining jobs, which is why the Ministry of Defence continues to work closely with BAE Systems and other Government Departments in pursuit of various export opportunities.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to criminalise the behaviour of developers who (a) falsify information and (b) are dishonest about their compliance with fire safety standards.

Where a developer dishonestly falsifies information of any kind with a view to profiting from it, that would be likely to constitute an offence of fraud by false representation under the Fraud Act 2006.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much funding the Government has allocated to new social housing in each year since 2010.

The Government is committed to increasing the supply of social housing and has made £9 billion available through the Affordable Homes Programme to March 2022 to deliver approximately 250,000 new affordable homes in a wide range of tenures.

The table below provides details on affordable homes programme funding since 2010. This data may also be found in the public domain at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-oscar-publishing-from-the-database

Financial Year

Affordable Homes Programme Expenditure

2010/11

£2,660,493,213

2011/12

£1,431,994,000

2012/13

£1,136,633,000

2013/14

£1,219,494,000

2014/15

£1,342,398,000

2015/16

£1,256,863,000

2016/17

£747,333,000

2017/18

£1,308,730,000

2018/19

£1,670,312,000

The way in which our delivery partners Homes England and the Greater London Authority allocate this funding across the country is publicly available. To view the further allocations across England regions and local authorities please see the following:

27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average length of time has been between (a) an application for a warrant and (b) a hearing to decide the issuing of that warrant under section 26 of the Theft Act 1968 in each of the last five calendar years.

This information is not collected or collated. The procedure for applying for warrants is designed to provide timely access to the courts as required by applicant law enforcement agencies.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the potential (a) security and (b) other effects of the merger between Three and Vodafone on (i) his Department's and (ii) his Department's agencies and bodies' contracts with Vodafone.

As an open economy, this Government welcomes and encourages investment where it supports the Prime Minister’s goal of boosting UK growth and jobs, meets our stringent legal and regulatory requirements, and does not compromise our national security. The Government has robust powers under the National Security & Investment Act, which it introduced, to block or impose remedies on transactions that pose a national security risk.

As you will appreciate, we cannot comment on specific acquisitions nor the applicability of the National Security and Investment regime.

It is the responsibility of Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) to assess the impact on consumers and competition in the market, with input from sectoral regulators.

The Investment Security Unit works closely with the Competition and Markets Authority on cases that are being considered for both national security and competition reasons. A memorandum of understanding has been agreed between the Investment Security Unit and the CMA to assist joint working: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/operation-of-the-national-security-and-investment-act-2021-memorandum-of-understanding/mou-between-beis-and-the-cma-on-the-operation-of-the-national-security-and-investment-act-2021.

The Ministry of Justice does not believe that there will be any effects on the current contracts that it has with Vodafone.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of lasting power of attorney applications initiated with the Office of the Public Guardian were resolved within (a) two weeks, (b) four weeks, (c) eight weeks, (d) 12 weeks and (e) more than 12 weeks in the calendar year 2022.

The current average time to register a lasting power of attorney (LPA) is 81.8 days. The Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) target to register LPAs is 40 days. It should be noted that the OPG must carry out checks on receipt of the LPA before notices are issued, and then must observe a statutory waiting period of 4 weeks to allow for objections before the registration process can be completed. This statutory waiting period cannot be waived and is included in the calculation for the number of days to register an LPA. We know the delays are frustrating for customers and we are committed to reducing the time it is currently taking to register LPAs.

OPG staff are working day and night to tackle the Covid backlog. Frontline operational staff whose role requires them to be office-based have worked in the office throughout the pandemic and continue to do so. The OPG rapidly changed working practices and processes during the pandemic to continue to deliver their services. In 2020 to 2021, the OPG processed an average of 53,000 LPA applications per month despite the many restrictions in place. This rose to an average of 60,000 per month in the last financial year, reaching over 70,000 in March 2022. The OPG have also hired extra staff, which is having an impact, with the number of LPAs being registered each month back to what it was before the pandemic.

The below table details the proportion of the lasting powers of attorney (LPA) registered between 2018 and 2022 within each of the timeframes.

LPAs registered within:

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2 weeks

0%

0%

0%

0%

4 weeks

0%

0%

0%

0%

8 weeks

91.2%

58.8%

1.2%

0.3%

12 weeks

8%

40%

65%

25.4%

Over 12 weeks

0.8%

1.2%

33.8%

74.3%

The below table details the proportion of the lasting powers of attorney (LPA) registered within 2022 (1st January to 31st May).

LPAs registered within:

In the calendar year of 2022 (1st Jan up until 31st May)

2 weeks

0%

4 weeks

0%

8 weeks

0.2%

12 weeks

0.8%

Over 12 weeks

99%

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of lasting power of attorney applications initiated with the Office of the Public Guardian were resolved within (a) two weeks, (b) four weeks, (c) eight weeks, (d) 12 weeks and (e) more than 12 weeks in each year between 2018 and 2022.

The current average time to register a lasting power of attorney (LPA) is 81.8 days. The Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) target to register LPAs is 40 days. It should be noted that the OPG must carry out checks on receipt of the LPA before notices are issued, and then must observe a statutory waiting period of 4 weeks to allow for objections before the registration process can be completed. This statutory waiting period cannot be waived and is included in the calculation for the number of days to register an LPA. We know the delays are frustrating for customers and we are committed to reducing the time it is currently taking to register LPAs.

OPG staff are working day and night to tackle the Covid backlog. Frontline operational staff whose role requires them to be office-based have worked in the office throughout the pandemic and continue to do so. The OPG rapidly changed working practices and processes during the pandemic to continue to deliver their services. In 2020 to 2021, the OPG processed an average of 53,000 LPA applications per month despite the many restrictions in place. This rose to an average of 60,000 per month in the last financial year, reaching over 70,000 in March 2022. The OPG have also hired extra staff, which is having an impact, with the number of LPAs being registered each month back to what it was before the pandemic.

The below table details the proportion of the lasting powers of attorney (LPA) registered between 2018 and 2022 within each of the timeframes.

LPAs registered within:

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2 weeks

0%

0%

0%

0%

4 weeks

0%

0%

0%

0%

8 weeks

91.2%

58.8%

1.2%

0.3%

12 weeks

8%

40%

65%

25.4%

Over 12 weeks

0.8%

1.2%

33.8%

74.3%

The below table details the proportion of the lasting powers of attorney (LPA) registered within 2022 (1st January to 31st May).

LPAs registered within:

In the calendar year of 2022 (1st Jan up until 31st May)

2 weeks

0%

4 weeks

0%

8 weeks

0.2%

12 weeks

0.8%

Over 12 weeks

99%

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average time is for the Office of the Public Guardian to approve a lasting power of attorney.

The current average time to register a lasting power of attorney (LPA) is 81.8 days. The Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) target to register LPAs is 40 days. It should be noted that the OPG must carry out checks on receipt of the LPA before notices are issued, and then must observe a statutory waiting period of 4 weeks to allow for objections before the registration process can be completed. This statutory waiting period cannot be waived and is included in the calculation for the number of days to register an LPA. We know the delays are frustrating for customers and we are committed to reducing the time it is currently taking to register LPAs.

OPG staff are working day and night to tackle the Covid backlog. Frontline operational staff whose role requires them to be office-based have worked in the office throughout the pandemic and continue to do so. The OPG rapidly changed working practices and processes during the pandemic to continue to deliver their services. In 2020 to 2021, the OPG processed an average of 53,000 LPA applications per month despite the many restrictions in place. This rose to an average of 60,000 per month in the last financial year, reaching over 70,000 in March 2022. The OPG have also hired extra staff, which is having an impact, with the number of LPAs being registered each month back to what it was before the pandemic.

The below table details the proportion of the lasting powers of attorney (LPA) registered between 2018 and 2022 within each of the timeframes.

LPAs registered within:

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2 weeks

0%

0%

0%

0%

4 weeks

0%

0%

0%

0%

8 weeks

91.2%

58.8%

1.2%

0.3%

12 weeks

8%

40%

65%

25.4%

Over 12 weeks

0.8%

1.2%

33.8%

74.3%

The below table details the proportion of the lasting powers of attorney (LPA) registered within 2022 (1st January to 31st May).

LPAs registered within:

In the calendar year of 2022 (1st Jan up until 31st May)

2 weeks

0%

4 weeks

0%

8 weeks

0.2%

12 weeks

0.8%

Over 12 weeks

99%

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on what (a) public interest grounds and (b) risk assessment evidence Jeremy Bamber remains in prison, in the context of his sentence in 1986 to life imprisonment with a minimum term of 25 years.

HMPPS has an obligation to protect the public by preventin