Ministry of Justice

The Ministry of Justice is a major government department, at the heart of the justice system. We work to protect and advance the principles of justice. Our vision is to deliver a world-class justice system that works for everyone in society.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Labour
Steve Reed (LAB - Croydon North)
Shadow Secretary of State for Justice

Liberal Democrat
Wera Hobhouse (LDEM - Bath)
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Justice)

Labour
Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Justice)
Baroness Chapman of Darlington (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Justice)

Scottish National Party
Anne McLaughlin (SNP - Glasgow North East)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Justice)

Liberal Democrat
Lord Marks of Henley-on-Thames (LDEM - Life peer)
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Justice)

Plaid Cymru
Liz Saville Roberts (PC - Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Shadow PC Spokesperson (Justice)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Alex Cunningham (LAB - Stockton North)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Afzal Khan (LAB - Manchester, Gorton)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Ellie Reeves (LAB - Lewisham West and Penge)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Anna McMorrin (LAB - Cardiff North)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Ministers of State
Victoria Atkins (CON - Louth and Horncastle)
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 17th May 2022
14:00
Justice Committee - Oral evidence - Select & Joint Committees
17 May 2022, 2 p.m.
The work of the Criminal Justice Inspectorates
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Scheduled Event
Tuesday 24th May 2022
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
24 May 2022, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
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Scheduled Event
Wednesday 25th May 2022
13:00
Justice Committee - Private Meeting - Select & Joint Committees
25 May 2022, 1 p.m.

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Scheduled Event
Tuesday 5th July 2022
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
5 Jul 2022, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
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Debates
Tuesday 26th April 2022
Select Committee Inquiry
Friday 4th March 2022
The role of adult custodial remand in the criminal justice system

This inquiry seeks to understand why the number of people on remand has increased since Covid, whether remand to custody …

Written Answers
Monday 16th May 2022
Secure Schools: Medway
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department plans to have the first children resident at the …
Secondary Legislation
Monday 16th May 2022
Civil and Family Proceedings Fees (Amendment) Order 2022
This Order amends the Civil Proceedings Fees Order 2008 (S.I. 2008/1053) and the Family Proceedings Fees Order 2008 (S.I. 2008/1054). …
Bills
Wednesday 21st July 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Act 2022
A Bill to Make provision about the provision that may be made by, and the effects of, quashing orders; to …
Dept. Publications
Tuesday 17th May 2022
11:45

Ministry of Justice Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Sep. 14
Oral Questions
Nov. 20
Topical Questions
Feb. 07
Westminster Hall
Feb. 22
Adjournment Debate
View All Ministry of Justice Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Ministry of Justice does not have Bills currently before Parliament


Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament

Introduced: 21st July 2021

A Bill to Make provision about the provision that may be made by, and the effects of, quashing orders; to make provision restricting judicial review of certain decisions of the Upper Tribunal; to make provision about the use of written and electronic procedures in courts and tribunals; to make other provision about procedure in, and the organisation of, courts and tribunals; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 28th April 2022 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 9th March 2021

A Bill to make provision about the police and other emergency workers; to make provision about collaboration between authorities to prevent and reduce serious violence; to make provision about offensive weapons homicide reviews; to make provision for new offences and for the modification of existing offences; to make provision about the powers of the police and other authorities for the purposes of preventing, detecting, investigating or prosecuting crime or investigating other matters; to make provision about the maintenance of public order; to make provision about the removal, storage and disposal of vehicles; to make provision in connection with driving offences; to make provision about cautions; to make provision about bail and remand; to make provision about sentencing, detention, release, management and rehabilitation of offenders; to make provision about secure 16 to 19 Academies; to make provision for and in connection with procedures before courts and tribunals; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 28th April 2022 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 20th May 2020

A Bill to make provision about the sentencing of offenders convicted of terrorism offences, of offences with a terrorist connection or of certain other offences; to make other provision in relation to terrorism; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 27th February 2020

A Bill to implement the Hague Conventions of 1996, 2005 and 2007 and to provide for the implementation of other international agreements on private international law.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 14th December 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 8th January 2020

To require the Parole Board to take into account any failure by a prisoner serving a sentence for unlawful killing or for taking or making an indecent image of a child to disclose information about the victim.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 4th November 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 5th March 2020

A Bill to consolidate certain enactments relating to sentencing.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 22nd October 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 7th January 2020

A bill to make in relation to marriage and civil partnership in England and Wales provision about divorce, dissolution and separation; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 25th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 21st January 2020

A bill to give effect to Law Commission recommendations relating to commencement of enactments relating to sentencing law and to make provision for pre-consolidation amendments of sentencing law

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 8th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 11th February 2020

A Bill to make provision about the release on licence of offenders convicted of terrorist offences or offences with a terrorist connection; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 26th February 2020 and was enacted into law.

Ministry of Justice - Secondary Legislation

This Order amends the Civil Proceedings Fees Order 2008 (S.I. 2008/1053) and the Family Proceedings Fees Order 2008 (S.I. 2008/1054). Articles 2 and 3 provide an exemption from paying specified fees in relation to applications for orders or directions relating to cross examination in person. Such applications will be those made by reference to the provisions of sections 85F-K of the Courts Act 2003 and sections 31R-W of the Matrimonial and Family Proceedings Act 1984, both of which were inserted by the Domestic Abuse Act 2021 (sections 66 and 65 respectively).
These Rules amend the Magistrates’ Courts Rules 1981 to include a new rule 3C governing the exercise of the court’s power to facilitate the giving of evidence by a witness by any of the means listed in the new rule.
View All Ministry of Justice Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
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(1,308 in the last 7 days)
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45,644 Signatures
(200 in the last 7 days)
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2,431 Signatures
(181 in the last 7 days)
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10,126 Signatures
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Petitions with most signatures
Petition Open
118,914 Signatures
(1,308 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
45,644 Signatures
(200 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
10,126 Signatures
(166 in the last 7 days)
Petition Debates Contributed

The offence of causing 'death by dangerous driving' should be widened to include: failure to stop, call 999 and render aid on scene until further help arrives.

134,933
Petition Closed
5 Sep 2020
closed 1 year, 8 months ago

The Government's manifesto stated “we will make intentional trespass a criminal offence”: an extreme, illiberal & unnecessary attack on ancient freedoms that would threaten walkers, campers, and the wider public. It would further tilt the law in favour of the landowning 1% who own half the country.

The maximum penalty for failure to stop after an incident is points and a 6-month custodial sentence. Causing death by careless/dangerous driving is between 5-14 yrs. The sentence for failing to stop after a fatal collision must be increased.

View All Ministry of Justice Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Justice Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


11 Members of the Justice Committee
Robert Neill Portrait
Robert Neill (Conservative - Bromley and Chislehurst)
Justice Committee Chair since 29th January 2020
Andy Slaughter Portrait
Andy Slaughter (Labour - Hammersmith)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Kieran Mullan Portrait
Kieran Mullan (Conservative - Crewe and Nantwich)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Maria Eagle Portrait
Maria Eagle (Labour - Garston and Halewood)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Rob Butler Portrait
Rob Butler (Conservative - Aylesbury)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Angela Crawley Portrait
Angela Crawley (Scottish National Party - Lanark and Hamilton East)
Justice Committee Member since 25th May 2021
Laura Farris Portrait
Laura Farris (Conservative - Newbury)
Justice Committee Member since 8th June 2021
Kate Hollern Portrait
Kate Hollern (Labour - Blackburn)
Justice Committee Member since 13th July 2021
Paul Maynard Portrait
Paul Maynard (Conservative - Blackpool North and Cleveleys)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd November 2021
Diane Abbott Portrait
Diane Abbott (Labour - Hackney North and Stoke Newington)
Justice Committee Member since 5th January 2022
Matt Vickers Portrait
Matt Vickers (Conservative - Stockton South)
Justice Committee Member since 15th March 2022
Justice Committee: Upcoming Events
Justice Committee - Oral evidence
The work of the Criminal Justice Inspectorates
17 May 2022, 2 p.m.
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
Andrew Cayley CMG QC - HM Chief Inspector at HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate
Andy Cooke QPM DL - HM Chief Inspector at HM Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services
Justin Russell - HM Chief Inspector at HM Inspectorate of Probation
Charlie Taylor - HM Chief Inspector at HM Inspectorate of Prisons

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Justice Committee - Private Meeting
25 May 2022, 1 p.m.
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Justice Committee: Previous Inquiries
The work of the Lord Chancellor Coronavirus (COVID-19): The impact on prison, probation and court systems Ageing prison population Children and young people in custody Private prosecutions: safeguards The Coroner Service The future of the Probation Service Ageing prison population Bailiffs: Enforcement of debt Children and young people in custody Court and Tribunal Reforms Criminal legal aid Work of the Crown Prosecution Service Director of Public Prosecutions Employment tribunal fees HM Inspectorate of Prisons report on HMP Liverpool HMP Birmingham The implications of Brexit for the justice system: follow-up Prison governance HM Chief Inspector of Probation Progress in the implementation of the Lammy Review's recommendations Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 The Lord Chief Justice's Report for 2018 Ministry of Justice Annual Report and Accounts 2017-18 Work of the Parole Board Pre-appointment hearing for HM Chief Inspector of Probation Pre-commencement hearing: Chair of the Parole Board Prison Population 2022: planning for the future The role of the magistracy – follow up Serious Fraud Office Transforming Rehabilitation Transparency of Parole Board decisions Work of the Victims' Commissioner Work of the Attorney General The work of the Law Commission The work of the Ministry of Justice The work of the Solicitor General Work of the Serious Fraud Office Young adults in the criminal justice system The work of the Lord Chancellor Work of the Prison Service The Lord Chief Justice's report for 2017 inquiry

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much has been spent on costs associated with the new secure school in Medway as of 11 May 2022.

Our priority is the safe and successful delivery of the first secure school in Medway. As of the end of April, the last period we can confirm with certainty, the total costs associated with the opening of the school were £8.4m.

Our aim is for the school to open for placements in late 2023. It is important that placements are made on a case-by-case basis and we ensure a smooth and safe increase, so this will be reviewed regularly after school opening.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department plans to have the first children resident at the Medway secure school.

Our priority is the safe and successful delivery of the first secure school in Medway. As of the end of April, the last period we can confirm with certainty, the total costs associated with the opening of the school were £8.4m.

Our aim is for the school to open for placements in late 2023. It is important that placements are made on a case-by-case basis and we ensure a smooth and safe increase, so this will be reviewed regularly after school opening.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department plans to begin work on the second planned secure school.

Our priority is the safe and successful delivery of the first secure school in Medway. As of the end of April, the last period we can confirm with certainty, the total costs associated with the opening of the school were £8.4m.

Our aim is for the school to open for placements in late 2023. It is important that placements are made on a case-by-case basis and we ensure a smooth and safe increase, so this will be reviewed regularly after school opening.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the presentation by the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights on Annual activity report 2021 by the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights, which took place at the Council of Europe on 26 April 2022.

We have taken note of the activities undertaken by Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights during 2021. These activities of course have taken place across the different member States of the Council of Europe, and on many topics in a human rights context.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will make it his policy to change the title of the Trial of Lunatics Act 1883 to the Criminal Procedure (Special Verdict) Act.

The Trial of Lunatics Act 1883 uses outdated terms, and I am sympathetic to the request to change these.

It is not possible to formally amend the title of an existing Act, but it is possible to change the way to which the existing Act is referred. This requires primary legislation, so until a suitable legislative vehicle has been identified we are unable to look at this further.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Answer of 28 March 2022 to Question 144981 on Prisons: Labour Turnover, what the relevant leaving rates are for non-directly employed prison staff.

This information is not held centrally. All staffing matters for contractors working in prisons, including leaving rates, are the responsibility of those contract providers. There is no requirement in the contracts to agree such matters with the Ministry of Justice.

Providers of contracted services play an important role in the prison estate and we continue to monitor them to ensure they maintain safe, decent and secure prisons.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Answer of 28 March 2022 to Question 144980, Prisons: Education, how many meetings his officials in his Department has held with representatives of relevant trade unions on the Prisoner Education Service.

We are delivering a Prisoner Education Service within this Parliament to raise prisoners’ levels of numeracy, literacy, skills and qualifications with the aim of helping them secure jobs or apprenticeships on their release. To do this, we must give prisons the tools they need to succeed. We will invest in digital infrastructure, more training that delivers the skills employers need, more education experts to support Governors and improved support for prisoners with additional learning needs.

To deliver this vision, we are currently running a series of engagement events, drawing on the expertise of stakeholders across the education and justice sectors.

HMPPS holds regular meetings with its recognised trade unions to share information and invite feedback on operational developments and proposals. As prison education staff are not employed by HMPPS, their union representatives are not part of these regular consultations. We have engaged with these representatives, however, as part of our wider engagement activity.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether Prison Education Framework contracts include an annual uplift in payments to prison education providers.

Contractual clauses are in place setting a mechanism for potential adjustments to charges. This information was published as part of the tender process, the supporting documents for which can be accessed via the following link: https://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:61049-2018:HTML:EN:HTML&tabId=1&tabLang=en.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the contract notice of 31 August 2021 for Youth Education Service Provision, on what date she plans to announce the new supplier of that provision.

The department is completing a competitive tender exercise for the education contracts in public Young Offender Institutions in England. Once confirmed we will announce the new suppliers of the provision.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Answer of 28 March 2022 to Question 144981, Prisons: Labour Turnover, what the leaving rates for (a) Band 2, and (b) Band 3 to 4 operational prison staff are in each of the past five years, broken down by region.

Leaving Rates by Grade are given in the HMPPS Workforce Bulletin – latest version is here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/her-majestys-prison-and-probation-service-workforce-quarterly-december-2021.

Information on leaving rates by grades is published in Table 11. Information on leaving rates by region is published in table 10, however this is only for “main” grades (band 3-5 officers, OSG, probation officers).

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the potential number of (a) filled and (b) vacant places in each youth custody setting in each of the next five years.

Although it is difficult to predict demand in the forthcoming years, overall demand in the Youth Secure Estate has fallen in the past two years, largely due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Following the removal of restrictions and with the Government’s commitment to recruit 20,000 additional police officers by 2023, we expect to see demand steadily rise, although there is significant uncertainty associated with this. Despite this anticipated higher demand for places, we are confident there will still be capacity to place the increased numbers of children and young people into custody in the next five years with children placed according to their individual needs.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the (a) mean and (b) median time was from offence to completion for cases of robbery in each crown court in England and Wales in the past three years.

Timeliness estimates from offence to completion for defendants dealt with at the Crown Court for robbery offences can be found in the attached tables by Crown Court.

Estimates of timeliness from offence to completion are taken from the point of offence committal through to the eventual completion of a case at court.

Caution should be taken when drawing conclusions from granular breakdowns – for example in the case of courts such as Salisbury and Newport (Isle of Wight) – as there is potential for marked variations based on small volumes and even single cases.

The Government is committed to supporting the recovery of the courts and we continue to take action to tackle the impact the pandemic has had on the system. We have extended 30 Nightingale courtrooms beyond the end of March 2022 and have again removed the limit on the number of days the Crown Court can sit this financial year. To secure enough capacity to sit at the required levels in 2022/23 and beyond we are expanding our plans for judicial recruitment.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
10th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to respond to the consultation on Mental Capacity Act: Small Payments Scheme.

We received over 200 responses to the consultation and have been carefully examining the views submitted. This is a complex area and responses have raised a number of issues that require more detailed consideration, including the security and simplicity of the scheme, how it would be delivered and the role and operation of the Court of Protection.

We are currently working with the relevant departments and stakeholders to prepare the Government response to the consultation and will provide the House with a further update in due course.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to install solar panels on the roof of Plymouth Magistrates Court.

There are currently no plans to install solar panels on the roof of Plymouth Magistrates Court.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many communications staff in his Department are employed (a) full time, (b) part time and (c) under flexible working arrangements.

The number of staff working in MoJ HQ to deliver the communications functions is 104.

91 are employed on full time contracts, 13 are employed on part time.

The data does not capture flexible working arrangements.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent discussions he has had with stakeholders on (a) plans to re-open and (b) plans for alternative uses of Hartlepool Magistrates' Court.

There are no plans to re-open this court. Hartlepool Magistrates’ and County Court closed in 2017 following a full public consultation and workloads were successfully transferred to Teesside Magistrates’ Court and Middlesbrough County Court.

The property is owned by the local council and HMCTS are contracted under a long lease agreement that allows the property to only be used for court operations. HMCTS are in conversation with the local council to find a suitable alternative use for the building, which will benefit the local community.

We will continue to keep our court and tribunal estate under close review to make sure it meets our operational requirements.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what support has been provided to reduce the backlog of criminal cases in (a) Leicester Crown Court and (b) the Midlands.

The Government is committed to supporting the recovery of the courts. We recognise that the impact of the pandemic in courts has been uneven across the country, with the Midlands being one of the areas experiencing a greater increase in caseload.

In order to tackle the backlogs, we have extended 30 Nightingale courtrooms beyond the end of March 2022. Two of these are in the Midlands, Park Hall Hotel in Wolverhampton and Maple House in Birmingham. We are also working with the judiciary to explore moving cases across regional boundaries to areas with spare capacity, where appropriate, and using a national, flexible pool of judges for some regions, including the Midlands, to draw from as required.

We opened a new ‘super courtroom’ in Loughborough to expand capacity for multi-hander cases, which involve three or more defendants, that have built up during the pandemic as they were harder to hear with social distancing measures in place. This ‘super courtroom’ will create the space needed to hear trials and free up capacity elsewhere in Leicestershire and the Midlands, allowing up to an extra 250 cases a year to be heard across England and Wales.

We have once again removed the limit on sitting days in the Crown Court for this financial year to allow courts to work at full capacity, delivering swifter justice for victims and reducing the backlog of cases. To secure enough capacity to sit at the required levels in 2022/23 and beyond we are expanding our plans for judicial recruitment.

To provide additional capacity in the Crown Court we are extending magistrates’ court sentencing powers from 6 to 12 months’ imprisonment for a single Triable either Way offence to allow more cases to be heard in the magistrates’ court and help to drive down the backlog of cases over the coming years.

These measures are already working, and as a result we expect to get through 20% more Crown Court cases this financial year than we did pre-Covid. Following an increase in funding as part of the Ministry of Justice’s Spending Review settlement, we aim to reduce the number of outstanding cases in the Crown Court to 53,000 by March 2025.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to reduce backlogs in family court cases.

We continue to take action to tackle the impact the pandemic has had on our courts and tribunals system. We invested £250 million to support recovery in our courts in the 2020/21 financial year. This included £76 million to increase our capacity to hear cases in the family and civil courts, as well as in tribunals. The recent Spending Review has also provided £324 million over the next three years to improve waiting times in the civil and family courts, and tribunals.

We increased Cafcass’ budget by £8.3 million for 2021/22 so that they have more capacity and can manage the additional pressures caused by the pandemic. We also provided Cafcass with an additional £491,000 to support work in the areas of the country where their resources are most under pressure.

We are maximising sittings from the judicial capacity available to work through our caseload. With the removal of Covid restrictions on 1st April 2022, face-to-face physical capacity is returning to business as usual during April although remote hearings will continue to play a part in the overall recovery effort.

Last financial year (2021/22) we undertook one of our most ambitious programmes of judicial recruitment ever, so that we can hear as many cases as possible. In the same year we lifted the number of days fee-paid judges can sit from 30 days to 80 for the second year in a row.

We are also managing demand in the family courts to ensure the capacity can be used most effectively to tackle the outstanding caseload. In March 2021 we launched a Family Mediation Voucher Scheme for those seeking to resolve private law matters relating to a child. Since its introduction, over 7,700 families have successfully used the scheme to access mediation and help resolve disputes outside of court.

In public family law, the outstanding caseload, by child, stood at 21,800 cases in January 2022. In 2021, average monthly disposals were roughly 200 more than they were in 2020. In private family law, the outstanding caseload, by child, in January 2022 stood at 83,000 cases, below the August 2021 peak of 85,000. In 2021, average monthly disposals were roughly 1,100 more per month than they were in 2020.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many police investigations have been launched in response to allegations against staff working in (a) young offender institutions and (b) secure training centres in each year since 2010.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has plans to develop the former governor's house at HMP Wormwood Scrubs.

A Full Planning Application has been submitted. Various reports and assessments have been undertaken as part of the application, including a security assessment. Details of the Planning Application can be viewed via the following link:

https://public-access.lbhf.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?keyVal=R4J1WQBIGO600&activeTab=summary

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has undertaken a risk assessment in respect of plans to develop the former governor's house at HMP Wormwood Scrubs.

A Full Planning Application has been submitted. Various reports and assessments have been undertaken as part of the application, including a security assessment. Details of the Planning Application can be viewed via the following link:

https://public-access.lbhf.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?keyVal=R4J1WQBIGO600&activeTab=summary

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has undertaken an assessment of the adequacy of the process used by debt collection agencies to ascertain the address of people against whom judgments have been made.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps a debt collection agency is required to take to verify the personal details, including home address, of the individual they are attempting to collect debt from.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps people can take to appeal court decisions made in their absence as a result of the court holding an incorrect home address.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of people found guilty in their absence in civil debt cases; and how many of those cases were as a result of the defendant not being aware of the summons due to the Court holding an incorrect home address.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps are the Courts required to take to ensure that (a) they have the correct personal details of defendants and (b) defendants are aware of their summons.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many civil claims against (a) HM Prison Service and (b) private providers have been brought by current or former children detained in (i) juvenile young offender institutions and (ii) secure training centres in each year since 2010.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison staff were dismissed for conducting inappropriate relationships with child prisoners in each year since 2010.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on how many occasions has the monitor appointed to Oakhill secure training centre reported allegations against custody officers, in accordance with section 8(3)(b) Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994, in the 12 month period ending (a) 31 March 2022, (b) 31 March 2021 and (c) 31 March 2020.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
26th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar on 21 February (HL5934), when they plan to (1) submit, and (2) publish, the UK’s 7th Periodic Report under the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what powers judges have to require the attendance of offenders in court for sentencing.

Where an offender is remanded on bail whilst they are awaiting sentencing (as opposed to being remanded into custody), they are under a duty to surrender themselves to the custody of the court at the next appointed time for a sentencing hearing. Where the offender fails in this duty, the court may issue a warrant for their arrest.

Where an offender is being held on remand in custody and they are directed to attend court for a sentencing hearing, a judge has no power to force them to attend the hearing if they refuse to do so.

The Secretary of State is considering the matter.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were (a) charged, (b) prosecuted, and (c) convicted for trespassing with intent to commit a sexual offence in each year since 2015.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions, convictions up to December 2020, available in the following tool pivot tool:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1063892/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020-revised.xlsx.

Within the pivot tables, filter for:

(Offence code: Detailed offence)

Indecent exposure

  • 08809: Exposure

88B Other miscellaneous sexual offences (Offence)

  • 08805: Administering a substance with intent to stupefy or overpower to engage in sexual activity
  • 08806: Committing an offence with intent to commit a sexual offence
  • 08807: Trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence

175 Sexual Offences- Miscellaneous (Offence)

  • 17504: Sexual activity in a public lavatory

To breakdown an offence by sex, filter for the required offence and move the ‘sex’ filter, in the pivot table field list, to the rows area.

Filter ‘year of appearance’ to 2015-20.

Figures for 2021 are due to be published 19th May 2022.

The figures given in the data tool relate to defendants for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When an offender has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed.

Information on charges issued by the police is not held by this department.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were (a) charged, (b) prosecuted and (c) convicted for committing an offence with intent to commit a sexual offence in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018, (v) 2019, (vi) 2020 and (vii) 2021.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions, convictions up to December 2020, available in the following tool pivot tool:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1063892/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020-revised.xlsx.

Within the pivot tables, filter for:

(Offence code: Detailed offence)

Indecent exposure

  • 08809: Exposure

88B Other miscellaneous sexual offences (Offence)

  • 08805: Administering a substance with intent to stupefy or overpower to engage in sexual activity
  • 08806: Committing an offence with intent to commit a sexual offence
  • 08807: Trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence

175 Sexual Offences- Miscellaneous (Offence)

  • 17504: Sexual activity in a public lavatory

To breakdown an offence by sex, filter for the required offence and move the ‘sex’ filter, in the pivot table field list, to the rows area.

Filter ‘year of appearance’ to 2015-20.

Figures for 2021 are due to be published 19th May 2022.

The figures given in the data tool relate to defendants for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When an offender has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed.

Information on charges issued by the police is not held by this department.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were (a) charged, (b) prosecuted and (c) convicted for other miscellaneous sexual offences in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018, (v) 2019, (vi) 2020 and (vii) 2021.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions, convictions up to December 2020, available in the following tool pivot tool:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1063892/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020-revised.xlsx.

Within the pivot tables, filter for:

(Offence code: Detailed offence)

Indecent exposure

  • 08809: Exposure

88B Other miscellaneous sexual offences (Offence)

  • 08805: Administering a substance with intent to stupefy or overpower to engage in sexual activity
  • 08806: Committing an offence with intent to commit a sexual offence
  • 08807: Trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence

175 Sexual Offences- Miscellaneous (Offence)

  • 17504: Sexual activity in a public lavatory

To breakdown an offence by sex, filter for the required offence and move the ‘sex’ filter, in the pivot table field list, to the rows area.

Filter ‘year of appearance’ to 2015-20.

Figures for 2021 are due to be published 19th May 2022.

The figures given in the data tool relate to defendants for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When an offender has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed.

Information on charges issued by the police is not held by this department.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were (a) charged, (b) prosecuted and (c) convicted for administering a substance with intent to stupefy or overpower to engage in sexual activity in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018, (v) 2019, (vi) 2020 and (vii) 2021.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions, convictions up to December 2020, available in the following tool pivot tool:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1063892/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020-revised.xlsx.

Within the pivot tables, filter for:

(Offence code: Detailed offence)

Indecent exposure

  • 08809: Exposure

88B Other miscellaneous sexual offences (Offence)

  • 08805: Administering a substance with intent to stupefy or overpower to engage in sexual activity
  • 08806: Committing an offence with intent to commit a sexual offence
  • 08807: Trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence

175 Sexual Offences- Miscellaneous (Offence)

  • 17504: Sexual activity in a public lavatory

To breakdown an offence by sex, filter for the required offence and move the ‘sex’ filter, in the pivot table field list, to the rows area.

Filter ‘year of appearance’ to 2015-20.

Figures for 2021 are due to be published 19th May 2022.

The figures given in the data tool relate to defendants for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When an offender has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed.

Information on charges issued by the police is not held by this department.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) charges, (b) prosecutions and (c) convictions there were for indecent exposure, broken down by gender, in the years (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018, (v) 2019, (vi) 2020 and (vii) 2021.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions, convictions up to December 2020, available in the following tool pivot tool:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1063892/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020-revised.xlsx.

Within the pivot tables, filter for:

(Offence code: Detailed offence)

Indecent exposure

  • 08809: Exposure

88B Other miscellaneous sexual offences (Offence)

  • 08805: Administering a substance with intent to stupefy or overpower to engage in sexual activity
  • 08806: Committing an offence with intent to commit a sexual offence
  • 08807: Trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence

175 Sexual Offences- Miscellaneous (Offence)

  • 17504: Sexual activity in a public lavatory

To breakdown an offence by sex, filter for the required offence and move the ‘sex’ filter, in the pivot table field list, to the rows area.

Filter ‘year of appearance’ to 2015-20.

Figures for 2021 are due to be published 19th May 2022.

The figures given in the data tool relate to defendants for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When an offender has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed.

Information on charges issued by the police is not held by this department.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Nuffield Foundation report, When is a wedding not a marriage? Exploring non-legally binding ceremonies, published on 8 March; and, in particular, of the conclusion that wedding law reform is achievable and long overdue.

The Government notes the conclusion of the Nuffield Foundation’s report. The Government remains committed to assessing the case for more comprehensive and enduring reform to marriage law once the Law Commission has completed its fundamental review of the law in this area. The final report will take into account the findings of the Nuffield Foundation and is due in July. The report will support the Government in understanding what types of ceremonies are taking place, why they are taking place and what the demand for them is, and who conducts them, in order to consider the implications of changing the law on marriage on all groups.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Department’s report, Assessing risk of harm to children and parents in private law children cases, published on 25 June 2020, when he expects the President of the Family Division to (a) promote the statement of practice recommended in Section 11.3 of the report and (b) incorporate that statement of practice into the Child Arrangements Programme.

In response to the Expert Panel’s report ‘Assessing Risk of Harm to Children and Parents in Private Law Children Cases’, the Government committed to working with all key partners in the family justice system to design a statement of practice for cases raising issues of domestic abuse or other risks of harm. This statement of practice will take into account provisions made in the Domestic Abuse Act 2021, the recently published Tackling Domestic Abuse Plan, and learning from the development of the Integrated Domestic Abuse Court investigative approach pilots. Work on developing this statement will be progressed jointly by system leaders with oversight from the Family Justice Board. The Family Justice Board is jointly chaired by Ministers from the Ministry of Justice and Department for Education. Any decision to incorporate a new statement of practice into the Child Arrangements Programme will be made by the President of the Family Division.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Department’s report, Assessing risk of harm to children and parents in private law children cases, published on 25 June 2020, what contact he has had with the President of the Family Division regarding the implementation of the Practice Direction recommended in Section 11.3 of that report.

In response to the Expert Panel’s report ‘Assessing Risk of Harm to Children and Parents in Private Law Children Cases’, the Government committed to working with all key partners in the family justice system to design a statement of practice for cases raising issues of domestic abuse or other risks of harm. This statement of practice will take into account provisions made in the Domestic Abuse Act 2021, the recently published Tackling Domestic Abuse Plan, and learning from the development of the Integrated Domestic Abuse Court investigative approach pilots. Work on developing this statement will be progressed jointly by system leaders with oversight from the Family Justice Board. The Family Justice Board is jointly chaired by Ministers from the Ministry of Justice and Department for Education. Any decision to incorporate a new statement of practice into the Child Arrangements Programme will be made by the President of the Family Division.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the adherence of judges in Family Courts to Practice Directions; and what steps he is taking to help ensure adherence to those Directions.

The Government has not made any overall assessment of the adherence of Family Court judges to Practice Directions. The independence of the judiciary is a fundamental principle in the constitutional separation of powers and the rule of law, and it would be inappropriate for ministers to comment on individual judicial decision making or the individual adherence of family court judges to Practice Directions. In 2019, the government announced a Call for Evidence to consider how effectively the family courts respond to allegations of domestic abuse and other risk of harm to children and parent victims in private law children proceedings, overseen by an Expert Panel. This call for evidence and the final report of the Expert Panel considered, amongst other things how Practice Direction 12J, Practice Direction 3AA and Part 3A of the Family Procedure Rules were being applied.

The Government is now working to deliver the commitments set out in the Implementation Plan published in response to the final report. As part of this, we are working with the Domestic Abuse Commissioner and Victims Commissioner to establish a monitoring and reporting mechanism to better understand what is happening in private law proceedings involving domestic abuse.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will implement mandatory training of judges in Family Courts in relation to domestic abuse to help increase their understanding of the issues they are dealing with in private law children cases.

It is not constitutionally appropriate for judicial training to be mandated, monitored and/or overseen by the Secretary of State. To preserve the independence of the judiciary, the Lord Chief Justice (LCJ), the Senior President of the Tribunals, and the Chief Coroner have statutory responsibility for judicial training, under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, Courts and Enforcement Act 2007, and Coroners and Justice Act 2009 respectively. Training responsibilities are exercised through the Judicial College. The judiciary and professional staff in the Judicial College are responsible for the design, content, and delivery of judicial training.

Refreshed and updated specialist digital training on domestic abuse was launched in October 2021 for all family judges and magistrates. This training year (2022/23), the Judicial College is also running bespoke training on domestic abuse for all family and civil judges and new training that addresses the attitudinal and behavioural issues raised in recent caselaw, the MoJ Harm Report and the Domestic Abuse Act will be rolled out from April 2022.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department last published monthly transparency data for spending over £25,000; what month that data covered; and when her Department plans to publish spending data for subsequent months.

The Department’s last published monthly transparency data for spending over £25,000 was for the month of March 2021, published on 22 April 2022.

Further data is currently going through the Department’s formal clearance process. The Department plans to publish data up to the end of November 2021 within the next month.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what data his Department holds on the number of successful prosecutions for identity fraud in each of the last five years.

The number of prosecutions for identity fraud cannot be identified separately from broader fraud offences in data held centrally and published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1063892/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020-revised.xlsx.

Information on identity fraud may be held on court records, but to be able to identify these cases would require examining individual court transcripts which would be of disproportionate cost.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress his Department has made on implementing the recommendations from its report of June 2020, Assessing Risk of Harm to Children and Parents in Private Law Children Cases; and what approach his Department plans to take on to cases decided prior to full implementation of those recommendations.

We are making good progress against the commitments outlined in our Implementation Plan that was published alongside the ‘Assessing Risk of Harm to Children and Parents in Private Law Children Cases’ report.

Changes were brought in as part of the Domestic Abuse Act 2021, including automatic eligibility for special measures in the Family Court, the prohibition of cross examination of victims by perpetrators or alleged perpetrators, and a clarification of the law on the use of section 91(14) orders in domestic abuse circumstances. The special measures provision is already in force and the remaining measures are expected to be commenced later this spring.

We are currently undertaking a review into the presumption of parental involvement and its risk of harm exception, in private law children cases. The research for this review is expected to be complete by the end of the year. In February we launched the Integrated Domestic Abuse Court (IDAC) pilot to test a more investigative approach to private law proceedings in courts in Dorset and North Wales.

On 26 March 2021, we launched the Family Mediation Voucher Scheme, which offers up to £500 towards eligible mediation cases, encouraging people to resolve their disputes outside of court where safe and appropriate to do so. We allocated £3.3m throughout the 2021-22 financial year, helping 6,726 families in the period to mediate on issues around their children. As of 24 April 2022, 7,916 vouchers have been distributed, and we will be making an official announcement on funding for the 2022-23 financial year shortly.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what data his Department holds on the number of prisoners with substance abuse issues (a) before their entry into prison and (b) after their sentence finishes.

We are committed to ensuring all those who need drug treatment in prison have access to a full range of treatment options, including abstinence-based interventions, to support a meaningful recovery from drug dependency.

In 2011, responsibility for health services, including substance misuse treatment, in prisons transferred from the National Offender Management Service to NHS England. Data on the number of prisoners in treatment services is collected via the National Drug Treatment Monitoring System and can be obtained from the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities.

Substance misuse treatment in secure settings: 2020 to 2021 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners have been released from custodial sentences on a Friday in each of the last five years.

Data showing how many prisoners have been released from custodial sentences on a Friday in each of the last five years can be viewed in table 1 below.

Table 1: Releases from custodial sentences on a Friday, by year, 2016-2020, in England and Wales

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Friday Releases

26,007

25,072

22,123

20,571

16,770

Source: Prison NOMIS

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what data his Department holds on the number of pre-sentence reports requested by the judiciary in each year since 2015.

Data for this is available using the figures published in table 4.24 of the Offender Management Statistics Quarterly bulletin, which can be found in the document linked below:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/981217/Probation_2020.ods.

While the decision of whether to order a pre-sentence report (PSR) is up to the discretion of the judiciary, we recognise their importance and are working to improve their quality, targeting and timeliness.

The Department is leading on a pilot that is currently running in 15 magistrates’ courts across England and Wales. The pilot is encouraging the earlier identification of cases that would benefit from a PSR, and providing additional training and support to build the capacity of PSR writers to further improve the quality of their reports. The pilot also requires that short format written reports are produced for three priority cohorts generally understood to have more complex needs, namely female offenders, young adult offenders and offenders at risk of custody. Whilst the majority of these cases may need a more comprehensive report, that may result in probation requesting an adjournment, a screening tool has been introduced to ensure that the reports on these cohorts are proportionate to the complexity of the individual case, rather than a fuller report when it is not necessary.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department spends on communications staff on average each year.

On average, expenditure on MoJ HQ communications staffing is £5.5m.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of recommendations to reduce the length of time before which people held under Imprisonment for Public Protection sentences are entitled to have their licence reviewed.

The Government brought forward an amendment to the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts (PCSC) Bill to require the Secretary of State to refer all eligible Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) offenders to the Parole Board for consideration of licence termination.

There are no current plans to change the length of time - 10 years - before which IPP offenders can be considered for licence termination. However, the Government keeps all aspects of the IPP sentence under constant review.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)