Lord Foster of Bath Portrait

Lord Foster of Bath

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

4 APPG memberships (as of 6 Oct 2021)
Gambling Related Harm, Media, Publishing, Taiwan
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Oct 2016 - 16th Jun 2017
Licensing Act 2003 Committee
14th Jun 2016 - 4th Apr 2017
Comptroller (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
7th Oct 2013 - 8th May 2015
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government)
6th Sep 2012 - 7th Oct 2013
Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (also Shadow Deputy Prime Minister)
1st Jul 2003 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
1st Jun 2002 - 1st Jun 2003
Shadow Spokesperson (Environment, Transport and the Regions)
1st Jun 1999 - 1st Jun 2001
Education & Employment
15th Nov 1995 - 29th Mar 1999
Shadow Spokesperson (Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 1995 - 1st Jun 1997
Shadow Spokesperson (Education)
1st Jun 1992 - 1st Jun 1995


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 27th October 2021
10:00
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 2nd November 2021
14:15
Communications and Digital Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Digital regulation
2 Nov 2021, 2:15 p.m.
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
Will Hayter - Senior Director, Digital Markets Unit at Competition and Markets Authority
Kate Collyer - Chief Economist and interim Director of Competition at Financial Conduct Authority
Stephen Almond - Director of Technology and Innovation at Information Commissioner's Office
Kate Davies - Public Policy Director at Ofcom
View calendar
Division Votes
Thursday 21st October 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 57 Liberal Democrat Aye votes vs 0 Liberal Democrat No votes
Tally: Ayes - 180 Noes - 130
Speeches
Wednesday 20th October 2021
Gambling Commission: Data

My Lords, I thank the Minister for his reply and draw attention to my entry in the register. The establishment …

Written Answers
Tuesday 3rd August 2021
Heating: Refrigerators
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary at the Department for Environment, Food …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Tuesday 20th July 2021
Minimum Energy Performance of Buildings Bill [HL] 2021-22
A Bill to make provision to increase the energy performance of buildings; and for connected purposes
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Foster of Bath has voted in 177 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(43 debate interactions)
Lord Grimstone of Boscobel (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
(4 debate interactions)
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Conservative)
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
(4 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department for International Trade
(4 debate contributions)
Home Office
(2 debate contributions)
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View all Lord Foster of Bath's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Foster of Bath, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Foster of Bath has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Foster of Bath has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Lord Foster of Bath


A bill to require the Secretary of State to ensure that domestic properties have a minimum energy performance rating of C on an Energy Performance Certificate; to make provision regarding performance and insulation of new heating systems in existing properties; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 2nd Reading (Lords)
Friday 7th February 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision to increase the energy performance of buildings; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Tuesday 20th July 2021
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision for a national strategy for cost-effective and efficient use of energy; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading : House Of Lords
Tuesday 14th June 2016

Lord Foster of Bath has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


100 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
19th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when their proposed Heat and Buildings Strategy will be published.

As my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State set out in the BEIS Select Committee on 20/07/21, the Government is planning to publish a Heat and Buildings Strategy in due course. The strategy will set out the immediate actions we will take for reducing emissions from buildings, as well as our approach to the key strategic decisions needed to achieve a mass transition to low-carbon heat.

In order to ensure that we remain on a credible path to net zero while retaining the option to pursue the optimal mix of technologies, we will grow the heat pump market to 600,000 per year by 2028; and undertake large-scale trials for hydrogen, to prove their safety case and build the market.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to extend the Energy Company Obligation to other measures in addition to space heating.

The targets for the current iteration of ECO are based on the Home Heating and Cost Reduction Obligation (HHCRO) powers set out in the Electricity Act 1989, Section 41B, and Gas Act 1986, Section 33BD. This allows Government to set a target for the promotion of measures for reducing the cost to individuals of heating their homes. Therefore, measures which do not result in space heating savings are not eligible.

Under the current scheme, ECO3, 44% of measures delivered were a form of insulation with the remainder being heating measures, such as replacement boilers, as of January 2021. ECO3 will end in March 2022, however, it was announced in February’s Sustainable Warmth Strategy that ECO4 will run from April 2022 through to 2026. The value of the scheme will also increase to £1bn per annum for ECO4. Further details about ECO4, including the scope of eligible measures, will be consulted on later this year.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what funds (1) have been, and (2) will be, allocated to local authorities to enable them to retrofit domestic premises to increase their energy efficiency.

The Green Homes Grant Local Authority Delivery (LAD) scheme, which supports energy efficiency and low carbon heat projects for low-income households, is being delivered in three phases:

  • Phase 1A; around £74 million was allocated to 55 projects in over 100 Local Authorities in October 2020, to be delivered by June 2021.
  • Phase 1B:  around £126 million has been allocated to 81 projects in over 200 Local Authorities, for delivery by September 2021.
  • Phase 2:  funding of £300 million has been allocated to the five Local Energy Hubs, who will work with Local Authorities in their region to deliver projects by December 2021.

The 2019 Conservative Manifesto committed to a £3.8bn Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund (SHDF) over a 10-year period, to improve the energy performance of social rented homes.

The Summer Economic Update announced the SHDF Demonstrator project, launched in 2020, which has awarded £62m of funding to social landlords across England and Scotland to test innovative approaches to retrofitting at scale, seeing over 2300 social homes improved to at least EPC band C.

The Autumn 2020 Spending Review committed £60m of funding for the first wave of the £3.8bn manifesto commitment in financial year 21/22.

The Government has since committed an additional £300 million on green home upgrades through Local Authorities. This extension will be through an increase in funding to Local Authorities via LAD and the SHDF wave one, and whilst the schemes are currently being designed, the focus remains on upgrading the worst-performing homes with energy efficiency installations and low-carbon heating.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement in the Energy White Paper Powering our Net Zero Future, published in December 2020, that “all rented non-domestic buildings will be EPC Band B by 2030, where cost-effective”, whether they plan to introduce a similar requirement for domestic premises; and if not, why not.

In the Clean Growth Strategy, the Government set the aspiration that as many homes as possible to reach EPC C by 2035 where practical, cost-effective and affordable.

We recently consulted on raising the energy performance standards in the domestic private rented sector to EPC band C for new tenancies from 2025 and all tenancies by 2028. We are currently analysing the responses and will be publishing the Government response in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 18 March (HL13898), what assessment they have made of (1) clause 2(1), and (2) clause 2(2), of the Domestic Premises (Energy Performance) Bill [HL].

As set out in the answer I gave the noble Lord on 18 March to Question HL13898, our plan for supporting fuel poor households is set out in the recently published strategy, Sustainable Warmth – supporting vulnerable households in England. Our forthcoming Heat and Buildings Strategy will set out how we intend to meet our wider energy efficiency commitments and set us on a path to decarbonising homes and buildings by 2050.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 26 January (HL12049), how they define the word 'ensure' in the context of their stated commitment "to ensure that as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable achieve a minimum energy efficiency rating of Band C, by 2030".

In the context of this target, we use the word ‘ensure’ to mean that we will take steps to make sure that this target is delivered. We will make sure that as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable achieve a minimum energy efficiency rating of Band C, by 2030.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 10 February (HL12638), what assessment they have made of clauses 2(1) and 2(2) of the Domestic Premises (Energy Performance) Bill [HL].

The Government believes supporting the Private Members Bill in question generally would reduce flexibility in the way we approach greenhouse gas emission savings and could potentially mean that more cost-effective approaches receive less attention or support. In addition, Government is committed to supporting low income and vulnerable households by meeting our statutory fuel poverty target, to improve as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable to a minimum energy efficiency rating of Band C by 2030. The Government has recently published a strategy, Sustainable Warmth – supporting vulnerable households in England, which sets out our plans to support fuel poor households in detail.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 9 February (HL12590), whether they will clarify what is meant by “as many homes as possible”.

The Government remains committed to the Clean Growth Strategy aim for as many homes as possible to be EPC Band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective, and affordable.

The updated Fuel Poverty Strategy, published February 2021, set out the road map to meeting our statutory fuel poverty target of improving as many fuel poor homes as reasonably practicable to energy efficiency rating Band C by the end of 2030, as well as our interim target of Band D by 2025.

There is no set number of homes to be achieved within those targets. However, the Heat & Buildings Strategy, which we plan to publish in due course, will set out how we intend to meet our commitments and set us on a path to decarbonising homes and buildings by 2050.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 2 February (HL12282), what year they estimate net zero could be achieved by spending one per cent of the UK’s GDP.

In June 2019, following advice from the Climate Change Committee (CCC), the UK Government became the first major economy to set a legally binding target to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. When publishing their recommendation for the level of the Sixth Carbon Budget in December 2020, the CCC made clear that Net Zero in 2050 remains the right target for the UK.

Ahead of COP26, we will set out ambitious plans across key sectors of the economy to meet our carbon budgets and net zero. We have already published the Energy White Paper and the first phase of our Transport Decarbonisation Plan, and will publish the Heat and Building Strategy in due course. We will also publish a comprehensive Net Zero Strategy, setting out the Government’s vision for transitioning to a net zero economy, making the most of new growth and employment opportunities across the UK. These will raise ambition as we outline our path to hit our 2050 target.

We will build on the strong foundations we have established through our leading progress in decarbonising our economy; our ambitious manifesto commitments; and announcements from my Rt. Hon. Friends the Prime Minister and Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer of measures to cut emissions as we build back better in our economic recovery from COVID-19.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 28 January (HL12149), whether they will reconsider the recommendation made by the Policy Exchange in their report Efficient Energy Policy: How to encourage improvements in domestic energy efficiency, published on 2 March 2016, to link Stamp Duty Land Tax to the energy performance of a dwelling, in the light of their finding that it would result in 2,700,000 homes being upgraded over a ten year period and be revenue neutral.

As with all tax policy, Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) is kept under review, but the Government does not currently have any plans to link SDLT on properties with their relative energy efficiency. As set out in the Energy White Paper, we will be consulting on regulatory options to improve the energy performance of owner occupier homes this year.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 26 January (HL12049), how they define “as far as is reasonably practicable”; and what is their estimate of the number of homes that may be excluded from the fuel poverty target.

We see improving the energy efficiency of homes to be the best long term solution to tackling fuel poverty. However, there are limitations as to the energy efficiency measures that can be put in place, including the physical characteristics of the property and the preferences of the householders. For example, some listed buildings cannot make use of certain energy efficiency measures like solid wall insulation. There will also be cases where householders simply do not want energy efficiency measures carried out in their home. These circumstances may mean that it is not reasonably practicable to improve the energy efficiency of the home.

Over time, innovative new energy efficiency measures may help to overcome some of these challenges while also reducing the cost of insulating homes. BEIS is encouraging innovation through funding ‘Innovations in the Built Environment’, a collection of competitions and projects, many of which encompass energy efficiency. We remain committed to encouraging the wide take up of energy efficiency measures.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their target “of reaching as many existing homes as possible at EPC band C or above by 2035” in the Energy White Paper, published on 14 December 2020, what “as many existing homes as possible” means; and what estimate they have made of the number of homes that will not be included in that target.

The Government remains committed to the Clean Growth Strategy aim for as many homes as possible to be EPC Band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective, and affordable.

In addition, for homes in fuel poverty, we remain committed to our statutory fuel poverty target of improving as many fuel poor homes as reasonably practicable to energy efficiency rating Band C by the end of 2030, as well as our interim target of Band D by 2025.

There is no set number of homes to be achieved within those targets. However, the Heat & Building Strategy and the updated Fuel Poverty Strategy, which we plan to publish in due course, will set out how we intend to meet our commitments and set us on a path to decarbonising homes and buildings by 2050.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer given by Lord Callanan on 25 January (HL11978), what estimate they have made of (1) the number of social houses that will be upgraded to EPC band C by the various schemes listed in that Answer, and (2) how many social houses will remain below EPC band C.

There are approximately 4.1 million social homes in England, with around 1.6 million homes currently rated below the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) band C.

The 2019 Conservative Manifesto committed to a £3.8bn Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund over a 10-year period, to improve the energy performance of social rented homes. The Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund will support the ambition set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, that as many homes as possible are improved to EPC band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective, and affordable, and for all fuel poor homes to reach this target by 2030. The Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund will bring a significant amount of the social housing stock that is currently below EPC C up to that standard.

The following schemes are also targeting energy performance improvement in social housing:

The £500m Green Homes Grant Local Authority Delivery scheme, which aims to improve the energy efficiency of around 50,000 homes rated EPC level D to G, where Social Housing Providers may work with Local Authorities to upgrade their housing stock;

The £50 million Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund (SHDF) Demonstrator, which has awarded funding to social landlords across England and Scotland to test innovative approaches to retrofitting at scale, seeing around 2300 social homes improved to at least EPC band C.

The Green Homes Grant voucher scheme, which provides grants to help homeowners improve the energy efficiency of their homes, is open to social, as well as private, landlords.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Climate Change Committee Sixth Carbon Budget, published on 9 December 2020, what estimate they have made of the potential amount of greenhouse gas emissions which could be reduced by spending up to two per cent of GDP.

The Committee on Climate Change's (CCC) latest estimate puts the incremental costs of action to deliver net zero emissions by 2050 at below 1% of UK GDP throughout the next 30 years. The Government is considering the CCC’s advice on Carbon Budget 6, and our Impact Assessment on setting the level of Carbon Budget 6 will set out more detail on the costs and benefits associated with reducing emissions.

HM Treasury is conducting a review on how to achieve the net zero transition in a way that works for households, businesses and public finances, as well as ensuring that this is compatible with our plans for a thriving and competitive economy. Their interim report, published on 17 December 2020, set out the overall approach to the Review and analysis which will inform the final report due this Spring.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Committee on Climate Change Net Zero: The UK's contribution to stopping global warming, published on 19 May 2019, what steps they are taking to ensure that their commitment for net-zero greenhouse gases by 2050 is "comprehensive, achieved without use of international credits" and covers international aviation and shipping.

In 2019, the UK became the first major economy in the world to legislate to end its contribution to global warming by 2050. International aviation and shipping emissions are included within the scope of the 2050 net zero target, which was set on a whole economy basis. We fully intend to meet our net zero target through cutting our domestic carbon emissions.

International credits can play an important role in cost-effective global emissions reduction, while creating development co-benefits. We retain our ability to use international credits if necessary, to achieve our commitments as we have said previously when setting Carbon Budgets and legislating for net zero. However, our intention is to meet our Nationally Determined Contribution and net zero commitment through domestic action.

Ahead of COP26, we will set out ambitious plans across key sectors of the economy to meet our carbon budgets and net zero. We have already published the Energy White Paper and the first phase of our Transport Decarbonisation Plan, and will publish the Heat and Building Strategy in due course. We will also publish a comprehensive Net Zero Strategy, setting out the Government’s vision for transitioning to a net zero economy.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Committee on Climate Change The Sixth Carbon Budget: The UK’s path to Net Zero, published on 9 December 2020, what plans they have to ensure that all social homes achieve EPC band C by 2028.

The Government remains committed to the ambition set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, that as many homes as possible are improved to Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective, and affordable.

At the Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer provided up to £50m for a UK-wide Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund (SHDF) Demonstrator, to support jobs, improve energy efficiency and reduce bills for social tenants whilst demonstrating the benefits of the Whole House Retrofit approach to reduce costs overall. At the recent spending review the chancellor announced £60 million in 2021/22 for the SHDF in England.

The Government has also recently published the Social Housing White Paper where we committed to review the Decent Homes Standard to consider how it can better support the decarbonisation and energy efficiency of social homes.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Committee on Climate Change The Sixth Carbon Budget: The UK’s path to Net Zero, published on 9 December 2020, what plans they have to set a legally binding target to upgrade all buildings to EPC Band C by 2035.

The Government remains committed to the ambition set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, that as many homes as possible are improved to Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective, and affordable.


We believe this still represents good value for money, and we are focussed on introducing a range of policies and proposals that deliver it. In 2020, alongside a significant package of public funding for building retrofit, we have:

  • Consulted on strengthening minimum energy performance standards for the domestic Private Rented Sector to at least EPC C by 2028;
  • Consulted on setting requirements for mortgage lenders to help homeowners improve the energy performance of the homes they lend to;
  • Committed to consult on energy performance requirements under the Decent Homes Standard for social housing;
  • Committed to consult in 2021 on regulatory measures for owner occupier homes.

The Heat and Building Strategy will set out further details on the actions we will take to reduce emissions from buildings.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, what consideration they have given to the recommendations of the report by Policy Exchange Efficient Energy Policy: How to encourage improvements in domestic energy efficiency, published on 2 March 2016, and in particular the recommendation that Stamp Duty Land Tax should be linked to the energy performance of a dwelling.

Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) is kept under review, but the Government does not currently have any plans to link SDLT on properties with their relative energy efficiency, as suggested in the report by Policy Exchange.

The Government acknowledges that more needs to be done to improve the energy performance of owner-occupied homes. As such, we are currently consulting on how mortgage lenders can help householders in England and Wales to improve the energy performance of their homes. We have committed to consult in 2021 on regulatory measures for owner occupiers and will consider a range of options as part of that consultation.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to eradicate fuel poverty; and if so, how.

We see improving the energy efficiency of homes as the best long term solution to tackling fuel poverty, enabling warmer homes with reduced energy bills. The fuel poverty target is therefore to ensure that as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable achieve a minimum energy efficiency rating of Band C, by 2030. There are interim milestones for the target of a minimum Band E rating by 2020 and Band D by 2025. Good progress is being made and in 2018, our most recent statistics indicated there were around 900,000 fewer fuel poor households living in an E, F or G rated property compared to 2010. An updated Fuel Poverty Strategy for England will be published in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what financial levers or incentives they are considering, if any, to persuade people to insulate their homes to Energy Performance Certificate band C levels.

Several government-funded schemes are in place to improve the energy efficiency of homes by installing insulation, most of which focus on homes with low-energy performance, and fuel poor homes.

The £1.5 billion Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme aims to deliver upgrades to 600,000 homes across England, with insulation forming one of the groups of primary measures available. Support is available for low-energy performing (rated EPC D or below) and fuel poor homes through the £500 million Local Authority Delivery (LAD) Green Homes Grant Scheme, and low-income and vulnerable households through the GB wide Energy Company Obligation (ECO) worth £640m per year until March 2022.

Lastly, the £50 million Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund Demonstrator (SHDF(D)) aims to help Local Authorities retrofit social housing at scale and upgrade the energy performance of poorer-performing homes. We have committed a further £60 million for the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund (SHDF) to continue upgrading the least efficient social housing.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish an Energy Bill or a draft Energy Bill this year.

The Government intends to bring forward an Energy Bill as soon as parliamentary time allows. The Energy Bill will aim to enable progress to be made on commitments made by the Prime Minister in his Ten Point Plan as well as deliver policy commitments set out in the Energy White Paper.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to Figure 2.3. on page 16 of the Updated energy and emissions projection 2019, published on 30 October, what steps (1) they have taken, and (2) they plan to take, to address any increase in CO2 emissions by the residential sector; whether they have a target for the reduction of emissions of CO2 in that sector; and if so, what that target is.

Between 1990 and 2018 UK greenhouse gas emissions have decreased by 43%. Over the same period, emissions from domestic homes have decreased by around 17%, or 18 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent

The Government is planning to publish a Heat and Buildings Strategy in the coming months, which will set out the immediate actions we will take for reducing emissions from buildings. These actions include the deployment of energy efficiency measures and low carbon heating as part of an ambitious programme of work required to enable key strategic decisions on how we achieve the mass transition to low-carbon heat and set us on a path towards our net zero targets.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether their target for upgrading domestic properties to Energy Performance Certificate band C by 2030 is 1.5 million homes, as set out in The Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution, published on 18 November, or all fuel poor homes, as set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, published on 12 October 2017.

We remain committed to the aspiration set out in the Clean Growth Strategy for as many homes as possible to be EPC Band C by 2035 where practical, cost-effective and affordable. We are also committed to ensuring that as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable achieve a minimum energy efficiency rating of Band C, by 2030.

There are a number of Government schemes available to support households in improving the energy efficiency of their homes, including the Green Homes Grant and Energy Company Obligation, with some funding specifically targeted towards households in fuel poverty.

In the Ten Point Plan, we specify that our green home finance initiatives could help to improve the energy performance of around 2.8 million homes, improving around 1.5 million to EPC C standard by 2030. These figures refer specifically to the proposals laid out in the consultation, ‘Improving home energy performance through lenders’, which is focused on mortgaged homes in England and Wales.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much money they have (1) allocated, and (2) propose to allocate to upgrade (a) fuel poor homes, and (b) all homes to achieve Energy Performance Certificate band C.

Our manifesto committed £6.3 billion to improving people’s homes, to accelerate our progress towards net zero emissions by 2050 and to help households reduce their energy bills.

The Summer Economic Update announced more than £2 billion of funding for upgrading the energy efficiency of homes. The Green Homes Grant is a £2 billion programme which will help improve the energy efficiency of homes in England. Low income and vulnerable homeowners in receipt of certain benefits may be eligible for a grant covering up to 100% of the cost of installation, up to £10,000.

The £50 million Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund will contribute to fuel poverty alleviation and energy efficiency improvements of social housing stock. The Prime Minister announced that the scheme will carry on for an additional year, with £60 million additional funding announced for social housing at Spending Review 2020

The Energy Company Obligation scheme requires energy companies to deliver energy efficiency and heating measures to low income, vulnerable and fuel poor households. The current scheme is worth £640m per year and ends in March 2022. My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister announced an extension to this scheme until 2026 in his Ten Point Plan. Further details about ECO will be consulted on in the first half of next year.

We will publish the Heat and Buildings Strategy and Fuel Poverty Strategy in the coming months. These strategies will set out further details on how we will work towards alleviating fuel poverty and improving homes’ energy performance ratings.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the role of local renewable energy supply in (1) achieving net zero carbon emission targets, and (2) reducing emissions of CO2.

Renewable electricity generation has more than quadrupled since 2010 and low carbon electricity now gives us over 50 percent of our total. We have the world’s largest offshore wind capacity (a third of the global total) and auction prices for future offshore wind projects fell by two-thirds between the 2015 and 2019 Contracts for Difference auctions.

We are working to deliver an ambitious Energy White Paper that addresses the transformation of the energy system consistent with delivering our net zero target.

Small-scale low-carbon electricity generation is supported by the Smart Export Guarantee (SEG), which came into force on 1 January 2020. The SEG gives small generators, such as homes with solar panels, the right to be paid for the renewable electricity they export to the grid. It reflects our continued commitment to ensuring that low carbon electricity is?central to the?transition to?the?smart?and flexible?energy systems of the future.

We are continuing to offer support to communities who want to generate energy locally through the Rural Community Energy Fund.?RCEF provides funding to rural communities for feasibility studies and pre-development of renewable energy projects.

In addition, the Government supports the deployment of low carbon heat through a number of different mechanisms, including through local heat networks which will play an important part in meeting our net zero targets.

Provisional BEIS estimates suggest that overall emissions fell by 14.2 million tonnes of carbon dioxide (MtCO2) (3.9 per cent) to 351.5 MtCO2 between 2018 and 2019, driven mainly by the changes in the fuel mix used for electricity generation (as published in March 2020).

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the role of local renewable energy supply in (1) enabling all homes to achieve Energy Performance Certificate band C, and (2) alleviating fuel poverty.

On site renewable energy generation, such as solar photovoltaic panels and wind turbines, can improve the energy performance of homes, and tackle fuel poverty where it reduces energy bills. Other upgrades can also play an important role in increasing the energy performance of homes and tackling fuel poverty, such as improvements to fabric efficiency of homes, upgrading lighting, or replacing heating and hot water systems.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 3 August (HL7278), why passive flue gas heat recovery systems with thermal storage are not mandated for (1) all replacement boilers in the UK, and (2) installation in all new buildings; and whether those systems deliver an average five per cent efficiency improvement and significant carbon savings.

Building Regulations set minimum energy performance standards for heating systems in new homes and when they are replaced or fitted into existing homes.

Under these regulations, when a gas combination boiler is installed in an existing dwelling, an additional energy efficiency measure must also be installed, with passive flue gas heat recovery systems being one of four options. The English housing stock is diverse, so the requirement is flexible to allow a suitable choice to be made that reflects the nature of the building, and the needs of the individual household.

When these regulations were introduced, many system and most regular boilers on the market were considered incompatible with passive flue gas heat recovery systems and compensation controls, or required an additional component, and therefore were exempt from the additional energy efficiency measures.

For new builds, buildings regulations around energy efficiency and space and water heating are deliberately couched in performance terms and do not prescribe the technologies, or fuels to be used, allowing manufacturers and builders the flexibility to innovate and select the most practical and cost-effective solutions in particular circumstances.

The extent to which a passive flue gas heat recovery system can increase the efficiency of a dwelling and reduce natural gas consumption is dependent on many factors. Analysis undertaken on behalf of BEIS showed that the typical household could increase boiler efficiency between 1% to 5% by adding a passive flue gas heat recovery system.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist (HL2159), when they expect to publish the outcome of their consultation Energy Performance Certificates in Buildings, which closed on 26 July 2018.

The Government will publish a summary of responses to the Call for Evidence later this year. Alongside this, we intend to publish an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) Action Plan which will build on the views expressed as part of the Call for Evidence, to set out a series of actions which the Government will take forward, and inform future policy thinking in order to maximise the effectiveness of EPCs in the future.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 23 July (HL6670), what estimate they have made of how much less carbon dioxide would be emitted if boilers in all large houses were fitted with stored passive flue gas heat recovery technology (1) when such houses are built, or (2) when boilers in such houses are replaced.

Passive Flue Gas Heat Recovery System’s (PFGHR) with thermal storage can deliver total annual gas savings for heating hot water of around 30% for a typical domestic building. This is equivalent to a boiler efficiency improvement of around 5% versus a system without. These savings can vary significantly depending on the volume of the thermal store, space heating demand, usage patterns and property type.

Domestic hot water gas savings will typically be close to 20% for a new-build dwelling, and up to 35% for a larger existing property.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 7 July (HL6124), whether they can answer the question put with regard to stored passive flue gas heat recovery technology rather than passive flue gas heat recovery technology.

The response I gave to the noble Lord on 7 July 2020 to Question HL6124 applies to passive flue gas heat recovery systems with and without thermal storage.

Analysis undertaken on behalf of BEIS showed that the typical household could increase boiler efficiency between 1% to 5% by adding a passive flue gas heat recovery system. The 1-5% boiler efficiency level includes both product types with the 5% being an upper maximum for a passive flue gas heat recovery device with thermal storage (typically a 5 to 10 litre store) in a large house.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Stored-Flue Gas Heat Recovery technology will be included within their grant scheme for energy saving projects for homeowners.

In his Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £2bn Green Home Grant scheme that will support homeowners and landlords in England to improve the energy efficiency of their properties, reducing energy bills and carbon emissions, and supporting a green economic recovery.

The funding will be spent on paying for accredited tradespeople to install a range of measures, for example insulation, to improve the energy performance of their homes. Further detail on the range of measures will be announced in due course, before the full launch.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 16 June (HL4962), what assessment they have made, if any, of the impact on carbon dioxide emissions of fitting all (1) new social housing developments, (2) replacement boilers in social housing, (3) new houses, and (4) replacement boilers in all houses, with stored passive flue gas heat recovery technology in each year to 2025.

Introduced in 2018, Boiler Plus regulations raised standards for all domestic boiler installations, supporting efforts to reduce carbon emissions while making it easier and cheaper to heat homes. In addition to raising the minimum efficiency standards for boilers, the regulations required an additional energy efficiency measure to be installed alongside combination gas boilers that accounted for 78% of the market. The measures include flue gas heat recovery.

Many system boilers and most regular boilers on the market were incompatible with flue gas heat recovery systems and compensation controls when boiler plus regulations were introduced and therefore were exempt from the requirement.

The extent to which a passive flue gas heat recovery system can increase the efficiency of a dwelling and reduce natural gas consumption is dependent on many factors including the annual space heating and domestic hot water demand of the specific building and importantly whether the system installed has built-in thermal storage. However, analysis showed that the typical household could increase boiler efficiency between 1% to 5% by adding a passive flue gas heat recovery system.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 4 June (HL4822), what legally binding targets they have set for (1) renewable energy as a whole, and (2) for each type of renewable energy; and in each case, why any such targets were set.

The Government is committed to the decarbonisation of the UK energy sector and as part of this commitment set a legally binding new target to cut emissions to ‘net zero’ by 2050.This came into force on 26th June 2019 under The Climate Change Act 2008 (2050 Target Amendment) Order 2019.

Under the EU Renewable Energy Directive (2009/28/EC), the UK has a target of 20% renewable energy by 2020. The Renewable Energy Directive does not include targets for individual renewable energy technologies. The Government has not set legally binding targets for renewable energy as a whole or for individual renewable energy technologies beyond 2020.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many domestic boilers they anticipate will be sold every year for the next 10 years; and what they estimate the carbon emissions for those boilers will be.

There are close to 2 million heating appliances sold in the UK each year, over 80% of which are domestic gas boilers. Gas boiler sales are likely to remain at a similar level in the immediate future. However, industry projections for heating appliance sales in 2020 are being revised due to the impact of covid-19.

Emissions from individual homes depend on the size and energy efficiency of the property. As a result of minimum energy efficiency requirements for new gas boilers, introduced in 2018, the average household that switches from an average gas boiler can save 200kgCo2 per year.

The Government is committed to reducing the emissions produced from heating our homes by increasing energy efficiency and utilising clean heating technologies to meet our net zero commitments. The immediate steps to tackle these emissions will be set out as part of the Heat and Buildings Strategy, which we aim to publish later in the year.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what statutory targets have been set for (1) renewable energy, and (2) carbon dioxide reduction; and why any such targets were set.

Climate change is a threat that requires an urgent global response. The Government is clear, we must act now.

The Climate Change Act 2008 was the first of its kind in the world and made the UK the first country to introduce a legally binding, long-term emissions reduction target.

The Act set a legally binding target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 80% by 2050 relative to 1990 levels. In June 2019, the Government passed legislation to increase that target to a reduction of at least 100% (net zero).

It also introduced our innovative framework of carbon budgets to ensure continued progress towards that target, capping emissions in successive five-year blocks. The carbon budgets currently set in legislation (carbon budgets 1 to 5 covering the period between 2008 to 2032) are amongst the most stringent in the world, requiring the equivalent of a 57% cut in emissions by 2030 from a 1990 baseline.

We have committed to end the use of unabated coal by 2025. Meeting our net zero target will require us to build on this progress by transforming our economy – our homes, our transport, our industries, how we generate and use energy, and how we use our land.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the data underpinning their Review of the Gambling Act 2005; and what additional data, if any, will be needed in order to effectively review that Act.

The government announced the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December 2020, starting with a wide ranging Call for Evidence. The Call for Evidence closed on 31 March 2021 and we received c.16,000 submissions which we are carefully considering. Part of this work will include considering where additional evidence may be required. We aim to publish a white paper outlining our conclusions and policy proposals by the end of the year.

The Commission requires all operators to monitor gambling activity across a range of indicators and to intervene where a customer may be at risk of harm. As part of our Review of the Gambling Act, we are looking at whether the data collected by operators, particularly remote operators, could be better deployed to support the government's objectives including the prevention of harm to children and vulnerable people.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the amount of consumer data held by gambling operators, and (2) whether this data could be used to prevent gambling-related harm.

The government announced the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December 2020, starting with a wide ranging Call for Evidence. The Call for Evidence closed on 31 March 2021 and we received c.16,000 submissions which we are carefully considering. Part of this work will include considering where additional evidence may be required. We aim to publish a white paper outlining our conclusions and policy proposals by the end of the year.

The Commission requires all operators to monitor gambling activity across a range of indicators and to intervene where a customer may be at risk of harm. As part of our Review of the Gambling Act, we are looking at whether the data collected by operators, particularly remote operators, could be better deployed to support the government's objectives including the prevention of harm to children and vulnerable people.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether their fan-led review of football governance will include an assessment of the financial sustainability of banning gambling sponsorship.

The Terms of Reference for the fan-led review of football governance have been published and amongst other matters, the review will explore ways of improving the governance, ownership and financial sustainability of clubs in English football, building on the strengths of the football pyramid.

While the role of gambling sponsorship currently sits outside the scope of the fan-led review, we launched the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December 2020, with the publication of a Call for Evidence. This closed on 31 March 2021 and received approximately 16,000 submissions from a broad range of interested organisations and individuals. As part of the wide scope of that Review, we called for evidence on the benefits or harms of gambling sponsorship arrangements in sports and other areas, and we are considering the evidence carefully.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of advertisements by gambling operators that will be aired before 9pm during the 2021 UEFA European Championship.

The Government has not made an estimate of the number of advertisements by gambling operators that will be aired before 9pm during the 2021 UEFA European Championship. Broadcasters have discretion over how advertising breaks are set and what adverts are broadcast, in line with Ofcom and ASA standards. In addition, the Gambling Industry Code for Socially Responsible Advertising includes a whistle to whistle ban that also prohibits adverts for betting being shown during live sports broadcast before the 9pm watershed. Subject to these rules, the volume of adverts depends on the commercial arrangements put in place between the gambling operators and the broadcasters. All gambling advertising, wherever it appears, is subject to strict controls on content and placement.

Gambling adverts must never be targeted at children or vulnerable people. The Advertising Standards Authority independently administers these standards through the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) which covers online and non-broadcast spaces and the Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP) for TV. If an advert for gambling holds particular appeal to children and is freely accessible then it will break the rules.

The government launched the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. This closed on 31 March and received approximately 16,000 submissions from a broad range of interested organisations and individuals. As part of the wide scope of that Review, we called for evidence on the benefits or harms of allowing gambling operators to advertise and we are considering the evidence carefully.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the benefits of suspending advertisements by gambling operators during the 2021 UEFA European Championship.

The Government has not made an estimate of the number of advertisements by gambling operators that will be aired before 9pm during the 2021 UEFA European Championship. Broadcasters have discretion over how advertising breaks are set and what adverts are broadcast, in line with Ofcom and ASA standards. In addition, the Gambling Industry Code for Socially Responsible Advertising includes a whistle to whistle ban that also prohibits adverts for betting being shown during live sports broadcast before the 9pm watershed. Subject to these rules, the volume of adverts depends on the commercial arrangements put in place between the gambling operators and the broadcasters. All gambling advertising, wherever it appears, is subject to strict controls on content and placement.

Gambling adverts must never be targeted at children or vulnerable people. The Advertising Standards Authority independently administers these standards through the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) which covers online and non-broadcast spaces and the Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP) for TV. If an advert for gambling holds particular appeal to children and is freely accessible then it will break the rules.

The government launched the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. This closed on 31 March and received approximately 16,000 submissions from a broad range of interested organisations and individuals. As part of the wide scope of that Review, we called for evidence on the benefits or harms of allowing gambling operators to advertise and we are considering the evidence carefully.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, in advance of any steps they intend to take following their review of the Gambling Act 2005, they will encourage the Gambling Commission to amend the social responsibility codes of practice to prohibit licensees from offering bet to view inducements

Our Review of the Gambling Act 2005 was launched on 8 December 2020 with a wide-ranging Call for Evidence, including on issues around advertising, marketing and the relationship between sport and gambling. The department received c.16,000 submissions in response, which are currently being carefully considered. We aim to publish a white paper by the end of the year outlining our conclusions and policy proposals.

The Gambling Commission’s consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction (including on issues to do with affordability) closed on 9 February and received over 13,000 responses. The Commission is reviewing that evidence and intends to publish an interim update on progress and to set out next steps in due course. The Commission’s consultation findings may inform its advice to the government for the Act Review.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, in advance of any steps they intend to take following their review of the Gambling Act 2005, they will encourage the Gambling Commission to make it a licence condition that gambling operators should not contract with affiliates unless the affiliates themselves are licensed.

Our Review of the Gambling Act 2005 was launched on 8 December 2020 with a wide-ranging Call for Evidence, including on issues around advertising, marketing and the relationship between sport and gambling. The department received c.16,000 submissions in response, which are currently being carefully considered. We aim to publish a white paper by the end of the year outlining our conclusions and policy proposals.

The Gambling Commission’s consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction (including on issues to do with affordability) closed on 9 February and received over 13,000 responses. The Commission is reviewing that evidence and intends to publish an interim update on progress and to set out next steps in due course. The Commission’s consultation findings may inform its advice to the government for the Act Review.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, in advance of any steps they intend to take following their review of the Gambling Act 2005, they will encourage the Gambling Commission to pursue urgently the development of new licence conditions which will require operators to conduct strict affordability checks before accepting bets.

Our Review of the Gambling Act 2005 was launched on 8 December 2020 with a wide-ranging Call for Evidence, including on issues around advertising, marketing and the relationship between sport and gambling. The department received c.16,000 submissions in response, which are currently being carefully considered. We aim to publish a white paper by the end of the year outlining our conclusions and policy proposals.

The Gambling Commission’s consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction (including on issues to do with affordability) closed on 9 February and received over 13,000 responses. The Commission is reviewing that evidence and intends to publish an interim update on progress and to set out next steps in due course. The Commission’s consultation findings may inform its advice to the government for the Act Review.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, in advance of any steps they intend to take following their review of the Gambling Act 2005, they will use their existing statutory powers to prohibit advertising by gambling companies in or near sports venues.

Our Review of the Gambling Act 2005 was launched on 8 December 2020 with a wide-ranging Call for Evidence, including on issues around advertising, marketing and the relationship between sport and gambling. The department received c.16,000 submissions in response, which are currently being carefully considered. We aim to publish a white paper by the end of the year outlining our conclusions and policy proposals.

The Gambling Commission’s consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction (including on issues to do with affordability) closed on 9 February and received over 13,000 responses. The Commission is reviewing that evidence and intends to publish an interim update on progress and to set out next steps in due course. The Commission’s consultation findings may inform its advice to the government for the Act Review.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to announce the result of their review of the Gambling Act 2005; and what plans they have to introduce primary legislation in this parliament in response to that review.

Our Review of the Gambling Act 2005 was launched on 8 December 2020 with a wide-ranging Call for Evidence, including on issues around advertising, marketing and the relationship between sport and gambling. The department received c.16,000 submissions in response, which are currently being carefully considered. We aim to publish a white paper by the end of the year outlining our conclusions and policy proposals.

The Gambling Commission’s consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction (including on issues to do with affordability) closed on 9 February and received over 13,000 responses. The Commission is reviewing that evidence and intends to publish an interim update on progress and to set out next steps in due course. The Commission’s consultation findings may inform its advice to the government for the Act Review.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ratify the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage.

The Government values the profound contribution of the UK’s craft workers, artisans and artists to the preservation of our unique intangible heritage. We are exploring the merits of ratifying the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, as a potential addition to the broad range of support measures which already exist for this vital aspect of our nation’s life.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) the owners and management of Football Index, and (2) individuals affected by the collapse of Football Index.

The government is taking the collapse of BetIndex Ltd (the operators of Football Index) and the concerns of those affected by this very seriously. We have heard from hundreds of individuals affected by these events in recent weeks, and on 20 April we announced an independent review of the regulation of the Football Index product. This review is intended to take an objective look at the decisions and actions of the Gambling Commission and any other relevant regulators, to provide a clear account of how the company’s activities were regulated, identify if there are potential areas for improvement and inform our Review of the Gambling Act 2005.

The Gambling Commission licensed BetIndex Ltd in 2015 and is responsible for ensuring that gambling operators comply with the gambling legislation and the conditions and codes of practice attached to their operating licences. The activities regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority are primarily set out in the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (Regulated Activities) Order (the RAO). The RAO contains the financial services activities, known as ‘regulated activities’, that require FCA authorisation before firms or individuals can carry them out. BetIndex was not authorised by the FCA.

The Commission is continuing its regulatory investigation into BetIndex Ltd and administration proceedings are ongoing. Our independent review is separate to those processes, and will be carried out and report in a way which will not compromise them. The government has not had discussions with BetIndex’s owners and management.

A Written Ministerial Statement on Regulation of Football Index was published on Tuesday 20 April 2021. It is publicly available here: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2021-04-20/hcws929

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what were the responsibilities of the (1) Financial Conduct Authority, and (2) Gambling Commission, in regulating Football Index.

The government is taking the collapse of BetIndex Ltd (the operators of Football Index) and the concerns of those affected by this very seriously. We have heard from hundreds of individuals affected by these events in recent weeks, and on 20 April we announced an independent review of the regulation of the Football Index product. This review is intended to take an objective look at the decisions and actions of the Gambling Commission and any other relevant regulators, to provide a clear account of how the company’s activities were regulated, identify if there are potential areas for improvement and inform our Review of the Gambling Act 2005.

The Gambling Commission licensed BetIndex Ltd in 2015 and is responsible for ensuring that gambling operators comply with the gambling legislation and the conditions and codes of practice attached to their operating licences. The activities regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority are primarily set out in the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (Regulated Activities) Order (the RAO). The RAO contains the financial services activities, known as ‘regulated activities’, that require FCA authorisation before firms or individuals can carry them out. BetIndex was not authorised by the FCA.

The Commission is continuing its regulatory investigation into BetIndex Ltd and administration proceedings are ongoing. Our independent review is separate to those processes, and will be carried out and report in a way which will not compromise them. The government has not had discussions with BetIndex’s owners and management.

A Written Ministerial Statement on Regulation of Football Index was published on Tuesday 20 April 2021. It is publicly available here: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2021-04-20/hcws929

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for a product licensing regime for online gambling products.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. As part of the wide scope of that Review, we have called for evidence on the case for greater controls on the design of online gambling products, including pre-release testing.

We welcome steps taken by technology companies to support people who are experiencing problem gambling. This includes Google’s recently announced plans to allow its users to opt out of gambling advertising.

According to the 2016 Combined Health Survey, the rate of problem gambling among those who had gambled online during the past year was 3.5%. The 2018 Health Survey for England found a problem gambling rate of 4.2% among past-year online gamblers.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the Gambling Commission’s decision to grant an operating licence to Football Index, and (2) whether the level of oversight of that company's activities was adequate.

The government is monitoring the situation with Football Index closely and Ministers [the Secretary of State and Minister for Media and Data] have met the Gambling Commission twice to receive urgent reports. A live investigation by the Commission is ongoing. The Commission has been in close contact with the Jersey Gambling Commission throughout this case and continues to work closely with them. Further information can be found on the Commission’s website: https://www.gamblingcommission.gov.uk/news-action-and-statistics/news/2021/BetIndex-update.aspx

The Gambling Commission does not carry out capital adequacy and stress tests, which would normally apply to banks, or routinely monitor the financial viability of operators. It looks at suitability when licensing an operator, including their financial circumstances, and may review these aspects in the course of its compliance activity. The Commission will investigate where there is evidence that operators have breached licence conditions.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the collapse of Football Index.

The government is monitoring the situation with Football Index closely and Ministers [the Secretary of State and Minister for Media and Data] have met the Gambling Commission twice to receive urgent reports. A live investigation by the Commission is ongoing. The Commission has been in close contact with the Jersey Gambling Commission throughout this case and continues to work closely with them. Further information can be found on the Commission’s website: https://www.gamblingcommission.gov.uk/news-action-and-statistics/news/2021/BetIndex-update.aspx

The Gambling Commission does not carry out capital adequacy and stress tests, which would normally apply to banks, or routinely monitor the financial viability of operators. It looks at suitability when licensing an operator, including their financial circumstances, and may review these aspects in the course of its compliance activity. The Commission will investigate where there is evidence that operators have breached licence conditions.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the rates of problem gambling among the professional football community.

The Government is aware of research that has suggested professional sports people may be at increased risk of experiencing gambling harm. Employers across all sectors have a duty to look after the welfare of their employees. Footballers can also access support from The Professional Footballers’ Association, which provides a 24/7 counselling helpline for past and present members, and Sporting Chance.

The Government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. The Review will be wide-ranging and evidence led and aims to make sure we have the right protections in place to make gambling safer for all.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of children exposed to gambling advertising through professional sports.

The government does not hold data on the number of children exposed to gambling advertising through professional sports. However, the Gambling Commission’s annual survey of children and young people includes figures on the proportion of children who have seen gambling adverts in a number of settings. In 2019, that survey found that 50% of 11-16 year olds had seen or heard a gambling advertisement linked to a sports event. In 2020, the survey found that 41% of 11-16 year olds had seen or heard gambling adverts linked to a sports event but the outbreak of Covid-19 halted fieldwork for the 2020 survey before it was finished. The 2020 survey is therefore not directly comparable to previous years.

All gambling advertising, wherever it appears, is subject to strict controls on content and placement and must never be targeted at children or vulnerable people. In 2019, the Gambling Industry Code for Socially Responsible Advertising was amended to include a whistle-to-whistle ban on betting adverts being shown during live sport before the 9pm watershed.

We launched the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. As part of the wide scope of that Review, we have called for evidence on the benefits or harms of allowing gambling operators to advertise.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made, if any, of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the level of gambling by women.

The Gambling Commission is continuing to monitor gambling behaviour during the Covid-19 period. Survey data published by the Commission in January indicated that 87% of women gamblers have gambled the same amount or less during the pandemic than they had previously. The Commission recently wrote to operators to remind them of its guidance issued in May 2020, which requires them to increase protections for those who may be at heightened risk of gambling harm. That guidance directed operators to monitor customer behaviour more closely to identify signs of potential harm, and banned mechanisms by which customers could cancel requests to withdraw money from their account.

The Gambling Commission also conducts a quarterly telephone survey of gambling behaviours which collects data about problem gambling prevalence. The most recent wave of that survey was carried out in September, and aggregated results for the year to September 2020 estimated the problem gambling rate amongst women to be 0.3%. This is higher than the rate estimated for the year to September 2019 (0.1%), but lower than the rate estimated for the year to March 2020 (0.4%). Caution should be used when interpreting these figures due to the low numbers of respondents involved. Much of the data for the year to September 2020 was collected prior to the Covid-19 period, and problem gambling is measured using questions which ask about past year experiences and behaviours, so it is not possible to accurately assess the relative impact of the pandemic on fluctuations in currently available data. The Commission will publish the next wave of telephone survey data later this month, which will give figures for the year to December 2020.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8th December with the publication of a call for evidence. The Review will be wide-ranging and evidence-led, and aims to make sure we have the right balance for regulation and appropriate protections for all vulnerable people.



Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the average amount of weekly disposable income; and what assessment they have made of the average amount of weekly gambling expenditure.

According to ONS data, the mean household disposable income in 2020 was £36,900, equating to approximately £710 per week. This data can be accessed at:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/personalandhouseholdfinances/incomeandwealth/bulletins/householddisposableincomeandinequality/financialyear2020.

Further consideration of how assessments might be made of disposable and discretionary income is included in the Gambling Commission’s consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction which is available at:

https://consult.gamblingcommission.gov.uk/author/remote-customer-interaction-consultation-and-call/supporting_documents/CI%20consultation%20call%20for%20evidence.pdf#page=19

In the same consultation and call for evidence, the Commission estimates that online gamblers spend an average (mean) of £57 per month on online gambling. However, this is only an indicative estimate based on Gross Gambling Yield for the remote sector and remote gambling participation rates from survey data, as the Commission does not track weekly or monthly gambling spend as an official statistic. The government is also aware of a recent study of Lloyds Banking Group customers in 2018 which estimates electronic transactions by gamblers to gambling operators across all sectors to average £112 (mean) per month. Note that unlike the Commission’s calculation, this figure is outgoing transactions only and is not adjusted for any winnings. Caution should be applied in considering data based on averages as both discretionary income and gambling spend vary significantly between individuals.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Barran on 22 January (HL11976), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, whether (1) secondary, or (2) primary, legislation would be required to bring loot boxes within scope of gambling regulation by defining their contents as money or money’s worth.

For the purposes of the Gambling Act 2005 gaming is defined in section 6(1) as playing a game of chance for a prize, which is defined in section 6(5) as being money or money’s worth. Section 6(6) of the Act allows the Secretary of State to make regulations clarifying what constitutes a game of chance for the purposes of the Act, but it does not include a provision for the Secretary of State to amend section 6(5).

The government is reviewing the evidence received through our bespoke Call for Evidence on whether loot boxes present a risk of harm to consumers, and if so, the extent and nature of those harms. The evidence we received will help us both identify the issues at play and ensure that any policy changes effectively address them. As we are still considering the evidence submitted, it is too early to know whether any changes might be needed and therefore we cannot specify how we could implement any changes should they be required. The government will set out its next steps on loot boxes, including whether or not primary or secondary legislation is needed, in the coming months.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further (1) to the report by the Select Committee on the Social and Economic Impact of the Gambling Industry Gambling Harm—Time for Action, published on 2 July 2020 (HL Paper 79), and (2) to the letter to that Committee from the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Sport, Tourism and Heritage on 21 December, whether (a) secondary, or (b) primary, legislation would be required to bring loot boxes within scope of gambling regulation by defining their contents as money or money’s worth.

The government remains committed to delivering on its manifesto pledges and ensuring young and vulnerable people are protected from harm. Our bespoke call for evidence on whether loot boxes cause harm and, if so, the nature of the harm, closed in November and received more than 30,000 responses (including individual responses to the survey of players’ experiences). We will publish a government response and next steps in the coming months, including implementation details for any changes proposed.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by the Prime Minister on 9 December (HC Deb, col 840), what plans they have to set up a working party to take forward the Turn on the Subtitles campaign that includes representatives of (1) that campaign, (2) Government departments, and (3) children's programming broadcasters.

The government is engaging with the Turn On The Subtitles campaign and other stakeholders, including broadcasters, to consider the evidence on the costs and benefits of switching on subtitles by default. A decision on next steps will be made in due course.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential merits of establishing a gambling ombudsman.

The House of Lords Select Committee on the Social and Economic Impact of the Gambling Industry recommended that a statutory ombudsman be created for the gambling sector. The government is carefully considering this and other recommendations made by the committee and will respond in due course.

In addition, the Public Accounts Committee has recommended that the government and the Gambling Commission should make an assessment of gaps in the existing arrangements for redress open to consumers, and set out a plan to resolve any gaps identified. The government has agreed with this recommendation and has indicated that it will write to the committee in the coming months to provide an update on progress in this area.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what powers Ofcom has to require television broadcasters to put subtitles on all children’s programmes.

Under the Communications Act 2003, broadcast television channels are required to make a certain proportion of their programmes, including children’s programmes, accessible.

Statutory targets are set by Ofcom which include five and ten year targets on subtitling, sign language and audio description for licensed television services. Ofcom’s Code on Television Access Services sets out these obligations and provides guidance and best practice on subtitling for broadcasters. This includes guidance in relation to subtitles aimed at young children which states that:

care should be taken to ensure that these are accurate and grammatical, as children and parents use subtitles in developing literacy skills”.

Television content on demand should be accessible for all UK audiences. That is why, under the Digital Economy Act 2017, the Government included measures to facilitate accessibility requirements for on-demand services. Officials are working closely with Ofcom to implement this legislation.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made (1) of the difficulties in obtaining insurance cover faced by people working in the creative industries, and (2) of the effect that such difficulties may have on those people’s creative output; and what plans they have to support such people.

The Government has announced a £500m compensation scheme to assist the film and TV production sectors who are ready to return to work, but are precluded from doing so by the difficulties they face obtaining insurance cover for Covid-19.

The new UK-wide £500 million Film and TV Production Restart Scheme will get TV and film productions across the country that have been halted or delayed specifically by a lack of insurance back up and running by giving productions the confidence they need that they will be supported if future losses are incurred due to Covid-19.

It will fill the gap left by the lack of available insurance and cover coronavirus-related losses for cast member and crew illnesses and filming delays or disruptions caused by the Covid-19. The scheme will directly support up to 40,000 - 50,000 jobs in the film and TV production industry.

A targeted intervention in the TV and film sector was considered necessary for its restart. The government will continue to monitor what further action is needed to support the re-opening of the economy and any potential further interventions would be assessed on a case by case basis. With regard to other creative industries, we are regularly in touch with a range of stakeholders from across the Creative Industries, including via ministerially-chaired roundtables, to ensure that we fully understand the range of issues affecting them during the Covid crisis and recovery period.

In terms of supporting the creative workforce, other recently announced sector-specific schemes include the £1.57bn funding package for the arts, culture and heritage industries, which comes on top of the multi-billion pound support already made available to the cultural and creative sectors, including the Job Retention Scheme and the Self Employed Income Support Scheme.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to allow casinos to reopen.

DCMS officials are in regular contact with Public Health England and the casino sector to discuss the protections that are needed to allow casinos to reopen safely. This includes arranging a visit for senior public health representatives to assess the measures which are in place. The Minister for Sport, Tourism and Heritage has spoken with representatives of the sector about the impacts of closure, and the government is working to ensure casinos can open as soon as the medical and scientific advice is that it is safe to do so.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement by Baroness Barran on 3 June (HL Deb, col 1360), why they believe that a reciprocal two-year EU-wide multi-entry touring visa for musicians and others is not legally possible.

In my response to The Earl of Clancarty in Parliament on 3 June, I said that a touring visa as he proposed was not “legally possible”.

I am afraid that this could have been phrased more accurately. While a visa of the kind he proposed is not legally impossible, the legal arrangements of the EU make it less negotiable, and each individual EU member state retains the right to caveat the third-party mobility arrangements negotiated at an EU-wide level. We are not asking for a special, bespoke, or unique deal. We are looking for a deal like the free trade agreements the EU has previously struck with other friendly countries such as Canada.

We recognise that music and the performing arts are culturally and economically crucial industries. Through negotiations with the EU on Mobility and Mode IV we are exploring how we can provide greater certainty to these industries in the future through reciprocal provisions based on best precedent.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on 12 July (UIN28169), what plans they have to consult (1) consumer bodies, (2) the industry, and (3) MPs and Peers, as part of their review of the legislation covering hydrofluorocarbons.

Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are the most common type of gas in the group known as fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-gases) and their use is being phased down under F-gas legislation.

We are currently reviewing the F-gas legislation and plan to publish an Assessment Report based on the review by spring 2022. We are engaging with industry stakeholders to gather information and technical evidence to inform the Assessment Report. This includes engagement with key trade bodies, such as the Federation of Environmental Trade Associations and the Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Industry Board. .

Following publication of the Assessment Report, we intend to publish a legislative proposal and run a formal public consultation during 2022. Any new legislation will be introduced to Parliament in the normal way, including consultation with hon. Members and Peers.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the return on investment for exporting businesses created by the Tradeshow Access Funding Programme, prior to its cancellation.

We have not carried out economic analysis of the impact of the Tradeshow Access Programme (TAP) as a standalone service. However, we know that the businesses we support in attending trade shows view it very highly, which suggests a positive return on their investment. When surveyed, 89% of businesses stated they were satisfied with their experience of TAP (DIT Export Client Quality Survey, published July 2020).

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when a replacement scheme for the Tradeshow Access Programme will be announced.

HM Government will announce further details on plans for a revised trade show support programme when discussions with HM Treasury are concluded.

The £38m Internationalisation Fund, launched last year, provides matching grants for export support including attendance at trade shows.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what allocations have been made from the 2020/21 Tradeshow Access Programme.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) entered this financial year with a full calendar of agreed events to be supported by the Tradeshow Access Programme with a budget of £6.5 million.

Regrettably, most of the events have since been cancelled due to the impact of COVID-19.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Tradeshow Access Programme funding is available to UK companies to take part in digital trade shows.

I am pleased to say that Her Majesty’s Government is currently operating a pilot programme to assess the benefits of providing support, through the Tradeshow Access Programme, to UK companies participating in digital tradeshows. The pilot runs until 31 March 2021.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Grimstone of Boscobel on 4 August (HL7349), who attended the most recent meetings of each of the 17 Expert Trade Advisory Groups (ETAGs) listed; whether the communication of the outcome of the review of the ETAGs will include the publication of (1) their membership during the meetings listed, and (2) their new membership, if different; and when that review is expected to conclude.

The attendance information that the Department holds for the most recent meetings in July and August is detailed in the attached table.

On 25th August, nine sectoral Expert Trade Advisory Groups (ETAGs) were stood down. 11 Trade Advisory Groups, which are sector-focused, have been created. Their membership can be found online (see here).

The following advisory groups will continue to exist: Continuity; Customs; Financial Services; Intellectual Property; Procurement; Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises; Sustainability; and Trade for Development. The review of how these groups operate is ongoing and will conclude in due course, together with a decision on whether membership will be published.

There is no plan to publish historic membership.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many meetings there have been of each of the 17 Expert Trade Advisory Groups, either in person or virtually; on what dates these meetings were held; and what plans there are for further meetings of each group.

Our Expert Trade Advisory Groups (ETAGs) have met 84 times to date. The table below shows how many meetings there have been for each of the 17 ETAGs and the dates on which they were held.

ETAG name

Total number of meetings held to date

Date of each meeting held

Agri-food

9

04/07/2019, 21/08/2019, 25/09/2019, 24/10/2019, 14/01/2020, 12/02/2020, 05/03/2020, 27/05/2020, 06/07/2020

Automotive

8

13/07/2019, 14/08/2019, 26/09/2019, 21/10/2019, 30/01/2020, 12/02/2020, 27/05/2020, 20/07/2020

Chemicals

2

22/08/2019, 10/02/2020

Creative

3

14/01/2020, 14/02/2020, 03/06/2020

Continuity

9

14/08/2019, 11/09/2019, 09/10/2019, 30/10/2019, 17/12/2019, 24/01/2020, 12/02/2020, 29/04/2020, 08/07/2020

Customs

3

08/07/2019, 14/02/2020, 21/07/2020

Digital

4

04.11.2019, 09/01/2020, 12/02/2020, 01/06/2020

Financial Services

7

16/09/2019, 28/10/2019, 10/01/2020, 31/01/2020, 02/03/2020, 29/05/2020, 03/07/2020

IP

4

30/09/2019, 20/01/2020, 08/06/2020, 21/07/2020

Investment

3

05/09/2019, 24/01/2020, 05/06/2020

Life Sciences

4

27/09/2019, 05/02/2020, 04/06/2020, 09/07/2020

PBS

4

03/09/2019, 28/01/2020, 28/04/2020, 03/06/2020

Procurement

4

17/02/2020, 20/03/2020, 12/06/2020, 02/07/2020

SMEs

3

16/08/2019, 13/02/2020, 15/05/2020

Sustainability

5

18/09/2018, 11/12/2018, 18/06/2019, 20/02/2020, 06/07/2020

TfD

7

02/02/2018, 24/10/2018, 21/03/2019, 15/07/2019, 09/10/2019, 28/02/2020, 19/05/2020

Transport Services

5

16/09/2019, 28/01/2020, 27/01/2020, 02/06/2020, 12/06/2020

Due to the outbreak of COVID-19, HMG’s publication priorities shifted and the planned publication of ETAG membership was delayed in the Spring. The Department is now undertaking a review of the ETAGs, the outcome of which will be communicated in due course.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which Expert Trade Advisory Groups have been created by the Department for International Trade; and who are the members of those groups.

There are currently 17 Expert Trade Advisory Groups (ETAGs), covering a range of sector and thematic policy areas. Over 250 organisations are members of the network of Expert Trade Advisory Groups. The Department intends to publish the names of these organisations in due course.

We have established engagement mechanisms, such as the ETAGs, to ensure a broad range of stakeholders have the opportunity to inform the UK’s trade policy. Any further opportunities for engagement during negotiations will be set out in due course.

The membership of ETAGs varies according to the needs of the Group, and may include a range of stakeholders from industry, consumer groups, business associations, trade unions or NGOs. Members were selected based on experience and?expertise in the relevant sectoral or thematic area.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the role of the Department for International Trade’s Expert Trade Advisory Groups will be as negotiations on trade agreements progress.

There are currently 17 Expert Trade Advisory Groups (ETAGs), covering a range of sector and thematic policy areas. Over 250 organisations are members of the network of Expert Trade Advisory Groups. The Department intends to publish the names of these organisations in due course.

We have established engagement mechanisms, such as the ETAGs, to ensure a broad range of stakeholders have the opportunity to inform the UK’s trade policy. Any further opportunities for engagement during negotiations will be set out in due course.

The membership of ETAGs varies according to the needs of the Group, and may include a range of stakeholders from industry, consumer groups, business associations, trade unions or NGOs. Members were selected based on experience and?expertise in the relevant sectoral or thematic area.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how the Department for International Trade selected the membership of its Expert Trade Advisory Groups.

There are currently 17 Expert Trade Advisory Groups (ETAGs), covering a range of sector and thematic policy areas. Over 250 organisations are members of the network of Expert Trade Advisory Groups. The Department intends to publish the names of these organisations in due course.

We have established engagement mechanisms, such as the ETAGs, to ensure a broad range of stakeholders have the opportunity to inform the UK’s trade policy. Any further opportunities for engagement during negotiations will be set out in due course.

The membership of ETAGs varies according to the needs of the Group, and may include a range of stakeholders from industry, consumer groups, business associations, trade unions or NGOs. Members were selected based on experience and?expertise in the relevant sectoral or thematic area.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
29th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the UK’s ability to introduce online harms legislation if safe harbour provisions form part of any future free trade agreement with the government of the US.

This Government is committed to making the UK the safest place in the world to be online and the best place to start and grow a digital business. We will carefully consider any interaction between trade policy and online harms policy in future trade agreements.

The UK Government has engaged with US Trade Representative on a range of areas including digital trade. Inevitably there is speculation as to what each side will want to achieve in a future UK-US deal, but it is too soon to say exactly what would be covered.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
29th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have had any discussions with trade representatives from the government of the US in relation to section 230 of the Communications Decency Act 1996.

This Government is committed to making the UK the safest place in the world to be online and the best place to start and grow a digital business. We will carefully consider any interaction between trade policy and online harms policy in future trade agreements.

The UK Government has engaged with US Trade Representative on a range of areas including digital trade. Inevitably there is speculation as to what each side will want to achieve in a future UK-US deal, but it is too soon to say exactly what would be covered.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
29th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with trade representatives from the government of the US in relation to intermediary liability.

This Government is committed to making the UK the safest place in the world to be online and the best place to start and grow a digital business. We will carefully consider any interaction between trade policy and online harms policy in future trade agreements.

The UK Government has engaged with US Trade Representative on a range of areas including digital trade. Inevitably there is speculation as to what each side will want to achieve in a future UK-US deal, but it is too soon to say exactly what would be covered.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
8th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the new cabotage rules for touring performers and orchestras introduced by the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement; and whether they will provide details of all official meetings held between the UK government and the EU at which those rules have been discussed.

The Department for Transport’s assessment is that the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) allows for the majority of haulage operations that were being undertaken by UK hauliers before the end of the transition period.  However, UK operators will not be allowed to undertake more than 2 movements within the EU before returning to the UK. These rules will also apply to specialist hauliers, such as hauliers who carry equipment for touring performers and orchestras.

Alternative arrangements for specialist hauliers were discussed in detail as part of negotiations, including specific proposals for liberalised access, but the EU was unwilling to agree more flexible arrangements. Unfortunately, the Department is not able to release the content of correspondence and records pertaining to the negotiation; these texts are confidential, and it is therefore not appropriate for them to be published.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the cost to the NHS of resolving problems which have occurred during treatment in the private health sector; and what plans they have to ensure that such costs are recovered by the NHS.

No assessment has been made. There is no general provision which allows the National Health Service to recover the costs of problems which have occurred during treatment in the private health sector. Where a private sector hospital or surgeon has been negligent and that negligence results in a damages claim against the party concerned, there is provision for the NHS hospital which subsequently treated the patient to recover specified monetary amounts from the compensator up to a specific maximum, which is currently £54,682 for care and treatment.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration they will give to gambling-related harm as part of their forthcoming cross-government Addiction Strategy.

Due to the pressures of the COVID-19 pandemic, work on the cross-Government addictions strategy has been delayed. While the scope of the strategy is yet to be determined, it is likely to include gambling-related harms.

1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what treatments are available for women affected by gambling addiction; and what assessment have they made, if any, of the percentage of women gamblers receiving treatment.

The NHS Long Term Plan committed to expanding the geographical coverage of treatment services by opening up to 15 specialist problem gambling clinics by 2023/24. Gambleaware commissions the National Gambling Treatment Service which offers a wide range of treatment services for gambling related harms, including for women.

The Government does not hold centrally information on the number of women gamblers receiving treatment.

1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what research, if any, they have conducted into the pathways to gambling disorder by women.

Public Health England is currently carrying out an evidence review on the prevalence, determinants and harms associated with gambling, and the social and economic burden of gambling-related harms. This includes reviewing the evidence on young people, men and women. The review is expected to be completed in March 2021.

Alongside this, the National Institute of Health Research commissioned a research unit in Sheffield University to undertake a mapping review of the effectiveness of national and international policies and interventions to reduce gambling-related harms.

30th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Royal College of Psychiatrists Self Harm and Suicide in Adults, published in July, what steps they are taking to address any shortcomings in the way suicide risk assessments are conducted.

The National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health has issued extensive guidance on the correct use of risk assessment tools. This guidance makes it clear to trusts that patient management plans should be based on a wider assessment of the individual and their circumstances.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence is currently reviewing its guidance on the management of self-harm with the intention to publish updated guidance in May 2022. This will ensure that guidance for trusts on risk assessment and safety planning is based on the most up-to-date evidence.

Funding has also been provided through the NHS Long-Term Plan specifically to support suicide prevention planning and ensure that every local authority has in place a multi-agency suicide prevention plan.

10th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions, if any, they have had with the government of Israel regarding reports of the forced displacement of Palestinian families in Silwan.

The UK regularly raises the issue of forced evictions from their homes with the Government of Israel. The Fourth Geneva Convention, which applies to all occupied territories, prohibits demolitions or forced evictions absent military necessity. The UK is clear that in all but the most exceptional of circumstances, evictions are contrary to International Humanitarian Law. The practice causes unnecessary suffering to Palestinians and is harmful to efforts to promote peace. We monitor the situation in Silwan closely, and officials regularly visited and attend related court hearings. We continue to urge Israel to cease such actions.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to undertake the five-year review of remote gaming duty set out in the 2014 HMRC draft note on Remote Gambling Taxation Reform.

The Government has no current plans to publish a review or evaluation document on remote gaming duty.

The reference in the 2014 HMRC draft note relates to the internal monitoring and evaluation process, which is standard practice across all taxes. The benefits, revenue effects and administration of remote gambling taxation are subject to constant evaluation.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the amount of corporation tax that has been avoided by online gambling companies which operate in the UK since the introduction of the Remote Gaming Duty in 2014.

Remote Gaming Duty is a point of consumption tax on gaming providers’ profits from remote gaming. There will be a liability if there is a UK person playing, regardless of where in the world the gaming provider is located. This is not linked to the Corporation Tax position.

A company is liable for UK Corporation Tax on its worldwide income and gains if it is resident in the UK for tax purposes. A non-UK tax resident company may still be liable for UK Corporation Tax if it is trading in the UK through a UK permanent establishment, such as a branch or agency. In this case the non-UK resident company would be liable for UK tax on the worldwide income and gains related to that permanent establishment.

HMRC does not generally estimate speculative amounts that could be payable if offshore companies decided to become UK tax resident.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
27th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they last reviewed the case for reducing VAT on accommodation and attractions to assist the tourism industry; what conclusions they reached; and whether they will publish the analysis that led to those conclusions.

At Spring Statement 2018, the Government launched a call for evidence on the impact of VAT and Air Passenger Duty on tourism in Northern Ireland, which also considered UK-wide changes. The response to the call for evidence was published at Budget 2018.
Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to prevent new homes from being built with a lower standard than Energy Performance Certificate band B.

Improving the energy efficiency of all our buildings to reduce carbon emissions is a key part of reaching our net zero target and new build is an area where we can and must maintain momentum.

From 2025, the Future Homes Standard will ensure that new homes are future-proofed with low carbon heating and high levels of energy efficiency to produce at least 75 per cent lower CO2 emissions compared to those built to current standards, which represents a considerable improvement in energy efficiency standards of new homes.

This year we will introduce an interim uplift to the energy efficiency standards that delivers a meaningful reduction in carbon emissions and provides a stepping-stone to the Future Homes Standard in 2025. This uplift will be expected to produce 31 per cent less CO2 emissions compared to current standards. This will deliver high-quality homes that are in line with our broader housing commitments and encourage homes that are future-proofed for the longer-term.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many new homes that have an energy efficiency rating below EPC band C were built in each of the last three years; and what steps they are taking, or intend to take, to ensure that in all new homes are built with at least an EPC band C rating.

The number of new homes, including change of use or the conversion of existing properties, that have an energy efficiency rating below EPC band C built, in each of the last three calendar years for which published figures are available, are; 14,772 in 2019, 15,264 in 2018 and 11,168 in 2017.

From 2025, the Future Homes Standard will ensure that new homes are future-proofed with low carbon heating and high levels of energy efficiency to produce at least 75 per cent lower CO2 emissions compared to those built to current standards, which represents a considerable improvement in energy efficiency standards of new homes.

This year we will introduce an interim uplift to the energy efficiency standards that delivers a meaningful reduction in carbon emissions and provides a stepping-stone to the Future Homes Standard in 2025. This uplift will be expected to produce 31 per cent less CO2 emissions compared to current standards. This will deliver high-quality homes that are in line with our broader housing commitments and encourage homes that are future-proofed for the longer-term.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Clean Growth Strategy, published on 12 October 2017, what plans they have to ensure that social housing is brought up to the same energy standards, over a similar timetable, to that proposed for the private rented sector.

In the Charter for Social Housing Residents – Social Housing White Paper published on 17 November 2020, we committed to review the Decent Homes Standard. We will ensure that the Decent Homes review considers how it can work to support better energy efficiency and the decarbonisation of social homes.

At the Chancellor’s summer economic update, the Government announced a £50 million demonstrator project to start the decarbonisation of social housing during 2020/21. This will encourage innovation and help inform the design of the future Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund.

At the Spending Review 2020, The Chancellor announced £60 million of further funding for the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund, to continue upgrading the least efficient social housing.

The Prime Minister announced an extension to the Green Homes Grant which social landlords are eligible to bid for. This will fund up to two thirds of the cost of hiring tradespeople to upgrade the energy performance of homes.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Greenhalgh on 16 September (HL7638), what assessment they have made of the letter sent by the Rural Services Network to the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on 18 August which stated that the definition of “designated rural areas” in section 157 of the Housing Act 1985 and subsequently used in their consultation Changes to the current planning system, published on 6 August, does not apply to 70 per cent of smaller rural communities.

The Government is currently consulting on this matter and will take all responses to the consultation into consideration.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the percentage of small rural communities that do not meet the “designated rural areas” definition in section 157 of the 1985 Housing Act used in the consultation Changes to the current planning system, published on 6 August.

National planning policy makes it clear that in rural areas, housing development that reflects local needs should be supported, and that affordable housing can be sought for residential developments that are not major developments in designated rural areas. Our consultation on changes to the current planning system does not propose to change this overall approach. To aid small and medium-sized (SME) builders through economic recovery, we are consulting on a proposal to increase the current threshold at which affordable housing contributions can be collected on new developments. The higher threshold will only be in place for a time limited period, and will not apply to designated rural areas. By raising the threshold, we are ensuring that sites that may not have been developed due to viability issues will now go ahead creating the homes our country needs. The Government has not set out a definition of small rural communities in national planning policy, but is keen to work with rural stakeholders as part of the consultation.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Review of the methodology for FGHRS in SAP Final Report, published by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on 9 June, what plans they have to mandate a minimum domestic hot water seasonal efficiency of at least 100 per cent when measured against EN 13203 Gas fired domestic appliances producing hot water for boilers installed in the UK for (1) new build social housing, (2) other new build housing, (3) as replacement boilers in social housing, and (4) as replacement boilers in all housing.

The Government recognises that the energy efficiency of buildings has an important role to play in meeting our commitment to net zero emissions by 2050 and that generating hot water efficiently is a necessary part of this. The Standard Assessment Procedure accounts for the benefits of installing energy saving measures in hot water systems including flue gas heat recovery systems.

As part of the Future Homes Standard consultation, launched in October 2019, we consulted on energy efficiency standards for new homes, including minimum building services efficiencies. This consultation closed on 7 February. We are analysing the consultation responses, and will publish a Government response in due course. A further consultation will follow, proposing changes to the energy efficiency standards for new non-domestic buildings; for building work to existing homes and non-domestic buildings; and on mitigating overheating in new dwellings.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Greenhalgh on 29 June (HL5657), whether the Future Homes Standard consultation meets the requirements of section J of the Cabinet Office's Consultation Principles, as updated on 19 March 2018.

The Government remains committed to meeting its target of net zero emissions by 2050 and recognises the important contribution that the energy efficiency of buildings has to make in meeting it. In October 2019, we launched the first stage of a two-part consultation on Part L and Part F of the Building Regulations. We proposed an ambitious uplift in the energy efficiency of new homes through the introduction of a Future Homes Standard from 2025. We expect that homes built to the Future Homes Standard will have carbon dioxide emissions 75-80 per cent lower than those built to current Building Regulations standards, which means they will be fit for the future, with low carbon heating and very high fabric standards.

The Government's Consultation Principles, promoted by Cabinet Office, provide departments with guidance on conducting consultations. Section J of that guidance states that an explanation should be provided where it is not possible to publish a response within 12 weeks of the consultation.

The Future Homes Standard consultation closed on 7 February and received over 3300 responses from organisations and individuals, many of which were detailed or provided supporting evidence that requires further consideration. This level of response exceeded expectations and is over ten times the amount of responses that were received for our previous 2012 consultation about changes to the building regulations that relate to the energy efficiency of buildings (part L).

Since the Future Homes Standard consultation closed, the department has been faced with the biggest public health emergency in living memory: a pandemic which has forced action across all of Government, resulting in unprecedented response, from shielding the most vulnerable, to keeping business running, preventing the loss of jobs, and supporting our public services. Every part of this Department has been rapidly mobilised to support those in need, from saving lives, protecting the vulnerable to supporting our NHS.

Our analysis of the Future Homes Standard consultation is ongoing and the Government remains committed to publishing a response in as timely a manner as possible, in line with principle J of the Cabinet Office principles.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Duncan of Springbank on 7 February (HL Deb, col 2001), what steps they are taking to ensure the Future Homes Standard will apply to (1) houses under construction in 2025, and (2) sites where planning permission has been granted but construction has not yet started.

The Government remains committed to meeting its target of net zero emissions by 2050 and recognises the important contribution that the energy efficiency of buildings has to make in meeting it. In October 2019, we launched the first stage of a two-part consultation on Part L and Part F of the Building Regulations. We proposed an ambitious uplift in the energy efficiency of new homes through the introduction of a Future Homes Standard from 2025. We expect that homes built to the Future Homes Standard will have carbon dioxide emissions 75-80 per cent lower than those built to current Building Regulations standards, which means they will be fit for the future, with low carbon heating and very high fabric standards.

Transitional arrangements apply when changes to the Building Regulations or approved standards take place. They provide developers with assurance about the standards to which they must build, and ensure that they should not have to make material amendments to work which is already underway when new Regulations came into force. However, the Government is aware of cases of housing developments being built out to energy efficiency requirements that have been superseded more than twice with changes to Part L of the Building Regulations. While we appreciate that many housebuilding sites are built out over a number of years, it cannot be right that new homes are being built to old standards introduced in 2010 or even 2006. That in turn means that occupiers do not benefit from the levels of energy efficiency and the bill savings they would expect from a brand-new home. It also means that new homes are contributing more carbon dioxide emissions than should be expected, which has an impact on climate change.

To mitigate this, the Future Homes Standard consultation proposed a more stringent set of transitional requirements in 2020 to ensure that developers do not continue to build to older energy efficiency standards for longer than is appropriate. The consultation also sought views on the possible transitional arrangements that may apply from 2025 when the Future Homes Standard is introduced.

The Future Homes Standard consultation closed on 7 February. The responses we have received will be considered carefully, and the Government response will be issued in due course.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to publish the outcome of their consultation Energy Performance Certificates in buildings, which closed on 26 July 2018.

BEIS and MHCLG will publish a summary of responses and plan to improve Energy Performance Certificates in due course.

Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
27th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish an analysis of the responses to their consultation which closed on 15 January 2019 on the business rates treatment of self-catering accommodation.

The Department is considering what further steps might be appropriate in the light of points made in responses to the consultation and will publish its analysis of those responses in due course.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)