Ministry of Justice

The Ministry of Justice is a major government department, at the heart of the justice system. We work to protect and advance the principles of justice. Our vision is to deliver a world-class justice system that works for everyone in society.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Labour
Steve Reed (LAB - Croydon North)
Shadow Secretary of State for Justice

Liberal Democrat
Wera Hobhouse (LDEM - Bath)
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Justice)

Labour
Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Justice)

Scottish National Party
Anne McLaughlin (SNP - Glasgow North East)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Justice)

Liberal Democrat
Lord Marks of Henley-on-Thames (LDEM - Life peer)
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Justice)

Plaid Cymru
Liz Saville Roberts (PC - Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Shadow PC Spokesperson (Justice)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Lyn Brown (LAB - West Ham)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Alex Cunningham (LAB - Stockton North)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Karl Turner (LAB - Kingston upon Hull East)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Anna McMorrin (LAB - Cardiff North)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Ministers of State
Victoria Atkins (CON - Louth and Horncastle)
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
Victoria Atkins (CON - Louth and Horncastle)
Minister for Afghan resettlement
Kit Malthouse (CON - North West Hampshire)
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
Lord Wolfson of Tredegar (CON - Life peer)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 7th December 2021
14:00
Justice Committee - Oral evidence - Select & Joint Committees
7 Dec 2021, 2 p.m.
Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences
View calendar
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 14th December 2021
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
14 Dec 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
Save to Calendar
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Debates
Monday 29th November 2021
Select Committee Inquiry
Tuesday 21st September 2021
Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences

More than 1,700 people are in prison serving indeterminate sentences for public protection, even though IPP sentences were abolished nearly …

Written Answers
Wednesday 1st December 2021
Reoffenders: Females
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Women need women who support them, published by Advance …
Secondary Legislation
Thursday 18th November 2021
Bills
Wednesday 21st July 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill 2021-22
A Bill to Make provision about the provision that may be made by, and the effects of, quashing orders; to …
Dept. Publications
Wednesday 1st December 2021
11:13

Ministry of Justice Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Nov. 09
Oral Questions
Nov. 20
Topical Questions
Nov. 29
Written Statements
Nov. 17
Westminster Hall
Sep. 22
Adjournment Debate
View All Ministry of Justice Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Ministry of Justice does not have Bills currently before Parliament


Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament

Introduced: 20th May 2020

A Bill to make provision about the sentencing of offenders convicted of terrorism offences, of offences with a terrorist connection or of certain other offences; to make other provision in relation to terrorism; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 27th February 2020

A Bill to implement the Hague Conventions of 1996, 2005 and 2007 and to provide for the implementation of other international agreements on private international law.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 14th December 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 8th January 2020

To require the Parole Board to take into account any failure by a prisoner serving a sentence for unlawful killing or for taking or making an indecent image of a child to disclose information about the victim.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 4th November 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 5th March 2020

A Bill to consolidate certain enactments relating to sentencing.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 22nd October 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 7th January 2020

A bill to make in relation to marriage and civil partnership in England and Wales provision about divorce, dissolution and separation; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 25th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 21st January 2020

A bill to give effect to Law Commission recommendations relating to commencement of enactments relating to sentencing law and to make provision for pre-consolidation amendments of sentencing law

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 8th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 11th February 2020

A Bill to make provision about the release on licence of offenders convicted of terrorist offences or offences with a terrorist connection; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 26th February 2020 and was enacted into law.

Ministry of Justice - Secondary Legislation

These Rules make amendments to the Prison Rules 1999 (S.I. 1999/728) (“the Prison Rules”) and the Young Offender Institution Rules 2000 (S.I. 2000/3371) (“the YOI Rules”). The amendments reflect the changes made by the Prisons (Substance Testing) Act 2021 (c. 18). That Act, which entered into force on 9 December 2021, introduced changes to improve the capability of prisons in England and Wales to test for the use of illicit substances by prisoners. Prior to the changes made by that Act prisons could require prisoners to provide a sample for any “controlled drug” or “drugs specified” in the Prison and YOI Rules. New drugs could be added to the list of those that could be tested for but only by making amendments to the rules by secondary legislation. Due to the chemical composition of psychoactive substances, in particular, being subject to rapid change this meant repeated amendments were needed in response to small changes in substance composition. The changes being made by these Rules mean that tests can be carried out for the broader generic definition of psychoactive substances and “prescription only medicines” and “pharmacy medicines” introduced by the 2021 Act. The changes made by these Rules will help staff in Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) and other agencies to understand the full extent and nature of substance misuse in prisons, and to take appropriate action to prevent it.
View All Ministry of Justice Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

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Petitions with most signatures
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Petition Debates Contributed

The offence of causing 'death by dangerous driving' should be widened to include: failure to stop, call 999 and render aid on scene until further help arrives.

134,934
Petition Closed
5 Sep 2020
closed 1 year, 2 months ago

The Government's manifesto stated “we will make intentional trespass a criminal offence”: an extreme, illiberal & unnecessary attack on ancient freedoms that would threaten walkers, campers, and the wider public. It would further tilt the law in favour of the landowning 1% who own half the country.

The maximum penalty for failure to stop after an incident is points and a 6-month custodial sentence. Causing death by careless/dangerous driving is between 5-14 yrs. The sentence for failing to stop after a fatal collision must be increased.

View All Ministry of Justice Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Justice Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


11 Members of the Justice Committee
Robert Neill Portrait
Robert Neill (Conservative - Bromley and Chislehurst)
Justice Committee Chair since 29th January 2020
Andy Slaughter Portrait
Andy Slaughter (Labour - Hammersmith)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Kieran Mullan Portrait
Kieran Mullan (Conservative - Crewe and Nantwich)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Maria Eagle Portrait
Maria Eagle (Labour - Garston and Halewood)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
James Daly Portrait
James Daly (Conservative - Bury North)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Rob Butler Portrait
Rob Butler (Conservative - Aylesbury)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Janet Daby Portrait
Janet Daby (Labour - Lewisham East)
Justice Committee Member since 22nd February 2021
Angela Crawley Portrait
Angela Crawley (Scottish National Party - Lanark and Hamilton East)
Justice Committee Member since 25th May 2021
Laura Farris Portrait
Laura Farris (Conservative - Newbury)
Justice Committee Member since 8th June 2021
Kate Hollern Portrait
Kate Hollern (Labour - Blackburn)
Justice Committee Member since 13th July 2021
Paul Maynard Portrait
Paul Maynard (Conservative - Blackpool North and Cleveleys)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd November 2021
Justice Committee: Upcoming Events
Justice Committee - Oral evidence
Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences
7 Dec 2021, 2 p.m.
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
The Rt Hon. the Lord Blunkett
The Rt Hon. the Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd
At 3.15pm: Oral evidence
Professor Nick Hardwick - Professor of Criminal Justice, Department of Law and Criminology at Royal Holloway, University of London
Professor Graham Towl - Professor of Psychology at Durham University, and visiting clinical professor at Newcastle University
Dr Jonathan Bild - Deputy Director at Sentencing Academy

View calendar
Justice Committee: Previous Inquiries

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department takes to ensure that at least one official from his Department is present during all (a) meetings and (b) phone calls relating to Government business between Ministers and third parties.

Ministers holding meetings or phone calls on government business are routinely accompanied by a private secretary or other official, in line with the expectations of paragraph 8.14 of the Ministerial Code.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many senior civil servants employed by his Department were based in each of the 12 NUTS1 regions of the UK on (a) 1 March 2019, (b) 1 March 2020, (c) 1 March 2021 and (d) 1 September 2021.

Data for the number of civils servants (headcount) employed by the Ministry of Justice by NUTS1 UK region as at 31st March 2019, 31st March 2020, 31st March 2021 and 30th September 2021 is provided in Table 1 below.

To align with published data an end of month position has been provided.

Table 1 - Ministry of Justice (including executive agency) SCS payroll staff in post by NUTS1 region

31-Mar-19

31-Mar-20

31-Mar-21

30-Sep-21

North East

6

4

6

6

North West

10

13

13

12

Yorkshire and the Humber

11

12

12

8

East Midlands

10

10

14

11

West Midlands

13

14

16

17

East of England

5

5

9

12

London

217

238

222

221

South East

9

9

13

12

South West

8

9

9

6

Wales

4

7

13

14

Scotland

1

2

3

3

Northern Ireland

0

0

0

0

Unknown

0

0

1

1

Total

294

323

331

323

Staff are assigned to a NUTS 1 region based on their HR Location Postcode in the department's HR database.

Those with an Unknown region have either a blank or invalid HR Location Postcode in the department's HR database.

This includes staff who are on TRA (Temporary Responsibility Allowance) to SCS.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department plans to take to ensure that (a) victims of serious crimes and (b) their immediate families are provided with effective support following traumatic events.

The Government is committed to ensuring victims of serious crime, and their loved ones, receive the support they need to cope and, as far as possible, recover in the aftermath of traumatic events.

In 2021/22, the MoJ will be providing £150.5m for victim and witness support services, of which c£115m will be distributed via Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) who commission local, practical and therapeutic support services for victims of all crime types, including serious violence.

The MoJ currently provides up to £4.6m per annum in funding to Victim Support to deliver the Homicide Service which supports immediate family members residing in England and Wales, who are bereaved through homicide both at home and abroad. The service provides families with a dedicated caseworker and offers a full range of emotional, practical, advocacy and peer support, as well as onward referrals to other services such as therapy and counselling.

Victims of terrorism are supported by the Home Office Victims of Terrorism Unit (VTU), who commission support to assist families to cope with, and recover from, the impact and consequences of a terrorist attack, including providing bereavement and psychological support for victims.

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP Wayland, published on 23 November 2021, whether he plans to undertake research on the effect on rehabilitation and reoffending of the virtual cessation of programmed courses, vocational and employment training and education for more than a year to date.

COVID-19 has had a significant impact on both prisons and society. As such, research into the impact of the cessation of courses, training and education has not been feasible, due to the various factors that will have impacted reducing reoffending and rehabilitation during the pandemic.

At the start of the pandemic, we took decisive action in custody to keep staff, prisoners, and the wider community safe. This included adjusting prison regimes to reduce contacts and limit the spread of COVID-19. Since then, we have eased restrictions to allow more activity wherever safe to do so, based on public health advice about the level of risk in each establishment.

Evaluations of previous rehabilitative programmes have been published during the pandemic via Justice Data Lab (see https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/justice-data-lab-statistics-january-2021) and we are exploring the impact that using different delivery models has had on education and other programmes, including the delivery of unpaid work.

Statistics on reoffending and prisoner employment on-release will continue to be published quarterly and further data on education is planned for next year (following our Prison Education Statistics publication in August 2021 - https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/prison-education-statistics-2019-2020)

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP Wayland, published on 23 November 2021, what steps he is taking to (a) eliminate the shortfall of 28 FTE Band 3 prison office staff at HMP Wayland and (b) increase staffing levels to a level that is compatible with rehabilitation and security.

A number of initiatives have been put in place to support an increase in staffing at HMP Wayland including a bespoke recruitment campaign for the Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Norfolk (BCN) region, supported by a dedicated local recruitment taskforce to increase focus on candidate engagement, attendance at local outreach events , and provide information to help and encourage people to apply.

The campaign aims to attract sufficient applications to support all the prisons within the cluster and offers an incentive to candidates who apply to establishments which have previously had less applications.

In addition to the external recruitment activity, an internal level transfer campaign has been delivered and applications are being progressed. This is a great opportunity for HMP Wayland to welcome experienced officers to the establishment, and to allow for the cross-fertilisation of knowledge, skills and experience.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Women need women who support them, published by Advance on 22 November 2021, what recent assessment he has made of the (a) costs and (b) potential merits of holistic community support provided by women’s centres.

The Female Offender Strategy recognises the importance of early intervention and initiatives that divert women away from the criminal justice system and into support services that address their vulnerabilities and the underlying causes of offending. It also acknowledges that women’s services such as women’s centres play a key role in providing holistic support to vulnerable and complex needs women in or at risk of contact with the criminal justice system.

The Ministry of Justice’s Data Lab report “Women’s Centres throughout England” (May 2015) https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/427388/womens-centres-report.pdf found that women’s centres can help to reduce reoffending by between 1 and 9 percentage points. Since publication of the Strategy, the Ministry of Justice has invested £9.5 million in women’s community sector organisations, including women’s centres.

The cost of support can be difficult to calculate because the type and scope of provision provided by women centres varies widely.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Women need women who support them report published by Advance on 22 November 2021, what steps he is taking to increase the use of (a) conditional cautions followed by support from a women’s centre and (b) community resolutions followed by support from a women’s centre relative to court-based disposals for women suspected of low-level offending.

The Government is legislating in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill to reform the out of court disposal framework, which includes conditional cautions, to ensure that, in future, all out of court disposals have conditions aimed at rehabilitation, reparation or punishment. They will provide an opportunity for intervention and support to offenders at an earlier stage, diverting them into rehabilitative services to help reduce escalation of offending and address complex needs. Community services for women, including those provided by women’s centres, can also be an important resource for the police as an alternative to prosecution.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Women need women who support them, published by Advance on 22 November 2021, what recent estimate he has made of the (a) re-arrest and (b) proven reoffending rates for women given a (i) conditional caution followed by support from a women’s centre and (ii) short prison sentence.

It is not possible to identify offenders who have been given a conditional caution followed by support from a women’s centre based on the data we collect. As a result, we cannot provide the associated proven reoffending rates.

The Home Office and Ministry of Justice do not collect data on re-arrests. The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of notifiable arrests made by police forces in England and Wales. These data are published as part of the ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical collection, available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

The 12-month proven reoffending rates for women released from a short custodial sentence between October to December 2019 are provided in the table below. This is broken down by custodial sentence length.

Custodial sentence length

Proportion of adult women offenders who reoffended1, 2

Less than 12 months

61.1%

Less than or equal to 6 months

64.1%

More than 6 months to less than 12 months

44.6%

  1. A proven reoffence is defined as any offence committed in a 12-month follow-up period that resulted in a court conviction or caution in this timeframe or a further six-month waiting period (to allow time for cases to progress through the courts).
  2. Offenders with prison sentence lengths of one day are excluded.

Taken from tables C1a and C2a accessible here https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1028660/proven-reoffending-oct19-dec19-3-monthly_-_Final.ods

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps the Government is taking to support the prosecution of a non-UK citizen or resident in the UK for indirect involvement in human rights abuses.

The Ministry of Justice is responsible for criminal law policy in England and Wales and the UK’s human rights framework. Any human right abuse which is a criminal offence committed in the UK could be prosecuted the same way as any criminal offence and the nationality or residence status of the defendant is irrelevant. Support for such prosecutions is of course a matter primarily for the Crown Prosecution Service in England and Wales and the Ministry of Justice does not hold that information. If the abuses are criminal offences committed abroad the jurisdiction of our courts will depend on the nature of the offence and whether the relevant statute provides for it to have extraterritorial effect. Again, support for such prosecutions would be a matter for the Crown Prosecution service in England and Wales and its equivalent bodies elsewhere in the UK. Assistance via international police cooperation or Mutual Legal Assistance in such cases is a matter for the Home Office. International matters generally and the International Criminal Court are the responsibility of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the role of the volunteers service in the coroner's court system; and whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of allocating funding to that service to help ensure uniformity of access.

The Government recognises the good work done by volunteers who support bereaved families and others who attend coroners’ courts. However, extending support services - such as the Coroners Courts Support Service - to cover all 85 coroner areas remains subject to affordability.

The Ministry of Justice collects annual data on coroners’ inquests which is then used to inform policy making. An annual statistical bulletin is published on the GOV.UK website at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/coroners-statistics-2020. Coroner statistics for 2021 will be published on 12 May 2022.

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the data collected by coroner's courts; and whether he plans to take steps to gather that data centrally.

The Government recognises the good work done by volunteers who support bereaved families and others who attend coroners’ courts. However, extending support services - such as the Coroners Courts Support Service - to cover all 85 coroner areas remains subject to affordability.

The Ministry of Justice collects annual data on coroners’ inquests which is then used to inform policy making. An annual statistical bulletin is published on the GOV.UK website at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/coroners-statistics-2020. Coroner statistics for 2021 will be published on 12 May 2022.

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what need was identified for the 2,000 additional temporary prison places announced in the Budget and Spending Review 2021; where those additional temporary places will be located; and what plans her Department has to set a future timeframe for their decommissioning.

The National statistics overview: Prison population projections: 2021 to 2026 are used to plan changes across the prison estate to respond to changes to the demand for prison places. Detailed plans, including the locations and future decommissioning, of the 2000 prison places funded through Spending Review 2021 are currently being drawn up. Work underway includes site feasibility studies, this will influence the location of these places.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
16th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) Extended Determinate Sentences, (2) Extended Sentences of Detention, and (3) sentences for offenders of particular concern, were imposed in each of the last five years for which data are available; and of these, how many had a minimum term in custody of 10 years or more.

The Ministry of Justice holds data on sentences covering the period requested and this can be viewed in the attached table.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
16th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) mandatory life sentences, (2) automatic life sentences, and (3) discretionary life sentences, were imposed in each of the last five years for which data are available; and of these, how many had a minimum term in custody of 10 years or more.

The Ministry of Justice holds data on sentences covering the period requested and this can be viewed in the attached table.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women entered prison between June 2020 and June 2021 to serve a sentence of (a) less than one month, (b) 2 to 3 months, (c) 4 to 6 months, (d) 7 to 12 months, (e) 13 to 24 months and (f) over 24 months.

The information requested is provided in the attached table.

Sentencing is a matter for the independent judiciary. The Female Offender Strategy set out the Government’s vision of fewer women offending and reoffending; fewer women in custody, especially on short-term sentences, with a greater proportion of women managed in the community successfully; and where prison is necessary, better conditions for those in custody.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the announcement of 23 January 2021 on Extra funding for organisations that steer women away from crime, how many of the 500 new prison places in women's prisons have been built to date; and which prisons they have been built in.

The expansion of the women’s prison estate to deliver new trauma-informed and gender specific facilities is still at a relatively early feasibility planning stage. The initial site list under consideration is: HMP Drake Hall, HMP Eastwood Park, HMP Foston Hall, HMP Send and HMP Styal. All proposed sites are existing women’s prisons. The exact numbers and mix of new open and closed facilities are being finalised. This is a huge opportunity to shift the landscape of the estate by creating more open places which are needed.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to page 87 of the Justice Select Committee's report on Prison Population 2022, published in March 2019, whether his Department has made an assessment of the savings that could be achieved by moving from prison to community support; and if he will place a copy of that assessment in the Library.

The Ministry of Justice has not made a detailed assessment of possible savings of moving from prison to community support illustrated by the case study on page 87 of the Justice Select Committee’s report. However, the Female Offender Strategy, published in June 2018, noted that Government had estimated that female offenders cost the public purse approximately £1.7bn in 2015/16, including estimated police costs of c.£1bn. This excluded wider social costs, such as the cost of intergenerational offending. The Government recognises that community sentences offer the opportunity to support women to effectively address the underlying causes of offending behaviour and to secure and maintain stable accommodation. We have several initiatives underway that are looking to encourage use of robust community sentences as an alternative to custody for women, including Problem Solving Courts, Community Sentence Treatment Requirements, Electronic Monitoring and a Pre-Sentence Report pilot, as well as our plans to open a first Residential Women’s Centre in Wales.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the report entitled Unlocking Potential, A review of education in prison, published in May 2016, what progress has been made in implementing the recommendations contained in that review.

Following Dame Sally Coates’ 2016 review, the budget for prison education was moved from the Department for Education (DfE) to the Ministry of Justice. This was in response to the core recommendation to give prison governors more flexibility and control over the curriculum so that they could better meet the learning needs of their prisoners. To address further recommendations, we introduced assessment on entry for English, maths and learning difficulties and disabilities, and boosted the capability of prisons to engage with employers through the creation of the New Futures Network (NFN). We expect to further improve the infrastructure for learning through the Government’s commitment to invest £200 million a year by 2024-25 to tackle reoffending and meet the manifesto commitment of delivering a new Prisoner Education Service. We have already started to trial innovation such as specialist education roles, as well as invest in digital tools to support prisoners with additional learning needs, such as trialling the use of reader pens.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
21st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) prosecutions and (b) convictions there were for causing death by driving when disqualified, unlicensed or uninsured in (i) London and (ii) England in each of the last three years.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions and convictions for the driving offences listed in the questions, up to December 2020, in the ‘Principle offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code’ data tool, available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987731/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020.xlsx

79342

Select ‘80701’ in the offence code filter of the pivot table.

In the Police Force Area (PFA) filter:

  • For London alone, select ‘City of London’ and ‘Metropolitan Police’
  • For England alone, select all PFAs except for Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, North Wales and South Wales

The number of convictions will populate row 33.

79343

Select ‘00412’ in the offence code filter of the pivot table.

In the Police Force Area (PFA) filter:

  • For London alone, select ‘City of London’ and ‘Metropolitan Police’
  • For England alone, select all PFAs except for Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, North Wales and South Wales

The number of convictions will populate row 33.

The Home Office are responsible for collecting data on charges relating to crimes recorded by the Police. These can be found in the Home Office outcomes open data tables, available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

79517

Select offence codes ‘00417’ and ‘00409’ in the offence code filter

In the Police Force Area (PFA) filter:

  • For London alone, select ‘City of London’ and ‘Metropolitan Police’
  • For England alone, select all PFAs except for Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, North Wales and South Wales

The number of prosecutions and convictions will populate rows 32 and 33 respectively.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were convicted for driving whilst disqualified in (a) London and (b) England in each of the last three years.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions and convictions for the driving offences listed in the questions, up to December 2020, in the ‘Principle offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code’ data tool, available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987731/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020.xlsx

79342

Select ‘80701’ in the offence code filter of the pivot table.

In the Police Force Area (PFA) filter:

  • For London alone, select ‘City of London’ and ‘Metropolitan Police’
  • For England alone, select all PFAs except for Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, North Wales and South Wales

The number of convictions will populate row 33.

79343

Select ‘00412’ in the offence code filter of the pivot table.

In the Police Force Area (PFA) filter:

  • For London alone, select ‘City of London’ and ‘Metropolitan Police’
  • For England alone, select all PFAs except for Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, North Wales and South Wales

The number of convictions will populate row 33.

The Home Office are responsible for collecting data on charges relating to crimes recorded by the Police. These can be found in the Home Office outcomes open data tables, available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

79517

Select offence codes ‘00417’ and ‘00409’ in the offence code filter

In the Police Force Area (PFA) filter:

  • For London alone, select ‘City of London’ and ‘Metropolitan Police’
  • For England alone, select all PFAs except for Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, North Wales and South Wales

The number of prosecutions and convictions will populate rows 32 and 33 respectively.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people in (a) England and (b) London have been (i) charged with and (ii) convicted of causing serious injury while dangerous driving in the each of last three years following the introduction of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions and convictions for the driving offences listed in the questions, up to December 2020, in the ‘Principle offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code’ data tool, available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987731/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020.xlsx

79342

Select ‘80701’ in the offence code filter of the pivot table.

In the Police Force Area (PFA) filter:

  • For London alone, select ‘City of London’ and ‘Metropolitan Police’
  • For England alone, select all PFAs except for Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, North Wales and South Wales

The number of convictions will populate row 33.

79343

Select ‘00412’ in the offence code filter of the pivot table.

In the Police Force Area (PFA) filter:

  • For London alone, select ‘City of London’ and ‘Metropolitan Police’
  • For England alone, select all PFAs except for Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, North Wales and South Wales

The number of convictions will populate row 33.

The Home Office are responsible for collecting data on charges relating to crimes recorded by the Police. These can be found in the Home Office outcomes open data tables, available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

79517

Select offence codes ‘00417’ and ‘00409’ in the offence code filter

In the Police Force Area (PFA) filter:

  • For London alone, select ‘City of London’ and ‘Metropolitan Police’
  • For England alone, select all PFAs except for Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, North Wales and South Wales

The number of prosecutions and convictions will populate rows 32 and 33 respectively.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
16th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been prosecuted for supplying illegal, unregulated, or black market gambling services in each of the last five years.

The number of prosecutions for offences relating to the supply of illegal, unregulated or black market gambling services are provided in the attached table and published in the ‘Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code data tool’, available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987731/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020.xlsx

The specific offences selected are listed below:

  • 10646 - Provision of facilities for gambling unless authorised by an operating licence or covered by a specific exception
  • 10647 - Use of premises for gambling without a licence
  • 10660 - Offences connected to gaming machines: making machine available for use; manufacture, supply etc. linked to machines.
Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Court of Appeal judgement, [2021] EWCA Crim 956, if he will make an ex gratia payment to the appellant in accordance with paragraph 104 of that judgement.

Ex gratia offers are discretionary, and the Ministry of Justice is required to consider all the relevant information before making a decision on an individual case. Correspondence relating to this specific case is currently being considered.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many women in prison aged (1) 18 to 24, and (2) 25 years or older, were pregnant while in custody in each of the last 10 years.

This information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

On 20 September the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) published a new policy on pregnancy, Mother and Baby Units and maternal separation from children up to the age of two in women’s prisons, which contains a range of reforms for improving the care of pregnant women. The policy requires increased local and central data collection on self-declared pregnant women in our care, to ensure individuals are receiving the relevant support and to ensure policy is more informed.

We publish some of this data in the HMPPS Annual Digest of statistical information. We published the first of these on 29 July 2021, which showed that during the period July 2020-April 2021 an average of 26 women self-declared as pregnant each week.

This is a dynamic area of policy and we will continue to consider our central data collection as it develops.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many civil servants employed by his Department were based in each of the 12 NUTS1 UK regions on (a) 1 March 2021, (b) 1 June 2021 and (c) 1 September 2021.

Data for the number of civils servants employed by the Ministry of Justice by NUTS1 UK region as at 31 March 2021 are available at the following website:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/civil-service-statistics-2021

Data for the number of civils servants (headcount) employed by the Ministry of Justice by NUTS1 UK region as at 1 June 2021 and 1 September 2021 is provided in Table 1 below.

To align with published data an end of month position has been provided.

Table 1 - Ministry of Justice (including executive agency) payroll staff in post by NUTS1 region

30-Jun-21

30-Sep-21

North East

4,902

4,953

North West

10,703

10,733

Yorkshire and the Humber

9,250

9,341

East Midlands

7,601

7,644

West Midlands

9,713

9,787

East of England

7,555

7,509

London

16,002

15,956

South East

10,576

10,578

South West

5,762

5,724

Wales

4,371

4,342

Scotland

575

588

Northern Ireland

0

0

Unknown

41

78

Total

87,051

87,233

Staff are assigned to a NUTS 1 region based on their HR Location Postcode in the department's HR database.

Those with an Unknown region have either a blank or invalid HR Location Postcode in the department's HR database

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many probation red sites there were in the week commencing 15 November 2021, for each probation region in England and Wales.

In the week commencing 15 November 2021, there were six red sites situated in England, and none appointed for Wales. These were Kent, Buckingham and Oxfordshire, Berkshire, Norfolk and Suffolk, Hertfordshire and HM Prison North Sea Camp.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what contingency arrangements for legal advice provision will be put in place in response to the cancellation of the Detained Duty Advice Scheme procurement process for Derwentside immigration removal centre; which legal aid providers will be delivering advice under those contingency arrangements; and whether legal advice at Derwentside will be delivered in-person or remotely.

The Legal Aid Agency (LAA) operates free legal advice surgeries in Immigration Removal Centres (IRCs) in England. Individuals who are detained are entitled to receive up to 30 minutes of advice regardless of financial eligibility or the merits of their case. There is no restriction on the number of surgeries an individual may attend. If an individual who is detained requires substantive advice on a matter which is in scope of legal aid, full legal advice can be provided if the statutory legal aid means and merits criteria are met.

In order to provide access to the Detention Duty Advice Scheme (DDAS) services for women held at Derwentside Immigration Removal Centre (IRC) from 1 January 2022, existing Providers at Yarl’s Wood IRC will be invited to express interest in providing an additional 6 months of interim provision at Derwentside.

Under the contingency arrangements, 2 surgeries per week are planned for Derwentside DDAS. Appointments will be available as soon as women are held at the centre.

Following a change of operations in line with Government advice on social distancing, the LAA DDAS is currently operating by phone in IRCs. Detained individuals who wish to access this service are asked to advise centre staff, who will notify the duty solicitor under the scheme. The duty solicitor will contact the individual directly.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many probation regions are using shipping containers as site accommodation for unpaid work staff; and at how many sites such containers are being used.

Shipping containers are used at some Community Payback sites, primarily as storage facilities. Staff working at sites with shipping containers will also have access to a Probation building in their region for office and welfare facilities.

Following unification of the service in June 2021, we are continuing to review the Community Payback estate, this includes assessing what sites are used for, the facilities available, and any storage amenities on site, including the number of shipping containers.

At this stage we are not able to provide an exact breakdown of the number of shipping containers currently on Community Payback sites.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many women aged 18 to 24 have been received into prison in each year of the past 10 years, by establishment.

The attached tables show the number of first receptions of women aged 18-24 from 2011 to 2020, by establishment.

The Female Offender Strategy set out the Government’s vision of fewer women offending and reoffending; fewer women in custody, especially on short-term sentences, with a greater proportion of women managed in the community successfully; and where prison is necessary, better conditions for those in custody.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department has spent on the (a) hire or purchase, (b) installation, (c) maintenance and and (d) replacement of shipping containers for use by probation services, in each of the last five years.

Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) provided front-line probation services for medium-low risk offenders from 2015 to June 2021. All front-line probation services transferred to the Probation Service on 26 June, in addition to assets that were required for the operation of services under the Unified Model.

CRCs will have had sub-contracting arrangements for their back-office operations, including shipping container installation and maintenance. These contractual relationships were between the CRC and their contractors.

During the lifetime of the contracts, CRCs were not obligated to provide an annual breakdown of spend on their back-office operations to the Authority and we, therefore, do not hold this data.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Deprivation of Liberty orders were issued each month since July to individuals in care who were under 16 years old.

The Ministry of Justice does not collect data on the number of deprivation of liberty orders in relation to individuals in care who were under 16 years old.

Applications for deprivation of liberty orders can be made by local authorities when they need to accommodate a child in a non-secure placement. Cafcass – the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service – collect the data on these applications from local authorities and 164 deprivation of liberty applications were made in the period 1 July – 31 October 2021.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the health and safety implications of using shipping containers as site accommodation for unpaid work staff.

All Community Payback facilities on site, including shipping containers, are subject to risk assessments. These assessments consider all foreseeable hazards and reduce the risk of harm to a reasonable level.

Shipping containers are primarily used as tool stores and our existing risk assessments outline the health and safety concerns associated with depots and tool stores.

Following unification of the Probation Service, HMPPS is developing a generic risk assessment for all Community Payback units, alongside a safe working practice document to detail the procedures for using the unit.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when the Review of Unpaid Work under the Target Operating Model for the reunified national probation service will (a) commence and (b) complete.

The unified Probation Service assumed responsibility for the delivery of Community Payback in June 2021, providing significant opportunities for reform. The Target Operating Model outlines our ambition for Community Payback, including initiatives to improve delivery, increase placement quality and better meet the needs of offenders.

As part of these reforms, the Government is relaunching Community Payback to ensure offenders are visibly and publicly making reparations for their crimes by undertaking work that benefits their local areas. We are investing an additional £93m in Community Payback over the next three years to bolster delivery and facilitate the relaunch.

This work has commenced through our first national agreement (with the Canal and River Trust) which previews a new strategic approach to delivering high quality placements at scale, the introduction of a statutory duty to consult on Community Payback in the PCSC Bill and the piloting of a digital assessment.

Wider changes to Community Payback outlined in the Target Operating Model are part of a long-term investment in Probation services and will be implemented gradually.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what age-specific training prison staff receive for working with female prisoners aged 18 to 24.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) have developed the ‘women’s estate specialist training’ (WEST) course. Its modular content is threaded throughout the apprenticeship foundation programme to offer a distinct and dedicated course, underpinned by a trauma informed approach. This forms part of the nine-week foundation period for new prison officers destined to work within the women’s estate. The first dedicated WEST course has been scheduled to take place in January 2022. This course also contains a module which focuses on young women in custody. Existing staff in the women’s estate are able to access information through ‘myLearning’ which includes the Young Adults page which is designed to be an accessible resource for all staff to understand better the needs of this age group in custody.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many women in prison aged 18 to 20 share a cell with a woman aged over 20 years old.

As of 12th November, there were 65 prisoners in the HM Prison and Probation Service Women’s estate who were aged between 18 and 20. Of these, fewer than five were sharing a cell with another prisoner who was aged 21 or over.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service workforce quarterly statistics, Probation Officer Recruitment Annex, September 2021, published on 18 November 2021, what assessment he has made of the impact on (a) probation officer workloads, (b) public protection and (c) rehabilitation of the probation officer vacancy rates in (i) Kent, Surrey and Sussex, (ii) South West, (iii) London, (iv) East Midlands and (v) other probation service regions.

There is not a process by which formal assessment is made of the published data that is referenced, rather the issues highlighted are monitored on an ongoing basis through operational management and plans around recruitment and retention.

The workload of Probation Officers is monitored through the Workload Measurement Tool (WMT) which considers the workloads of case holding Probation Practitioners. This reflects the current levels of staffing on an ongoing basis. The output of this is considered at both the operational and strategic level to support decision making. This tool prioritises public protection in how it operates affording the most time to cases with high levels of risk and need.

In response to known pressures in staffing across the country and in the identified areas, in 2020/21, we recruited a record 1,007 trainee probation officers. We are further increasing our recruitment to unprecedented levels, with a target 1,500 trainee Probation Officers being recruited this financial year (2021/2022).

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service workforce quarterly statistics, Probation Officer Recruitment Annex, September 2021, published on 18 November 2021, what steps he is taking to reduce probation officer vacancy rates in (a) Kent, Surrey and Sussex, (b) South West, (c) London, (d) East Midlands and (e) other probation service regions.

In April 2021 we published the first national Recruitment and Retention Strategy for the Probation Service which identified several key areas of focus.

The Probation Service is committed to increasing recruitment to fill Probation Officer vacancies, particularly in areas with significant local employment market challenges.

In 2020/21, we recruited a record 1,007 trainee probation officers. We are further increasing our recruitment to unprecedented levels, with a target 1500 trainee Probation Officers being recruited this financial year (2021/2022).

As outlined in the Recruitment and Retention Strategy, our focus is addressing recruitment and retention challenges within the Probation Service, particularly for those Probation Delivery Units (PDUs) with the highest average Probation Officer vacancy rates over a 12-month period.

We have identified 6 common drivers of attrition across those regions where it is more challenging to recruit and retain probation officers. These drivers include:

o Pay and benefits

o Newly Qualified Officers’ (NQO) attrition

o High caseloads

o Lack of career progression

o Wellbeing

o Bullying, Harassment and Discrimination

Work is currently underway to address all drivers of attrition, including options to retain NQOs in their qualifying regions for a period post qualification and a targeted recruitment campaign to reduce probation officer vacancy rates in Kent, Surrey & Sussex (KSS), in an effort to fill 35 probation officer vacancies.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) prosecutions and (b) convictions there have been of offences under the Modern Slavery Act in connection with child criminal exploitation (i) for each of the last three years and (ii) in total since 31 July 2015.

From centrally held Ministry of Justice data, it is not possible to identify how many offences under the Modern Slavery Act were prosecuted or convicted in connection with child criminal exploitation. The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions for offences under the Modern Slavery Act in the ‘Outcomes by Offence’ data tool, available below, but these do not identify the age of the victim:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987715/outcomes-by-offence-2020.xlsx

  • Use the ‘Offence’ filter to select ‘106 Modern Slavery’.

Offences involving child criminal exploitation will be recorded in court data under their legal offence title.

Information to identify the age and specific offence may be held on court record but to identify them would require a manual search of court records and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the 2020-21 budget is for providing legal aid to people appealing migration decisions.

The Lord Chancellor has a duty to ensure that legal aid is made available in accordance with the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (2012), for cases where the relevant criteria, such as the financial eligibility of the applicant and/or the degree of legal merit in their case, is met, where applicable.

The Ministry of Justice works within HM Treasury allocations as shown in the Main and Supplementary Estimates (https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-main-estimates) each year. However, the nature of Legal Aid funding means that it is demand led, and as such the MoJ ensures sufficient allocation is made to cover the incurred costs.

Spend on legal aid since 2010 can be viewed at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics, which currently shows expenditure up to and including June 2021.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he has taken to progress reform of the Human Rights Act.

As the Deputy Prime Minister has set out, we will overhaul the Human Rights Act (HRA) to end its abuse by dangerous criminals and restore common sense to our justice system. In line with our manifesto commitment we will make sure it meets the needs of the society it serves and commands public support.

The Government established the Independent Human Rights Act Review to examine the framework of the HRA, how it is operating in practice and whether any change is required. We have received the Panel’s report and are carefully considering its conclusions. We will publish the Panel’s report in due course and consult on any proposed legislative changes.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to punish those guilty of murder of desecrating or concealing the bodies of their victims.

On 8 November, the Government announced an Inquiry into the offences committed by David Fuller in Tunbridge Wells, and that we would be reviewing the existing penalty available for the offence of sexual penetration of a corpse. These reviews may highlight issues relating to the coverage of the existing offences that deal with desecration, and we will consider any changes to the law in light of their findings.

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP Belmarsh, published on 10 November 2021, whether the Prison Service plans to reinstate the tripling up of prisoners in any cells in HMP Belmarsh.

There are currently no plans to resume the use of triple cells at HMP Belmarsh.

HMPPS continually monitors the anticipated population and capacity of the prison estate and will always ensure that there is sufficient space to hold those committed to custody from the courts.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Report on an unannounced inspection of HMYOI Cookham Wood, published on 16 November 2021, what steps he is taking to help ensure that progress is made against HMIP inspection outcomes at HMYOI Cookham Wood.

The Ministry of Justice is currently preparing an action plan which will be published in due course in response to the HMIP inspection report on HMYOI Cookham Wood. The plan will set out steps being taken to address the issues identified including those to reduce violence and providing children with more access to education.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Report on an unannounced inspection of HMYOI Cookham Wood, published on 16 November 2021, what steps he is taking to help ensure that there is improvement in access to sufficient hours of education at HMYOI Cookham Wood; and if he will establish a timescale for such improvement.

The Ministry of Justice is currently preparing an action plan which will be published in due course in response to the HMIP inspection report on HMYOI Cookham Wood. The plan will set out steps being taken to address the issues identified including those to reduce violence and providing children with more access to education.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Report on an unannounced inspection of HMYOI Cookham Wood, published on 16 November 2021, what steps he is taking to help ensure that an effective violence reduction strategy is implemented at HMYOI Cookham Wood; and if he will establish a timescale for the implementation of such a strategy.

The Ministry of Justice is currently preparing an action plan which will be published in due course in response to the HMIP inspection report on HMYOI Cookham Wood. The plan will set out steps being taken to address the issues identified including those to reduce violence and providing children with more access to education.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP Altcourse, published on 11 November 2021, whether it is HM Prison and Probation Service policy to record the use of rigid bar handcuffs (a) as a use of force and (b) otherwise.

Operational guidance on the use of rigid bar handcuffs, and the HM Prison and Probation Service policy on the use of force state that any use of handcuffs is considered a use of force, and must only be used when necessary, reasonable and proportionate to the seriousness of the circumstances. Following the use of rigid bar handcuffs, staff must complete a statement to justify their decision.

Use of rigid bar handcuffs must be discussed at a subsequent local Use of Force committee meeting and lessons learned shared with all staff. This can include, for example, discussions on alternatives which may have de-escalated the situation and any further training that may be required.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to A joint thematic inspection of the criminal justice journey for individuals with mental health needs and disorders, published on 17 November 2021, what recent discussions he has had with Ministerial colleagues in the Department for Health and Social Care on the (a) steps needed to increase the use of Mental Health Treatment Requirements and (b) information-sharing and rates of attendance at Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangement meetings by mental health providers.

The Ministry of Justice welcomes the joint thematic inspection and will be providing a formal response and supporting action plan in the new year.

Working with the Department of Health and Social Care and NHS England we will be increasing the availability of Primary Care Mental Health Treatment Requirements to cover at least 50% of all courts by 2023. We are also preparing to launch a campaign with sentencers and court staff to raise awareness of MHTRs where they are available and to promote their use.

The Secretary of State’s statutory guidance to (MAPPA) responsible authorities has a dedicated chapter on mentally-disordered offenders, emphasising the importance of information sharing with and by medical practitioners, to inform risk assessment and risk management. The guidance is available at https://mappa.justice.gov.uk/MAPPA/view?objectID=5682416.

Officials have also undertaken significant work to build awareness on the part of medical practitioners of the role of MAPPA and of their part in the effective delivery of these arrangements in individual cases.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to A joint thematic inspection of the criminal justice journey for individuals with mental health needs and disorders, published on 17 November 2021, what recent assessment he has made of the potential effect of prison leaver homelessness on reoffending linked to mental ill-health.

The MoJ welcomes the joint thematic inspection of the criminal justice journey for individuals with mental health needs and disorders and will be providing a formal response and supporting action plan with HMPPS, DHSC and NHSE/I in the new year.

The Government is committed to tackling the causes of reoffending to keep our communities safe. We know there is a link between homelessness and reoffending; offenders without settled accommodation are around 50 percent more likely to reoffend. As part of the Beating Crime plan, MoJ have delivered a new transitional accommodation service for offenders leaving prison at risk of homelessness. Launched initially in five probation regions this July it is offering up to 12 weeks temporary accommodation and support to prison leavers to facilitate them into settled accommodation.

My department is supporting efforts to ensure those with mental health needs are referred to community services for assessment and treatment in a timely fashion through such work as the NHS’ RECONNECT scheme which provides a care after prison custody service to support patients through all healthcare pathways including mental health. Integrated Offender Management (IOM) schemes include clear pathways to support mental health services to help address the root cause of criminal behaviour. By facilitating offenders’ access to these services, we are helping them turn their back on crime.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to A joint thematic inspection of the criminal justice journey for individuals with mental health needs and disorders, published on 17 November 2021, what recent assessment he has made of the potential effect on reoffending of the length of waiting lists for (a) mental health assessments in the community and (b) mental health treatments in the community.

The MoJ welcomes the joint thematic inspection of the criminal justice journey for individuals with mental health needs and disorders and will be providing a formal response and supporting action plan with HMPPS, DHSC and NHSE/I in the new year.

The Government is committed to tackling the causes of reoffending to keep our communities safe. We know there is a link between homelessness and reoffending; offenders without settled accommodation are around 50 percent more likely to reoffend. As part of the Beating Crime plan, MoJ have delivered a new transitional accommodation service for offenders leaving prison at risk of homelessness. Launched initially in five probation regions this July it is offering up to 12 weeks temporary accommodation and support to prison leavers to facilitate them into settled accommodation.

My department is supporting efforts to ensure those with mental health needs are referred to community services for assessment and treatment in a timely fashion through such work as the NHS’ RECONNECT scheme which provides a care after prison custody service to support patients through all healthcare pathways including mental health. Integrated Offender Management (IOM) schemes include clear pathways to support mental health services to help address the root cause of criminal behaviour. By facilitating offenders’ access to these services, we are helping them turn their back on crime.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)