David Davis Portrait

David Davis

Conservative - Haltemprice and Howden

3 APPG memberships (as of 25 Aug 2021)
Deliberative Democracy, Future of Work, Trafficked Britons in Syria
3 Former APPG memberships
Drones, Responsible Tax, Social Integration
Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union
13th Jul 2016 - 8th Jul 2018
Shadow Secretary of State (Home Office)
10th Nov 2003 - 12th Jun 2008
Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice (also Shadow Minister for London)
23rd Jul 2002 - 10th Nov 2003
Shadow Minister without Portfolio
18th Sep 2001 - 23rd Jul 2002
Liaison Committee (Commons)
30th Oct 1997 - 11th May 2001
Public Accounts Committee
25th Jul 1997 - 11th May 2001
Minister of State (Foreign and Commonwealth Office)
20th Jul 1994 - 2nd May 1997
Parliamentary Secretary (Duchy of Lancaster Office)
27th May 1993 - 19th Jul 1994
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
3rd Dec 1990 - 27th May 1993


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Information Commissioner (Remuneration)
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 359 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 2
Speeches
Tuesday 21st September 2021
Salisbury Incident 2018: Update

I welcome the Home Secretary’s response today, which I have to say contrasts with the responses of previous Governments to …

Written Answers
Monday 20th September 2021
Coronavirus: Public Opinion
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 10th March 2020
Automation and the future of work
That this House welcomes the Government’s commitment to level up; notes that a co-ordinated, cross-departmental approach to creating the conditions …
Bills
Tuesday 19th January 2021
Freedom of Speech (Universities) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to place a duty on universities to promote freedom of speech; to make provision for fining universities that …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 26th July 2021
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: Silverstone Circuits Ltd
Address of donor: Jimmy Brown Centre, Silverstone Circuit, Northamptonshire NN12 8TN
Amount of donation …
EDM signed
Wednesday 23rd June 2021
General Practice Data for Planning Research
That this House is concerned with the current plans for the General Practice Data for Planning Research, while although noting …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, David Davis has voted in 273 divisions, and 35 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Mar 2021 - Coronavirus - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 35 Conservative No votes vs 305 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 484 Noes - 76
22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 29 Conservative Aye votes vs 318 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 300 Noes - 318
22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 297
22 Mar 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 253
10 Feb 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 327 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 526 Noes - 24
9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 341 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 351 Noes - 276
9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 303
9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 354 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 363 Noes - 267
27 Jan 2021 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 354 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 363 Noes - 267
27 Jan 2021 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 353 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 361 Noes - 267
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 344 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 353 Noes - 277
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative No votes vs 319 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 308
30 Dec 2020 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 328 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 335 Noes - 212
1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
10 Nov 2020 - Committee on Standards - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 334 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 261 Noes - 334
4 Nov 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 330 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 333 Noes - 264
3 Nov 2020 - Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 335 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 266 Noes - 336
3 Nov 2020 - Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 336 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 335
3 Nov 2020 - Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 333 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 269 Noes - 334
19 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative No votes vs 324 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 327 Noes - 264
19 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 326 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 328 Noes - 264
15 Oct 2020 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 314 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 256 Noes - 317
15 Oct 2020 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 312 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 256 Noes - 316
15 Oct 2020 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 310 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 311
15 Oct 2020 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 310 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 255 Noes - 314
13 Oct 2020 - Public Health: Coronavirus Regulations - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 82
2 Sep 2020 - Recall of MPs (Change of Party Affiliation) - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 41 Conservative No votes vs 47 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 52
1 Jul 2020 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative Aye votes vs 317 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 232 Noes - 321
1 Jul 2020 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 316 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 254 Noes - 317
30 Jun 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 332 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 252 Noes - 332
20 May 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 345 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 352
20 May 2020 - Liaison (Membership) - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative Aye votes vs 316 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 323
10 Mar 2020 - Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 301 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 306
27 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 256
28 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
David Davis voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 321 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 256
View All David Davis Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(16 debate interactions)
Nigel Evans (Conservative)
(11 debate interactions)
Rosie Winterton (Labour)
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(48 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(42 debate contributions)
Home Office
(38 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(15 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all David Davis's debates

Haltemprice and Howden Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

David Davis has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by David Davis

23rd June 2021
David Davis signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 23rd June 2021

General Practice Data for Planning Research

Tabled by: Dawn Butler (Labour - Brent Central)
That this House is concerned with the current plans for the General Practice Data for Planning Research, while although noting the importance of data for legitimate research believes that it puts patient data and medical histories at serious risk of abuse; believes that the plans will potentially discourage sick patients …
27 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Jul 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 21
Independent: 3
Conservative: 1
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
21st June 2021
David Davis signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 21st June 2021

Meeting between parliamentarians and Julian Assange

Tabled by: Richard Burgon (Labour - Leeds East)
That this House expresses its concern at the refusal of the UK Government and prison authorities to allow an online video meeting between Julian Assange and a cross-party group of British parliamentarians; notes that the request was first made in December 2020 in a letter signed by 17 British parliamentarians …
23 signatures
(Most recent: 6 Sep 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 11
Scottish National Party: 4
Independent: 2
Alba Party: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Conservative: 1
Green Party: 1
View All David Davis's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by David Davis, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


David Davis has not been granted any Urgent Questions

David Davis has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

6 Bills introduced by David Davis


A Bill to repeal the European Communities Act 1972 and make other provision in connection with the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the EU.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Tuesday 26th June 2018 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to confer power on the Prime Minister to notify, under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union, the United Kingdom’s intention to withdraw from the EU.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 16th March 2017 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to make provision about the handling of complaints by the Health Service Commissioner for England; to require the Commissioner to notify a complainant of the reason for the delay if the investigation of the complaint is not concluded within a twelve month period; to require the Commissioner to lay before Parliament an annual report giving details of how long investigations of complaints have taken to be concluded and progress towards meeting a target of concluding investigations within a twelve month period; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 26th March 2015 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to place a duty on universities to promote freedom of speech; to make provision for fining universities that do not comply with that duty; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Tuesday 19th January 2021
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to make provision about obligations on wind farm operators in respect of financial cover for potential liabilities arising from cause of public nuisance; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 21st July 2015

A Bill to amend the Employment Rights Act 1996 to provide that disclosures of information about malpractice to a Member of Parliament where the disclosure is in the public interest be included as protected disclosures; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 19th November 2013

David Davis has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


179 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government on public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 14 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQ45797 on 14 September 2021.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government on public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 13 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQ45797 on 14 September 2021.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government on public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 12 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQ45797 on 14 September 2021.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government on public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 11 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQ45797 on 14 September 2021.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government on public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 10 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQ45797 on 14 September 2021.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 8 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 7 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 6 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 5 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 4 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 3 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 2 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether polling by the Government related to public opinion on covid-19 was conducted on 1 February 2020.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to the answer given to PQs 186126-186130 on 29 April 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Government to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the results of 16 polls on public opinion on covid-19 conducted or commissioned by his Department which took place on Sundays between March and July 2020, which covered public opinion on Covid-19.

I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the answer given to PQs 82315 and 82316 on 9 September 2020, and PQ 156454 on 2 March 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Cabinet Office to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.



Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which companies the Cabinet Office's Insight and Evaluation Team commissioned to carry out covid-19 polling on behalf of the Government.

I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the answer given to PQs 82315 and 82316 on 9 September 2020, and PQ 156454 on 2 March 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Cabinet Office to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.



Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the (a) contents and (b) results of the 265 covid-19 polling files held by his Department's Insight and Evaluation Team.

I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the answer given to PQs 82315 and 82316 on 9 September 2020, and PQ 156454 on 2 March 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Cabinet Office to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.



Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the (a) dates and (b) results of covid-19 polling undertaken by Hanbury Strategy on behalf of the Government.

I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the answer given to PQs 82315 and 82316 on 9 September 2020, and PQ 156454 on 2 March 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Cabinet Office to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.



Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, on what dates between 1 January 2020 and 28 July 2020 covid-19 polling was undertaken by (a) his Department's Insight and Evaluation Team and (b) companies on behalf of his Department.

I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the answer given to PQs 82315 and 82316 on 9 September 2020, and PQ 156454 on 2 March 2021.

Covid-19 polling for the cross-government public information campaign has been conducted regularly since the start of the pandemic. This work allows the Cabinet Office to optimise campaign messaging and maximise effectiveness, ensuring vital public health information reaches as many people as possible. The insight gathered continue to inform the Government’s ongoing communications strategy and response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and so shall not be published at this time.

The Cabinet Office publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder and spend over £500, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling basis. This will include expenditure on this campaign and will be broken down by supplier.



Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff have undertaken work in the Cabinet Office Freedom of Information Clearing House in each of the last 10 years; and what the annual budget was for the Cabinet Office Freedom of Information Clearing House in that time period.

This Government is fully committed to transparency, and ensuring all requests for Freedom of Information (FOI) are handled appropriately. All requests are considered in an applicant-blind manner, regardless of - for example - the occupation of the applicant. The Cabinet Office FOI process complies with relevant protections under the Data Protection Act 2018.

Under section 45 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 the Cabinet Minister issues a Code of Practice, available on gov.uk, which provides guidance and advice to public authorities on the handling of Freedom of Information Requests. In addition, and in line with practice since 2005, the Cabinet Office provides advice to Departments, to ensure cases are handled consistently, and sensitive material handled appropriately. A Clearing House was established in 2004 and has operated in different forms since the FOI Act came into force in January 2005 as an advice centre to coordinate complex requests across Whitehall. There is now no stand alone Clearing House team, but coordination functions are carried out by a number of staff members who have a range of wider responsibilities. Policy responsibility for Freedom of Information transferred from the Ministry of Justice to the Cabinet Office in 2015.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what criteria are used to determine whether a Freedom of Information Request is sufficiently sensitive to be referred to the Cabinet Office Freedom of Information Clearing House.

This Government is fully committed to transparency, and ensuring all requests for Freedom of Information (FOI) are handled appropriately. All requests are considered in an applicant-blind manner, regardless of - for example - the occupation of the applicant. The Cabinet Office FOI process complies with relevant protections under the Data Protection Act 2018.

Under section 45 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 the Cabinet Minister issues a Code of Practice, available on gov.uk, which provides guidance and advice to public authorities on the handling of Freedom of Information Requests. In addition, and in line with practice since 2005, the Cabinet Office provides advice to Departments, to ensure cases are handled consistently, and sensitive material handled appropriately. A Clearing House was established in 2004 and has operated in different forms since the FOI Act came into force in January 2005 as an advice centre to coordinate complex requests across Whitehall. There is now no stand alone Clearing House team, but coordination functions are carried out by a number of staff members who have a range of wider responsibilities. Policy responsibility for Freedom of Information transferred from the Ministry of Justice to the Cabinet Office in 2015.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that the introduction of voter identification cards does not affect an individual's civil rights.

Voter ID is part of a body of work this Government is delivering to strengthen the integrity of our electoral system and give the public confidence that our elections are secure and fit for the 21st century.

Electors will be required to show an approved form of photographic ID before casting their vote in a polling station across Great Britain at national UK-wide elections, and at local elections in England.

The list of approved photographic ID will not be limited to passports and driving licences, a broad range of documents already in use will be accepted, including, for example, concessionary travel passes, PASS scheme cards, Ministry of Defence identity cards and photocard parking permits issued as part of the Blue Badge scheme.

Any voter who does not have an approved form of ID will be able to apply, free of charge, for a local elector ID from their local authority.

The provision of local elector ID will be the exception rather than the norm, evidenced by the published evaluations of the pilots:

https://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/our-views-and-research/our-research/voter-identification-pilots/may-2019-voter-identification-pilot-schemes/our-findings

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/819404/2019_Voter_ID_Pilots_Evaluation.pdf

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to prevent printer manufacturers from locking devices to only being able to use approved printer cartridges.

The Government is committed to tackling consumer rip-offs and bad business practices. The Government has ensured that the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has significant powers and expertise to investigate such issues.

Under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008, it is a criminal offence to provide consumers with misleading information or omit important details about a product they are purchasing.

Under competition law, the CMA is responsible for investigating individual and market-wide competition issues. Consumers and businesses should report concerns about competition issues to the CMA.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what additional manufacturing capacity there is in the UK for manufacturing a vaccine for covid-19 once one is developed.

The Vaccines Taskforce is working with the BioIndustry Association Taskforce to review existing domestic capability to manufacture vaccines, in response to Covid-19. The Taskforce is also reviewing options for increasing this capacity. The Business Secretary recently announced that the government will accelerate building the UK’s first Vaccine Manufacturing and Innovation Centre, which is based at Harwell in Oxfordshire. The government will invest up to a further £93 million in the Centre, ensuring that it opens in summer 2021 – a full 12 months ahead of schedule. The Centre – which is already under construction – will have capacity to produce enough vaccine doses to serve the entire UK population in as little as 6 months. While the Centre is being built, the government will establish a rapid deployment facility thanks to a further investment of £38 million to begin coronavirus vaccine manufacturing at scale from this summer. This facility will support efforts to ensure a vaccine is widely available to the public as soon as possible.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to increase employment in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency, (b) Yorkshire and the Humber and (c) the UK.

As of 12th March, employment rates in the UK are at a record high at 76.5% and unemployment is at a near record low at 3.9%. 33 million people are now in work, which is 271,000 more than last year. The growth in employment has largely been driven by an increase in female full-time employment.

The Government is investing over £1.3 billion through Yorkshire and Humber Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) Growth Deals. This includes over £141 million through the Humber LEP that is providing financial assistance to local businesses, as well as improving infrastructure and skills. We have also established Enterprise Zones across the UK including in the Humber, which is the largest Enterprise Zone award in the country. The Zone has attracted business investment and new jobs to the area, such as at the Humber Enterprise Park in Brough in the Hon Gentleman’s constituency.

The Government-backed British Business Bank’s Start-Up Loans programme provides loans to entrepreneurs seeking to start and grow their own businesses. Since 2012, 5,930 loans have been issued in the Yorkshire and the Humber region, totalling over £50 million. In the Haltemprice and Howden constituency, 110 loans have been issued, totalling over £1 million (as at end-December 2019).

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to to improve productivity in each region of the UK.

The Government is committed to levelling up all regions of the UK. We are working with local leaders and businesses on Local Industrial Strategies to boost productivity and living standards, whilst increasing investment in science, research, and development across the country.

These long-term strategies are based on robust evidence, providing an in-depth understanding of?local economies. Local Industrial Strategies explicitly focus on driving productivity by setting out the spatial impacts of national and local policy across our cities, towns, and rural areas.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps she is taking to encourage the use of sites under the North Sea for carbon sequestration.

Carbon capture, usage and storage (CCUS) will play a vital role in meeting our net zero greenhouse gas emissions target by 2050, supporting both our Industrial Strategy and the revitalisation of the economies of the UK’s industrial areas. The Government is committed to deploying CCUS in the 2020s.

The Oil and Gas Authority issued its first CO2 storage licence to Pale Blue Dot Energy (Acorn) Ltd (PBD) for the Acorn Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project in 2018.

In order to support the development of potential CO2 storage sites, the Government invested £2.5 million in the Energy Technologies Institute’s (ETI) CO2 Storage Appraisal Project which looked in detail at eight potential CO2 storage sites[1]. The UK also has the world-leading CO2-stored database[2] which is hosted and developed by the British Geological Survey and provides the data for over 500 potential offshore CO2 storage sites around the UK.

We are working closely with North Sea countries through the North Sea Basin Taskforce to share best practice and cooperate on North Sea CO2 storage. In October 2019, we cooperated with Norway and the Netherlands to achieve a provisional amendment to the London Protocol, allowing for the cross-border transport of CO2 for permanent storage, such as in the North Sea – a key breakthrough for UK projects and facilitating international CCUS deployment

[1] Energy Technologies Institute LLP, Strategic UK CCS Storage Appraisal, 2016

[2] CO2 Stored Database available at: http://www.co2stored.co.uk/home/index

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support small businesses in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber.

The Government is committed to supporting all entrepreneurs to start and grow a business, to create jobs and spread prosperity.

In the North Yorkshire and Humber regions businesses can access support through www.gov.uk, the Business Support Helpline (0300 456 3565) and their local Growth Hubs (York, North Yorkshire and East Riding Growth Hub and Humber Growth Hub). These are led and governed by the York, North Yorkshire and East Riding and the Humber Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs). Growth Hubs provide a free, impartial, ‘single point of contact’ to help businesses in these areas identify and access the right support for them at the right time no matter their size or sector. In 2018-2019 the two Growth Hubs supported 14,939 businesses and helped 81 new businesses to start up.

In addition, within the Humber LEP area, the ‘Growing the Humber’ business investment programme has supported the creation of over 2,800 jobs to date. This signposts anyone interested to a range of business support information, as well as to organisations that provide a wide variety of services, including funding, support, advice, mentoring and business services who can help business start-up, survive and thrive.

The Department for International Trade in Yorkshire and the Humber works with a network of International Trade Advisers and partners across the region to enable local businesses to showcase their products and services overseas, with their Northern Powerhouse team running bespoke Trade missions. Since April 2016, there have been 68 Northern Powerhouse missions to 19 countries, supporting 1,252 companies. As we leave the EU, they will be working to deepen our trading ties with overseas markets to maximise export opportunities for small businesses.

The British Business Bank (BBB) with a consortia of LEPs manages the £400m Northern Powerhouse Investment Fund (NPIF), which celebrated the milestone of having invested £100m in 385 Northern-based SMEs. This support addresses the disparity in availability of regional finance was further bolstered last autumn, with a £100m Business Angel investment programme was launched to support clusters of business angels outside London.

The BBB has also established a UK-wide Network of regional managers working with business support partners, delivering advice tailored to local needs.

The Government-backed British Business Bank’s Start-Up Loans programme provides loans to entrepreneurs seeking to start and grow their own businesses. Since 2012, 5,875 loans have been issued in the Yorkshire and the Humber region, totalling over £49m, and with an average loan amount of £8,459. In the Haltemprice and Howden constituency, 108 loans have been issued, totalling over £974,000 (as at end-December 2019).

29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has plans in place for allocating the cost of removing and replacing Huawei equipment in the event that its installation is prohibited.

On 28 January, the Government announced the final conclusions of the Telecoms Supply Chain Review in relation to high risk vendors. It was announced that equipment from high risk vendors should be excluded from the core parts of the 5G and full fibre networks that are critical to security, and their presence limited to 35% in the rest of the network. We expect the cost of meeting restrictions on the presence of equipment from high risk vendors to be met by the operators using that equipment.

24th Feb 2020
5G
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the announcement by his Department on 20 February 2020 of a £65 million package for 5G trials, what the Government's policy is on security in the telecommunications supply chain in respect of those trials; and what decisions have been made in respect of the identity of the suppliers that will provide the infrastructure for those trials.

The recent announcement of a new £65 million package of 5G trials forms part of the DCMS £200 million 5G Testbeds and Trials programme. That included £35 million for nine winning projects from our rural and industrial 5G competitions, and a new £30 million open competition - 5G Create - that will launch in due course.

The Programme ensures that each of our projects has a security strategy in place that identifies and mitigates security risks and is proportionate for R&D environments. Testbeds are encouraged to employ nationally recognised standards and best practice security approaches. This includes identifying and mitigating supply chain risks and taking steps to manage High Risk Vendors. None of the successful projects announced as part of Industrial 5G and Rural Connected Communities will use equipment from high risk vendors. We will publish guidance in due course for our 5G Create competition when it launches.

13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much Huawei equipment analysis has been installed by UK 5G carriers since March 2019.

Huawei’s presence in the UK is subject to detailed, formal oversight through the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre and its oversight board. The recent conclusions of the Telecoms Supply Chain Review set out clear limits on the role of Huawei, as a High Risk Vendor, in the UK telecoms market. The Government examined the full range of threats and risks when making its decision on the use of high risk vendors in the UK telecoms networks.

28th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he has taken to help ensure that (a) website owners' and (b) providers' compliance with GDPR protects the privacy of their (i) customers and (ii) users.

The Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA) and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) strengthen the obligations on organisations to process individuals’ data fairly, lawfully and transparently and to keep it safe and secure. It also strengthens individuals’ rights to seek to access, rectify or delete their data.

This legislation is regulated and enforced by the independent Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). The ICO has issued comprehensive guidance for organisations on how to comply with the legislation and is also working closely with specific sectors to address areas of risk.

If individuals have concerns about the way online services are processing their data, they may wish to complain to the ICO. The ICO has a range of corrective powers and sanctions to enforce the GDPR, including:

  • issuing warnings and reprimands;

  • imposing a temporary or permanent ban on data processing;

  • ordering the rectification, restriction or erasure of data; and

  • suspending data transfers to third countries.

Nigel Adams
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans his Department has in place for the oversight of private companies' use of live facial recognition technology.

The use of biometric data (including facial images) by private companies to identify individuals is regulated by the General Data Protection Regulation and the Data Protection Act 2018. Under the legislation, data processing must be fair, lawful and transparent. Individuals who consider their data has been misused can make complaints to the Information Commissioner's Office, the independent regulator of the legislation.

To ensure a safe use of facial recognition technology (FRT) in all sectors, the government tasked the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation (CDEI) to produce a Snapshot briefing paper looking at the uses and potential implications of facial recognition technology’s deployment in the UK. The paper was published on 28 May and we are considering its findings.

2nd Mar 2020
What progress he has made on implementing the recommendations of the Augar review of post-18 education and funding.

The Augar report recommended 53 changes to address some of the challenges and tensions in our higher education and further education systems. It is imperative that we get any such decisions rights. I can reassure my right hon. Friend that this government will conclude the review alongside the next Spending Review.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to promote apprenticeships in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency, (b) Yorkshire and the Humber and (c) the UK.

We have introduced a wide range of reforms to apprenticeships to improve their quality and to encourage employers across England to increase the number of apprenticeships they offer.

Since May 2010, there have been 4,392,000 starts in England. Of these, 6,930 apprenticeships starts have been in Haltemprice and Howden and 535,420 in Yorkshire and the Humber.

We are raising the profile of our apprenticeship programme through wider communications and marketing activity. The third phase of the Fire it Up campaign was launched in January, targeting important audience groups that are central to widening participation in apprenticeships.

Our thirteenth annual National Apprenticeship Week took place this month (3 to 9 February). Nearly 900 events were held across the country to celebrate and promote the diversity and value that apprenticeships bring to employers, apprentices and communities across England today.

In addition, in January 2018, we introduced a legal requirement for schools to give colleges or other organisations providing further education or training, the opportunity to make pupils aware about technical qualifications and apprenticeships.

We also offer a free service to schools through the Apprenticeship Support and Knowledge (ASK) project to ensure that teachers have the knowledge and support to enable them to promote apprenticeships to their students. In the last academic year, the ASK Programme reached over 300,000 students.

We are investing £2.5 billion in apprenticeships this year (2019-20) so that employers of all sizes across England can provide apprenticeship opportunities for people of all ages and backgrounds. We are moving smaller employers onto our award-winning apprenticeship service to give them a greater choice of where their apprentices are trained, and so that they can also benefit from transferred funds from levy payers. Levy transfers can help to support new starts in supply chains and address local skills needs.

9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to support farmers in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber.

Farmers currently have access to a range of support measures, including direct payments under the CAP. We have published the Agriculture Bill that sets out how we will support the industry as we leave the EU and this includes rewarding farmers for delivering public goods.

We would expect farmers in Yorkshire and Humber to participate in the scheme and to be able to apply for the wider support we intend to make available to farmers through the Bill.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what plans her Department has to open trade negotiations with Taiwan.

The UK remains committed to strengthening its rich and wide-ranging trading relationship with Taiwan. Total trade in goods and services between the UK and Taiwan was £6.1 billion in 2020. The UK is working with Taiwan to deepen its relationship, including through the annual Trade Talks and associated dialogues, ministerial engagement, and through engagements by the Prime Minister’s Trade Envoy to Taiwan.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps her Department has taken to ensure that (a) farmers and (b) food producers in (a) East Riding of Yorkshire and (b) Haltemprice and Howden constituency can benefit from a free trade agreement with Australia.

An ambitious free trade deal with Australia will benefit businesses and producers across the UK – this will include greater access for UK agri-food goods to the Australian market through the removal of tariffs.

A deal with Australia is also a gateway to joining the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), a high-standards free trade agreement of 11 Pacific nations, which will mean lower tariffs for British exports to those markets. By 2030, two-thirds of the world’s middle class will be in Asia, which is creating unheralded new export opportunities for British farming. This is where the future opportunity lies for UK farmers.

Any deal the UK signs with Australia will include protections for the agriculture industry and will not undercut UK farmers or compromise the UK’s high standards.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of a free trade agreement with Australia on (a) the East Riding of Yorkshire and (b) Haltemprice and Howden constituency.

The Government’s economic analysis, published on 17 June 2020, seeks to identify the potential scale of the long-term additional benefit to the UK from having a deal with Australia.

Yorkshire and the Humber’s top goods export to Australia, general industrial machinery, equipment and machine parts, saw an increase from 2019 to 2020. Liberalisation of tariffs on these products (currently up to 5%) and reducing other non-tariff barriers to trade should further benefit this industry, and others.

Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published prior to implementation.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions officials in his Department have had with (a) representatives of the travel industry, (b) representatives of covid-19 test providers and (c) officials in the Her Majesty's Treasury on reducing the cost of covid-19 tests to the public when travelling abroad; and if he will make a statement.

The Department for Transport continues to work with other government departments, the travel industry and private testing providers to further reduce testing costs, while ensuring travel is as safe as possible.

The price of tests has reduced significantly over recent weeks, and several providers are offering Day 2 tests for green arrivals for under £50.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of British holidaymakers that are aware of the cost of covid-19 tests when travelling abroad; and if he will make a statement.

It is a matter for each country to decide on appropriate health measures.

It is therefore important for travellers to check the relevant Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office Travel Advice for their destination in advance of travel.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the financial impact of the UK tourism sector of the additional costs of covid-19 tests for holidaymakers travelling abroad; and if he will make a statement.

The government recognises that the tourism sector has been affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. That is why we have provided the tourism, leisure and hospitality sectors with £25 billion in support since the start of the pandemic. The Government has also recently published a Tourism Recovery Plan.

The price of tests has reduced significantly over recent weeks, with several providers offering Day 2 tests for green arrivals for under £50. The government continue to work with the travel industry and private testing providers to further reduce testing costs, while ensuring international travel is as safe as possible.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government has had discussions with (a) the travel industry and (b) private covid-19 testing providers on proposals for reducing the cost of covid-19 tests required for travel abroad.

The government continues to work with the travel industry and private testing providers to further reduce testing costs, while ensuring travel is as safe as possible.

The price of tests has reduced significantly over recent weeks, and several providers are offering Day 2 tests for green arrivals for under £50.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many Highways England road improvement projects have had their pedestrian element cancelled as a result of an estimated economy saving in each of the last five years.

Highways England includes provision for Non-Motorised Users, including pedestrians, cyclists and horse riders, as standard in all its scheme designs. The number of schemes that have had pedestrian elements removed can only be provided at a disproportionate cost for this answer.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many road traffic collisions there have been on the A63 between the Ferensway Interchange (Central Hull) and North Cave Interchange in the last five; what the location was of those collisions; what serious injuries resulted from those collisions; and how many fatalities resulted from those collisions.

The number of personal injury reported road accidents, fatal casualties and seriously injured casualties on the A63 between the Ferensway Interchange (Central Hull) and North Cave Interchange between 2014 and 2018 can be found in the table below.

Reported road accidents and casualties on the A63 between the Ferensway Interchange (Central Hull) and North Cave Interchange, 2014-2018

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Personal injury accidents

46

55

44

44

44

Fatal casualties

0

0

1

0

2

Seriously injured casualties

5

8

7

14

6

Source: DfT, STATS19

Please note that the number of serious injuries provided is as reported by the police. Since 2016, changes in severity reporting systems for a large number of police forces (including for Humberside police force which covers the geographic area required) mean that serious injury figures, and to a lesser extent slight injuries, as reported by the police are not comparable with earlier years. Adjustments to account for the change have been produced for high level series in the Reported Road Casualties in Great Britain, annual report: 2018.

Injury descriptions are available from the CRASH system only since January 2016 for Humberside police force. The most severe injury description as reported by the police for seriously injured casualties on the A63 between the Ferensway Interchange (Central Hull) and North Cave Interchange between 2016 and 2018 can be found in the attached Table A. Please note that this information is as reported by the police and is not the result of a medical assessment.

The eastings and northings of each accident for the requested geographical area can be found in the attached Table B. The location of each accident can also be found in user-friendly online maps, for example on the THINK! website (https://www.think.gov.uk/thinkmap/).

9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of High Speed Two.

The Oakervee Review has been tasked with rigorously examining HS2 Ltd’s costs and schedule. The Review findings and Government’s assessment of the likely costs of High Speed 2 will be published in due course.

9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to tackle issues raised in the Independent Case Examiner's Annual Report 2020 on the Child Maintenance Service, including the findings on the way that Service presents its accounts information.

Since the report was published in October 2020 the Child Maintenance Service has been running at a reduced level and has been focussed on frontline activity serving our customers due to the Coronavirus Pandemic.

However, we are now starting to increase that service and have introduced a Transformation Programme that will constantly review how we work and help to automate lots of processes.

We are continually improving our contact channels and we plan to improve our calculation letters in line with our online portal and system. This is so that all lines of communication between Child Maintenance Group and customers present information to customers in the same way to reduce confusion.

There are also proposed changes to our online portal that surround explaining the calculation and explaining the payment plan to our customers, these changes are planned for Quarter 3 of the financial year.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to ensure that complaints to the Independent Case Examiner are being promptly investigated.

In the current financial year the Department provided additional funding to the Independent Case Examiner’s Office, to allow it to increase its headcount from 89 to 112. The recruitment and rigorous training of additional Investigation Case Mangers, to reduce the time complaints wait to be brought into investigation, is underway.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average length of time is between a complaint being accepted by the Independent Case Examiner and the case being allocated to a caseworker; and what the average length of time is between a case being accepted by the Independent Case Examiner and the complainant receiving an outcome.

When the Independent Case Examiner’s Office accept a complaint for investigation, they will initially try to broker a solution between the complainant and the relevant department or supplier, without having to request evidence to inform an investigation – this is known as “resolution”. If it’s not possible to resolve the complaint, the evidence will be requested and the case will await allocation to an Investigation Case Manager (ICM). The cases that reach the Independent Case Examiner are the most complex and usually require investigation. Complainants are kept updated about the timings involved with their case and the vast majority are satisfied with the service they receive.

Based on the complaints that were allocated for investigation during the 2020 calendar year, the average length of wait between the complaint being accepted for examination and it being allocated to an Investigation Case Manager was 64.5 weeks.

During the 2020 calendar year, the average length of time between a case being accepted for examination by the Independent Case Examiner’s Office and the complainant receiving an outcome was 81.4 weeks (this total includes the 64.5 weeks average wait before being allocated to an Investigation Case Manager. It excludes those cases which are resolved without the need for a full investigation).

Whilst the Unit has received additional resource during the current financial year, to help reduce the time complaints wait to be brought into investigation, progress has been constrained by the effects of Covid, which included the redeployment of some staff, and the delay in recruitment of new staff.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the statutory basis is for the Child Maintenance Service to accept only verbal evidence, without supporting documentation, in relation to changes to the paying parent’s financial circumstances.

In these unprecedented times, we have seen a significant increase in the number of new claims to UC - it’s right that we look to streamline our operations, and ensure that people get the support they need. No one will get away with giving false information to avoid paying what they owe and all decisions carry rights of appeal, so either parent can dispute a decision.

Those found to be abusing the system at this difficult time will find themselves subject to the full extent of our enforcement powers – including prosecution through the courts.

The Government has been clear in its commitment to support families during this public health emergency and we have made a number changes to the welfare system to ensure people are receiving the support they need. These include increasing the standard rate of Universal Credit and working tax credit for this year by around £1000 per year. People who need money urgently continue to be able to access up to a month’s Universal Credit advance upfront by applying online. In addition, Statutory Sick Pay now applies from day one, rather than the fourth day of illness. In April, in response to Covid-19 we increased Local Housing Allowance rates for housing benefit and universal credit claimants to the 30th percentile of local rents, providing additional financial support for private renters. This significant investment of almost £1 billion, ensures over 1 million households will see an increase, on average, of £600 per year

Taken together, these measures represent an injection of over £6.5 billion into the welfare system and, along with the other job and business support programmes announced by the Chancellor, represent one of the most comprehensive packages of support introduced by an advanced economy in response to the coronavirus outbreak.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has directed the Child Maintenance Service to introduce greater flexibility in relation to evidence requirements during the covid-19 outbreak.

In these unprecedented times, we have seen a significant increase in the number of new claims to UC - it’s right that we look to streamline our operations, and ensure that people get the support they need. No one will get away with giving false information to avoid paying what they owe and all decisions carry rights of appeal, so either parent can dispute a decision.

Those found to be abusing the system at this difficult time will find themselves subject to the full extent of our enforcement powers – including prosecution through the courts.

The Government has been clear in its commitment to support families during this public health emergency and we have made a number changes to the welfare system to ensure people are receiving the support they need. These include increasing the standard rate of Universal Credit and working tax credit for this year by around £1000 per year. People who need money urgently continue to be able to access up to a month’s Universal Credit advance upfront by applying online. In addition, Statutory Sick Pay now applies from day one, rather than the fourth day of illness. In April, in response to Covid-19 we increased Local Housing Allowance rates for housing benefit and universal credit claimants to the 30th percentile of local rents, providing additional financial support for private renters. This significant investment of almost £1 billion, ensures over 1 million households will see an increase, on average, of £600 per year

Taken together, these measures represent an injection of over £6.5 billion into the welfare system and, along with the other job and business support programmes announced by the Chancellor, represent one of the most comprehensive packages of support introduced by an advanced economy in response to the coronavirus outbreak.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how financial support provided to small businesses through the Small Business Grant Scheme will be classified for the purposes of applications for universal credit made by the owners of those businesses.

During this difficult time for the country, we recognise the extreme disruption the necessary actions are having on people’s lives, their businesses, their jobs and the nation’s economy. And that’s why we have produced a huge and unprecedented programme of support both for workers and for business, and we’ll do everything we can to ensure people can pay their bills, stay in their home and put food on their table.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has been made of the effect of the roll out of universal credit on the number of people in employment in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber.

The Department successfully completed the rollout of Universal Credit in December 2018 and it is available in every Jobcentre across the country including those across the Haltemprice and Howden constituency and Yorkshire and the Humber. It is a modern, flexible, personalised system which has scrapped the ‘cliff edges’ featured across legacy benefits, where money was lost when working more than 16, 24 and 30 hours.

Universal Credit provides claimants with the support they need to better prepare for work, move into work, or to increase earnings. The Universal Credit Work Allowance has been increased by £1,000 and means that 2.4m households will keep an extra £630 of income each year.

The Department’s latest data for the Yorkshire and Humber region (to October 2019) shows there are over 200,000 more people in employment in the region compared with 2010.

The employment rate for the Haltemprice and Howden constituency for the year 2019 was 82.6% compared with 73.8% for the region of Yorkshire and the Humber overall. This can be compared to 2010 when the employment rate for the Haltemprice and Howden constituency was 79.2% compared with 68.9% for the region of Yorkshire and the Humber overall.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much the NHS has spent on private hospital facilities since the start of March 2020 for booked procedures that have failed to take place.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many private hospital beds have been (a) booked by NHS providers, (b) used by NHS providers and (c) unused since the start of March 2020.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will provide a breakdown of the types of services and treatments provided by private sector providers to NHS patients during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much NHS England has spent on purchasing hospital capacity and health services from private sector providers during the covid-19 outbreak since March 2020.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients were treated by private sector providers contracted by the NHS during the covid-19 outbreak in each month since March 2020, by hospital trust in England.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his Department's timeframe is for the decision on refinancing proposals put forward by Hull Citycare Ltd Local Improvement Finance Trust.

Discussions are currently taking place between the Department and HM Treasury and we will provide further information on the timeframe for a decision in due course.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason a decision has yet to be taken by his Department on the refinancing proposals put forward by Hull Citycare Ltd Local Improvement Finance Trust.

Discussions are currently taking place between the Department and HM Treasury and we will provide further information on the timeframe for a decision in due course.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what checks his Department carries out on covid-19 testing providers before adding them to the Government approved list of providers; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the Rt hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Ellesmere Port and Neston (Justin Madders MP) on 21 May 2021 to Question 1099.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the risks to public health of British holidaymakers failing to comply with covid-19 testing requirements after travelling abroad; and if he will make a statement.

We are unable to provide the information requested as it relates to the ongoing formulation of Government policy. However, an important part of the Government’s aim to see a safe and sustainable return to international travel is ensuring the inbound rules are being adhered to, including individuals entering England from both amber-list and green-list countries and territories.

We are working closely with the Home Office to ensure that our international travel regulations are robustly enforced. The Home Office has contracted Mitie (private security) to conduct door-step visits to those suspected of non-compliance. Any individuals suspected of non-compliance by Mitie officers are referred to the police for follow-up enforcement action, which can include issuing Fixed Penalty Notices.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of British holidaymakers travelling abroad who will choose not to comply with covid-19 testing requirements on their return.

We are unable to provide the information requested as it relates to the ongoing formulation of Government policy. However, an important part of the Government’s aim to see a safe and sustainable return to international travel is ensuring the inbound rules are being adhered to, including individuals entering England from both amber-list and green-list countries and territories.

We are working closely with the Home Office to ensure that our international travel regulations are robustly enforced. The Home Office has contracted Mitie (private security) to conduct door-step visits to those suspected of non-compliance. Any individuals suspected of non-compliance by Mitie officers are referred to the police for follow-up enforcement action, which can include issuing Fixed Penalty Notices.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential benefits to public health of applying a costs cap to covid-19 testing services for British holidaymakers travelling abroad.

The Department has not made a specific assessment.

We are committed to working with the travel industry and private testing providers to reduce the cost of travel testing whilst also ensuring travel is as safe as possible. Since requirements were introduced for international travel testing, the costs of travel testing have fallen significantly. NHS Test and Trace tests are available at the market mid-point to ensure tests are available at an appropriate cost. We also offer deferred payment plans and hardship support.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 testing providers his Department has removed from the Government list of providers for tests required for travel in response to customer feedback to NHS Test and Trace.

To date, seven providers have been removed from the GOV.UK list in response to customer feedback to NHS Test and Trace.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the NHS app's storing of vaccination data on civil liberties.

When individuals use the NHS App to demonstrate their COVID-19 vaccine status, the data is not stored within the app, but is made available to the app temporarily without any access to their General Practitioner records. COVID-19 status data can be viewed during ‘live’ access, held temporarily for the duration of their login.

A Data Protection Impact Assessment has been completed on the COVID-19 vaccine status service, which is provided through the NHS App, to assess and mitigate privacy and data security risks, including risks to civil liberties.

In addition, a full Equalities and Health Impact Assessment was completed on the digital and non-digital routes for the certification service in advance of the national launch to assess the impact of the products on groups with protected characteristics.

The Data Protection and Equalities and Health Impact Assessments are both kept under review as the service is developed.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what NHS England's policy and guidelines are on applying Do Not Resuscitate orders to patients; and whether specific underlying health conditions are factors taken into account.

NHS England and NHS Improvement clinical leaders have emphasised to health and care providers that Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions should only ever be made on an individual basis. The Department remains clear that inappropriate or blanket application of DNACPR decisions is unacceptable, whether due to medical condition, disability or age.

Joint guidance for clinicians from the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council UK and Royal College of Nursing reflects that agreement to a DNACPR order is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether NHS England issue guidelines on when GPs should start discussions with their patients on end of life care; and whether age is the primary factor taken into account when starting those discussions.

Guidance on undertaking discussions with patients on end of life care is provided by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Identification of any person approaching the end of life and decisions on when to begin discussions on end of life care and support need to be considered on an individual basis.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether NHS England issue guidelines on when GPs should start discussions with their patients on end of life care; and whether (a) budgetary factors and (b) underlying health conditions are considered as part of the decision to begin those discussions.

Guidance on undertaking discussions with patients on end of life care is provided by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Identification of any person approaching the end of life and decisions on when to begin discussions on end of life care and support need to be considered on an individual basis.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what NHS England's policy and guidelines are on applying Do Not Resuscitate orders to patients; and whether age is the primary factor taken into account.

NHS England and NHS Improvement clinical leaders have emphasised to health and care providers that Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions should only ever be made on an individual basis. The Department remains clear that inappropriate or blanket application of DNACPR decisions is unacceptable, whether due to medical condition, disability or age.

Joint guidance for clinicians from the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council UK and Royal College of Nursing reflects that agreement to a DNACPR order is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what NHS England's policy and guidelines are on applying Do Not Resuscitate orders to patients; and what specific factors are taken into account when applying such an order.

NHS England and NHS Improvement clinical leaders have emphasised to health and care providers that Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions should only ever be made on an individual basis. The Department remains clear that inappropriate or blanket application of DNACPR decisions is unacceptable, whether due to medical condition, disability or age.

Joint guidance for clinicians from the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council UK and Royal College of Nursing reflects that agreement to a DNACPR order is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what NHS England's policy and guidelines are on applying Do Not Resuscitate orders to patients; and whether budgetary factors are taken into account.

NHS England and NHS Improvement clinical leaders have emphasised to health and care providers that Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions should only ever be made on an individual basis. The Department remains clear that inappropriate or blanket application of DNACPR decisions is unacceptable, whether due to medical condition, disability or age.

Joint guidance for clinicians from the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council UK and Royal College of Nursing reflects that agreement to a DNACPR order is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 16 November 2020 to Question 109164, whether the NHS plans to publish backdated data on critical care capacity from when publication ceased.

There is no intention of publishing backdated data on critical care capacity.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the NHS plans to resume the (a) collection and (b) publication of data on critical care bed capacity across the NHS.

NHS England and NHS Improvement will publish weekly critical care bed availability and occupancy this winter, although the date for when this will start has not yet been confirmed.

Data for previous winters can be accessed at the following link: https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/uec-sitrep/

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Pillar 2 covid-19 tests have been carried out in (a) Yorkshire and the Humber and (b) Haltemprice and Howden constituency in each month since February 2020.

The Government does not publish this data in this format. Weekly data for pillar 2 testing in England is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/nhs-test-and-trace-statistics-england-weekly-reports

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Pillar 3 covid-19 tests have been carried out in (a) Yorkshire and the Humber and (b) Haltemprice and Howden constituency in each month since February 2020.

We do not hold data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Pillar 1 covid-19 tests have been carried out in (a) Yorkshire and the Humber and (b) Haltemprice and Howden constituency in each month since February 2020.

We do not hold data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his response to the hon. Member for Ealing Central and Acton on 21 September 2020, Official Report, column 633, on Covid-19 Update, where he stated that Vitamin D is one of the many things that we have looked into, to see whether it reduces the incidence or impact of coronavirus, if he will publish the results of the trial to which he referred.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence published ‘Vitamin D for COVID-19: Evidence Review’ which is available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/advice/es28/evidence/evidence-review-pdf-8777674477

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition also published ‘Rapid review: Vitamin D and acute respiratory tract infections’ which is available at the following link:

https://app.box.com/s/g0ldpth1upfd7fw763ew3aqa3c0pyvky

These rapid evidence reviews, published in June 2020, concluded that there is currently no evidence to support taking vitamin D supplements to reduce the risk and severity of COVID-19. My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care was referring to these publications when he responded to the hon. Member for Ealing Central and Acton (Rupa Huq MP).

Public Health England will keep this topic under review and will consider updating this assessment if emerging high-quality evidence suggests a change to existing conclusions, and advise the Government accordingly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what performance targets are in place for commercial providers of track and trace functions; what penalties can be imposed for failure to meet those targets; and what penalties have already been imposed for failure to meet those targets.

Contracts were awarded to Serco and Sitel to provide call handling services for the contact track and trace initiative. The contracts have been published and can be found at the following links:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/c23fdfaf-d1f2-4d8c-a0cd-6b6f35793ccd

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/7645e3ef-ce16-4cae-8932-1eb6521a50cb

Contractual penalties are often unenforceable under English law so they were not included in test and trace contracts with Serco or Sitel. Sitel and Serco are approved suppliers on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework and the contracts have standard performance and quality assurance processes in place. Some information on Key Performance Indicators and service levels has been redacted from these published contracts as it is considered to be commercially sensitive.

The contracts have break clauses in them, meaning if the company does not meet required service levels we may cancel the contract and reclaim our money.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish all contracts agreed between his Department and (a) Serco, (b) Sitel Group and (c) all other commercial providers of track and trace functions.

Contracts were awarded to Serco and Sitel to provide call handling services for the contact track and trace initiative. The contracts have been published and can be found at the following links:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/c23fdfaf-d1f2-4d8c-a0cd-6b6f35793ccd

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/7645e3ef-ce16-4cae-8932-1eb6521a50cb

Contractual penalties are often unenforceable under English law so they were not included in test and trace contracts with Serco or Sitel. Sitel and Serco are approved suppliers on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework and the contracts have standard performance and quality assurance processes in place. Some information on Key Performance Indicators and service levels has been redacted from these published contracts as it is considered to be commercially sensitive.

The contracts have break clauses in them, meaning if the company does not meet required service levels we may cancel the contract and reclaim our money.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the NHS plans to resume the (a) collection and (b) publication of data on critical care bed capacity across the NHS.

NHS England’s collection and publication of critical care bed capacity data was paused as part of the initial response to COVID-19. A date to restart collection and publication of this data has not yet been decided.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he made of the potential merits of using local providers of contact tracing as part of the Government's covid-19 test and trace programme.

We have always been clear that NHS Test and Trace must be local by default and that we do not operate alone – we work with and through partners across the country. Contact tracing happening at a local level is not separate to that happening at a national level – all the information provided feeds into NHS Test and Trace. This is a team effort – it will only work if national and local systems work together.

NHS Test and Trace is working, and local action to tackle outbreaks and keep people safe is a crucial part of the national service.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many do not resuscitate orders were put in place between (a) 1 February 2019 to 1 August 2019 and (b) 1 February 2020 to 1 August 2020.

The Department does not hold data on the numbers or assessment of Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decisions (DNACPR).

Agreement to a DNACPR is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates. There has not been a national instruction or directive issued for blanket DNACPR decisions to be put in place. We remain clear that the blanket application of DNACPRs is unacceptable and that standards and quality of care should be maintained even in pressurised circumstances.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many do not resuscitate orders were put in place in care homes where the person died (a) from any cause and (b) with covid-19 on the death certificate between 1 February 2020 to 1 August 2020.

The Department does not hold data on the numbers or assessment of Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decisions (DNACPR).

Agreement to a DNACPR is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates. There has not been a national instruction or directive issued for blanket DNACPR decisions to be put in place. We remain clear that the blanket application of DNACPRs is unacceptable and that standards and quality of care should be maintained even in pressurised circumstances.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, on what basis some care homes were chosen by the NHS to put do not resuscitate orders on all their residents during the height of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department does not hold data on the numbers or assessment of Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decisions (DNACPR).

Agreement to a DNACPR is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates. There has not been a national instruction or directive issued for blanket DNACPR decisions to be put in place. We remain clear that the blanket application of DNACPRs is unacceptable and that standards and quality of care should be maintained even in pressurised circumstances.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many care homes were instructed by the NHS to put in place do not resuscitate orders between 1 February 2020 to 1 August 2020; and how many people were placed under those orders.

The Department does not hold data on the numbers or assessment of Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decisions (DNACPR).

Agreement to a DNACPR is an individual decision and should involve the person concerned or, where the person lacks capacity, their families, carers, guardians or other legally recognised advocates. There has not been a national instruction or directive issued for blanket DNACPR decisions to be put in place. We remain clear that the blanket application of DNACPRs is unacceptable and that standards and quality of care should be maintained even in pressurised circumstances.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department made of the performance of bidders for the covid-19 test and trace contact tracing contract on previous Government contracts.

The contracts awarded to Serco and Sitel to provide call handling services for the contact tracing initiative were made using direct awards under Lot 2 of Crown Commercial Service’s Contact Centre Services framework which was varied under Public Contract Regulations (PCR) 2015 Regulation 72 to allow for direct awards for COVID-19 related procurements.

Crown Commercial Service undertook a pre-procurement exercise engaging with all suppliers on Lot 2 to understand which could establish the contract centre in the volumes required and the timescales needed. All suppliers on Lot 2 were engaged with, in order to ascertain capabilities to meet the contract output specifications.

Serco and Sitel are approved suppliers on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework. They gained their places through fair and open competition via an Official Journal of the European Union procurement. Value for money and capability were part of the assessment criteria. The Department has put in place arrangements to ensure robust contract management in terms of performance and quality standards in line with relevant guidance.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what criteria his Department used to determine whether the bidders for the covid-19 test and trace contract had the necessary competencies to carry out contact tracing.

The contracts awarded to Serco and Sitel to provide call handling services for the contact tracing initiative were made using direct awards under Lot 2 of Crown Commercial Service’s Contact Centre Services framework which was varied under Public Contract Regulations (PCR) 2015 Regulation 72 to allow for direct awards for COVID-19 related procurements.

Crown Commercial Service undertook a pre-procurement exercise engaging with all suppliers on Lot 2 to understand which could establish the contract centre in the volumes required and the timescales needed. All suppliers on Lot 2 were engaged with, in order to ascertain capabilities to meet the contract output specifications.

Serco and Sitel are approved suppliers on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework. They gained their places through fair and open competition via an Official Journal of the European Union procurement. Value for money and capability were part of the assessment criteria. The Department has put in place arrangements to ensure robust contract management in terms of performance and quality standards in line with relevant guidance.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which suppliers entered bids for the contract to provide contact tracers as part of the Government's covid-19 test and trace programme.

The contracts awarded to Serco and Sitel to provide call handling services for the contact tracing initiative were made using direct awards under Lot 2 of Crown Commercial Service’s Contact Centre Services framework which was varied under Public Contract Regulations (PCR) 2015 Regulation 72 to allow for direct awards for COVID-19 related procurements.

Crown Commercial Service undertook a pre-procurement exercise engaging with all suppliers on Lot 2 to understand which could establish the contract centre in the volumes required and the timescales needed. All suppliers on Lot 2 were engaged with, in order to ascertain capabilities to meet the contract output specifications.

Serco and Sitel are approved suppliers on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework. They gained their places through fair and open competition via an Official Journal of the European Union procurement. Value for money and capability were part of the assessment criteria. The Department has put in place arrangements to ensure robust contract management in terms of performance and quality standards in line with relevant guidance.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the recommendations contained in the report published by Public Health England on 12 February 2020 entitled Recommendations on the continuing use of case-identification / contact-tracing / case and contact isolation (CCI) management to mitigate the impact of imported cases of Covid-19, which Minister in his Department considered those recommendations; and what decisions were made as a result of those recommendations.

Following the meeting of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) on 11 February 2020, Public Health England (PHE) identified a number of potential endpoints where it may be decided that contact tracing and isolation should be abandoned. PHE provided two papers which set out the potential endpoints which are available on GOV.UK at the following links:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/890217/s0018-when-to-stop-contact-tracing-developing-triggers-200220-sage9.pdf

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/890215/s0015-recommendations-on-continuing-use-cci-management-120220-sage9.PDF

Contact tracing and investigation of complex incidents have continued throughout the pandemic. Once there was clear evidence of widespread, sustained community transmission and the Prime Minister announced the move to the delay phase on 12 March, contact tracing was unlikely to control the outbreak alone. At this point, contact tracing was targeted where it could be most effective during this phase – focusing on the most vulnerable, for instance, carrying out contact tracing in care homes, hospitals and institutional environments. This decision to end the containment phase of the response, implement social distancing and enter the delay phase was a decision made by the Government.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of NHS patients were triaged under the Frailty Index mechanism in (a) March, (b) April and (c) May 2020.

NHS Digital publishes primary care data about the cumulative number of registered patients aged 65 years or over who have had a frailty assessment using the Electronic Frailty Index or any other appropriate assessment tool, up to the end of the reporting period. The data is reported quarterly on a cumulative basis as part of the General Medical Services / Personal Medical Services core contract data collection.

The latest available publication covers the reporting period up to 31 March 2020. This is available at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/gp-contract-services/2019-20

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) process was undertaken and (b) criteria used to award Serco the contract for putting in place contact tracers; whether that process an open competition; on what date the tendering process started; and which other companies submitted a bid to provide those contact tracers.

Serco are an approved supplier on the Crown Commercial Service contact centre framework. They gained their place through fair and open competition via an Official Journal of the European Union procurement. Value for money and capability were part of the assessment criteria. Crown Commercial Service undertook a pre-procurement exercise engaging with all suppliers under the framework to understand which could establish the contract centre in the volumes required and the timescales needed. The department has put in place arrangements to ensure robust contract management in line with relevant guidance.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the scientific basis is for the decision to close station waiting rooms rather than allow the partial use of the facilities with social distancing measures in place.

In the Government guidance to transport operators, there is no explicit ask for rail operators to close waiting rooms. However, it does ask for measures to be put in place to support social distancing e.g. by “rearranging, limiting or removing seating to try and ensure social distancing is observed” The ‘Coronavirus (COVID-19): Safer transport – guidance for operators’ can be found at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/884370/coronavirus-covid-19-safer-transport-guidance-for-operators.pdf

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the NHS plans to restart the (a) collection and (b) publication of data on critical care bed capacity across the NHS.

NHS England data sets are currently under review following communication from the NHS Chief Operating Officer to trusts on 28 March 2020. A date to restart collection and publication of this data has not yet been decided.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for not following the response of (a) South Korea, (b) Singapore, (c) Taiwan, (d) Hong Kong and other places with experience of coronavirus outbreaks.

We recognise that transparency is important in these unprecedented times. Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and papers are not generally published until after an emergency has ended. However, given the extended nature of the pandemic, we have already published some of the statements and the accompanying evidence. These publications can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

In addition, it is intended to further speed up the publication SAGE papers over the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for the decision to not cancel mass events at the start of March 2020 in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

We recognise that transparency is important in these unprecedented times. Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and papers are not generally published until after an emergency has ended. However, given the extended nature of the pandemic, we have already published some of the statements and the accompanying evidence. These publications can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

In addition, it is intended to further speed up the publication SAGE papers over the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for the decision not to require health checks and quarantine in response to the covid-19 outbreak for travellers entering the UK.

We recognise that transparency is important in these unprecedented times. Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and papers are not generally published until after an emergency has ended. However, given the extended nature of the pandemic, we have already published some of the statements and the accompanying evidence. These publications can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

In addition, it is intended to further speed up the publication SAGE papers over the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for the decision to close schools in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

We recognise that transparency is important in these unprecedented times. Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and papers are not generally published until after an emergency has ended. However, given the extended nature of the pandemic, we have already published some of the statements and the accompanying evidence. These publications can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

In addition, it is intended to further speed up the publication SAGE papers over the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for the decision to stop testing and tracking the contacts of people who potentially had covid-19 during the early phases of the covid-19 outbreak.

Contact tracing has been used throughout the COVID-19 response. It was not stopped.

At the start of the outbreak, when we were in the ‘contain’ phase, we traced the contacts of every case. This helped to delay community transmission and bought time for the National Health Service and country to prepare. As the virus became more widespread and the chains of transmission unclear, the country moved to the ‘delay’ phase, and the contact tracing approach changed. Rather than follow up every case, we focused on specific places such as care homes and prisons to control specific outbreaks and protect those most at risk of infection.

On testing, from the start of the pandemic, our first priority was patients. This was vital in helping clinicians to better understand their condition and ensure they received the best quality care. As our capacity increased, we then expanded testing to other groups.

As we move into the next phase of our response, both testing and contact tracing will play an increasingly important role – that is why we are developing an integrated test and trace programme. This includes a new app which will complement existing web-based and phone-based contact tracing approaches. Alongside this there will be swab testing for anyone reporting COVID-19 symptoms.

This programme will play an important role in helping to minimise the spread of the virus in the future.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) drugs and (b) therapies for covid-19 are being assessed by his Department.

Treatments for COVID-19 are currently being trialled in both large Phase III and smaller Phase II clinical trials. The Phase III trials underway include the PRINCIPLE, RECOVERY and REMAP-CAP trials which cover primary, acute and intensive care settings.

As of 13 May 2020, RECOVERY trial drugs included: dexamethasone, lopinavir/ritonavir; hydroxychloroquine; hydrocortisone; prednisolone; methylprednisolone; azithromycin; and tocilizumab. The PRINCIPLE trial drugs included hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin. The REMAP-CAP trial drugs included: Lopinavir/ritonavir; Hydroxychloroquine; corticosteroids; interferon-beta; anakinra; tocilizumab; sarilumab; and heparin. In addition, convalescent plasma is being trialled through REMAP-CAP.

As of 13 May 2020, drugs being tested through ACCORD, a Phase II clinical trial platform, included: bemcentinib; MEDI3506; ravuilizumab; baricitinib; and Gemtuzamab ozogamicin.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the evidential basis for the Government decision not to recommend that the public wear face masks in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

We recognise that transparency is important in these unprecedented times. Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and papers are not generally published until after an emergency has ended. However, given the extended nature of the pandemic, we have already published some of the statements and the accompanying evidence. These publications can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

In addition, it is intended to further speed up the publication SAGE papers over the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will publish the model and input parameters used by Imperial College London in their paper entitled Report 9: Impact of non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) to reduce COVID-19 mortality and healthcare demand, which informed Government policy on the covid-19 lockdown.

The model referred to in the question is not held by the Government. It is held by its creators, and we understand the code for the Imperial model has been made available online by the authors. The information it provides will be an element considered by Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling (SPI-M) when reaching its consensus statement to share with the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies. SPI-M consensus statements and supporting documents are published periodically and can be found on GOV.UK.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will publish statistics on the risk of death posed by covid-19, by gender, after removing co-morbidities.

Government statistics on the risk of death posed by COVID-19, by age group, ethnic group and gender, after removing co-morbidities, are not currently published.

We have asked Public Health England to review COVID-19 outcomes among different groups to better understand how factors such as ethnicity, deprivation, age, gender and obesity could impact on how people are affected, and to explore underpinning reasons for disparities.

We are also supporting the National Institute for Health Research’s call for rapid research proposals on COVID-19 and ethnicity.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will publish statistics on the risk of death posed by covid-19, by age group, after removing co-morbidities.

Government statistics on the risk of death posed by COVID-19, by age group, ethnic group and gender, after removing co-morbidities, are not currently published.

We have asked Public Health England to review COVID-19 outcomes among different groups to better understand how factors such as ethnicity, deprivation, age, gender and obesity could impact on how people are affected, and to explore underpinning reasons for disparities.

We are also supporting the National Institute for Health Research’s call for rapid research proposals on COVID-19 and ethnicity.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will publish statistics on the risk of death posed by covid-19, by ethnic group, after removing co-morbidities.

Government statistics on the risk of death posed by COVID-19, by age group, ethnic group and gender, after removing co-morbidities, are not currently published.

We have asked Public Health England to review COVID-19 outcomes among different groups to better understand how factors such as ethnicity, deprivation, age, gender and obesity could impact on how people are affected, and to explore underpinning reasons for disparities.

We are also supporting the National Institute for Health Research’s call for rapid research proposals on COVID-19 and ethnicity.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of changes to the NHS pension scheme on doctors' working hours.

The Government is aware that the annual allowance may contribute to decisions from senior clinicians to reduce their National Health Service commitments, although a precise estimate of the change in consultants’ working hours as a result of pension tax is not available. The Government is listening closely to concerns raised by senior doctors and NHS employers about the tapered annual allowance.

The NHS has implemented a short-term measure to compensate NHS clinicians at retirement for the effect on their pensions of annual allowance tax charges incurred in 2019/20. To address this issue for future years, the Government is holding an urgent review of the annual allowance taper. The review will report at Budget on 11 March and will also consider the findings from the Department’s recent consultation on a package of pension flexibility for NHS clinicians who face annual allowance charges.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps are being taken to reduce the levels of nitrates in meat products.

Nitrates and nitrites are used as preservatives and are important for inhibiting microbial growth, in particular Clostridium Botulinum in processed meat such as bacon and hams. They work against microorganisms that can spoil food, as well as those that cause foodborne disease, and are naturally present in certain vegetables such as swiss chard, celery and spinach.

Based on scientific evaluation, legislation specifies the maximum amount of nitrates and nitrites that can be added to various meat products to ensure that only safe levels of nitrates are used. The Food Standards Agency works closely with the meat industry to ensure that nitrates and nitrites are used at the lowest possible levels to achieve this necessary technological function, without jeopardising product safety.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure families from the UK who are detained in North East Syria receive medical care, including in cases where there is a clear risk to life.

The UK has no consular presence within Syria, which makes it difficult to provide direct consular assistance, but we carefully consider whether and how we can help every British national who directly seeks our assistance. The provision of medical care within camps in North East Syria is a matter for the camp authorities, but UK aid is provided to those in acute need in these camps, including British nationals. For example, in Al Hol camp, we help fund a wide range of activities including basic, life-saving healthcare, food, hygiene products, child protection and shelter, in addition to informal education support. When the population substantially increased in early 2019, UK aid provided 1,300 tents to the camp. The UK's funding is flexible and allows partners on the ground to plan for spikes in need.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to facilitate welfare and proof of life checks for families from Britain who are detained in north-east Syria.

The UK has no consular presence within Syria from which to provide assistance. This makes it difficult to help but we take a case-by-case approach to any requests for assistance, which includes liaising with partners on the ground where feasible.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with the Turkish government on (a) the conflict in Northern Syria and (b) that country's policy towards YPG forces.

Ministers and officials regularly discuss the situation in northern Syria with the Government of Turkey. The Foreign Secretary discussed international efforts on Syria with Turkish Foreign Minister Çavusoglu during in his visit to London on 8 July.

We also regularly discuss our differences of views on the YPG, which is an important part of the Syrian Democratic Forces. We acknowledge Turkey's security concerns regarding the PKK. The UK sees a clear distinction between the PKK, which we proscribed as a terrorist organisation in 2001, and the SDF, the partner force of the Global Coalition against Daesh in Syria. We pay tribute to the courage and sacrifices made by SDF in the fight against Daesh. We continue to urge the Kurdish elements of the SDF to distance themselves from the PKK and its terrorist activity. The UK also calls on all parties to the conflict in Syria to respect international law.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether it is his policy that the activities of Kurdish fighters in Syria constitute terrorism.

The UK sees a clear distinction between the aims of the PKK, which we proscribed as a terrorist organisation in 2001, and the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), the partner force of the Global Coalition against Daesh in Syria. We pay tribute to the courage and sacrifices made by SDF in the fight against Daesh. We continue to urge the Kurdish elements of the SDF to distance themselves from the PKK and its terrorist activity. The UK also calls on all parties to the conflict in Syria to respect international law.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what (a) financial, (b) logistical and (c) military support has been provided by the Government to Kurdish fighters in Syria.

As part of the Global Coalition the UK has provided military support, including airstrikes, to the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), of which the Kurdish YPG are a contingent part, in the campaign to remove Daesh from north-eastern Syria. We have also provided humanitarian and limited stabilisation support to address the immediate needs of the local population in areas under SDF control in north-eastern Syria. We maintain political and diplomatic contact with a number of Kurdish groups to work towards a political solution to the conflict.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with the Turkish government on British volunteers fighting with the Peoples Protection Forces, known as the YPG.

We have regular discussions with the Turkish authorities on the issue of stopping foreign fighters passing through Turkey to or from Syria. Since 2011, the FCO has advised against all travel to Syria. As we have made clear, where individuals travel to the region to participate in fighting and then return, they will be investigated. Any decision on whether to prosecute will be taken independently by the Crown Prosecution Service on a case by case basis.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with its Turkish counterpart on recent legal action in British courts against individuals returning to the UK following periods fighting with the Peoples Protection Forces known as the YPG.

We have regular discussions with the Turkish authorities on the issue of stopping foreign fighters passing through Turkey to or from Syria. Since 2011, the FCO has advised against all travel to Syria. As we have made clear, where individuals travel to the region to participate in fighting and then return, they will be investigated. Any decision on whether to prosecute will be taken independently by the Crown Prosecution Service on a case by case basis.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answers of 18 May 2020 to Questions 44961 and 44962, if he will publish the results of the communications his Department has had with British Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates on covid-19.

FCO Ministers and officials in the UK and in Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates, constantly engage with our international partners to understand their approaches to tackling COVID-19; inform our policy-making; and agree international action in response to the crisis. The FCO does not routinely publish internal communications

Nigel Adams
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what analysis his Department has carried out on the response to covid-19 in (a) South Korea, (b) Taiwan, (c) Singapore, (d) Hong Kong and (e) Australia.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) officials are in regular communication with British Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates to monitor COVID-19 developments across the world. Furthermore, Ministers and senior officials engage their international counterparts regularly. The FCO is looking closely at what others across the world are doing to tackle COVID-19, and is harnessing the UK's diplomatic network to best understand the approaches taken by others.

Nigel Adams
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what analysis his Department has carried out on the response to covid-19 in (a) Austria, (b) Germany, (c) Italy, (d) France, (e) Spain, (f) Sweden, (g) Norway and (h) United States.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) officials are in regular communication with British Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates to monitor COVID-19 developments across the world. Furthermore, Ministers and senior officials engage their international counterparts regularly. The FCO is looking closely at what others across the world are doing to tackle COVID-19, and is harnessing the UK's diplomatic network to best understand the approaches taken by others.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what processes he has in place for UK embassies, high commissions and consulates to provide his Department with information on how covid-19 is being handled throughout the world.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office officials are in regular communication with British Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates to monitor COVID-19 developments across the world. Ministers and senior officials also regularly engage with their international counterparts. This includes in multilateral fora such as G7 Foreign Ministers or NATO and bilaterally.

Nigel Adams
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has consulted representatives of (a) the travel industry and b) representatives of covid-19 test providers on the potential merits of removing VAT from the cost of covid-19 test services required for travel abroad; and if he will make a statement.

VAT is a broad-based tax on consumption and the standard rate of 20 per cent normally applies to most goods and services, including PCR tests. VAT makes a significant contribution towards the public finances, raising about £130 billion in 2019/20. This helped to fund the Government's priorities in key areas such as health, schools, and defence. Any loss in tax revenue would have to be balanced by a reduction in public spending, increased borrowing or increased taxation elsewhere.

Medical testing, where it is administered by registered health professionals, is exempt from VAT. The Government also continues to offer free COVID-19 testing for those with COVID-19 symptoms.

Competition among private providers in the market for COVID-19 tests has already worked to reduce the cost of PCR tests significantly, without Government intervention, and the Government expects these prices to continue to decrease over time. In order to reflect the recent reduction in the price of PCR tests that are available privately, NHS Test and Trace has already decreased the cost of the tests that they provide for international arrivals.

17th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the Exchequer of removing VAT from the price of covid-19 test services in each quarter in 2021-22.

VAT is a broad-based tax on consumption and the standard rate of 20 per cent normally applies to most goods and services, including PCR tests. VAT makes a significant contribution towards the public finances, raising about £130 billion in 2019/20. This helped to fund the Government's priorities in key areas such as health, schools, and defence. Any loss in tax revenue would have to be balanced by a reduction in public spending, increased borrowing or increased taxation elsewhere.

Medical testing, where it is administered by registered health professionals, is exempt from VAT. The Government also continues to offer free COVID-19 testing for those with COVID-19 symptoms.

Competition among private providers in the market for COVID-19 tests has already worked to reduce the cost of PCR tests significantly, without Government intervention, and the Government expects these prices to continue to decrease over time. In order to reflect the recent reduction in the price of PCR tests that are available privately, NHS Test and Trace has already decreased the cost of the tests that they provide for international arrivals.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion of loan charge cases remained unsettled after the 30 September deadline.

At the time of the independent review of the Loan Charge, about 12,000 employers and individuals had the opportunity to avoid the Loan Charge by concluding settlements, having provided all the relevant information to HMRC by 5 April 2019. Early indications are that as at 2 October about 60 percent of these taxpayers have either settled, informed HMRC that they had instead decided to report and pay the Loan Charge, or have been taken out of scope of the Loan Charge following the Government’s changes in response to the independent review.

HMRC are continuing settlement discussions with a relatively small number of taxpayers who were prevented from meeting the 30 September deadline by exceptional circumstances beyond their control, such as recent hospitalisation. HMRC’s criteria for continuing settlement discussions beyond the 30 September deadline are:

  • The taxpayer had actively engaged in the settlement process until the occurrence of a factor, and
  • The factor is entirely outside the control of the taxpayer, and
  • The factor prevented the taxpayer from settling by 30 September, and
  • Absent the factor, the taxpayer would have been able to settle by 30 September, and
  • The taxpayer will be able, and agrees, to settle within a defined period of no more than 3 months after the 30 September.

HMRC do not hold aggregate data on when individual taxpayers were issued with settlement offers.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what criteria HM Revenue and Customs use to decide whether individual Loan Charge settlement discussions can continue past the 30 September settlement deadline.

At the time of the independent review of the Loan Charge, about 12,000 employers and individuals had the opportunity to avoid the Loan Charge by concluding settlements, having provided all the relevant information to HMRC by 5 April 2019. Early indications are that as at 2 October about 60 percent of these taxpayers have either settled, informed HMRC that they had instead decided to report and pay the Loan Charge, or have been taken out of scope of the Loan Charge following the Government’s changes in response to the independent review.

HMRC are continuing settlement discussions with a relatively small number of taxpayers who were prevented from meeting the 30 September deadline by exceptional circumstances beyond their control, such as recent hospitalisation. HMRC’s criteria for continuing settlement discussions beyond the 30 September deadline are:

  • The taxpayer had actively engaged in the settlement process until the occurrence of a factor, and
  • The factor is entirely outside the control of the taxpayer, and
  • The factor prevented the taxpayer from settling by 30 September, and
  • Absent the factor, the taxpayer would have been able to settle by 30 September, and
  • The taxpayer will be able, and agrees, to settle within a defined period of no more than 3 months after the 30 September.

HMRC do not hold aggregate data on when individual taxpayers were issued with settlement offers.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people subject to the Loan Charge were offered settlements (a) four weeks, (b) three weeks, (c) two weeks, (d) one week and (e) less than one week before the 30 September settlement deadline.

At the time of the independent review of the Loan Charge, about 12,000 employers and individuals had the opportunity to avoid the Loan Charge by concluding settlements, having provided all the relevant information to HMRC by 5 April 2019. Early indications are that as at 2 October about 60 percent of these taxpayers have either settled, informed HMRC that they had instead decided to report and pay the Loan Charge, or have been taken out of scope of the Loan Charge following the Government’s changes in response to the independent review.

HMRC are continuing settlement discussions with a relatively small number of taxpayers who were prevented from meeting the 30 September deadline by exceptional circumstances beyond their control, such as recent hospitalisation. HMRC’s criteria for continuing settlement discussions beyond the 30 September deadline are:

  • The taxpayer had actively engaged in the settlement process until the occurrence of a factor, and
  • The factor is entirely outside the control of the taxpayer, and
  • The factor prevented the taxpayer from settling by 30 September, and
  • Absent the factor, the taxpayer would have been able to settle by 30 September, and
  • The taxpayer will be able, and agrees, to settle within a defined period of no more than 3 months after the 30 September.

HMRC do not hold aggregate data on when individual taxpayers were issued with settlement offers.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether any recipient of Loan Charge settlement letters has received letters containing confidential information belonging to other people.

HMRC take taxpayer confidentiality seriously. Of the tens of thousands of items of communication that HMRC have sent to taxpayers in recent months about their disguised remuneration usage, HMRC are aware of fewer than 10 occasions where confidential information was sent to the wrong taxpayer in error. In these circumstances HMRC follow the necessary processes to undertake corrective action.

HMRC issue settlement calculations to those who have come forward to settle their tax affairs based on the information they provided to HMRC. The settlement offer letter explains that they can ask HMRC to reconsider the calculations if they believe the figures set out in the letter are not correct.

To maintain a consistent approach, the terms of any settlement opportunity must fall within HMRC’s published Litigation and Settlement Strategy and apply equally to all those who may wish to take up the opportunity. As set out in the Litigation and Settlement Strategy, HMRC will only settle for an amount that is consistent with the law.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how HM Revenue and Customs calculates loan charge settlement offers; and what processes are in place to ensure all loan charge settlement offers are calculated consistently.

HMRC take taxpayer confidentiality seriously. Of the tens of thousands of items of communication that HMRC have sent to taxpayers in recent months about their disguised remuneration usage, HMRC are aware of fewer than 10 occasions where confidential information was sent to the wrong taxpayer in error. In these circumstances HMRC follow the necessary processes to undertake corrective action.

HMRC issue settlement calculations to those who have come forward to settle their tax affairs based on the information they provided to HMRC. The settlement offer letter explains that they can ask HMRC to reconsider the calculations if they believe the figures set out in the letter are not correct.

To maintain a consistent approach, the terms of any settlement opportunity must fall within HMRC’s published Litigation and Settlement Strategy and apply equally to all those who may wish to take up the opportunity. As set out in the Litigation and Settlement Strategy, HMRC will only settle for an amount that is consistent with the law.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what arrangements HM Revenue and Customs been put in place for people subject to the Loan Charge who are experiencing financial hardship as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

The Government and Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) are acutely aware of the current economic challenges facing taxpayers as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

HMRC have a strong, established approach to supporting those who are unable to pay the tax they owe in full, through payment arrangements for those who reach a settlement agreement with HMRC, and Time to Pay (TTP) arrangements which are available for those paying the Loan Charge. These are tailored to each individual’s financial circumstances.

Anyone worried about their ability to pay tax owed, as a result of a change in their financial circumstances, should get in touch with HMRC as soon as possible. A TTP arrangement is designed to be flexible and is not a fixed contract. It can be amended over time in order to enable HMRC to lengthen the arrangement if expenses increase or income decreases.

HMRC are also able to refer taxpayers to an external body to provide independent advice on options available to people who are unable to pay or are in difficulty with their debts.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people that have died by suicide as a result of the 2019 Loan Charge.

The Government takes concerns over the physical and mental wellbeing of taxpayers very seriously. These cases are complex and typically involve many different factors.

There are no cases in which suicide is known to have been the result of the Loan Charge. HMRC have referred five cases to the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) where HMRC have been notified that an individual has taken their life and had used a disguised remuneration scheme.

The IOPC has advised in two of these cases that they felt it was appropriate for HMRC to review the case internally. In the other three, it returned the matter to HMRC to proceed as appropriate.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what revenue has accrued to the public purse from taxation on the purchase of digital books.

The details that HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) collect from taxpayers on their VAT returns do not provide enough detail to be able to quantify precisely the revenue raised from these supplies. HMRC do not require detail on particular products and customer types because it would place a considerable administrative burden on businesses.
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much revenue has accrued to the public purse from IR35 in each year since it was implemented.

The off-payroll working rules (IR35) have been in place for nearly 20 years. They are designed to ensure that individuals working like employees but through their own company pay broadly the same tax and National Insurance contributions (NICs) as other employees who are directly employed.

HMRC do not have an annual breakdown of revenue received from the application of the off-payroll working rules. The Government estimates that only one in ten personal services companies (PSCs) who should be operating the rules are doing so. This non-compliance is projected to increase from £700 million per year in 2017/18 to £1.3 billion per year in 2023/24.

HMRC have measured the impact of reforming the off-payroll rules in the public sector and estimate that the reform has already raised an additional £550 million in income tax and NICs in the first 12 months since it was introduced.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of changes to IR35 on the number of people working as (a) freelancers and (b) contractors in the UK.

The Tax Information and Impact Note (TIIN) published in July 2019 sets out HMRC’s assessment that the reform to the off-payroll working rules is expected to affect 170,000 individuals. The TIIN can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/rules-for-off-payroll-working-from-april-2020/rules-for-off-payroll-working-from-april-2020.

HMRC are undertaking an extensive programme of education and support to help organisations and contractors prepare for the reform.

As a result of the review into the reform of the off-payroll working rules published on 27 February 2020, HMRC are ramping up communication, including webinars and guides, to support contractors in understanding the rules. This will complement the significant work already being taken to support businesses to prepare.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment the Government has made of the effect of funding allocated from the public purse to education in each region on the level of productivity in those regions.

When considering funding for public services, including education, the government considers a range of factors as a matter of course, including the impact on regional productivity. The Government is committed to uniting and levelling up, spreading opportunity across the whole of the UK - we are looking at how best to do this and I will set out more details in due course.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment the Government has been made of the effect of recent changes to Vehicle Excise Duty on the motorhome industry in (a) the UK, (b) Yorkshire and the Humber and (c) Haltemprice and Howden constituency.

The Government reformed VED for motorhomes to encourage the uptake of vehicles with lower carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to help us meet our legally binding climate change targets. It is right that under the reformed system motorhomes with high CO2 emissions pay greater first year VED than those with lower emissions.

However, I have met with representatives of the industry and I am sensitive to their concerns. The Government is committed to levelling up economic performance throughout the country, including in Yorkshire and the Humber.

As with all taxes, the Government keeps the VED treatment of motorhomes under review. Any changes will be considered by the Chancellor and announced at fiscal events.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people who would remain within scope of the Loan Charge if the recommendations of the Independent Review into the Loan Charge are fully implemented.

The Government published Sir Amyas Morse’s independent review of the Loan Charge on 20 December, alongside the Government’s response to his recommendations.

The Government accepted all but one of Sir Amyas’s recommendations. This means that out of the estimated 50,000 individuals who used a loan scheme between 1999 and 2019 and did not settle with HMRC before March 2016, it is estimated that more than 30,000 people will benefit from the significant package of measures announced, 11,000 of whom will be taken out of scope of the charge altogether.

12th Jul 2021
What recent progress she has made with the Secretary of State for Defence on implementing the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy.

The Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy was implemented on 1 April this year.

We are working closely with the Ministry of Defence to accelerate the relocation of locally employed staff, and their families, from Afghanistan. A charter flight carrying 117 individuals arrived safely at the end of June, with more to follow this month.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment her Department has made of the eligibility of Humberside for funding for Violence Reduction Units.

We have invested £105.5m over three years into the Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) programme, establishing and developing 18 VRUs in the areas worst affected by serious violence. The minimum allocation any one VRU receives each financial year is £880,000. VRUs do not operate in a single form, therefore costs associated with their operations vary significantly; however, funding made available through the programme has been sufficient to allow for the establishment and sustainment of a range of VRU operating models.

These 18 areas have been selected for funding based on their volumes of hospital admissions relating to injury with a sharp object, which represents the most consistent and reliable data source for serious violence. Collectively, these areas have accounted for 80% of total relevant admissions, allowing VRU funding to focus on a significant majority of the serious violence problem across England and Wales.

A review of this data informed the most recent decisions about VRU funding made in February 2021. At this point, the available data demonstrated that the Humberside police force area, which includes the constituency of Haltemprice and Howden and county of East Riding of Yorkshire, did not feature in the ranked list of areas experiencing the greatest volume of hospital admissions for injury with a sharp object that collectively accounts for 80% of said admissions (i.e. the top 18 force areas, of which Humberside was not one, collectively accounted for 80% of relevant admissions). On this occasion, Ministers determined not to provide funding from the Serious Violence fund for Humberside.

Future VRU funding for currently eligible and ineligible areas, and any potential allocation models, will be carefully considered in the context of Departmental priorities through the upcoming Spending Review process.

Further information on the levels of police recorded crime within Haltemprice and Howden and/or East Riding of Yorkshire can be found in the Open Data Tables, available here: Police recorded crime and outcomes open data tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The Home Office collects and publishes this information at the CSP level; information on offences involving firearms or knives are available at the Police Force Area level from the same link.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment her Department has made of the level of serious violence in (a) Haltemprice and Howden, (b) East Riding of Yorkshire and (C) Humberside.

We have invested £105.5m over three years into the Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) programme, establishing and developing 18 VRUs in the areas worst affected by serious violence. The minimum allocation any one VRU receives each financial year is £880,000. VRUs do not operate in a single form, therefore costs associated with their operations vary significantly; however, funding made available through the programme has been sufficient to allow for the establishment and sustainment of a range of VRU operating models.

These 18 areas have been selected for funding based on their volumes of hospital admissions relating to injury with a sharp object, which represents the most consistent and reliable data source for serious violence. Collectively, these areas have accounted for 80% of total relevant admissions, allowing VRU funding to focus on a significant majority of the serious violence problem across England and Wales.

A review of this data informed the most recent decisions about VRU funding made in February 2021. At this point, the available data demonstrated that the Humberside police force area, which includes the constituency of Haltemprice and Howden and county of East Riding of Yorkshire, did not feature in the ranked list of areas experiencing the greatest volume of hospital admissions for injury with a sharp object that collectively accounts for 80% of said admissions (i.e. the top 18 force areas, of which Humberside was not one, collectively accounted for 80% of relevant admissions). On this occasion, Ministers determined not to provide funding from the Serious Violence fund for Humberside.

Future VRU funding for currently eligible and ineligible areas, and any potential allocation models, will be carefully considered in the context of Departmental priorities through the upcoming Spending Review process.

Further information on the levels of police recorded crime within Haltemprice and Howden and/or East Riding of Yorkshire can be found in the Open Data Tables, available here: Police recorded crime and outcomes open data tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The Home Office collects and publishes this information at the CSP level; information on offences involving firearms or knives are available at the Police Force Area level from the same link.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of updating the areas eligible for Violence Reduction Unit funding.

We have invested £105.5m over three years into the Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) programme, establishing and developing 18 VRUs in the areas worst affected by serious violence. The minimum allocation any one VRU receives each financial year is £880,000. VRUs do not operate in a single form, therefore costs associated with their operations vary significantly; however, funding made available through the programme has been sufficient to allow for the establishment and sustainment of a range of VRU operating models.

These 18 areas have been selected for funding based on their volumes of hospital admissions relating to injury with a sharp object, which represents the most consistent and reliable data source for serious violence. Collectively, these areas have accounted for 80% of total relevant admissions, allowing VRU funding to focus on a significant majority of the serious violence problem across England and Wales.

A review of this data informed the most recent decisions about VRU funding made in February 2021. At this point, the available data demonstrated that the Humberside police force area, which includes the constituency of Haltemprice and Howden and county of East Riding of Yorkshire, did not feature in the ranked list of areas experiencing the greatest volume of hospital admissions for injury with a sharp object that collectively accounts for 80% of said admissions (i.e. the top 18 force areas, of which Humberside was not one, collectively accounted for 80% of relevant admissions). On this occasion, Ministers determined not to provide funding from the Serious Violence fund for Humberside.

Future VRU funding for currently eligible and ineligible areas, and any potential allocation models, will be carefully considered in the context of Departmental priorities through the upcoming Spending Review process.

Further information on the levels of police recorded crime within Haltemprice and Howden and/or East Riding of Yorkshire can be found in the Open Data Tables, available here: Police recorded crime and outcomes open data tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The Home Office collects and publishes this information at the CSP level; information on offences involving firearms or knives are available at the Police Force Area level from the same link.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what data her Department uses in determining which areas receive funding for Violence Reduction Units.

We have invested £105.5m over three years into the Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) programme, establishing and developing 18 VRUs in the areas worst affected by serious violence. The minimum allocation any one VRU receives each financial year is £880,000. VRUs do not operate in a single form, therefore costs associated with their operations vary significantly; however, funding made available through the programme has been sufficient to allow for the establishment and sustainment of a range of VRU operating models.

These 18 areas have been selected for funding based on their volumes of hospital admissions relating to injury with a sharp object, which represents the most consistent and reliable data source for serious violence. Collectively, these areas have accounted for 80% of total relevant admissions, allowing VRU funding to focus on a significant majority of the serious violence problem across England and Wales.

A review of this data informed the most recent decisions about VRU funding made in February 2021. At this point, the available data demonstrated that the Humberside police force area, which includes the constituency of Haltemprice and Howden and county of East Riding of Yorkshire, did not feature in the ranked list of areas experiencing the greatest volume of hospital admissions for injury with a sharp object that collectively accounts for 80% of said admissions (i.e. the top 18 force areas, of which Humberside was not one, collectively accounted for 80% of relevant admissions). On this occasion, Ministers determined not to provide funding from the Serious Violence fund for Humberside.

Future VRU funding for currently eligible and ineligible areas, and any potential allocation models, will be carefully considered in the context of Departmental priorities through the upcoming Spending Review process.

Further information on the levels of police recorded crime within Haltemprice and Howden and/or East Riding of Yorkshire can be found in the Open Data Tables, available here: Police recorded crime and outcomes open data tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The Home Office collects and publishes this information at the CSP level; information on offences involving firearms or knives are available at the Police Force Area level from the same link.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of people on pre-charge bail for over 12 months in 2019-20 are under investigation by the National Crime Agency.

The Home Office collect and publish data on the number of individuals on pre-charge bail and the length of pre-charge bail. The data are published as part of ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ publication, available in Annex B: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2020

However, data on the proportion of individuals on pre-charge bail under investigation by the National Crime Agency are not available.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to reduce the length of time that suspects are held on pre-charge bail.

Following public consultation, we are legislating in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill to adjust the timescales to better reflect operational realities, while retaining the important independent oversight of the court within the process. Magistrates will continue to make key decisions on more complex, lengthier cases.

The Government is committed to restoring confidence in the criminal justice system and there is significant activity under way to increase the speed, capacity, and efficiency of every stage of a case. The Crown Prosecution Service, National Police Chief’s Council and College of Policing have recently published the Case Progression Commitment which outlines the measures that will be taken to improve efficient case progression.

As part of the government’s recruitment drive which will increase the police’s capacity, police forces have already hired nearly 9,000 officers from its target to recruit 20,000 by 2023.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how long on average a National Crime Agency investigation takes before a charging decision is made in cases where a suspect has been released on bail.

The amount of time taken for an investigation and a charging decision to be reached can vary depending on the case and its complexity. The NCA will always look to complete work as quickly as possible. However, NCA cases are by their very nature complex and the new Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill specifically recognises this in Schedule 4 of the Bill. It makes amendments relating to pre-charge bail and several of the amendments have the effect of recognising NCA cases as ‘exceptionally complex’ and increasing the time limits on pre-charge detention before authorisation must be sought for extensions.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions individuals have been held on police bail for over five years in the last (a) one year, (b) two years, (c) three years, (d) four years and (e) five years.

The Home Office collect and publish data on use of various police powers, including pre-charge bail. Information has been collected on the number of individuals on pre-charge bail and the length of pre-charge bail since April 2017. The data are published as part of the annual ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical release, available in Annex B:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

However, data on other types of police bail are not available.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions individuals have been held on police bail for over three years in the last (a) one year, (b) two years, (c) three years, (d) four years and (e) five years.

The Home Office collect and publish data on use of various police powers, including pre-charge bail. Information has been collected on the number of individuals on pre-charge bail and the length of pre-charge bail since April 2017. The data are published as part of the annual ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical release, available in Annex B:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

However, data on other types of police bail are not available.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions individuals have been held on police bail for over 12 months in the last (a) one year, (b) two years, (c) three years, (d) four years, (e) five years and (f) six or more years.

The Home Office collect and publish data on use of various police powers, including pre-charge bail. Information has been collected on the number of individuals on pre-charge bail and the length of pre-charge bail since April 2017. The data are published as part of the annual ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical release, available in Annex B:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

However, data on other types of police bail are not available.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people currently being held on police bail have been so held for over (a) one year, (b) two years, (c) three years, (d) four years and (e) five or more years.

The Home Office collect and publish data on use of various police powers, including pre-charge bail. Information has been collected on the number of individuals on pre-charge bail and the length of pre-charge bail since April 2017. The data are published as part of the annual ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical release, available in Annex B:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

However, data on other types of police bail are not available.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding has been (a) allocated and (b) budgeted for trials collecting Internet Connection Records.

The acquisition and retention of Internet Connection Records (ICRs) is provided for in the Investigatory Powers Act 2016. ICRs are subject to restrictions set out in the Act and can only be acquired for the specific investigative purposes set out in Section 62.

Acquisition of ICRs in the vast majority of cases is subject to independent authorisation by the Office for Communications Data Authorisations. The use of communications data is subject to the oversight of the Investigatory Powers Commissioner (IPC).

It is longstanding government policy not to disclose the specific communications data (CD) acquired by public authorities or retained by telecommunications operators under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) and its predecessors. This would include details of any data to be acquired or retained and the details of any Telecommunications Operators involved in any trial.

It would be operationally and commercially sensitive to disclose the funding allocations for a trial or any other use of investigatory powers.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what data has been (a) collected and (b) stored as part of the two trials collecting Internet Connection Records.

The acquisition and retention of Internet Connection Records (ICRs) is provided for in the Investigatory Powers Act 2016. ICRs are subject to restrictions set out in the Act and can only be acquired for the specific investigative purposes set out in Section 62.

Acquisition of ICRs in the vast majority of cases is subject to independent authorisation by the Office for Communications Data Authorisations. The use of communications data is subject to the oversight of the Investigatory Powers Commissioner (IPC).

It is longstanding government policy not to disclose the specific communications data (CD) acquired by public authorities or retained by telecommunications operators under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) and its predecessors. This would include details of any data to be acquired or retained and the details of any Telecommunications Operators involved in any trial.

It would be operationally and commercially sensitive to disclose the funding allocations for a trial or any other use of investigatory powers.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the legal basis is for the trials recording the Internet Connection Records of their customers, including any relevant sections of applicable legislation.

The acquisition and retention of Internet Connection Records (ICRs) is provided for in the Investigatory Powers Act 2016. ICRs are subject to restrictions set out in the Act and can only be acquired for the specific investigative purposes set out in Section 62.

Acquisition of ICRs in the vast majority of cases is subject to independent authorisation by the Office for Communications Data Authorisations. The use of communications data is subject to the oversight of the Investigatory Powers Commissioner (IPC).

It is longstanding government policy not to disclose the specific communications data (CD) acquired by public authorities or retained by telecommunications operators under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) and its predecessors. This would include details of any data to be acquired or retained and the details of any Telecommunications Operators involved in any trial.

It would be operationally and commercially sensitive to disclose the funding allocations for a trial or any other use of investigatory powers.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish details of the two internet service providers that are reported to be conducting trials with her Department and National Crime Agency with the intention to collect Internet Connection Records.

The acquisition and retention of Internet Connection Records (ICRs) is provided for in the Investigatory Powers Act 2016. ICRs are subject to restrictions set out in the Act and can only be acquired for the specific investigative purposes set out in Section 62.

Acquisition of ICRs in the vast majority of cases is subject to independent authorisation by the Office for Communications Data Authorisations. The use of communications data is subject to the oversight of the Investigatory Powers Commissioner (IPC).

It is longstanding government policy not to disclose the specific communications data (CD) acquired by public authorities or retained by telecommunications operators under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) and its predecessors. This would include details of any data to be acquired or retained and the details of any Telecommunications Operators involved in any trial.

It would be operationally and commercially sensitive to disclose the funding allocations for a trial or any other use of investigatory powers.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to limit the use of child sources in criminal investigations.

Young people under 18 years of age are only deployed as Covert Human Intelligence Sources (CHIS) in extremely rare and exceptional circumstances and are authorised in very small numbers.

For example, the Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office (IPCO) confirmed that between January 2015 and December 2018, there were only 17 instances where law enforcement bodies deployed under 18s as CHIS.

In his response on this issue to the Joint Committee on Human Rights, the then Investigatory Powers Commissioner noted that in the “vast majority of cases” deployment of young people as CHIS is only considered “when the juvenile is already engaged in the relevant criminality or is a member of a criminal gang, and that they are not asked to participate in activity that they were not already undertaking.”

While investigators may wish to avoid the use of young people as CHIS, we must recognise that some young people are involved in serious crimes, as perpetrators and victims. Consequently, young people may have unique access to information that is important in preventing and prosecuting gang violence and terrorism. This includes the troubling ‘county lines’ phenomenon which, along with the associated violence, drug dealing and exploitation, has a devastating impact on young people, vulnerable adults and local communities.

Those operating these powers have a duty to ensure they promote the best interests of the young person as a primary consideration. Extensive guidance and enhanced safeguards exist to ensure that the powers are used appropriately, and that young people are suitably safeguarded.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the compliance rate for travel quarantine rules.

A robust system is in place for ensuring the compliance of those who should be self-isolating after travelling to the country. In the vast majority of cases, the public are complying with these measures. However, where we cannot confirm this is the case, referrals are made to the police who will follow up with the individuals directly.

On 30 September, the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) published its latest report on the police use of Covid-19 enforcement notices issued under all emergency health protections. The report showed that up to 22 September, 4,114 case referrals from public health authorities were accepted by police forces in England and Wales relating to the isolation status of a member of the public following travel, under the International Travel Regulations. Of these, 3,216 cases investigated by officers found the individual to be complying with the regulations, with no further action being necessary.

In addition, in the period from 8 June to 14 October, 18 Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) have been issued by Border Force for failure by individuals to provide information at the border.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with police forces on information and intelligence obtained from Uber.

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions Uber has provided information to police forces in (a) 2016, (b) 2017, (c) 2018, (d) 2019 and (e) 2020.

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the necessary warrants have been in place for the sharing of information between Uber and police forces in (a) 2016, (b) 2017, (c) 2018, (d) 2019 and (e) 2020.

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what role her Department has played in any data sharing agreements made between police forces and Uber.

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the legal basis is for the sharing of intelligence from Uber to police forces without the prior granting of a warrant.

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure appointments to the roles of the (a) Surveillance Camera Commissioner and (b) Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material are done so (a) fairly, openly and transparently and (b) within the other requirements set out by the Government’s Governance Code on Public Appointments.

The appointment of a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material is under consideration and will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and take account of any possible implications for legal proceedings.

We are committed to empowering the police to use technologies like biometrics within a strict legal framework and will update parliament on our plans shortly.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has for the future of the roles of (a) Surveillance Camera Commissioner and (b) Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material.

The appointment of a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material is under consideration and will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and take account of any possible implications for legal proceedings.

We are committed to empowering the police to use technologies like biometrics within a strict legal framework and will update parliament on our plans shortly.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has made an assessment of the implications for ongoing legal proceedings of a change in office holder for the Surveillance Camera Commissioner.

The appointment of a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material is under consideration and will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and take account of any possible implications for legal proceedings.

We are committed to empowering the police to use technologies like biometrics within a strict legal framework and will update parliament on our plans shortly.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions she has had with her officials on the recruitment process for the roles of the (a) Surveillance Camera Commissioner and (b) Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material.

The process to appoint a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material, will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and is under consideration including consultation with the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/578498/governance_code_on_public_appointments_16_12_2016.pdf

As set out in the Governance Code, Ministers are consulted about all the possible recruitment options.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she discussed the forthcoming appointments of the (a) Surveillance Camera Commissioner and (b) Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material with the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

The process to appoint a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material, will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and is under consideration including consultation with the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/578498/governance_code_on_public_appointments_16_12_2016.pdf

As set out in the Governance Code, Ministers are consulted about all the possible recruitment options.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to enable the appointments of the (a) Surveillance Camera Commissioner and (b) Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material when the current post holders terms conclude.

The process to appoint a Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material, will be made in accordance with the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments (Governance Code), and is under consideration including consultation with the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/578498/governance_code_on_public_appointments_16_12_2016.pdf

As set out in the Governance Code, Ministers are consulted about all the possible recruitment options.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the Investigatory Powers Commissioner's Office's ability to effectively oversee the Intelligence Services.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner (IPC) recently published its annual report for 2018. The report includes comprehensive data on the IPC office’s structures and processes for overseeing the Intelligence Services.

It also includes specific chapters on each of the main UK intelligence agencies. The Prime Minister commended this report to both Houses on 5 March.

The report demonstrates the high quality of oversight of our intelligence and security agencies. The Home Office maintains regular contact with the IPC and his office at Ministerial and official level to ensure that they are resourced and equipped to carry out its statutory duties.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) Technical Capability Notices and (b) National Security Notices have been issued in each year since 2016.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 allows the Government to place obligations on telecommunications operators or postal operators through a Technical Capability Notice or National Security Notice.

The Act governs these notices and provides extensive privacy safeguards and a robust oversight regime, including approval of notices by an independent Judicial Commissioner.

For reasons of national security, it would be not be appropriate to disclose the number of Technical Capability Notices and National Security Notices issued.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to regulate the use of facial recognition technology by the Metropolitan Police.

The High Court found in September 2019 that there is a clear and sufficient legal framework for police use of live facial recognition technology. The framework includes police common law powers to protect the public, data protection and human rights legislation and the Surveillance Camera Code of Practice. This means they can only use it for a policing purpose where necessary and proportionate.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people were extradited from the US to the UK for (a) violent and (b) non-violent crimes in each year since 2003.

Since 2003, the following have been extradited from the US to the UK:

Year

Total number extradited

Total number extradited for non-violent offences

2003

2

1

2004

4

1

2005

1

1

2006

4

2

2007

6

3

2008

10

1

2009

7

1

2010

5

3

2011

5

1

2012

4

2

2013

4

0

2014

0

0

2015

2

0

2016

5

2

2017

2

0

2018

5

3

2019

3

0

2020

1

1

TOTAL

70

22

We have taken non-violent offences to include:

  • Fraud
  • Drug related offences
  • Theft
  • Forgery
  • Money laundering
  • Handling stolen goods
  • Obtaining property by deception
  • Tax evasion
  • Unlicensed exporting of goods
  • Obstruction of justice
  • Bribery
  • Robbery
  • Child Abduction

All figures are from local management information, and have not been quality assured to the level of published National Statistics. As such they should be treated as provisional and therefore subject to change. The figures do not include Scotland, which deals with its own extradition cases.

21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, under what circumstances the Government is able to remove the citizenship of a UK national who does not have access to a secondary citizenship.

Section 40 of the British Nationality Act (BNA) 1981 provides for the deprivation of British citizenship.

A decision to deprive British citizenship on the ground it is conducive to the public good can only be made if the person would not be left stateless. Where a deprivation decision is made on the ground it is conducive to the public good because the person has conducted themselves in a manner which is seriously prejudicial to the vital interests of the UK, the Secretary of State must have reasonable grounds for believing the person can become a national of another country.

There is no requirement for a person to have access to another citizenship where a decision to deprive British citizenship is made on the grounds it was obtained by means of fraud, false representation or concealment of a material fact.

UK deprivation legislation is compliant with the 1961 UN Convention on Statelessness.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been extradited from the (a) UK to the US and (b) US to the UK in each year since 2003.

The table below provides a breakdown of extraditions between the UK and the US between 2003 and 2019.

Year

UK to US

US to UK

2003

6

2

2004

8

4

2005

14

1

2006

15

4

2007

9

6

2008

6

10

2009

16

7

2010

12

5

2011

8

5

2012

20

4

2013

11

4

2014

18

0

2015

7

2

2016

8

5

2017

8

2

2018

6

5

2019

10

3

All figures are from local management information and have not been quality assured to the level of published National Statistics. As such they should be treated as provisional and therefore subject to change. The figures do not include Scotland, which deals with its own extradition cases.

16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what his Department's policy is on recording identify theft as a crime.

The theft of another person’s identity is often a pre-cursor to fraud. However, the use of that identity is not itself a recordable crime. A crime is recorded when a financial gain is made from the use of the person’s identity (i.e. when a fraud has taken place). This approach ensures that crimes are not double counted.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he has taken to support employment at BAE Systems in Brough.

While employment at Brough is a matter for BAE Systems, the Ministry of Defence remains engaged with the company to understand its plans for the site. Export growth is particularly important for sustaining jobs, which is why the Ministry of Defence continues to work closely with BAE Systems and other Government Departments in pursuit of various export opportunities.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to criminalise the behaviour of developers who (a) falsify information and (b) are dishonest about their compliance with fire safety standards.

Where a developer dishonestly falsifies information of any kind with a view to profiting from it, that would be likely to constitute an offence of fraud by false representation under the Fraud Act 2006.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much funding the Government has allocated to new social housing in each year since 2010.

The Government is committed to increasing the supply of social housing and has made £9 billion available through the Affordable Homes Programme to March 2022 to deliver approximately 250,000 new affordable homes in a wide range of tenures.

The table below provides details on affordable homes programme funding since 2010. This data may also be found in the public domain at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-oscar-publishing-from-the-database

Financial Year

Affordable Homes Programme Expenditure

2010/11

£2,660,493,213

2011/12

£1,431,994,000

2012/13

£1,136,633,000

2013/14

£1,219,494,000

2014/15

£1,342,398,000

2015/16

£1,256,863,000

2016/17

£747,333,000

2017/18

£1,308,730,000

2018/19

£1,670,312,000

The way in which our delivery partners Homes England and the Greater London Authority allocate this funding across the country is publicly available. To view the further allocations across England regions and local authorities please see the following:

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)