Andy Slaughter Portrait

Andy Slaughter

Labour - Hammersmith

First elected: 5th May 2005


Shadow Solicitor General
4th Dec 2021 - 15th Nov 2023
Justice Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 17th May 2022
Animal (Penalty Notices) Bill
1st Dec 2021 - 8th Dec 2021
Shadow Minister (Justice)
29th Oct 2021 - 4th Dec 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
27th Oct 2021 - 23rd Nov 2021
Justice Committee
8th May 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow Minister (Housing)
21st Oct 2016 - 29th Jun 2017
Shadow Minister (Justice)
8th Oct 2010 - 27th Jun 2016
Human Rights (Joint Committee)
26th Jul 2010 - 2nd Nov 2010
London Regional Select Committee
14th Dec 2009 - 6th May 2010
Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee
2nd Nov 2009 - 6th May 2010
Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Committee
2nd Nov 2009 - 6th May 2010
Children, Schools and Families
9th Nov 2007 - 2nd Nov 2009
Regulatory Reform
12th Jul 2005 - 26th Nov 2007


Oral Question
Thursday 7th December 2023
10:10
Attorney General
Oral Question No. 9
What recent steps has she taken with Cabinet colleagues to uphold the rule of law within Government
Save to Calendar
Division Votes
Monday 4th December 2023
Victims and Prisoners Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 161 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 193 Noes - 279
Written Answers
Monday 4th December 2023
Allergies: Health Services
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospital admissions due to anaphylaxis there have …
Early Day Motions
Monday 5th July 2021
Hassan Mushaima and political prisoners detained in Bahrain
That this House is deeply concerned by the decade-long detention of 73-year-old Hassan Mushaima in Bahrain who was sentenced to …
Bills
Monday 26th April 2021
High-rise Properties (Electrical Safety) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to require social landlords of residential properties in high-rise buildings to undertake regular safety inspections of electrical installations; …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 20th March 2023
1. Employment and earnings
24 March 2022, payment of £170 received for a survey completed on 25 February 2022. Hours: 45 mins.
EDM signed
Thursday 20th July 2023
School libraries and librarians
That this House recognises the importance of encouraging children to enjoy books from an early age and of developing a …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 23rd March 2022
Short and Holiday-Let Accommodation (Registration) Bill 2021-22
A Bill to establish a national register of short and holiday-let accommodation; to give local authorities powers to require information …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Andy Slaughter has voted in 724 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

25 Oct 2023 - Economic Activity of Public Bodies (Overseas Matters) Bill - View Vote Context
Andy Slaughter voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 150 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 197 Noes - 276
View All Andy Slaughter Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
James Cartlidge (Conservative)
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
(56 debate interactions)
Robert Jenrick (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office) (Immigration)
(21 debate interactions)
James Cleverly (Conservative)
Home Secretary
(21 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(85 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(37 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Judicial Review and Courts Act 2022
(46,555 words contributed)
Fire Safety Bill 2019-21
(9,519 words contributed)
Building Safety Act 2022
(1,567 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Andy Slaughter's debates

Hammersmith Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

1.Restaurants to put all information about allergens in their food on the face of the main menu so customers have full visibility on what they're ordering.
2.Servers must initiate a discussion with customers about allergies on all occasions.
3.National register for anaphylaxis deaths

The Government should appoint an Allergy Tsar to act as a champion for people with allergies to ensure they receive appropriate support and joined up health care to prevent avoidable deaths and ill health.

Amend legislation to make it a legal requirement for a driver to stop & report accidents involving cats.

The proposed Human Rights Act reforms must be withdrawn. The Government must not make any changes to the Human Rights Act, especially ones that dilute people's human rights in any circumstances, make the Government less accountable, or reduce people's ability to make human rights claims.

The Government should bring forward legislation to allow assisted dying for adults who are terminally ill and have mental capacity. It should be permitted subject to strict upfront safeguards, assessed by two doctors independently, and self-administered by the dying person.

Join other nations in providing a route to safety for refugees. Waive all visa requirements for Ukrainian passport holders arriving in the UK.

The Government's manifesto stated “we will make intentional trespass a criminal offence”: an extreme, illiberal & unnecessary attack on ancient freedoms that would threaten walkers, campers, and the wider public. It would further tilt the law in favour of the landowning 1% who own half the country.

To not decide to scrap free travel for those who are under 18. As a teenager who has relied so much on free travel, it has allowed for me to go to school without the worry of an extra expense and explore around the beautiful city of London also. Destroying free travel would hurt so many of us.


Latest EDMs signed by Andy Slaughter

13th July 2023
Andy Slaughter signed this EDM on Thursday 20th July 2023

School libraries and librarians

Tabled by: Margaret Greenwood (Labour - Wirral West)
That this House recognises the importance of encouraging children to enjoy books from an early age and of developing a culture of reading for pleasure in schools; notes that evidence suggests that school libraries lead to better literacy and educational outcomes, higher attainment, improved wellbeing and contribute to the delivery …
43 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Oct 2023)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 28
Independent: 3
Liberal Democrat: 3
Scottish National Party: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
23rd March 2022
Andy Slaughter signed this EDM on Thursday 24th March 2022

P&O Ferries and DP World

Tabled by: Karl Turner (Labour - Kingston upon Hull East)
That this House condemns in the strongest possible terms the decision of P&O Ferries to fire 800 staff without notice or consultation with their trade unions, the RMT and Nautilus; demands the immediate reinstatement of the sacked workers; condemns their replacement with agency workers earning as little as £1.80 per …
125 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Apr 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 92
Scottish National Party: 12
Liberal Democrat: 7
Independent: 5
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Alba Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
View All Andy Slaughter's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Andy Slaughter, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Andy Slaughter has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Andy Slaughter has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Andy Slaughter


A Bill to require social landlords of residential properties in high-rise buildings to undertake regular safety inspections of electrical installations; to establish a complaints procedure for tenants of such properties who have electrical safety concerns; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Monday 26th April 2021

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make providers of social housing, local safeguarding children boards, Electoral Registration Officers, Returning Officers and the Housing Ombudsman public authorities for the purposes of the Freedom of Information Act 2000; to make information held by persons contracting with public authorities subject to the Freedom of Information Act 2000; to extend the powers of the Information Commissioner; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 19th July 2017
(Read Debate)

240 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
16th Oct 2023
To ask the Attorney General, how many confiscation orders of what value the Serious Fraud Office obtained in the last ten years.

The Serious Fraud Office has obtained 68 confiscation orders totalling £202,000,000 since 1st April 2014.

Michael Tomlinson
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
16th Oct 2023
To ask the Attorney General, what costs the Serious Fraud office incurred in cases where individuals were acquitted in the last ten years.

The Serious Fraud Office has paid out £7.485 million in judge-directed acquittals in cases where individuals were acquitted during the past 10 years.

Michael Tomlinson
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Attorney General, how many corporate self-reports the Serious Fraud Office has received in each of the last five years.

In financial year 2018/19 the SFO received 7 corporate self-reports.

In financial year 2019/20 the SFO received 6 corporate self-reports.

In financial year 2020/21 the SFO received 3 corporate self-reports.

In financial year 2021/22 the SFO received 8 corporate self-reports.

In financial year 2022/23 the SFO received 8 corporate self-reports.

Michael Tomlinson
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Attorney General, what provision the Serious Fraud Office made in its Annual Report 2022-23 for special payments for the case involving three executives of G4S.

The Serious Fraud Office’s Annual Report and Accounts for 2022-23 included a provision of £6 million to cover any claims that could be made during the year in relation to casework outcomes, this would include any settlements that result from ongoing claims relating to G4S, which have yet to be agreed.

Michael Tomlinson
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has spent on the (a) investigation into ENRC and (b) defending the proceedings brought against the SFO by ENRC.

As stated in the response to the Hon. Member’s previous question [45309] the Serious Fraud Office’s (SFO) investigation into ENRC is ongoing. The ENRC have brought two civil actions for alleged misfeasance against the SFO. This matter remains ongoing and as such the final costs are not yet determined.

The SFO does not disclose the costs associated with its cases as this risks prejudicing the administration of justice and is against the public interest. Information on how the SFO uses resources is published in aggregate in its Annual Report and Accounts.

Michael Tomlinson
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) spent on the (a) Employment Tribunal Mr T Martin v Serious Fraud Office and (b) SFO’s subsequent appeal of that tribunal decision.

The Employment Tribunal case in question initially concluded in February 2021. The cost to the SFO at that time was approximately £83,000.

The associated Employment Appeal Tribunal concluded in July 2022. The proceedings have been remitted to the Employment Tribunal, a date is yet to be confirmed, and costs will be finalised once this has concluded.

Michael Tomlinson
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much her Department spent on the (a) Calvert-Smith review and (b) Altman review of the Serious Fraud Office.

The costs of Sir David Calvert-Smith’s independent review into the Serious Fraud Office’s (SFO) handling of the Unaoil case (R. v Akle & Anor), which was commissioned by the Attorney General, are still being finalised. The costs to date to the Attorney General’s Office are £84,571.90. There are some costs outstanding, but it is anticipated these will not increase the overall cost of the review significantly. The total costs will be recovered from the SFO.

The cost of Brian Altman QC’s independent review of the collapse of R v. Woods & Marshall, which was commissioned by the Director of the SFO, was £359,442.37. This was paid for by the SFO.

Both reviews presented valuable recommendations and the implementation of these remain a priority for the Law Officers and the Director of the SFO.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) spent on the (a) prosecution trials brought against ENRC and (b) SFO defence against ENRC counter claims lawsuit.

The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has an ongoing investigation into ENRC. There are no prosecutions, and therefore no associated costs, at this stage. The ENRC have brought two civil actions for alleged misfeasance against the SFO. This matter remains ongoing and as such the final costs are not yet determined.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much the Serious Fraud Office spent on the (a) Employment Tribunal and (b) subsequent appeal brought by a former ENRC case-controller who was dismissed.

An Employment Tribunal has not been brought by a former ENRC case-controller against the Serious Fraud Office.

20th Jun 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many applications have been submitted to the Advisory Committee on Public Appointments by civil servants regarding the business roles they intend to take up after leaving their positions with the Serious Fraud Office in the period 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2022.

During this period, one application was made to the Advisory Committee on Business Appointments (ACOBA) by a former Civil Servant following employment at the Serious Fraud Office (SFO). This application was made by former SFO Director Sir David Green.

The details of Sir David’s application are available here.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
2nd Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, whether she plans to implement the recommendations from the Criminal Justice Joint Inspection into the police and CPS's response to rape post-charge in full; what her timetable is for implementing those recommendations; and if she will make a statement.

The CPS has welcomed the recent Criminal Justice Joint Inspection (CJJI) report on how well the criminal justice system serves survivors of rape and has largely accepted all the recommendations within it that relate directly to their work. They will use the report’s findings and recommendations to further inform their response to rape prosecutions and to build on the significant work undertaken so far, which has focussed on the following three main areas of work:
  • better collaboration with the police from the very start of an investigation, taking an offender-centric approach to case-building;
  • supporting prosecutors and expanding the size of specialist units so that they are properly resourced to respond to these challenging and complex cases; and
  • improving the support given to victims, and recognising the trauma they experience.
On the timeframes for implementing the two recommendations relating to communicating with victims, the CPS has already commenced a vital programme of work to improve how they communicate with victims. As part of this, the CPS has commissioned crucial research into victims’ needs to understand what victims need and want, so the CPS can serve them better. This research is part of a fundamental review into how the CPS can improve communication with victims. Although this three-phased programme is underway, the CPS will require time to complete it, to ensure that it fundamentally improves the quality of communication with victims. The CPS’s full response to the report and its recommendations can be found here.
Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
13th Jan 2022
To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the oral Answer of 6 January 2022, Official Report, column 146, on the Criminal Justice System: Disclosure between Parties, when the independent review on the disclosure failings at the Serious Fraud Office will commence; who will be conducting that review; and what the (a) timescale and (b) terms of reference for that review are.

The details of the review, including the intended timescales and the terms of reference, will be published once they have been agreed. I am committed to ensuring that this review is conducted as quickly as possible.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
11th May 2021
To ask the Attorney General, how many of the 167 cases referred to the Crown Prosecution Service by police under sections (a) 2(1) and (b) 2(A) of the Suicide Act 1961 between 1 April 2009 and 31 July 2020 related to a person with a terminal illness.

CPS Policy on assisted suicide provides guidance to prosecutors on assessing the evidential and public interest stages in the Code for Crown Prosecutors when reaching decisions in cases of encouraging or assisting suicide.

The Policy promotes consistency of decision making and is very clear about the factors which are to be considered both for and against prosecution. It sets out clear guidance about the importance of establishing whether the decision of the person who wants to commit suicide is voluntary, clear, settled, and informed, and whether the decision has been made without any pressure from the suspect.

The CPS publishes information collated from manual records on cases relating to Assisted Suicide. From 1 April 2009 up to 31 January 2021, there have been 167 cases referred to the CPS by the police that have been recorded as assisted suicide. Of these 167 cases:

  • 110 were not proceeded with by the CPS;
  • 32 cases were withdrawn by the police;
  • eight are currently ongoing cases;
  • three cases of encouraging or assisting suicide have resulted in a conviction;
  • one case of assisted suicide was charged and acquitted after trial in May 2015; and

eight cases were referred onwards for prosecution for homicide or other serious crime.

Of the 110 cases not proceeded with by the CPS, manual records indicate:

  • 29 - did not meet the evidential stage.
  • 45 - were not in the public interest.
  • 30 – where information on either the evidential test or the public interest test is not recorded.

A further six cases are recorded with more than one suspect in the same case; these resulted in a mixed outcome where the evidential stage was not met for some suspects and the public interest test was not met for the others.

CPS manual records do not capture specific case circumstances, including those relating to persons with a terminal illness.

The CPS collects data to assist in the effective management of its prosecution functions. The CPS does not collect data that constitutes official statistics as defined in the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
11th May 2021
To ask the Attorney General, how many of the 167 cases referred to the CPS by police under the Suicide Act 1961, Sections 2(1) and 2(A), between 1 April 2009 and 31 July 2020 did not result in a charge; and how many of those cases failed to pass the (a) evidential and (b) public interest stage.

CPS Policy on assisted suicide provides guidance to prosecutors on assessing the evidential and public interest stages in the Code for Crown Prosecutors when reaching decisions in cases of encouraging or assisting suicide.

The Policy promotes consistency of decision making and is very clear about the factors which are to be considered both for and against prosecution. It sets out clear guidance about the importance of establishing whether the decision of the person who wants to commit suicide is voluntary, clear, settled, and informed, and whether the decision has been made without any pressure from the suspect.

The CPS publishes information collated from manual records on cases relating to Assisted Suicide. From 1 April 2009 up to 31 January 2021, there have been 167 cases referred to the CPS by the police that have been recorded as assisted suicide. Of these 167 cases:

  • 110 were not proceeded with by the CPS;
  • 32 cases were withdrawn by the police;
  • eight are currently ongoing cases;
  • three cases of encouraging or assisting suicide have resulted in a conviction;
  • one case of assisted suicide was charged and acquitted after trial in May 2015; and

eight cases were referred onwards for prosecution for homicide or other serious crime.

Of the 110 cases not proceeded with by the CPS, manual records indicate:

  • 29 - did not meet the evidential stage.
  • 45 - were not in the public interest.
  • 30 – where information on either the evidential test or the public interest test is not recorded.

A further six cases are recorded with more than one suspect in the same case; these resulted in a mixed outcome where the evidential stage was not met for some suspects and the public interest test was not met for the others.

CPS manual records do not capture specific case circumstances, including those relating to persons with a terminal illness.

The CPS collects data to assist in the effective management of its prosecution functions. The CPS does not collect data that constitutes official statistics as defined in the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
11th May 2021
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Policy for Prosecutors in Respect of Cases of Encouraging and Assisting Suicide between 1 April 2009 and 1 April 2021.

CPS Policy on assisted suicide provides guidance to prosecutors on assessing the evidential and public interest stages in the Code for Crown Prosecutors when reaching decisions in cases of encouraging or assisting suicide.

The Policy promotes consistency of decision making and is very clear about the factors which are to be considered both for and against prosecution. It sets out clear guidance about the importance of establishing whether the decision of the person who wants to commit suicide is voluntary, clear, settled, and informed, and whether the decision has been made without any pressure from the suspect.

The CPS publishes information collated from manual records on cases relating to Assisted Suicide. From 1 April 2009 up to 31 January 2021, there have been 167 cases referred to the CPS by the police that have been recorded as assisted suicide. Of these 167 cases:

  • 110 were not proceeded with by the CPS;
  • 32 cases were withdrawn by the police;
  • eight are currently ongoing cases;
  • three cases of encouraging or assisting suicide have resulted in a conviction;
  • one case of assisted suicide was charged and acquitted after trial in May 2015; and

eight cases were referred onwards for prosecution for homicide or other serious crime.

Of the 110 cases not proceeded with by the CPS, manual records indicate:

  • 29 - did not meet the evidential stage.
  • 45 - were not in the public interest.
  • 30 – where information on either the evidential test or the public interest test is not recorded.

A further six cases are recorded with more than one suspect in the same case; these resulted in a mixed outcome where the evidential stage was not met for some suspects and the public interest test was not met for the others.

CPS manual records do not capture specific case circumstances, including those relating to persons with a terminal illness.

The CPS collects data to assist in the effective management of its prosecution functions. The CPS does not collect data that constitutes official statistics as defined in the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
28th Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many deaths from allergies there have been in each year since 2000, by type of allergy.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon gentleman’s Parliamentary Question of 28 November is attached.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
3rd Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Government Security Group conducted an investigation into release of information relating to Government plans to seek an injunction against the BBC over concerns of national security.

It is the longstanding policy of successive governments not to comment on leak investigations.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much was spent on severance pay for Ministers who were appointed on 8 July 2022 and who left office on or shortly after 6 September 2022.

Details of the severance payments made to ministers when leaving office are published in departments’ annual reports and accounts.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
7th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many applications were submitted to the Advisory Committee on Business Appointments by civil servants on the prospective roles they intended to take after leaving positions in Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs between 1 April 2015 and 31 March 2022.

22 applications were submitted to the Advisory Committee on Business Appointments by civil servants in Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs between 1 April 2015 and 31 March 2022

27th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the effectiveness of (a) legislation and (b) regulatory guidance on the forcible installation of prepayment meters by energy suppliers; and whether his Department is taking steps to help tackle the forcible installation of prepayment meters.

Prepayment meters (PPMs) allow customers to pay for energy on a pay-as-you-go basis and serve an important function by helping the avoidance of debt and court action.

Ofgem has stringent rules on the force-fitting of PPMs and has recently published a letter where it outlines steps it will be taking on tackling inappropriate supplier PPM practises including making sure suppliers are complying with those rules, which can be found here: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/letter-jonathan-brearley-secretary-state-business-energy-and-industrial-strategy-tackling-inappropriate-energy-supplier-prepayment-meter-practices.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State has also asked energy suppliers to commit voluntarily to stop this practice.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to ban the forcible installation of prepayment meters.

Prepayment meters (PPMs) allow customers to pay for energy on a pay-as-you-go basis and serve an important function by helping the avoidance of debt and court action. A ban on PPM installation as a last resort could lead to an increase in bailiff action and physical disconnections. The Government has no plans to remove this option.

Ofgem has stringent rules on the force-fitting of PPMs. My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State has written to Ofgem asking them to conduct a review to make sure energy suppliers are complying with those rules. He has also asked suppliers to commit voluntarily to stop this practice.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the terms of the bailout loan provided to Celsa Steel, including (a) the detail of the conditions applied on (i) jobs, (ii) climate, (iii) governance and (iv) tax, (b) how those conditions are legally binding, (c) the steps the Government plans take to monitor compliance with those conditions and (d) what options the Government has available to it and will take if those conditions are not met.

As set out in my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State’s Written Ministerial Statement on 2 July, the details of the loan to Celsa UK are subject to commercial confidentiality.

The loan has been designed to benefit the workforce, business, and wider society. This will ensure that public money is used to further benefit the UK, including protecting over 1,000 jobs. The loan requires further financial commitments from shareholders and existing lenders and will be monitored by the Government in line with HM Treasury’s rules on ‘Managing Public Money’.

6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when Whirlpool first notified the Office for Product Safety and Standards of (a) the safety fault with its machines and (b) its intention to recall over 500,000 affected appliances, announced on 17 December 2019; what targets the Office for Product Safety and Standards has set Whirlpool for carrying out the recall of its washing machines; what quality assurance the Office for Product Safety and Standards has carried out on the modification that Whirlpool is proposing to offer to consumers as part the recall; and how long the Office for Product Safety and Standards expects affected Whirlpool customers will have to wait to have their at-risk washing machines repaired or replaced following the recall.

Whirlpool informed the Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) in October 2019 that it was investigating a potential issue with door locks on some models of washing machine. OPSS required the company to provide detailed data on this issue in order to have clarity on the nature and scale of the problem and to identify the appropriate response to protect public safety. Following assessment of the issue, it was agreed that a full recall should be instigated and the recall programme was announced on 17 December 2019.

OPSS is acting to ensure the company conducts an effective recall with a process that is as quick and easy for consumers as possible. OPSS is monitoring Whirlpool’s actions closely and will hold the company to account. Data on the recall, including on the time taken for customers to receive a remedy will be published by OPSS.

In order to include a modification as part of an appropriate response, a manufacturer must provide scientific and technical evidence that the modification addresses the problem identified; that those undertaking the modification have received full training on applying the modification; and that there is a robust quality assurance process in place for each modification.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he plans to make additional funding available to exhibitions and events businesses that are employing staff to rebuild their business following the covid-19 outbreak.

The events industry and its suppliers have been severely hit by the current crisis. My officials and I continue to engage with events stakeholders - for example through the Visitor Economy Working Group and the Events Industry Board - to monitor the ongoing impact on exhibitions and events businesses.

Events businesses and workers can access the Government’s economic support package, including the recently extended Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme and the Bounce Back Loan scheme. We will continue to engage with stakeholders to assess how we can most effectively support tourism’s recovery across the UK.

We are working closely with events stakeholders, such as the Association of Events Organisers, to develop Covid-19 Secure reopening guidance for conferences and events venues.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the timeframe is for the reopening of the events industry as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Meetings of up to 30 people indoors are now allowed in permitted venues if social distancing can be maintained and the venue can demonstrate that it has followed the Covid-19 guidance. Since 11 July, a range of outdoor events have been able to take place - including agricultural shows, literary fairs and car boot sales.

From 1 August, exhibition and conference centres are allowed to show small groups (of up to 30 people with social distancing requirements) around to view the facilities and plan future events and to enable government-backed pilots to take place. They should not be open fully to host events more widely.

From 1 October, it is expected that events of all types (such as trade shows, consumer shows, exhibitions and conferences) will be allowed if the business has written a risk assessment and has put in place mitigations to reduce the risk of Covid-19 transmission. As with all aspects of the Government’s response to Covid-19, our decisions have been and will continue to be based on scientific evidence and public health assessments.

We have worked closely with events stakeholders through both the Visitor Economy and Events & Entertainment Working Groups to develop Covid-19 Secure reopening guidance for the business events industry. We continue to meet with the Events Industry Senior Leaders Advisory Panel to discuss the specific issues facing the industry.


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Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 19 October 2023 to Question 200806 on Schools: Buildings, what her Department's unallocated budget is for the 2023-24 financial year; and how much and what proportion of that unallocated budget has been ringfenced to support schools affected by reinfoced autoclaved aerated concrete.

The department will always put the safety and wellbeing of children and staff in education settings at the heart of its policy decisions.

The 2021 Spending Review announced a total of £19 billion of capital funding to support the education sector. As part of this, the department’s capital budget is £7 billion for 2023/24.

The department will spend what it takes to keep pupils safe and will fund emergency mitigation work needed to make school and college buildings with RAAC safe, including installing alternative classroom space where necessary. Where schools and colleges need additional help with revenue costs, the department expects all reasonable requests will be approved.

The department will fund refurbishment projects, or rebuilding projects where these are needed, to remove RAAC from the school estate. Schools and colleges will either be offered capital grants or rebuilding projects through the School Rebuilding Programme. The department will set out further details for affected schools and colleges in due course.

The department’s immediate support will be managed from unallocated departmental budgets. This will not have an impact on existing programmes. The department will provide further information about funding at relevant points in due course.

The department reviews how the capital budget is allocated on an ongoing basis and updates its annual budget via Parliament twice a year through the Main and Supplementary estimates process, which sets out the expected budget by area of spend.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
20th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 19 October 2023 to Question 200806 on Schools: Buildings, what her Department's unallocated budget is for the 2023-24 financial year; and how much and what proportion of that unallocated budget has been ringfenced to support schools affected by RAAC.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 18 September 2023 to question 199083, and with reference to the budgets used to fund emergency mitigation works for schools with reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete, whether that money would have been used for other Department capital projects; and if he will publish details of what those capital projects would have been.

It is the responsibility of those who run schools - academy trusts, Local Authorities and voluntary aided school bodies - to manage the safety and maintenance of their schools and to alert the Department if there is a serious concern with a building. It has always been the case that where the Department is made aware of a building that may pose an immediate risk, immediate action is taken.

The Department will spend whatever it takes to keep children safe. It will fund emergency mitigation work needed to make buildings safe, including installing alternative classroom space where necessary. Where schools and colleges need additional help with revenue costs, the Department expects all reasonable requests will be approved. The Department will then also fund refurbishment projects, or rebuilding projects, to rectify the RAAC issue for the long term. The Department will set out further details for affected schools and colleges in due course.

The Department will work with the relevant responsible body, which will depend on the type of school or college with confirmed RAAC. Every case will be different, and the Department is working closely with affected schools and colleges to understand and support their needs, including with capital funding.

The Department’s immediate support will be managed from unallocated departmental budgets. This will not impact existing programmes.

​The Department will always put the safety and wellbeing of children and staff in education settings at the heart of its policy decisions. The Government has taken more proactive action to identify and mitigate RAAC in education settings than the devolved administrations in the UK, or indeed, governments overseas.

12th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, from which budget the Government will allocate funds for remedial work to schools affected by reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete.

Nothing is more important than the safety of children and staff. It has always been the case that where we are made aware of a building that may pose an immediate risk, the Department takes immediate action.

It is the responsibility of those who run schools – academy trusts, Local Authorities, and voluntary-aided school bodies – who work with their schools on a day-to-day basis, to manage the safety and maintenance of their schools and to alert us if there is a concern with a building.

The Department has acted decisively and proactively to tackle this issue. This Government has taken more proactive action on RAAC than any other in the UK. The Department issued comprehensive guidance in 2018, and subsequent years, to all responsible bodies highlighting the potential risks associated with RAAC and supporting them to identify this within their buildings, as well as to take appropriate steps in meeting their obligations to keep buildings safe. The most recent guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reinforced-autoclaved-aerated-concrete-estates-guidance.

There are over 22,000 schools and colleges in England, and the vast majority are unaffected. A significant proportion of the estate was built outside the period where RAAC was used, with around one third of the estate built since 2001, therefore, the Department has focused efforts on buildings built in the post-war decades.

The Department issued a questionnaire in March 2022, asking responsible bodies to inform the Department of any suspected RAAC identified in their estates. Responsible bodies have submitted questionnaires for over 98% of schools with blocks built in the target era, of which there are 14,900. We are pressing all remaining schools to get checks completed, to determine which schools require surveys.

The Department is contacting responsible bodies to help them respond to this request and to advise on what needs to be done, so that they can establish whether they believe they have RAAC. This work will continue until we have a response for all target era schools.

Schools and colleges where RAAC is suspected are being fast tracked for surveying, which is used to confirm whether RAAC is actually present. All schools and colleges that have already told us they suspect they might have RAAC will be surveyed within a matter of weeks, in many cases in a matter of days.

All schools where RAAC is confirmed are provided with a dedicated caseworker to support them and help implement a mitigation plan and minimise the disruption to children’s learning.

Across Government, Departments have been asked to report on the current picture of suspected and confirmed RAAC in their estates as soon as possible. This will be updated on a regular basis as new buildings are identified and surveying and remediation are carried out. The Department for Education published lists of education settings confirmed as having RAAC on Wednesday 6 September, and committed to providing further updates.

Schools will contact parents where RAAC is identified and inform them of any impacts on their child. The vast majority of schools are unaffected. Any parents that are unsure if their child’s school is affected should contact their school directly.

While some short term disruption is inevitable, all available measures will be taken to minimise disruption to pupil learning and ensure that pupils continue to receive face-to-face teaching. Where there is any disturbance to face-to-face education, schools will prioritise attendance for vulnerable children and young people and children of key workers. The guidance published by the Department in August also includes guidance on provision for pupils with SEND and sets out expectations that schools continue to provide free school meals to eligible pupils.

The Department will fund emergency mitigation work needed to make buildings safe, including installing alternative classroom space where necessary. Where schools and colleges need additional help with revenue costs, like transport to locations or temporarily renting a local hall or office, the department will provide that support for all reasonable requests. The Department will also fund longer term refurbishment projects, or rebuilding projects where these are needed, to rectify the RAAC issue in the long term.

All previously confirmed Schol Rebuilding Programme projects announced in 2021 and 2022 will continue to go ahead. A full list of confirmed projects can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-rebuilding-programme-schools-in-the-programme.

Further information on RAAC in education settings is available on the Education Hub: https://educationhub.blog.gov.uk/2023/09/06/new-guidance-on-raac-in-education-settings/.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent assessment he has made of the humanitarian situation in Gaza.

The humanitarian situation in Gaza remains dire. The UN reports that unemployment is at 45 percent, with youth unemployment at over 60 percent. Some 46 percent of the population live below the US$5.50 poverty line and an estimated 60 percent of households are food insecure. The health service is severely overburdened and reliable access to clean water and electricity remains challenging.

DFID will provide £16m in humanitarian assistance to Gaza in 2019/20. This is supporting the health system, including improved trauma care, and contributing to emergency food aid for around 1.2 million vulnerable people. To help address the underlying causes of the humanitarian situation we are investing to build the capacity of Gaza’s water and energy services and to address barriers to trade. Ultimately, Gaza’s immense challenges can only be resolved with a political solution that delivers peace, stability and the easing of movement and access restrictions.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the total cost for the Old Oak Common to Euston branch of HS2 is; and what proportion of that cost will be met by private finance.

The scope and cost estimates for this section of the route are subject to review following the Network North announcement. An updated cost estimate will be reported to Parliament in due course, noting we are seeking to strip back the project and deliver a station that works, but does not include any features we do not need.

In relation to private finance, work has commenced on developing the design of the model that will be used, as well as consideration of how and where the alternative funding generated by this will be spent. This will include consideration of a range of development models and financing mechanisms, before a final proposal is determined. Updates will be reported to Parliament in due course as this work progresses.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
6th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 27 February 2023 to Question 150416 on Bicycles and Electric Vehicles: Safety, whether the proposed rental framework to allow local transport authorities to manage rental services of cycles and e-cycles will include measures to help prevent users from leaving e-cycles on (a) pathways and (b) roads; and if he will publish details of the proposals.

Government plans to introduce legislation for private and rental e-scooter use when parliamentary time allows and will consult on regulations in due course. No final decisions about e-scooter regulations have been or will be made before interested parties have had an opportunity to offer views.

The Department also intends to introduce a rental framework which will allow local transport authorities to manage rental services of cycles, e-cycles and e-scooters, so that matters such as fleet sizes and parking can be kept under local control.

Local authorities already have legal powers to remove e-cycles and other items that are abandoned on the road or pathway. The Department will continue to work with local authorities and keep under review ways to prevent e-cycles and e-scooters from becoming obstructive to other road users and pedestrians, particularly those with disabilities.

6th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 27 February 2023 to Question 150416 on Bicycles and Electric Vehicles: Safety, what his planned timetable is for introducing a rental framework for local transport authorities to manage rental services of cycles and e-cycles.

Government plans to introduce legislation for private and rental e-scooter use when parliamentary time allows and will consult on regulations in due course. No final decisions about e-scooter regulations have been or will be made before interested parties have had an opportunity to offer views.

The Department also intends to introduce a rental framework which will allow local transport authorities to manage rental services of cycles, e-cycles and e-scooters, so that matters such as fleet sizes and parking can be kept under local control.

Local authorities already have legal powers to remove e-cycles and other items that are abandoned on the road or pathway. The Department will continue to work with local authorities and keep under review ways to prevent e-cycles and e-scooters from becoming obstructive to other road users and pedestrians, particularly those with disabilities.

6th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 27 February 2023 to Question 150416 on regulation of e-scooters, what his Department's timeframe is for (a) the consultation process and (b) agreeing potential consequential regulatory measures.

Government plans to introduce legislation for private and rental e-scooter use when parliamentary time allows and will consult on regulations in due course. No final decisions about e-scooter regulations have been or will be made before interested parties have had an opportunity to offer views.

The Department also intends to introduce a rental framework which will allow local transport authorities to manage rental services of cycles, e-cycles and e-scooters, so that matters such as fleet sizes and parking can be kept under local control.

Local authorities already have legal powers to remove e-cycles and other items that are abandoned on the road or pathway. The Department will continue to work with local authorities and keep under review ways to prevent e-cycles and e-scooters from becoming obstructive to other road users and pedestrians, particularly those with disabilities.

22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential risks to safety of trends in the level of fires caused by e-bikes and e-scooters.

The Department for Transport is working with the industry and across Government to understand the prevalence and causes of fires involving lithium-ion batteries used in e-cycles and e-scooters. This is with a view to publishing guidance on safety at a later date.

22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to introduce legislative proposals which regulate the safety of (a) e-bikes and (b) e-scooters.

When parliamentary time allows, we intend to regulate e-scooters. This will require setting robust technical requirements and clear expectations on users. No decisions have been made on the details of the regulations for e-scooters, and we will consult before any new arrangements come into force.

The Department has no plans to introduce legislative proposals to regulate safety for e-cycles.

Also, when parliamentary time allows, the Department intends to introduce a rental framework which will allow local transport authorities to manage rental services of cycles, e-cycles and e-scooters, so that fleet sizes and parking can all be kept under local control.

23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will place in the Library a copy of the extension letter to Transport for London which he referred to in his letter of 17 December 2021 to hon. Members representing London constituencies.

I can confirm that the extension letter of 17 December 2021, extending the 1 June 2021 extraordinary funding settlement for Transport for London, will be placed in the Library and published on Gov.uk.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much funding was allocated to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea for the building of the temporary cycle infrastructure on Kensington High Street, and whether those funds are planned to be clawed back following the removal of the scheme in response to his Department’s guidance to local authorities.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea has been allocated a total of around £1 million from the Department’s Active Travel Fund and Transport for London’s London Streetspace Programme. This has supported a number of active travel measures in its area in response to the pandemic including school streets, low traffic neighbourhoods, changes to the public realm to allow greater social distancing, and cycle lanes like the one on Kensington High Street. Funding is generally transferred once schemes are delivered and once claims are brought forward by each Borough, meaning that the total amount of funding provided to date is much less than the total allocated. Borough payments are due to be finalised in September 2021, and will reflect scheme delivery in each area. No funding has been or will be provided to the Royal Borough to cover the costs of removing the cycle lane on Kensington High Street.

In common with other authorities in London and elsewhere, the Royal Borough’s performance in delivering active travel infrastructure is being taken into account in all future funding allocations. The delivery of active travel schemes in London and decisions on active travel funding for individual boroughs are overseen by a group including senior representatives from the Department for Transport and Transport for London.

The Department will be issuing updated statutory Network Management Duty guidance to all local transport authorities shortly which will make clear that they should always leave cycling and walking schemes in place for long enough for their impacts to be properly assessed.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what communication took place between his Department and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea prior to that council’s decision to remove the temporary cycle infrastructure on Kensington High Street; and whether his Department advised against the removal of the temporary cycle lanes in that location.

Transport in London is devolved meaning the Department has no role in respect of borough decisions of this sort, which are a matter for the Mayor of London. The Department was not, therefore, formally consulted on the Royal Borough’s plans. As a general point, the Department agrees that local authorities should not remove cycle lanes before their impacts have been properly assessed, and will shortly issue further advice to authorities on this matter.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish an updated economic appraisal of the Airports National Policy Statement.

We have always been clear that Heathrow expansion remains a private sector project which must meet strict criteria on air quality, noise and climate change, as well as being privately financed, affordable, and delivered in the best interest of consumers.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the comments of Sir Howard Davies on 15 June 2021, what plans he has to review the Airports National Policy Statement.

We have always been clear that Heathrow expansion remains a private sector project which must meet strict criteria on air quality, noise and climate change, as well as being privately financed, affordable, and delivered in the best interest of consumers.

11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the (a) membership, (b) terms of reference (c) work programme and (d) budget is of the Hammersmith Bridge taskforce.

The first meeting of the Hammersmith Bridge task force, chaired by Baroness Vere, took place on 16 September 2020. Alongside the Department, the task force has a membership of all key stakeholders including: Transport for London; The London Boroughs of Hammersmith and Fulham and Richmond upon Thames; the Port of London Authority; the Greater London Authority, and; Network Rail.

The task force will focus on urgently pulling together all necessary information, including technical and operational information and costs, in order to reach a decision on the most appropriate way to safely re-open Hammersmith Bridge to full use and provide appropriate temporary measures during the works.

Any funding will be subject to the findings of the task force and the agreed next steps.

16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of whether a scrappage scheme that allowed older cars to be swapped for new diesel and petrol cars would be compatible with the Government’s commitment to phase out sales of those vehicles by 2035.

The Government has no current plans to introduce a scrappage scheme. We are investing?around?£2.5bn,??with grants available for ultra-low emission vehicles, as well?as funding?to support charge point infrastructure at homes,?workplaces,?on residential streets?and across the wider roads network. We are consulting on bringing forward the end to the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and vans from 2040 to 2035, or earlier if a faster transition appears feasible, as well as including hybrids for the first time. By talking to stakeholders about the best way to achieve that ambition, we will more easily be able to identify what measures would be needed to support the transition.

16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the role of congestion charging in helping to reduce traffic in towns and cities; and whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of congestion charging for helping to control levels of (a) traffic and (b) air pollution as the covid-19 lockdown is lifted.

The decision to implement road charging in towns and cities is ultimately one for the relevant Local Highways Authority. The Mayor of London recently reinstated the Congestion and Ultra Low Emission Zone charges in the capital as a measure to manage traffic and air quality.

A number of larger cities are developing proposals for charging Clean Air Zones to reduce air pollution and our recent rapid call for evidence will ensure we can fully understand the impact that coronavirus is having on changes in air pollution emissions, concentrations and exposure.

28th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospital admissions due to anaphylaxis there have been in each year since 2000.

Data on admissions due to anaphylaxis is not available prior to 2011. The following table shows the number of admissions due to anaphylaxis between 2011/12 and 2022/23:

Year

Anaphylactic shock due to adverse food reaction

Anaphylactic shock, unspecified

Anaphylactic shock due to serum

Anaphylactic shock due to adverse effect of correct drug or medicament properly administered

2022/23

1482

1589

20

579

2021/22

1903

2364

27

617

2020/21

1906

2406

37

565

2019/20

2134

2708

11

664

2018/19

2287

2670

18

532

2017/18

1855

2345

11

625

2016/17

1768

2324

16

679

2015/16

1711

2116

9

646

2014/15

1594

1958

19

634

2013/14

1505

1992

7

608

2012/13

1381

1764

12

590

2011/12

1258

1871

7

599

Source: NHS England

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospitals outside of those included in the New Hospital Programme have been identified to have reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete; and whether his Department plans to fund emergency mitigation works to those hospitals.

As of 17 October 2023, there are 42 hospital sites with confirmed reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete (RAAC). Of these, seven are in the New Hospital Programme and will be fully replaced by 2030. All hospital sites with confirmed RAAC are in NHS England’s ongoing national RAAC programme. This is backed by significant additional funding of £698 million from 2021 to 2025 for trusts to put in place necessary remediation and failsafe measures. National funding is allocated annually based on National Health Service trust plans and delivery progress.

The Department has published a full list of hospitals with confirmed RAAC, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reinforced-autoclaved-aerated-concrete-raac-in-hospitals-management-information

Where structural surveys identify RAAC in their estate, trusts are inducted into the national remediation programme. Each site will be different, and just because RAAC is present, it does not necessarily mean there is a high risk.

9th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department plans to take steps to provide funding for sexual health clinics for mpox work that was not covered by local authority tariffs.

No additional funding is currently planned for sexual health services in response to Mpox. Funding has been provided for antiviral medicines to treat Mpox, the procurement of the smallpox vaccine and for sexual health services to deliver this vaccine to those eligible for vaccination. There have been very few Mpox cases reported in the United Kingdom so far this year compared to the 2022 outbreak. It is likely that multiple factors, including vaccination, have contributed to the decline in transmission. We continue to work towards the goal of elimination of person-to-person Mpox transmission in the UK.

The Department is providing more than £3.5 billion this financial year to local authorities through the Public Health Grant to fund public health services, including sexual health services, increasing to £3.575 billion in 2024/25. This will provide every local authority real-terms funding protection over the next two years. Individual local authorities are responsible for and well placed to make funding and commissioning decisions about the sexual health services that best meet the needs of their local populations.

9th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department plans to extend the mpox vaccination programme, in the context of case numbers in London in summer 2023.

In December 2022, the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) led the four public health bodies of the United Kingdom in publishing a joint strategy for Mpox control which is available at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/mpox-monkeypox-control-uk-strategy-2022-to-2023/uk-strategy-for-mpox-control-2022 -to-2023.

This stated the ambition to work towards elimination of person-to-person Mpox transmission in the UK. The strategy made clear that vaccination was one of eight key areas of public health intervention, and that the vaccination programme would continue to be reviewed, drawing on the best available evidence, to ensure it delivers as efficiently as possible to protect those most at risk from Mpox.

The Government remain committed to delivering on this strategy. UKHSA continues to monitor the epidemiology of the Mpox outbreak very closely, including the recent, small cluster of cases in London, and are ready to scale up a response as required.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
9th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of implications for his policies of rises in the number of diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections.

We are committed to improving sexual heath in England, including tackling sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and are considering the next steps for delivering the best outcomes, but no specific assessment has been made of our policies and the increase in STIs.

Sexual health services (SHSs) play a key public health role in diagnosis, early treatment and management of STIs and we are providing more than £3.5 billion to local authorities through the public health grant to fund public health services, including SHSs, in this financial year. Individual local authorities are responsible for and well placed to make funding and commissioning decisions about the SHSs that best meet the needs of their local populations.

As part of the HIV Action Plan, we are investing over £3.5 million from 2021 to 2024 to deliver the National HIV Prevention Programme for England, including HIV Testing Week and other campaigns to improve information and testing for HIV and other STIs.

The UK Health Security Agency published a Syphilis Action Plan to address the increase in syphilis diagnosis in England, focusing on key interventions such as targeted testing, partner notification and awareness raising.

12th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children under the age of (a) four and (b) 11 were admitted to hospital for a tooth extraction due to decay in Hammersmith constituency in each of the last five years.

This information is not held in the format requested.

12th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate her Department has made of the number of GP practices open in Hammersmith constituency. today and what the number was in 2013.

In September 2013, there were 21 practices registered in Hammersmith and 20 practices are registered in October 2022.

Practices close for a variety of reasons, including practice mergers or retirement and a reduction in practice numbers does not represent a reduction in the quality of care. When a practice does close, patients are informed and advised to register at another local practice of their choice. Practices and commissioners must put in place appropriate measures to ensure that the affected patients have access to general practitioner services.

12th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of GP surgeries were rated as good by the Care Quality Commission in Hammersmith constituency as of September 2022.

As of 12 October 2022, 16 or 84.2% of general practitioner practices in Hammersmith are currently rated by the Care Quality Commission as ‘Good’.

12th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people were diagnosed with diabetes in Hammersmith constituency. in each of the last five years.

The following table shows the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in Hammersmith constituency in each year from 2016 to 2020, by diabetes type.

Type 1

Type 2 and other

2016

20

420

2017

30

360

2018

25

375

2019

20

510

2020

15

320

The following table shows the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in Weaver Vale constituency in each year from 2016 to 2020, by diabetes type.

Type 1

Type 2 and other

2016

10

315

2017

20

290

2018

15

365

2019

15

300

2020

15

265

The following table shows the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in Liverpool Wavertree constituency in each year from 2016 to 2020, by diabetes type.

Type 1

Type 2 and other

2016

15

385

2017

30

330

2018

15

430

2019

20

530

2020

15

275

Source: National Diabetes Audit

12th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people were diagnosed with HIV in Hammersmith constituency in each of the last 5 five years.

This information is not collected in the format requested.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate he has made of the cost to the NHS of each covid-19 PCR test (a) administered at a testing centre or other NHS setting, (b) self-administered at home and (c) overall.

The cost to the NHS Test and Trace (NHSTT) of each COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test varies with a few factors including which lab the sample is processed at and releasing this information would disadvantage us in contract negotiations with current and new suppliers.

The National Health Service budget has not funded PCR testing. PCR testing is provided by the NHS Test and Trace team using a separate budget administered through the Department. The breakdown of the audited NHS Test and Trace expenditure for the 2020/2021 financial year will be published as part of the Department’s 2020-21 Annual Report and Accounts.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the (a) effect of the shortage of learning disability nurses on the inappropriate use of Do not resuscitate notices for people with learning disabilities and (b) level of recruitment for learning disability nurses in NHS posts.

We have made no such assessment.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish all the consultancies contracted by his Department for any period between 1 March 2020 and 19 January 2021 to undertake work for the Joint Biosecurity Centre, identifying the (a) total spend per consultancy and (b) number of consultants supplied by each firm.

Tables showing the consultancies procured by the Department for the Joint Biosecurity Centre and NHS Test and Trace are attached. Audited figures on the total spend for each consultancy is not currently available.

We are unable to provide the number of consultants supplied by each company as this information is commercially sensitive, as it could impact the competitive nature of future bids.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish a list of consultancies hired by his Department for any period from 1 March 2020 to the present day to undertake work on the NHS Test and Trace programme; and if he will publish the (a) total expenditure by his Department on each of those consultancies and (b) the number of consultants supplied by each of those consultancies.

Tables showing the consultancies procured by the Department for the Joint Biosecurity Centre and NHS Test and Trace are attached. Audited figures on the total spend for each consultancy is not currently available.

We are unable to provide the number of consultants supplied by each company as this information is commercially sensitive, as it could impact the competitive nature of future bids.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to answer Question 103453 tabled on 14 October 2020, Question 123542 tabled on 30 November 2020 and Question 130657 tabled on 15 December 2021 by the Hon. Member for Hammersmith.

We take parliamentary scrutiny incredibly seriously and it is fundamentally important that hon. Members are provided with accurate and timely information to enable them to hold the Government to account. We are working rapidly to provide all Members with accurate answers to their questions, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s questions will be answered as soon as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will list the 21 companies that Serco has subcontracted to work on NHS Test and Trace.

Serco have worked with the Cabinet Office and the Department to engage a spread of regional and national providers including small and medium sized enterprises, who have been integrated, trained and supported by Serco to meet the Department’s required delivery model. The names of the companies are commercial in confidence.

As the prime contractor, Serco are responsible and accountable for the performance of their sub-contractors in terms of contributing to meeting the agreed service targets and quality standards in the primary contract they hold with the Department.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many consultants Deloitte has deployed to work at the new Joint Biosecurity Centre since 16 March 2020; what the day rate was for each of those consultants; and what the total cost to the public purse has been of employing those consultants.

No consultants from Deloitte have been or are employed in the Joint Biosecurity Centre.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 30 November to Question 95024, how many consultants from the Boston Consulting Group were deployed at the new Joint Biosecurity Centre as of 29 September 2020; and what the average day rate for each consultant was.

The Joint Biosecurity Centre does not employ any consultants from Boston Consulting Group.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many consultants have been deployed by Boston Consulting Group at the new Joint Biosecurity Centre since 16 March 2020; what the day rate is for each consultant; and what the total cost to the public purse of employing those consultants has been.

The Joint Biosecurity Centre does not currently employ any consultants from Boston Consulting Group.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the oral question of the hon Member for Hammersmith to the Leader of the House on 5 November 2020, Official Report, col 495, when he plans to answer Questions 95023, 95024, and 95025, tabled on 24 September 2020, and Question 97479, tabled on 30 September 2020, and Questions 103452, 103453, 103454, 103455 and 103456 tabled on 14 October 2020 by the hon. Member for Hammersmith.

We take parliamentary scrutiny incredibly seriously and it is fundamentally important that hon. Members are provided with accurate and timely information to enable them to hold Government to account. We are working rapidly to provide all Members with accurate answers to their questions, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers to Questions 95024, 95025, 103452.

The hon. Member’s remaining questions will be answered as soon as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many consultants are currently employed on the Government's Test and Trace programme; what the total expenditure on these consultants has been to date; which firms are providing those consultants; and how many consultants each such firm has provided at what cost.

As of the beginning of November 2020 there were over 2,300 contractors and consultants working for 73 different suppliers for the Test and Trace programme. The total expenditure on these contractors and consultants to date has been approximately £375 million.

The pay rates of individuals engaged from each supplier is commercially sensitive information.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the highest daily or hourly rate paid for any individual consultant at each firm providing services to the Government's Test and Trace programme; what the period of engagement is for that consultant at each such firm; how much the Government has paid to engage that consultant at each such firm; and what the duties are of that consultant at each such firm.

As of the beginning of November 2020 there are over 2,300 consultants and contractors working for 73 different suppliers for the Test and Trace programme. The total expenditure on these consultants to date has been approximately £375 million.

The pay rates of individual consultants engaged from each supplier is commercially sensitive information.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what type of contract he has used to engage consultants to work on the Government's Test and Trace programme; and what tendering process he used to let those contracts.

Call off contracts from the Crown Commercial Framework (CCF) which contain a preselected list of suppliers with standard terms and conditions have been used in the majority of awards. Payment rates are as per the CCF rate card with discounts attained depending on value and length of role.

As part of our strategic workforce planning activities the number of consultants engaged is constantly under review and subject to change. Much of the focus of existing consultancy on the programme is to support the ‘build’ of the organisation. This support is only required on a temporary basis and most often used to provide skills that have not been identified within the Civil Service. For example, consultancies are used to provide support on app development.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many additional consultants he plans to engage to work on the Government's Test and Trace programme; and from which firms he plans to engage those consultants.

As part of our strategic workforce planning activities the number of consultants engaged is constantly under review and subject to change.

Much of the focus of existing consultancy on the programme is to support the ‘build’ of the organisation. This support is only required on a temporary basis, and most often used to provide skills that have not been identified within the Civil Service. For example, consultancies are used to provide support on app development.

Call off contracts from the Crown Commercial Framework which contain a preselected list of suppliers with standard terms and conditions have been used in the majority of awards.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to answer Questions 95023, 95024, 95025 and 95029, tabled on 24 September 2020, and Question 97479, tabled on 30 September 2020 by the hon. Member for Hammersmith.

We take parliamentary scrutiny incredibly seriously and it is fundamentally important that hon. Members are provided with accurate and timely information to enable them to hold the Government to account. We are working rapidly to provide all Members with accurate answers to their questions, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer to Questions 95025 and 95029 of 10 November.

The hon. Member’s remaining questions will be answered as soon as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department included key performance indicators in its contracts with (a) Deloitte and (b) Boston Consulting Group for those companies' work in the Joint Biosecurity Centre.

The Joint Biosecurity Centre does not currently employ any consultant from Deloitte or Boston Consulting Group.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many consultants have been deployed by Deloitte at the new Joint Biosecurity Centre; and what the average day rate is for each consultant.

The Joint Biosecurity Centre does not currently employ any consultants from Deloitte.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many consultants have been deployed by Boston Consulting Group at the new Joint Biosecurity Centre; and what the average day rate is for each consultant.

The Joint Biosecurity Centre does not currently employ any consultants from Boston Consulting Group.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will set out the competitive process used to award contracts at the Joint Biosecurity Centre; and if he will confirm how many companies put in bids for these contracts.

The United Kingdom is facing the biggest public health challenge in a generation. The Joint Biosecurity Centre has been set up at pace to ensure decision makers at local and national levels have access to the best available information. This involved awarding contracts for a range of goods and services. Contracts were awarded in accordance with the Public Contract Regulations 2015.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to recruit additional consultants to work in the Joint Biosecurity Centre.

The Joint Biosecurity Centre is likely to have an ongoing requirement for consultancy support, for example to fill very specialised epidemiology, data science and data engineering roles.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which strain of covid-19 is most prevalent in the UK at the present time.

There is currently no concept of different strains. There are very few differences and a low genetic diversity in the COVID19 from across the world and the viruses recovered from the United Kingdom are typical of this.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Nov 2023
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what representations his Department is making to his Saudi counterpart on the death sentence passed on Mohammed al-Ghamdi.

Saudi Arabia remains an FCDO Human Rights Priority Country, in part because of the continued use of the death penalty. The UK strongly opposes the death penalty in all countries and circumstances. The Minister for the Middle East and Human Rights, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon has raised these cases with the Saudi authorities. We will continue to monitor them.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Nov 2023
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, if he will make representations to his Saudi counterpart on (a) the reported enforced disappearance of human rights activist Mohammed al-Qahtani, (b) releasing information on his whereabouts, (c) re-establishing his family contacts and (d) releasing him immediately.

Saudi Arabia remains an FCDO Human Rights Priority Country, in part because of the continued use of the death penalty. The UK strongly opposes the death penalty in all countries and circumstances. The Minister for the Middle East and Human Rights, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon has raised these cases with the Saudi authorities. We will continue to monitor them.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Nov 2023
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what representations he has made to his Saudi counterpart on the death sentence passed on Abdullah al-Derazi.

Saudi Arabia remains a Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office Human Rights Priority Country, in part because of the continued use of the death penalty. We continue to monitor the cases of the young men, including Abdullah al-Derazi, who allegedly committed their crimes as minors and are at risk of execution. The Minister for the Middle East and Human Rights, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon regularly raises these cases, including Abdullah al-Derazi with the Saudi authorities as a priority.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Nov 2023
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what discussions he has had with this Saudi counterpart about adoption of a moratorium on the death penalty.

Saudi Arabia is well aware of the UK's opposition to the death penalty in all countries and in all circumstances, as a matter of principle. We regularly raise concerns about its use and Saudi Arabia is an FCDO Human Rights Priority Country, in part because of the continued use of the death penalty. The Minister for the Middle East and Human Rights, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon regularly discusses a wide range of human rights issues with the Saudi authorities, most recently during the President of the Saudi Human Rights Commission's visit to the UK in September 2023. We monitor and raise all known juvenile death penalty defendant cases with the Saudi authorities, and discuss outstanding questions regarding the application of the Royal Decree of 2020. We will continue to do so.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Nov 2023
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, if he will make public representations to his Saudi counterpart on revoking death sentences passed on minors.

Saudi Arabia is well aware of the UK's opposition to the death penalty in all countries and in all circumstances, as a matter of principle. We regularly raise concerns about its use and Saudi Arabia is an FCDO Human Rights Priority Country, in part because of the continued use of the death penalty. The Minister for the Middle East and Human Rights, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon regularly discusses a wide range of human rights issues with the Saudi authorities, most recently during the President of the Saudi Human Rights Commission's visit to the UK in September 2023. We monitor and raise all known juvenile death penalty defendant cases with the Saudi authorities, and discuss outstanding questions regarding the application of the Royal Decree of 2020. We will continue to do so.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when he plans to answer named day Question 65661 on Israel: Embassies, tabled by the hon. Member for Hammersmith on 18 October 2022.

There are no plans to move the UK embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv. Israel is a close friend and key strategic partner, built on decades of cooperation. We will continue to strengthen our relationship with Israel through our Embassy in Tel Aviv.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Israeli counterpart on holding an independent investigation into the death during a military activity carried out by Israeli forces of Rayyan Suleiman in Bethlehem on 29 September 2022.

We regularly raise the issue of the numbers of Palestinians killed and injured by Israeli Defence Forces in the West Bank and Gaza with the Israeli authorities. We encourage them to carry out swift, transparent and thorough investigations and, if wrongdoing is found, that those responsible be held to account. We stress the importance of the Israeli security forces providing appropriate protection to the Palestinian civilian population, particularly the need to protect children, and urge restraint in the use of live fire.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Israeli counterpart on holding independent investigations into the use of live ammunition and killing of (a) Haitham Hani Mohammad Mubarak on 8 September and (b) Odai Trad Hisham Salah on 15 September 2022.

We regularly raise the issue of the numbers of Palestinians killed and injured by Israeli Defence Forces in the West Bank and Gaza with the Israeli authorities. We encourage them to carry out swift, transparent and thorough investigations and, if wrongdoing is found, that those responsible be held to account. We stress the importance of the Israeli security forces providing appropriate protection to the Palestinian civilian population, particularly the need to protect children, and urge restraint in the use of live fire.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make an estimate of the number of (a) night-time and (b) daytime Israeli military raids there have been on Palestinian homes in the West Bank in 2022.

While we recognise Israel's legitimate need to deploy security measures, we encourage them to deploy these in a way that minimises tension. We call on Israel to abide by its obligations under international law and we have a regular dialogue with Israel on legal issues relating to the occupation. We stress the importance of the Israeli security forces providing appropriate protection to the Palestinian civilian population.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the announcement that the Government is reviewing the location of Britain's embassy in Israel, what the terms of reference are for the review; and if that review will take contributions from British non-Governmental organisations with an interest.

There are no plans to move the UK embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv. Israel is a close friend and key strategic partner, built on decades of cooperation. We will continue to strengthen our relationship with Israel through our Embassy in Tel Aviv.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she has held discussions with her counterpart in Bharain on individual cases of death row inmates.

The Government has taken note of the Human Rights Watch report published on 10 October 2022. Ministers and officials continue to reiterate the UK's opposition to use of the death penalty, publicly and privately, with senior members of the Bahraini Government. During a visit to Bahrain in July the former Minister for the Middle East met with senior members of the Bahraini Government and discussed human rights issues, including the death penalty where she restated the UK position. Lord Ahmad also met with Bahrain Foreign Minister Dr Abdullatif Al Zayani in July, and again in September during the margins of the UN General Assembly. During the meetings they discussed a number of shared human rights priorities, including specific human rights cases of interest. The UK's position on the use of the death penalty is longstanding and clear. The Government of Bahrain is fully aware of our position.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Human Rights Watch report entitled The Court is Satisfied with the Confession: Bahrain Death Sentences Follow Torture, Sham Trials published on 10 October 2022, if he will take steps to implement the recommendations in that report.

The Government has taken note of the Human Rights Watch report published on 10 October 2022. Ministers and officials continue to reiterate the UK's opposition to use of the death penalty, publicly and privately, with senior members of the Bahraini Government. During a visit to Bahrain in July the former Minister for the Middle East met with senior members of the Bahraini Government and discussed human rights issues, including the death penalty where she restated the UK position. Lord Ahmad also met with Bahrain Foreign Minister Dr Abdullatif Al Zayani in July, and again in September during the margins of the UN General Assembly. During the meetings they discussed a number of shared human rights priorities, including specific human rights cases of interest. The UK's position on the use of the death penalty is longstanding and clear. The Government of Bahrain is fully aware of our position.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the findings on human rights violations and the involvement of Bahraini officials in the Human Rights Watch report entitled The Court is Satisfied with the Confession: Bahrain Death Sentences Follow Torture, Sham Trials published on 10 October 2022.

The Government has taken note of the Human Rights Watch report published on 10 October 2022. Ministers and officials continue to reiterate the UK's opposition to use of the death penalty, publicly and privately, with senior members of the Bahraini Government. During a visit to Bahrain in July the former Minister for the Middle East met with senior members of the Bahraini Government and discussed human rights issues, including the death penalty where she restated the UK position. Lord Ahmad also met with Bahrain Foreign Minister Dr Abdullatif Al Zayani in July, and again in September during the margins of the UN General Assembly. During the meetings they discussed a number of shared human rights priorities, including specific human rights cases of interest. The UK's position on the use of the death penalty is longstanding and clear. The Government of Bahrain is fully aware of our position.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department has received written assurances from the Government of Bahrain that the death penalty will not be carried out in that country.

The Government has taken note of the Human Rights Watch report published on 10 October 2022. Ministers and officials continue to reiterate the UK's opposition to use of the death penalty, publicly and privately, with senior members of the Bahraini Government. During a visit to Bahrain in July the former Minister for the Middle East met with senior members of the Bahraini Government and discussed human rights issues, including the death penalty where she restated the UK position. Lord Ahmad also met with Bahrain Foreign Minister Dr Abdullatif Al Zayani in July, and again in September during the margins of the UN General Assembly. During the meetings they discussed a number of shared human rights priorities, including specific human rights cases of interest. The UK's position on the use of the death penalty is longstanding and clear. The Government of Bahrain is fully aware of our position.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Answer on 9 December 2021 to Question 85212 on Palestinians: Health Services, whether her Department has completed its review of the report by Medical Aid for Palestinians entitled Systematic Discrimination and Fragmentation as Key Barriers to Palestinian Health, published on 29 November 2021; and (b) what assessment she has made of the implications of its findings for her policies.

Officials regularly review reports relevant to the situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories to inform our policy. We are aware of the findings of this report and remain committed to ensuring access to essential healthcare services for all Palestinians. We are a longstanding supporter of the UN Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) which provides core services, including healthcare to Palestinian refugees in Gaza. The UK Embassy in Tel Aviv regularly raises the importance of access to healthcare with the Israeli authorities.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Answer of 9 December 2021 to Question 85214 on Gaza: Demonstrations, what estimate her Department has made of the number of investigations opened by Israeli authorities into the use of live ammunition by Israeli forces against Palestinians during the 2018-19 Gaza protests.

We have not made this estimate. The UK has repeatedly made clear to Israel our longstanding concerns about the manner in which the Israel Defence Forces police non-violent protests and the border areas, including use of live ammunition. We will continue to do so. The UK supports an independent and transparent investigation which establishes the facts about the violence that occurred during the Great March of Return in Gaza. The UK continues to monitor progress of ongoing investigations by the Israeli authorities.

1st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what reports she has received of the (a) number and (b) change in number of Palestinian children held in solitary confinement in Israeli military detention in the most recent period for which information is available; and if she will she seek assurances from the Israeli authorities that they will end the practice.

We do not collect this information. The British Embassy in Tel Aviv has a regular dialogue with Israel on legal issues relating to the occupation, including the treatment of Palestinian children.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the report of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights titled Ensuring accountability and justice for violations of international law in the occupied Palestinian territory, dated 12 June 2017, what diplomatic steps the Government has taken to encourage Israel to enact the 550 recommendations made to it by the Human Rights Council mechanisms between 2009-2018.

Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories is a human rights priority for the FCDO. The UK continues to engage with the Israeli government on human rights issues in the context of the occupation. We repeatedly call on Israel to abide by its obligations under international law and have a regular dialogue with Israel on legal issues relating to the occupation, including the treatment of Palestinians.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if she will make representations to her Bahraini counterpart for the immediate and unconditional release from prison of Dr Abduljalil AlSingace and Hassan Mushaima.

We continue to monitor and raise the cases of Dr Abduljalil al-Singace, Hassan Mushaima and others as necessary, with the Bahraini Government as well as with the oversight bodies.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the hunger strike by former political opposition leader, Abdulhadi AlKhawaja, in Bahrain, and reports that Mr AlKhawaja has been denied family visitation rights and phone calls, if she will make representations to her Bahraini counterpart for Mr AlKhawaja’s phone calls and family visitation to be reinstated.

The UK has a continuing dialogue with the Government of Bahrain in which we raise individual cases, when and where we have concerns.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if she will make representations to her Bahraini counterpart for the regular and timely provision of prescribed eyedrops to political prisoner, Ali AlBanai.

Responsibility for the provision of medical care to Ali Al Banai lies with the Government of Bahrain, who have made clear that access to medical care for those in detention is guaranteed. We welcome these assurances from the Government of Bahrain. We encourage those with concerns about his detention to raise them with the oversight bodies.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, in the context of reports that political prisoner Dr Abduljalil AlSingace has had his phone calls punitively suspended by authorities in Bahrain and with reference to his ongoing hunger strike that began on 8 July 2021, what representations the Government plans to make to its Bahraini counterparts on (a) the reinstatement of Dr AlSingace’s phone calls, (b) his confiscated research to be given to his family and (c) his immediate and unconditional release.

We will continue to monitor and raise the case of Dr Abduljalil al-Singace with the Bahraini Government. We encourage those with concerns about his detention to raise them with the oversight bodies.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 23 November 2021 to Question HL3907 and Answer of 19 November 2021 to Question 72473, for what reason the Government will not disclose the most recent date or dates upon which it raised the case of Dr Abduljalil AlSingace with its counterparts in Bahrain.

We continue to monitor and regularly raise, as appropriate, the case of Dr Abduljalil al-Singace with the Bahraini Government.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to reports of the discontinuance of dental treatment for political prisoner Ali AlHajee, on what date the Government last raised the case of Ali AlHajee with the Bahraini authorities; and if she will make representations to her Bahraini counterpart for the immediate continuation of Ali AlHajee’s dental treatment.

Responsibility for the provision of medical care to Ali Al Hajee lies with the Government of Bahrain, who have made clear that access to medical care for those in detention is guaranteed. We welcome these assurances from the Government of Bahrain. We encourage those with concerns about his detention to raise them with the oversight bodies.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the report by Medical Aid for Palestinians entitled Systematic Discrimination and Fragmentation as Key Barriers to Palestinian Health, published on 29 November 2021, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the findings of that report.

We are aware of the report and are reviewing its findings. The UK remains firmly committed to ensuring access to essential healthcare services for all Palestinians. We are a longstanding supporter to the UN Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) which provides core services, including healthcare to Palestinian refugees in Gaza. The UK Embassy in Tel Aviv regularly raises the importance of access to healthcare with the Israeli authorities.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the answer of 9 June 2020 to Question 57198 on Gaza: Demonstrations, what recent assessment her Department has made of the progress made by Israel in (a) investigating and (b) holding wrongdoers accountable for potentially unlawful killings by its forces in the context of the 2018-19 Gaza protests.

The UK has repeatedly made clear to Israel our longstanding concerns about the manner in which the Israel Defence Forces police non-violent protests and the border areas, including use of live ammunition. We will continue to do so.

The UK supports an independent and transparent investigation which establishes the facts about the violence that occurred during the Great March of Return in Gaza. The UK continues to monitor progress of ongoing investigations by the Israeli authorities.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the letter to her of 11 November 2021 from ten hon. Members calling on the Government to blacklist the Israeli NSO Group in light of cyberattacks carried out on UK soil against refugees, activists and parliamentarians by Gulf states including Bahrain and the UAE; when she plans to reply to that letter; if she will make her policy to (i) impose a trade sanction on the NSO Group, (ii) suspend the Gulf Strategy Fund pending an independent inquiry into the human rights implications of its programmes, (iii) suspend UK spyware licences and cybersecurity contracts to Bahrain, the UAE and Saudi Arabia pending an independent investigation and (iv) publicly raise concerns with the Governments of Bahrain, the UAE and Saudi Arabia on their role in cyberattacks carried out in the UK using Pegasus software.

The letter of 11 November from the ten honourable members is being reviewed and a response will be sent in due course. It is important that we ensure that commercial cyber tools are used in a legal and responsible way. They should not be used in ways that threaten human rights. The UK is committed to countering the proliferation of high end cyber capabilities, and we will continue to work with international partners to achieve this. Commercial cyber tools should be used in a responsible way.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if she will (a) raise with her Israeli counterpart (i) the fatal shooting of Mohammad Mo’ayyad Bahjat Abu Sara and (ii) the abduction and assault of a 15-year-old boy by Israeli settlers on 17 August 2021 and (b) seek assurances that there will be a criminal investigation into both incidents.

We condemn any incidence of violence by settlers against Palestinians. We welcome the efforts of Israeli authorities to address settler violence, and urge them to thoroughly investigate every instance to bring those responsible to justice. We also continue to stress the importance of the Israeli security forces providing appropriate protection to the Palestinian civilian population, in particular the need to protect children, and urge restraint in the use of live fire.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the decision by the International Criminal Court of 5 February 2021 to extend its jurisdiction to the territories occupied by Israel in 1967, whether the Government has agreed to give advance warning to the Israeli Government (a) of any plans to arrest Israelis on their arrival in the UK and (b) in the event that a request for an arrest warrant is issued against an Israeli citizen.

The UK is a strong supporter of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and we respect the independence of the Court. In this instance, we do not consider that the ICC has jurisdiction as the UK does not currently recognise Palestinian statehood.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment his Department has made of the impact of the economic crisis in Lebanon on (a) poverty rates, and (b) access to healthcare for Palestinian refugees in Lebanon.

Lebanon faces a severe economic and political crisis, a result of the failure of Lebanon's political elites to form a government and deliver much-needed and long-promised reforms, exacerbated by the public health crisis caused by COVID-19 and the aftermath of the Beirut port explosion of August 2020. This crisis has had a severe impact on healthcare provision and poverty rates in the country, for both Lebanese citizens and the most vulnerable refugee populations. The UK and members of the International Support Group for Lebanon are clear that Lebanon's leaders need to form a capable government and implement a credible reform process as the only sustainable way to address this crisis.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will (a) raise with his Israeli counterpart the death of 15-year-old Ahmad Zahi Ibrahim Bani-Shamsa on 16 June 2021 and (b) seek assurance that there will be a criminal investigation into his death.

The UK is aware of the reports surrounding the death of Ahmad Zahi Ibrahim Bani-Shamsa. We urge the Government of Israel to conduct a swift and transparent investigation. We continue to stress the importance of the Israeli security forces providing appropriate protection to the Palestinian civilian population, in particular the need to protect children, and urge restraint in the use of live fire. We remain concerned by the number of Palestinians, including children, killed in the West Bank and Gaza.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will call on the Government of Israel to investigate the firing of two missiles at a two-storey home in Gaza City’s Al-Manara neighbourhood on 11 May 2021.

Israel has a legitimate right to self-defence, and the right to defend its citizens from attack. In doing so, it is vital that all actions are proportionate, in line with International Humanitarian Law, and make every effort to avoid civilian casualties. We repeatedly call on Israel to abide by its obligations under international law and have a regular dialogue with Israel on legal issues relating to the occupation.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will call for Israel to investigate the firing of a missile by an Israeli warplane on 12 May 2021.

Israel has a legitimate right to self-defence, and the right to defend its citizens from attack. In doing so, it is vital that all actions are proportionate, in line with International Humanitarian Law, and make every effort to avoid civilian casualties. We repeatedly call on Israel to abide by its obligations under international law and have a regular dialogue with Israel on legal issues relating to the occupation.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
15th Jun 2021
What discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the potential merits of advising UK businesses against trading with illegal settlements as a disincentive to Israeli settlement building in the occupied Palestinian territories.

The UK’s position on settlements is clear. They are illegal under international law, present an obstacle to peace, and threaten the physical viability of a two-state solution.

The UK and Israel have a strong and important trading relationship and we are firmly opposed to boycotts or sanctions. But we do not recognise the Occupied Palestinian Territories, including the settlements, as part of Israel.

We urge Israel to halt settlement expansion immediately.

Ultimately it will be the decision of an individual or company whether to operate in settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories, but the British Government would neither encourage nor offer support to such activity.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of the recent reported Israeli military offensive on healthcare (a) workers and (b) infrastructure in Gaza.

The UK welcomed the announcement of a ceasefire in Israel and Gaza on 20 May, which is an important step to ending the cycle of violence and loss of civilian life. The UK priority now is ensuring timely humanitarian access into and out of Gaza, including for essential health services. We are urging the Government of Israel to ensure this access is maintained. We have made clear our concern about the ongoing humanitarian situation in Gaza, including significant damage and destruction of civilian infrastructure including homes, schools, hospitals, and clinics.

The United Kingdom is also providing an initial £3.2 million of UK aid to UNRWA's emergency flash appeal, which launched on 19 May 2021. This appeal will address the immediate humanitarian needs of vulnerable Palestinians living in Gaza.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent representations he has made to his Israeli counterparts on the reported use of force by that country's security forces against Palestinian demonstrators.

The UK continues to urge the Israeli Government to respect the fundamental rights and freedoms of peaceful, legal protestors.

In instances where there have been accusations of excessive use of force, we continue to urge Israel to ensure that its investigations are transparent, swift and comprehensive. We also continue to stress the importance of the Israeli security forces providing appropriate protection to the Palestinian civilian population.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what information his Department holds on the (a) number and (b) type of violations of UN Security Council Resolution 1701 involving cross-border firing of weapons and (ii) incursions by (A) land and (B) air in each of the last 12 months.

The UN's latest Report on the Implementation of Security Council Resolution 1701 for the period 17 June to 20 October 2020 provides a comprehensive assessment of violations in this period, including air and land violations. https://unifil.unmissions.org/sites/default/files/s_2020_1110_e.pdf

The UK condemns all violations of UN Security Council Resolutions 1509 and 1701, and calls for all sides to adhere to the relevant resolutions. We welcome the efforts made by United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) to mediate between parties and decrease tensions.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent steps his Department has taken to end demolitions of Palestinian homes and structures and prevent forcible transfer of Palestinian communities, such as the Bedouin village of Humsa-Al Bqai’a in Area C of the West Bank.

The UK urged the Government of Israel to end demolitions of property in the West Bank at the UN Security council on 25 February 2021. On the same day, The British Ambassador in Tel Aviv raised ongoing demolitions with the Israeli Authorities in a meeting alongside like-minded partners. I [Minister Cleverly] publicly called on Israel to stop demolitions on 5 February 2021. Officials from the British Consulate General Jerusalem make regular visits to areas at risk of demolition, and visited Humsa Al-Baqai'a on 6 November 2020 to reiterate UK support for the community.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he plans to take in response to Israeli demolitions of Palestinian infrastructure and continued settlement expansion in the West Bank by Israel.

The UK urged the Government of Israel to end demolitions of property in the West Bank at the UN Security council on 25 February 2021. On the same day, The British Ambassador in Tel Aviv raised ongoing demolitions with the Israeli Authorities in a meeting alongside like-minded partners. I publicly called on Israel to stop demolitions on 5 February 2021. Officials from the British Consulate General Jerusalem make regular visits to areas at risk of demolition, and visited Humsa Al-Baqai'a on 6 November 2020 to reiterate UK support for the community.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make representations to the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (a) not to proceed with the imminent execution of Nawaf al-Osaimi for a crime allegedly committed as a teenager and (b) to halt all executions pending a review of the death row population to identify those convicted of crimes allegedly committed as children and resentence them in line with the 2020 Royal Decree.

The UK strongly opposes the death penalty in all countries and in all circumstances, as a matter of principle. This is especially the case for juveniles. This is in line with the provisions of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the Arab Charter on Human Rights. We reiterated our opposition to the death penalty in Saudi Arabia in a joint statement at the UN Human Rights Council on 15 September.

We regularly raise our concerns about the use of the death penalty, including individual cases with the Saudi Arabian authorities and we will continue to do so. In August, our Chargé d'affaires in Riyadh raised the issue of the death penalty with Minister of State Al Jubeir. I raised the death penalty with Dr Awwad al Awwad, President of Saudi Arabia's Human Rights Commission during his virtual visit in July.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many projects were delivered under the Integrated Activity Fund in the financial years (a) 2016-17 and (b) 2017-18; and what the (a) budget and (b) spend was for each of those projects.

I refer the Honourable Member to my response of 10 November 2020 to question 112065. 30 projects were delivered in 2017/18. The budget for each financial year was £20 million. Total spend was £10.5 million in 2016/17 and £13.9 million in 2017/18.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many of the projects delivered through the Integrated Activity Fund in (a) 2016-7 and (b) 2017-18 were delivered solely within one country; and what those countries were in each of those financial years.

I refer the Honourable Member to my responses to questions 112065 on 10 November and 113155 on 12 November.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, how many projects his Department applied for under the Integrated Activity Fund (IAF) in each financial year since 2016-17; and what the (a) allocated budget and (b) actual spending was for each project.

We do not disclose information related to Integrated Activity Fund projects to maintain the confidence and confidentiality of our Gulf partners.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make representations to his Israeli counterpart on the increase in the proportion of children strip searched in Israeli military detention.

The UK remains concerned about the treatment of Palestinian children detained in Israeli military detention. We are committed to working with Israel to secure improvements to the practices surrounding children in detention. Our Embassy in Tel Aviv have a regular dialogue with Israel on legal issues relating to the occupation, including on this issue. We also continue to fund projects providing legal aid to minors and capacity building to local lawyers.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make representations to the Government of Israel on the findings of Save the Children's report entitled, Defenceless: The impact of the Israeli military detention system on Palestinian children, published on 29 October 2020.

We are concerned by the findings of the Save the Children's report entitled, 'Defenceless: The impact of the Israeli military detention system on Palestinian children'. We remain concerned about the treatment of Palestinian children detained in Israeli prisons. Reports of the heavy use of painful restraints and the high number of Palestinian children who are not informed of their legal rights, in contravention of Israel's own regulations, are particularly concerning, as is the continued transfer of Palestinian child and adult detainees to prisons inside Israel in violation of the Fourth Geneva Convention. We remain committed to working with Israel to secure improvements to the practices surrounding children in detention. Our Embassy in Tel Aviv have a regular dialogue with Israel on this issue. We also fund projects providing legal aid to minors and capacity building to local lawyers. We continue to call on the Israeli authorities to comply with their obligations under international law.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the oral contribution of the hon Member for Glasgow East in the debate on the Transparency of the Integrated Fund on 22 October 2020, Official Report, col 475 WH that no Overseas Security and Justice Assistance assessment was carried out for the visits of officials from the Bahrain Ministry of Interior and judges from the Court of First Instance to the UK in March 2018 and August 2019, which were delivered under the Integrated Activity Fund, what assessment the Government has made of compliance of those matters with its (a) human rights safeguarding policies and (b) human rights obligations.

In helping Bahrain in the area of justice and security, we always consider when an OSJA assessment might be appropriate. The visits to the UK in 2018 and 2019 were arranged for Bahraini officials to meet, observe and ask questions of UK judges and officials about the approach to alternative sentencing by the UK's courts and National Probation Service. I am satisfied that both visits were consistent with our domestic and international rights and obligations and that OSJA assessments were not required.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the fatal shooting of 16-year-old Mohammad Damer Hamdan Matar near the occupied West Bank village of Deir Abu Meshal on 19 August, what steps he is taking to ensure accountability for Israeli soldiers’ use of live ammunition against Palestinian children in situations where lethal force was not necessary to protect life.

Whilst we have not made representations on this specific incident, we remain deeply concerned by the ongoing cycle of violence. We continue to stress the importance of the Israeli security forces providing appropriate protection to the Palestinian civilian population, in particular the need to protect children, and urge restraint in the use of live fire. In instances where there have been accusations of excessive use of force, we have advocated swift, transparent investigations.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Palestinian counterpart on reports of night time family home arrests of Palestinian children by Israeli soldiers.

We remain concerned about Israel's extensive use of administrative detention which, according to international law, should be used only when security makes this absolutely necessary rather than as routine practice and as a preventive rather than a punitive measure. We continue to call on the Israeli authorities to comply with their obligations under international law.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, he will make representations to the Government of Israel to release the 151 Palestinian children being held in Israeli military detention as called for by UN officials during the covid-19 pandemic.

We remain concerned by the impact that COVID-19 could have on Palestinian detainees, including children. The British Embassy in Tel Aviv have a regular dialogue with Israel on legal issues relating to the occupation, including the treatment of Palestinian prisoners in Israeli prisons. We remain committed to working with Israel to secure improvements to the practices surrounding children in detention in Israel and continue to make representations to the Israeli authorities on this issue. This includes the increased risk due to lack of hygiene, proper ventilation, population density and issues of due process. We continue to call for steps to be taken that will reduce the risk of COVID-19 spreading in prisons whilst simultaneously respecting fundamental human rights.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to reports of the treatment of political prisoners (a) Sheikh Zuhair Ashoor, (b) Mohamed Sarhan,(c) Mohamed Fakrawi, (d) Ali Al-Wazir and (e) Sadiq Al-Qasra in Jau Prison, Bahrain, if he will make representations to his Bahraini counterpart on the (i) conditions in detention and (ii) treatment of those prisoners.

The Government of Bahrain has made clear that access to appropriate medical care for those in detention continues to be guaranteed, which means under normal circumstances that any prisoner wishing to see a doctor is taken to the prison clinic, with referral to specialist facilities where required; but that as part of Bahrain's COVID-19 precautions, all initial medical consultations now take place via video calls. Where necessary, physical appointments with external medical specialists continue to be available, although, in line with guidance issued by the World Health Organization, prisoners seeing external specialists are required to isolate for 10 days in a separate detention facility before returning to prison ensuring the safety of both patients and medical staff. We welcome these assurances from the Government of Bahrain, urge continued transparency and would encourage those with any concerns about treatment in detention to raise them with the appropriate Bahraini human rights oversight body.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to reports of ongoing medical negligence in Jau Prison in Bahrain of (a) inmates not being provided with Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) despite cases of covid-19 and (b) Dr Abduljalil AlSingace not receiving medical treatment, if the Government will make urgent representations to the Government of Bahrain on provision of appropriate (i) PPE and (ii) treatment for Dr AlSingace.

We are not aware of any confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Bahrain's prisons. The Government of Bahrain has made clear that access to appropriate medical care for those in detention continues to be guaranteed, which means under normal circumstances that any prisoner wishing to see a doctor is taken to the prison clinic, with referral to specialist facilities where required; but that as part of Bahrain's COVID-19 precautions, all initial medical consultations now take place via video calls. Where necessary, physical appointments with external medical specialists continue to be available, although, in line with guidance issued by the World Health Organization, prisoners seeing external specialists are required to isolate for 10 days in a separate detention facility before returning to prison ensuring the safety of both patients and medical staff. We welcome these assurances from the Government of Bahrain, urge continued transparency and would encourage those with any concerns about treatment in detention to raise them with the appropriate Bahraini human rights oversight body.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to the decision by Bahrain’s Court of Cassation to uphold death sentences against Mohammed Ramadhan and Husain Moosa on 13 July 2020, if he will suspend Government support for (a) the Bahraini Special Investigations Unit, (b) the Ministry of Interior Ombudsman and (c) other Bahraini institutions accused of complicity in the torture of both men.

We are deeply concerned that the death penalty verdicts imposed on Mohammed Ramadhan and Husain Moosa by Bahrain's Court of Cassation have been upheld. Lord Ahmad, who is the Minister of State responsible for human rights, reinforced this position in his tweet of 14 July. We have raised both cases at senior levels with the Government of Bahrain. The Bahraini Government is fully aware that the UK opposes the death penalty, in all circumstances, as a matter of principle.

The UK welcomed the investigation by the Ombudsman and Special Investigation Unit into the cases of Mohammed Ramadhan and Husain Moosa, ultimately leading to the Attorney General and Minister of Justice ordering a retrial - a first in Bahrain.

The UK is committed to supporting Bahrain's oversight bodies, including the Ministry of Interior Ombudsman and the independent Special Investigations Unit. We continue to believe that Bahrain is taking steps in the right direction to improve its record on justice and security issues. The support we provide to these bodies, including in partnership with the UN Development Programme contributing to their work to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 16 (strengthening institutions and increasing access to justice), contributes to the ongoing development of both their capacity and capabilities.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to the decision by Bahrain’s Court of Cassation to uphold death sentences against Mohammed Ramadhan and Husain Moosa on 13 July 2020, if the Government will take steps to increase transparency on the use of UK funding allocated to Bahrain under the Integrated Activity Fund.

We are deeply concerned that the death penalty verdicts imposed on Mohammed Ramadhan and Husain Moosa by Bahrain's Court of Cassation have been upheld. Lord Ahmad, who is the Minister of State responsible for human rights, reinforced this position in his tweet of 14 July. We have raised both cases at senior levels with the Government of Bahrain. The Bahraini Government is fully aware that the UK opposes the death penalty, in all circumstances, as a matter of principle.

Our assistance is designed to support Bahrain-led reform in areas including human rights. It is provided in line with international standards and fully complies with our human rights obligations and the Overseas Security and Justice Assistance process. Programmes are routinely monitored by officials and evaluated, by officials, on a regular basis to ensure that they are on track for delivery.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many applications have been made by (a) barristers, (b) solicitors and (c) others for licences to permit payments by sanctioned entities to be made for legal advice or representation in the last 12 months.

The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) in HM Treasury is responsible for financial sanctions enforcement. OFSI may issue a licence to enable the payment of reasonable fees and/or expenses for the provision of legal services. OFSI is unable to provide the information requested as it does not collate information on legal expenses licence applications in this format and it would involve disproportionate costs to gather.

OFSI publishes an Annual Review containing information on the breakdown of legal expenses licences issued during the preceding financial year. The 2020-21 Annual Review can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1025562/OFSI_Annual_Review_2021.pdf. Data for the 2021-22 financial year is expected to be published in the Autumn.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
1st Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the (a) criteria and (b) process, including timescales, are for the determination of applications for licences to permit payment for legal advice and representation.

The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) in HM Treasury is responsible for financial sanctions enforcement. OFSI may issue a licence to enable the payment of reasonable fees and/or expenses for the provision of legal services. It is for the applicant to demonstrate to OFSI that the legal fees and disbursements are reasonable. All licence applications are carefully assessed against the criteria set out in the relevant Regulations.

OFSI has received a significant increase in the number of legal expenses licence applications since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Information requirements for legal expenses licences can be found on Page 28 of OFSI’s general guidance: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1062452/General_Guidance_-_UK_Financial_Sanctions.pdf.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
1st Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many and what proportion of applications for licences to permit payments by sanctioned entities to be made for legal advice or representation have been (a) granted, (b) rejected and (c) not yet dealt with.

The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) in HM Treasury is responsible for financial sanctions enforcement. OFSI may issue a licence to enable the payment of reasonable fees and/or expenses for the provision of legal services.

From June 2021 to June 2022 OFSI issued 29 licences for the payment of legal fees. OFSI is unable to provide all of the information requested as it does not collate information on legal expenses licence applications in this format and it would involve disproportionate costs to gather.

OFSI publishes an Annual Review containing information on the breakdown of legal expenses licences issued during the preceding financial year. The 2020-21 Annual Review can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1025562/OFSI_Annual_Review_2021.pdf. Data for the 2021-22 financial year is expected to be published in the Autumn.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
1st Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many and what proportion of applications for licences to permit payments by sanctioned entities for legal advice or representation relate to licences to permit payment for advice on the lawfulness of sanctions.

The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) in HM Treasury is responsible for financial sanctions enforcement. OFSI may issue a licence to enable the payment of reasonable fees and/or expenses for the provision of legal services. OFSI is unable to provide the information requested as it does not collate information on legal expenses licence applications in this format and it would involve disproportionate costs to gather.
Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend the furlough scheme for (a) the exhibition and conference sector and (b) other sectors which require long lead-in times to re-establish operations.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer has said there will be no further extensions or changes to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS).

After eight months of the CJRS, the scheme will close at the end of October.

The introduction of flexible furloughing further ensures that firms can adjust how they furlough to match their speed of reopening. Firms will be able to claim flexibly under the CJRS until October.

It would be challenging to target the CJRS to specific sectors in a fair and deliverable way, and it may not be the case that this is the most effective or sensible way to provide longer term support for those sectors who may not yet be reopening.

The Government will continue to engage with businesses and sectors with the aim of ensuring that the support provided is right for those sectors and for the economy as a whole.

9th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what timescale the Government plans to allow companies to seek Government funding for bailouts under Project Birch.

As part of its normal operations the government has always considered providing support to strategically important companies that can reasonably be expected to have a long-term viable future, and whose failure or distress could cause disproportionate harm to the UK economy or society. Companies must have exhausted all other options before being considered, and any support given is on terms that protect the taxpayer, with existing lenders and shareholders expected to contribute to, and share in, the financial burden.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the timescale is for loans provided to companies bailed out through Project Birch to be converted into shares; and what conditions the Government plans to attach to such conversions into shares.

As part of its normal operations the government has always considered providing support to strategically important companies that can reasonably be expected to have a long-term viable future, and whose failure or distress could cause disproportionate harm to the UK economy or society. Companies must have exhausted all other options before being considered, and any support given is on terms that protect the taxpayer, with existing lenders and shareholders expected to contribute to, and share in, the financial burden.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he has taken to prepare a new mandate for UK Government Investments to manage new shareholdings in bailed out companies.

The government will keep the management of assets from the COVID-19 response under review.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how the Government plans to monitor companies’ compliance with any conditions that are attached to bailout loans and to hold those companies accountable if those conditions are breached.

As part of its normal operations the government has always considered providing support to strategically important companies. As with any agreement commercial and policy conditions can be attached, these are monitored using a variety of appropriate mechanisms.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend the business rates holiday for 2020-21 to supply chain businesses servicing the retail, leisure, and hospitality sector that ceased trading as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has provided enhanced support to the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors through the business rates holiday, given the acute impacts of COVID-19. The Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government has published guidance for local authorities on eligibility for the relief, which excludes properties that are not reasonably accessible to visiting members of the public.

A range of measures to support all businesses has also been made available, including the new Bounce Back Loans scheme, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan scheme, and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help firms continue to keep people in employment.

17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's policy paper entitled Fraud Strategy: stopping scams and protecting the public, published in May 2023, whether she plans to publish the terms of reference on the proposed review of the disclosure regime.

As announced in the Fraud Strategy, the Home Office, in collaboration with the Attorney General’s Office and the Ministry of Justice, will shortly launch an independent review into the challenges of investigating and prosecuting fraud.

The review will consider the following:

Phase 1

  • Modernising the disclosure regime for cases with large volumes of digital evidence.

Phase 2

  • Whether fraud offences and the Fraud Act 2006 meet the challenges of modern fraud, including whether penalties still fit the crime.
  • Creating civil orders and penalties to prevent fraudsters reoffending.
  • Making it easier for individuals to inform on associates in criminal fraud networks

The terms of reference will be published once a review chair is in post and the review is launched. The Home Office is working with the Ministry of Justice to identify suitable candidates to lead the review.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's policy paper entitled Fraud Strategy: stopping scams and protecting the public, published in May 2023, whether she has made an assessment of the potential merits of appointing a senior judge to lead that review.

As announced in the Fraud Strategy, the Home Office, in collaboration with the Attorney General’s Office and the Ministry of Justice, will shortly launch an independent review into the challenges of investigating and prosecuting fraud.

The review will consider the following:

Phase 1

  • Modernising the disclosure regime for cases with large volumes of digital evidence.

Phase 2

  • Whether fraud offences and the Fraud Act 2006 meet the challenges of modern fraud, including whether penalties still fit the crime.
  • Creating civil orders and penalties to prevent fraudsters reoffending.
  • Making it easier for individuals to inform on associates in criminal fraud networks

The terms of reference will be published once a review chair is in post and the review is launched. The Home Office is working with the Ministry of Justice to identify suitable candidates to lead the review.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to page 21 of her Department's policy paper entitled Fraud Strategy: stopping scams and protecting the public, published in May 2023, when she plans to launch the first phase of the independent review on the disclosure regime.

As announced in the Fraud Strategy, the Home Office, in collaboration with the Attorney General’s Office and the Ministry of Justice, will shortly launch an independent review into the challenges of investigating and prosecuting fraud.

The review will consider the following:

Phase 1

  • Modernising the disclosure regime for cases with large volumes of digital evidence.

Phase 2

  • Whether fraud offences and the Fraud Act 2006 meet the challenges of modern fraud, including whether penalties still fit the crime.
  • Creating civil orders and penalties to prevent fraudsters reoffending.
  • Making it easier for individuals to inform on associates in criminal fraud networks

The terms of reference will be published once a review chair is in post and the review is launched. The Home Office is working with the Ministry of Justice to identify suitable candidates to lead the review.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
6th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's press release entitled Thousands of asylum seekers to be moved out of hotels, published on 5 June 2023, what site in West London is being used to house asylum seekers; what hotels her Department plans to use to accommodate asylum seekers in (a) Hammersmith and Fulham and (b) Kensington and Chelsea; and what her Department's planned timescales are for the use of those sites to house asylum seekers.

The specific location of any of our asylum accommodation is not put in the public domain in order to maintain the privacy and security of those accommodated.

Robert Jenrick
Minister of State (Home Office) (Immigration)
15th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will list the names of hotels in Hammersmith constituency that have contractual agreements with the Home Office to house refugees; how many refugees are currently housed in hotels in Hammersmith constituency; and what is the average length of time for a refugee to be placed in a hotel.

For the safety, security and wellbeing of those we house we do not publicly disclose the names of individual hotels which may or may not be utilised. There are currently 2 Asylum support hotels in use in Hammersmith constituency, these hotels are being used to house people seeking asylum. As of 14 November, there were 90 occupants in these hotels.

The average length of stay in our contingency hotels is 6 to 12 months due to the current accommodation and capacity challenges.

With regards to refugees, there is 1 hotel in the Hammersmith constituency and there are currently 146 occupants in the hotel.

Robert Jenrick
Minister of State (Home Office) (Immigration)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of making noncompliance with Part 6 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 a criminal offence.

Section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 established the UK as the first country in the world to require businesses to report annually on steps taken to prevent modern slavery in their operations and supply chains. To comply with the requirement, statements must be:

  • Published annually via a prominent link on the organisation's homepage;
  • Approved by the Board of Directors or equivalent;
  • Signed by a Director or equivalent.

To assess compliance with the legal requirements, the Home Office contracted the Business & Human Rights Resource Centre (BHRRC) to undertake an audit on the Home Office's behalf. The audit findings on levels of compliance were published on 17 September 2020 in the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner's annual report (available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/independent-anti-slavery-commissioners-annual-report-2019-to-2020).

The Secretary of State has the power to bring civil proceedings in the High Court for an injunction requiring an organisation to comply with the duty to produce a modern slavery statement. This power has not been used to date.

In July 2018, the Home Secretary commissioned the Independent Review of the Modern Slavery Act. The aim of the Review was to identify where the Act is working well, what can be improved in the implementation of the Act and whether specific areas of the legislation need to be strengthened. The independent review recommended that Government should strengthen its approach to organisations failing to comply with section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 and recommended use of a civil penalty scheme to penalise non-compliance.

The Government has committed to strengthen section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act, to ensure businesses and large public bodies report transparently on action they have taken to address modern slavery risks in their operations and supply chains. These measures were set out in the Government’s response to the transparency in supply chains consultation, published on 22 September 2020.

In addition, in January 2021 the Foreign Secretary announced that financial penalties will be introduced for organisations who fail to meet their statutory obligations to publish annual modern slavery statements. These measures require primary legislation and will be introduced when parliamentary time allows. The Government will publish guidance to help organisations prepare for the new reporting requirements when timings of legislation are clear.

3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of civil injunctions on compliance with Part 6 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 in each year since 2015.

Section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 established the UK as the first country in the world to require businesses to report annually on steps taken to prevent modern slavery in their operations and supply chains. To comply with the requirement, statements must be:

  • Published annually via a prominent link on the organisation's homepage;
  • Approved by the Board of Directors or equivalent;
  • Signed by a Director or equivalent.

To assess compliance with the legal requirements, the Home Office contracted the Business & Human Rights Resource Centre (BHRRC) to undertake an audit on the Home Office's behalf. The audit findings on levels of compliance were published on 17 September 2020 in the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner's annual report (available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/independent-anti-slavery-commissioners-annual-report-2019-to-2020).

The Secretary of State has the power to bring civil proceedings in the High Court for an injunction requiring an organisation to comply with the duty to produce a modern slavery statement. This power has not been used to date.

In July 2018, the Home Secretary commissioned the Independent Review of the Modern Slavery Act. The aim of the Review was to identify where the Act is working well, what can be improved in the implementation of the Act and whether specific areas of the legislation need to be strengthened. The independent review recommended that Government should strengthen its approach to organisations failing to comply with section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 and recommended use of a civil penalty scheme to penalise non-compliance.

The Government has committed to strengthen section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act, to ensure businesses and large public bodies report transparently on action they have taken to address modern slavery risks in their operations and supply chains. These measures were set out in the Government’s response to the transparency in supply chains consultation, published on 22 September 2020.

In addition, in January 2021 the Foreign Secretary announced that financial penalties will be introduced for organisations who fail to meet their statutory obligations to publish annual modern slavery statements. These measures require primary legislation and will be introduced when parliamentary time allows. The Government will publish guidance to help organisations prepare for the new reporting requirements when timings of legislation are clear.

2nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Government plans to take to ensure that all police forces in England contain a dedicated rape and serious sexual offences unit; and what estimate he has made of how quickly those units could be established in all forces.

We recognise that having police officers with the right skills is critical in ensuring rape and sexual offences cases are managed appropriately and effectively. We are supporting the police to ensure this is the case through:

  • funding Operation Soteria, which includes reviewing the learning and development offer to officers and sharing learning nationally;
  • supporting the Vulnerability Knowledge and Practice Programme, run by the National Police Chiefs’ Council, which drives improvement in the policing response to all safeguarding crimes (including adult sexual offences); and
  • the three-year Spending Review settlement secures an additional £540m for the Police Uplift Programme by 2024/25. This will enable forces to recruit and maintain the full 20,000 officer uplift, delivering on this Government’s commitment to recruit additional officers and keep the public safe.

The deployment of officers and structure of forces is ultimately an operational matter for Chief Constables as there will be different considerations in different force areas.

22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many allegations of rape were recorded in the first three quarters of the financial year 2020-21; and how many of those cases resulted in a (a) referral to the CPS, (b) charge or summons, (c) completed prosecution and (d) conviction, including guilty pleas, within one year of recording.

In June 2021 the Government published its End to End Rape Review Report and Action Plan. During that review, we took a hard and honest look at how the entire criminal justice system deals with rape and in too many instances it simply had not been good enough.

The Action Plan outlined a robust programme of work to achieve a significant improvement, and we are committed to delivering on the actions in order to bring this about.

This includes the publication on a quarterly basis of scorecards to shine a light on the performance of the criminal justice system and give greater transparency.

Further information on recorded rape offences, including time to charge and measures from the CPS and Ministry of Justice, can be found in the Criminal Justice Scorecard for recorded adult rape offences:

CJS scorecard - recorded adult rape offences - Justice data

10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of the initial 5,000 places on the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme will be allocated to people already in the UK.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) commenced on 6th January. The ACRS will provide up to 20,000 women, children and others at risk with a safe and legal route to resettle in the UK.

Due to the success of our emergency evacuation and the larger than anticipated number of people brought over to the UK, we plan to exceed our initial aim of 5,000 people in the first year of the ACRS.

There are around 6,500 people in the UK who have been brought to safety during and after the evacuation who are eligible for the ACRS. They include women’s rights activists, journalists, and prosecutors, as well as the Afghan families of British Nationals. This also includes some of those most at risk, such as members of the LGBT community.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answers of 10 September 2020 to Question 85969 and 14 October 2020 to Question 100312, if she will take steps with knife (a) manufacturers and (b) retailers to change the design of kitchen knives to replace pointed ends with rounded ends.

We know that knives are used for legitimate purposes by the vast majority of people. Bladed articles with pointed ends have legitimate uses and are often needed for a wide range of purposes, including as tools for work for instance in farming or fishing and in private such as in the household for use during cooking. While we are always ready to engage with manufacturers and retailers to help ensure public safety, it is important that the government strikes the right balance between allowing access to knives for legitimate reasons, with the need to protect the public from dangerous weapons. We believe the current legislation strikes the right balance. We will, however, continue to do everything we can to ensure that people do not carry dangerous weapons and commit violent crime in the first place.

This is why we have invested £176.5 million over two years in preventing serious violence in local communities and bolstering police capacity to respond to serios violent crimes when they do occur.

It is also why we have launched a consultation on new powers for the police to target those who have been convicted of knife related offences. We will also be piloting new Knife Crime Prevention Orders, introduced through the Offensive Weapons Act 2019. These new preventative orders will provide an additional tool for police to steer people away from serious violence.

7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 10 September 2020 to Question 85969 on Knives, what steps the Government is taking to work with retailers to promote the responsible sales of knives.

The Government has agreed a set of voluntary commitments with major retailers to promote the responsible sale of knives and to prevent the sale of knives to under-18s, both in stores and online. The agreement commits retailers to having robust measures in place to ensure age verification and both appropriate display and access to knives in stores.

Retailers also act to ensure customers and staff are reminded that knives are age restricted products and that all staff receive regular training. Since March 2016, 19 major retailed have joined the agreement, with some stopping the sale of single knives in their stores altogether. We are continuing to work with retailers to strengthen the agreement further in relation to the display of knives.

The Offensive Weapons Act 2019 strengthens the law in relation to the preventing the online sale of knives to under 18s by requiring age verification and stopping knives being sent to residential addresses after they are bought online, unless the seller has arrangements in place with the delivery company to ensure that the product would not be delivered into the hands of a person under 18.

We have paused commencement of some of the Act’s provisions due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the social distancing measures that have been in place to avoid placing significant additional burdens on businesses and delivery companies to modify their sales and delivery systems and train staff over this period. We are keeping the position under review and we expect to be able to commence the provisions at the earliest opportunity.

5th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people in prison have been identified (a) provisionally and (b) conclusively by her Department as victims of modern slavery through the National Referral Mechanism.

The Single Competent Authority (SCA) operates the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), which is a civil process for the identification and support of victims of modern slavery. The SCA does not hold real-time or reportable data on the number of individuals that have been identified as potential or confirmed victims of modern slavery whilst in prison.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will (a) make an assessment of the validity of September 2020 research on knives from De Montfort University and (b) bring forward legislative proposals on replacing pointed knives with rounded knives for domestic use.

We continue to work with retailers to promote the responsible sales of knives. It is important to strike the right balance between allowing access to knives, for instance as tools, with the need to protect the public from dangerous weapons.

We are doing everything in our power to make our streets safer, including recruiting 20,000 additional police officers over the next three years and providing the most substantial increase in police funding in a decade. Additionally, the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 introduced new knife crime prevention orders which were requested by the police and will provide them with a vital means to steer those most at risk away from serious violence.

£70 million of the Serious Violence Fund was invested in 18 areas to develop multi-agency Violence Reduction Units which bring together police, local government, health and education professionals, community leaders and other key partners to identify the drivers of serious violence and agree a multi-agency response to them. In addition to the Serious Violence Fund, we have invested £200 million in early intervention and prevention support initiatives to support young people at risk of exploitation and involvement in serious violence, through the Youth Endowment Fund.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether (a) the five techniques and (b) harshing were employed during interrogations in Iraq between 2003 and 2009.

The International Criminal Court (ICC)’s report entitled “Situation in Iraq/UK”, published on 9 December 2020, brings to an end its long running examination into allegations of war crimes by UK personnel in Iraq, with the finding that there is no basis on which to proceed to a full investigation.

The UK Government maintains a clear policy framework governing detention, interrogation and the passing and receipt of intelligence relating to detainees. It does not participate in, solicit, encourage or condone, and in no circumstance will UK personnel ever be authorised to take action amounting to, unlawful killing, the use of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment (“CIDT”), or extraordinary rendition.

Joint Doctrine Publication (JDP) 1-10, Captured Persons, is the capstone doctrine publication for all Captured Persons activities. It provides detailed direction and guidance to UK Armed Forces involved in planning, training for or conducting captured persons activities. Importantly, it also reflects the UK Government’s policy and guidance resulting from recent operations.

Complimenting JDP 1-10 are The Principles Relating to the Detention and Interviewing of Detainees Overseas and the Passing and Receipt of Intelligence Relating to Detainees. These follow a thorough review of existing guidance to be as clear as possible about the standards under which the intelligence agencies and our Armed Forces operate.

The use of approved verbal and non-physical techniques remains vital if we are to retain the ability to secure swiftly in appropriate circumstances intelligence that can save lives. These techniques are non-threatening and do not cause physical harm.

However, the prohibition on the ‘five techniques’, introduced in 1972, remains in force, as set out in JDP 1-10. The prohibited techniques were redefined following the 2010 Baha Mousa public inquiry as: Stress positions; Hooding; Subjection to noise; Deprivation of sleep and rest; and, Deprivation of food and water. These techniques must never be used for any purpose.

The UK takes all alleged incidents of this kind very seriously, and allegations against UK personnel are investigated. Regrettably, as previously acknowledged, for example in the Baha Mousa Inquiry published in 2011, unauthorised use of the ‘five techniques’ were used by elements of UK forces in Iraq.

With regard to compensation, as a matter of policy, when claims are received, they are investigated and considered on the basis of whether the MOD has a legal liability; and where there is such a liability, compensation is paid.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the December 2020 International Criminal Court report entitled Situation in Iraq/UK, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies of the reported flawed guidance in interrogation procedures used in Iraq between 2003 and 2009.

The International Criminal Court (ICC)’s report entitled “Situation in Iraq/UK”, published on 9 December 2020, brings to an end its long running examination into allegations of war crimes by UK personnel in Iraq, with the finding that there is no basis on which to proceed to a full investigation.

The UK Government maintains a clear policy framework governing detention, interrogation and the passing and receipt of intelligence relating to detainees. It does not participate in, solicit, encourage or condone, and in no circumstance will UK personnel ever be authorised to take action amounting to, unlawful killing, the use of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment (“CIDT”), or extraordinary rendition.

Joint Doctrine Publication (JDP) 1-10, Captured Persons, is the capstone doctrine publication for all Captured Persons activities. It provides detailed direction and guidance to UK Armed Forces involved in planning, training for or conducting captured persons activities. Importantly, it also reflects the UK Government’s policy and guidance resulting from recent operations.

Complimenting JDP 1-10 are The Principles Relating to the Detention and Interviewing of Detainees Overseas and the Passing and Receipt of Intelligence Relating to Detainees. These follow a thorough review of existing guidance to be as clear as possible about the standards under which the intelligence agencies and our Armed Forces operate.

The use of approved verbal and non-physical techniques remains vital if we are to retain the ability to secure swiftly in appropriate circumstances intelligence that can save lives. These techniques are non-threatening and do not cause physical harm.

However, the prohibition on the ‘five techniques’, introduced in 1972, remains in force, as set out in JDP 1-10. The prohibited techniques were redefined following the 2010 Baha Mousa public inquiry as: Stress positions; Hooding; Subjection to noise; Deprivation of sleep and rest; and, Deprivation of food and water. These techniques must never be used for any purpose.

The UK takes all alleged incidents of this kind very seriously, and allegations against UK personnel are investigated. Regrettably, as previously acknowledged, for example in the Baha Mousa Inquiry published in 2011, unauthorised use of the ‘five techniques’ were used by elements of UK forces in Iraq.

With regard to compensation, as a matter of policy, when claims are received, they are investigated and considered on the basis of whether the MOD has a legal liability; and where there is such a liability, compensation is paid.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the December 2020 International Criminal Court report entitled Situation in Iraq/UK, whether he plans to compensate in accordance with international law victims of torture perpetrated by British forces during detention and interrogation in Iraq between 2003 and 2009.

The International Criminal Court (ICC)’s report entitled “Situation in Iraq/UK”, published on 9 December 2020, brings to an end its long running examination into allegations of war crimes by UK personnel in Iraq, with the finding that there is no basis on which to proceed to a full investigation.

The UK Government maintains a clear policy framework governing detention, interrogation and the passing and receipt of intelligence relating to detainees. It does not participate in, solicit, encourage or condone, and in no circumstance will UK personnel ever be authorised to take action amounting to, unlawful killing, the use of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment (“CIDT”), or extraordinary rendition.

Joint Doctrine Publication (JDP) 1-10, Captured Persons, is the capstone doctrine publication for all Captured Persons activities. It provides detailed direction and guidance to UK Armed Forces involved in planning, training for or conducting captured persons activities. Importantly, it also reflects the UK Government’s policy and guidance resulting from recent operations.

Complimenting JDP 1-10 are The Principles Relating to the Detention and Interviewing of Detainees Overseas and the Passing and Receipt of Intelligence Relating to Detainees. These follow a thorough review of existing guidance to be as clear as possible about the standards under which the intelligence agencies and our Armed Forces operate.

The use of approved verbal and non-physical techniques remains vital if we are to retain the ability to secure swiftly in appropriate circumstances intelligence that can save lives. These techniques are non-threatening and do not cause physical harm.

However, the prohibition on the ‘five techniques’, introduced in 1972, remains in force, as set out in JDP 1-10. The prohibited techniques were redefined following the 2010 Baha Mousa public inquiry as: Stress positions; Hooding; Subjection to noise; Deprivation of sleep and rest; and, Deprivation of food and water. These techniques must never be used for any purpose.

The UK takes all alleged incidents of this kind very seriously, and allegations against UK personnel are investigated. Regrettably, as previously acknowledged, for example in the Baha Mousa Inquiry published in 2011, unauthorised use of the ‘five techniques’ were used by elements of UK forces in Iraq.

With regard to compensation, as a matter of policy, when claims are received, they are investigated and considered on the basis of whether the MOD has a legal liability; and where there is such a liability, compensation is paid.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of whether the Government was involved in acts of rendition in Iraq from 2003 to 2009.

The UK Government does not participate in, solicit, encourage or condone unlawful killing, the use of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment (“CIDT”), or extraordinary rendition. In no circumstance will UK personnel be authorised to take action amounting to torture, unlawful killing, extraordinary rendition, or CIDT. UK military action is conducted in line with the UK’s Human Rights obligations and International Humanitarian Law.

The UK Government supports the rule of law, and opposes any form of unlawful deprivation of liberty that places a detained person outside the protection of the law, including so-called extraordinary rendition. Any request for the transit of foreign flights through the UK or overseas territories is considered on a case-by-case basis and are granted only when the purpose of the transit complies with international law.

There were two previously declared incidents relating to the US in 2002, where British Territory had been used for this purpose. The transition of two detainees through Diego Garcia was reported to Parliament by the then Foreign Secretary in February 2008. Since those events in 2002 the UK are not aware of any other instances of other countries holding or moving any detainees through the territorial land, air or seas of the UK or our overseas territories.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the article by Dr Nick Thoburn of the University of Manchester entitled Razing the neighbourhood: consequences and alternatives to council estate demolition, published in April 2023, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of that report's recommendations on repair, refurbishment and retrofit of existing social housing.

Further to the measures under debate in the Social Housing Regulation Bill, approaches to regeneration should have the support of a majority of residents. Residents and the wider community should have the opportunity to have a say on the choices and options, master-planning and design.

24th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how he plans to assess the impact of the provisions in the Building Safety Bill and associated Building Safety Funding proposals on the delivery of new social housing and improvements to existing social homes.

The Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC) continues to have regular conversations with social landlords and their representative bodies about the implications of the Building Safety Bill and the Building Safety Fund for their residents and their work to build and improve social housing. DLUHC continue to work to ensure that residents live in safe buildings.

The Building Safety Bill provides that the effectiveness of key elements of the new legislation, including the Building Safety Regulator and the regulatory system for building safety, will be examined at least once every five years through an independent review. 123 applications are currently progressing through the Building Safety Fund with £128 million committed.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to mitigate the potential effect on Gypsies and Travellers of the Home Office proposals outlined in the consultation, Strengthening police powers to tackle unauthorised encampments with regard to proposals to (a) criminalise trespass and (b) seize homes.

The Government remains committed to tackling unauthorised encampments. The Home Office will be publishing a full Government response to the consultation on strengthening police powers to tackle unauthorised encampments. The Home Office have considered all suggestions carefully, and will take account of the potential effect on settled and nomadic communities, before taking a decision on how to proceed.


17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 10 November 2020 to Question 110299, what the planned timescale is for Michael Wade's report on proposals to protect leaseholders from unaffordable remediation costs.

Government Advisor Michael Wade is advising the department on how to protect leaseholders from unaffordable costs. We will provide an update to Parliament before the Building Safety Bill returns to Parliament.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 10 November 2020 to Question 110299, whether the work that Michael Wade is developing on protecting leaseholders from unaffordable costs will seek to replace the Building Safety Charge in the Building Safety Bill.

The proposed Building Safety Charge has been designed to ensure that the costs leaseholders pay for building safety measures are transparent and reasonable. We envisage this will include ongoing costs, such as those for the Building Safety Manager, and powers for the Secretary of State to exclude specific costs from being re-charged.

My department is working on proposals to protect leaseholders from unfair costs caused by historic building safety defects.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister for Building Safety to the Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee on 19 October 2020, for what reason the Government decided to change its policy on allowing costs to be placed onto leaseholders.

It is unacceptable for leaseholders to have to worry about the cost of fixing historic safety defects in their buildings that they did not cause. Government has repeatedly said that building owners should step up and not pass these costs on to leaseholders, where possible.

Where developers or building owners have been unable or unwilling to pay, we have introduced funding schemes providing £1.6 billion to?accelerate the pace of work and?meet?the costs of remediating the highest risk and most expensive defects – Aluminium Composite Material cladding and other unsafe cladding systems like High Pressure Laminates.

The department is working on proposals to protect leaseholders from unfair costs caused by historic building safety defects. We will provide an update before the Building Safety Bill returns to Parliament.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister for Building Safety to the Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee on 19 October 2020, whether the Building Safety Charge will apply to retrospective building faults.

The proposed Building Safety Charge has been designed to ensure that the costs leaseholders pay for building safety measures are transparent and reasonable. We envisage this will include ongoing costs, such as those for the Building Safety Manager, and powers for the Secretary of State to exclude specific costs from being re-charged.

The department is working on proposals to protect leaseholders from unfair costs caused by historic building safety defects.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, which external financial advisers are working with Michael Wade on protecting leaseholders from unaffordable costs.

Michael Wade has engaged with a number of stakeholders from the financial sector, including lenders, insurers and their representative bodies. He has not employed one specific financial adviser to work with him on this project, rather he has sought input from across the sector.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 10 November 2020 to Question 110299 on High Rise Flats: Insulation, what plans he has in place to ensure that the funding solution that Michael Wade is drawing up will work when leaseholders are financially unable to pay for remediation costs.

The department is undertaking analysis on the affordability of costs for leaseholders and an update to the analysis will be included in the revised Impact Assessment to the Building Safety Bill.

My department will provide an update before the Building Safety Bill returns to Parliament.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 10 November 2020 to Question 110299 on High Rise Flats: Insulation, whether the leaseholder funding solution that Michael Wade is working on will prioritise the buildings most at risk.

The programme has prioritised remediation of combustible cladding – and particularly Aluminium Composite Material cladding– because it acts as a fire accelerant and poses the greatest risk of fire spread. We have made £1.6 billion available to support the remediation of unsafe cladding.

Our impact assessment also identifies work not related to cladding that will need to be remediated. Michael Wade, senior adviser to?MHCLG, is working with leaseholders and the financial sector to identify financing solutions that protect leaseholders from unfair costs of building safety works while ensuring that the bill does not fall on taxpayers.

12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when he plans to publish the outcome of the review of the ban on the use of combustible materials in and on the external walls of buildings.

I refer the Hon Member to the answer I gave to Question UIN 100277 on 12 October 2020.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, where an external wall system has windows installed and a similar system tested to BR135 does not, whether those systems will be considered to match in terms of assessing eligibility for the Building Safety Fund.

The Building Safety Fund prospectus was published 26 May. The prospectus sets out the buildings and non-ACM cladding systems, in the technical annex e, that are eligible for funding.?During the registration and application process, the Department will be able to engage individually with building owners regarding questions specific to individual buildings.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, where an external wall system has a different number of cavity barriers installed to a similar system tested to BR135, whether those systems will be considered to match in terms of assessing eligibility for the Building Safety Fund.

The Building Safety Fund prospectus was published 26 May. The prospectus sets out the buildings and non-ACM cladding systems, in the technical annex e, that are eligible for funding.?During the registration and application process, the Department will be able to engage individually with building owners regarding questions specific to individual buildings.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, where an external wall system has ventilation openings installed and a similar system tested to BR135 does not, whether those systems will be considered to match in terms of assessing eligibility for the Building Safety Fund.

The Building Safety Fund prospectus was published 26 May. The prospectus sets out the buildings and non-ACM cladding systems, in the technical annex e, that are eligible for funding.?During the registration and application process, the Department will be able to engage individually with building owners regarding questions specific to individual buildings.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether an A2 cladding/C class combustible insulation system which has passed a BS 8414 test will be eligible for funding under the Building Safety Fund.

The Building Safety Fund prospectus was published 26 May. The prospectus sets out the buildings and non-ACM cladding systems, in the technical annex e, that are eligible for funding.?During the registration and application process, the Department will be able to engage individually with building owners regarding questions specific to individual buildings.

24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the non-ACM cladding remediation fund applies to (a) combustible cladding with a Euroclass rating of B as well as cladding with a Euroclass rating of C or below, (b) all types of combustible cladding, or just to HPL and timber, (c) the removal of combustible insulation installed beneath combustible cladding, (d) the removal of combustible insulation installed beneath A1 or A2 cladding and (e) the removal of combustible insulation installed in External Wall Insulation systems with render.

We will be publishing the prospectus for the Building Safety Fund in May which will provide all the eligibility criteria for the Fund, including which cladding materials and systems will be supported.

11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when the Government plans to publish the (a) fire safety bill and (b) building safety bill.

As announced in the Queen’s speech on 19 December 2019, the Government is committed to bringing forward legislation on fire and structural safety that delivers meaningful and lasting change. The Fire Safety Bill will be introduced to Parliament shortly by the Home Office. The Building Safety Bill will follow and be published later this year. Resident safety is paramount, and we owe it to them to get this right.

11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent discussions he has had with leaseholder organisations on leaseholders affected by the advice note for building owners, published on 20 January 2020.

On 4 March, the Secretary of State met a group of leaseholders facing difficulties related to unsafe or unknown cladding, remediation bills and the mortgage challenges arising from that.

In February, the Department met representatives from leaseholder groups including "Manchester Cladiators", to discuss building safety, remediation costs and mortgage finance.

11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the guidance note entitled, Building safety advice for building owners, including fire doors, what support his Department is providing to leaseholders that are unable to sell their properties while the freeholder is carrying out fire safety checks.

Building safety is the responsibility of the building owner and they must ensure that they move swiftly to identify and address any fire safety issues they find. They should let leaseholders know of any planned safety checks and must be forthcoming with the outcomes of those checks and the actions arising from them.

11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the guidance note entitled, Building safety advice for building owners, including fire doors, what support his Department is providing to freeholders affected by the provisions of that guidance note.

Building owners are responsible for the safety of their buildings and must ensure that they act on any safety concerns they find. The Independent Expert Advisory Panel consolidated advice is for building owners. It advises building owners what actions they should take to ensure their building is fire safe.

11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the guidance note entitled, Building safety advice for building owners, including fire doors, what discussions he has had with representatives from the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors on the EWS1 forms for leaseholders.

The Government has regular engagement with the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors on a variety of issues, including the operation of the EWS1 form.

11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what funding the Government is providing to remove unsafe cladding from residential buildings below 18 metres in height.

We are investing £1.6 billion to support the remediation of unsafe Aluminium Composite Material (ACM) and unsafe non-ACM cladding systems on private and social residential buildings above 18 metres.

Dame Judith Hackitt – who led the Independent Review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety - has recommended that we focus further public funding on remediating unsafe cladding from high rise buildings. Higher rise buildings are the least likely to evacuate safely in the event of a fire spreading via external cladding.

Government intervention does not remove overall responsibility for building safety from building owners, and they should consider all routes to meet costs, protecting leaseholders where they can – for example through warranties and recovering costs from contractors for incorrect or poor work.

13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether any court buildings have been identified as having reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete (RAAC); and whether his Department plans to fund emergency mitigation works to any courts in which RAAC is identified.

I refer the honourable Member to the answer I gave on 26 September 2023 to Question 199292:

https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2023-09-13/199292.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will make an estimate of the number of Law Centres that have closed in England since 2010; and how much funding his Department has provided to Law Centres since 2010.

The Ministry of Justice does not hold direct information on the number of law centres in England or those that have ceased operating.

Since 2015/16, the Legal Aid Agency has paid £57.2m to law centres across England and Wales, in respect of Civil and Criminal Legal Aid work. We are unable to provide the information from 2010 onwards as Legal Aid Provider Statistics data is only available from 2015/16 onwards.

Further, the Government has invested over £25m in grant funding for the not-for-profit sector including law centres since 2014.

In March 2023, the Government announced a new £10.4m Improving Outcomes Through Legal Support (IOTLS) grant. This grant runs from July 2023 until March 2025 and is being administered by the Access to Justice Foundation on behalf of the Ministry of Justice. The grant has been awarded to 59 organisations across England and Wales, including 15 law centres. This funding will enable organisations to provide legal advice and support to help people resolve their problems as early as possible.

The IOTLS grant builds on the previous legal support grants including the £4.8m Help Accessing Legal Support grant which ran from September 2022 until June 2023 and supported 52 front line organisations including 14 law centres.

Between April 2020 and March 2021, during the peak of the Covid-19 pandemic, organisations were awarded Government emergency grant funding totalling £5.4m via the Covid-19 Specialist Advice Service Scheme. Of the total amount, £3m was distributed to law centres via the Law Centres Network. This funding enabled organisations to continue providing critical services to the most vulnerable and prevented the closure of a number of law centres.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
29th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department collects data on the number of cells that are overcrowded in each prison.

All prisoner accommodation is certified in line with the Certified Prisoner Accommodation Framework. Cells are only shared where a Prison Group Director has certified them to be of an adequate size and condition. The process of certification requires every prison to record all cells that have been assessed as suitable for crowding, and this information is held centrally.

Crowding data is published annually as part of the HMPPS Annual Digest. The 2022/23 version of the Annual Digest is due to be published on 27 July 2023.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 7 June 2023 to Question 187087 on Prison Accommodation, for what reason it is not practicable to collect data on time out of cell for each prison in England and Wales.

Prison governors set a regime for each day specifying when prisoners will ordinarily be unlocked. There will be occasions, however, when certain prisoners will remain in their cell during these times. Reasons for this will include illness, being over retirement age, the management of operational incidents, and other operational reasons such as staff needing to be deployed to other duties.

There will also be occasions where prisoners will be out of cell at times when they are scheduled to be locked in, for example to attend medical appointments at hospital, a late arrival from court, or a transfer between prisons.

To accurately record the amount of time prisoners spend out of cell, His Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) would therefore be required to record information for each individual prisoner, taking into account their unique movements on a daily basis.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of his Department holding data on time spent out of cell across all prisons in England and Wales.

We are committed to delivering purposeful activity within prisons: our plans for prison regime reform are set out in the Prisons Strategy White Paper - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

As noted in my reply of 9 May, there is no central requirement governing the amount of time that prisoners should spend out of their cells. Governors have the flexibility to deliver balanced regimes to meet the needs of their establishment’s population. The collection of data on time spent out of cell is not currently practicable.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
28th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if his Department will publish data on the average time spent out of cell in each prison in England and Wales.

The information requested for adult prisoners is not held by the Ministry of Justice as collecting it would require the detailed monitoring of cell activity in each prison establishment.

There is no central requirement governing the amount of time that prisoners should spend out of their cells. Governors are instead afforded the flexibility to deliver balanced regimes that maintain an appropriate level of time out of cell on a range of activities, including association, which meet the needs of the establishment’s population.

HMPPS has introduced a Regime Dashboard which reports the percentage of prisoners receiving different levels of regime each week. We are further developing this to align to future regimes. A performance metric has also been introduced to hold prisons to account on their levels of regime delivery. Data from this are scheduled for publication in July 2023.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
28th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department expects to have completed its implementation of local regime leads across the entire prison estate through the National Regime Model.

All prisons will have a local regime lead in place by the end of 2023/24.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
8th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 6 February 2023 to Question 137767 on Ministry of Justice: Liability, what specific legal challenge caused the increase in value.

The legal challenge referred to in my previous answer (Question 137767) is an appeal against a Court decision to greatly restrict the Claimant’s case that the Secretary of State ruled incorrectly on Prison Service Pay Review Body recommendations.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Justice Committee's oral evidence session on the work of the Ministry of Justice on 31 January 2023 and Question 59 on the £73.7 million attributed to a lease of undeveloped land, whether his Department plans to seek a change in the covenant to allow the land to be used for broader purposes.

My officials have engaged with the landowner to seek a change to the restrictions on the lease, so that the surplus land can be put to alternative use as soon as possible. This would require the agreement of the landowner.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
1st Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Department's annual report and accounts for 2021-22, for what reason his Department has increased the contingent liability for injuries to staff, prisoners and the public.

The contingent liabilities in question relate to HMPPS and are in respect of claims for injuries to staff, prisoners and the public but also third-party contract disputes and other legal claims brought against the agency, where the likelihood for a liability arising is deemed possible but unlikely.

The increase in the value reported related to a specific legal challenge which does not relate to injuries.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information his Department holds on how many property sales were held up in England and Wales due to delays to probate decisions in 2021-22.

This information is not held centrally.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many hearings for trials in (a) magistrates' and (b) Crown courts could not take place when listed due to a prosecutor not being available for those hearings in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 to date.

This information is published as part of Criminal Court Statistics Quarterly – ‘Trial effectiveness at the criminal courts’ tool. The tool includes ineffective trials by reason and court type. The latest tool is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-court-statistics-quarterly-april-to-june-2022.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
15th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the causes of delays within the Probate Service; and what steps he is taking tackle those delays.

Despite the unprecedented challenges faced by the probate service during the Covid 19 pandemic, and the increased volume of applications that have been seen since, the average length of time taken for a grant of probate following receipt of the documents required has been maintained at between five and seven weeks – with the average responses being almost 1 week faster in quarter 2 of 2022 than the yearly average for 2020 and 2021.

HMCTS has increased resources to meet the higher demand following an increased number of estates requiring probate and is further increasing resourcing to further bring down overall timeliness on digital and paper applications.

Average waiting times for probate grants, from April 2022 to June 2022, are published on gov.uk via Family Court Statistics Quarterly (Table 25):

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/family-court-statistics-quarterly-april-to-june-2022

Information covering up to September 2022 will be published on 15 December.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
13th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Answer of 25 April 2022 to Question 158877 on Wormwood Scrubs Prison: Prison Governors, if he will place a copy of the security assessment in the Library; and if he will list vulnerabilities identified by the security assessment.

As with all proposals for new uses of Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) sites we have drawn up a site mitigation assessment plan. This ensures we have given full consideration of issues related to physical security, and other vulnerabilities such as estate boundaries, personal safety of staff and residents, and use of technology. It is not possible to place a copy of the assessment in the library nor to publish a list of vulnerabilities as this would compromise security and public safety.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has undertaken a risk assessment in respect of plans to develop the former governor's house at HMP Wormwood Scrubs.

A Full Planning Application has been submitted. Various reports and assessments have been undertaken as part of the application, including a security assessment. Details of the Planning Application can be viewed via the following link:

https://public-access.lbhf.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?keyVal=R4J1WQBIGO600&activeTab=summary

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has plans to develop the former governor's house at HMP Wormwood Scrubs.

A Full Planning Application has been submitted. Various reports and assessments have been undertaken as part of the application, including a security assessment. Details of the Planning Application can be viewed via the following link:

https://public-access.lbhf.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?keyVal=R4J1WQBIGO600&activeTab=summary

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) staff in total and (b) full-time equivalent staff were employed in the headquarters of (a) HMPPS and NOMS and (b) area services in each year since 2010.

The number of staff in post in HMPPS HQ and Area Services each year since 2010 can be found below in table 1 (headcount) and table 2 (full time equivalent).

Table 1: HMPPS HQ and Area Services staff in post1, by financial year as at 31 March 2010 to 31 March 2021 and 31 December 2021 (Headcount)

Headcount

HMPPS HQ2,3

Area Services3

Total

31-Mar-2010

3,718

609

4,327

31-Mar-2011

2,329

916

3,245

31-Mar-2012

1,526

1,271

2,797

31-Mar-2013

1,182

1,267

2,449

31-Mar-2014

1,199

1,384

2,583

31-Mar-2015

1,447

1,464

2,911

31-Mar-2016

1,785

1,658

3,443

31-Mar-2017

2,072

1,604

3,676

31-Mar-2018

2,139

1,574

3,713

31-Mar-2019

2,471

1,694

4,165

31-Mar-2020

3,752

1,677

5,429

31-Mar-2021

4,150

1,709

5,859

31-Dec-2021

4,352

1,826

6,178

Table 2: HMPPS HQ and Area Services staff in post1, by financial year as at 31 March 2010 to 31 March 2021 and 31 December 2021 (full time equivalent)

Full Time Equivalent

HMPPS HQ2,3

Area Services3

Total

31-Mar-2010

3,556

590

4,146

31-Mar-2011

2,235

883

3,118

31-Mar-2012

1,462

1,174

2,636

31-Mar-2013

1,125

1,173

2,298

31-Mar-2014

1,164

1,281

2,444

31-Mar-2015

1,412

1,378

2,789

31-Mar-2016

1,731

1,604

3,335

31-Mar-2017

2,019

1,545

3,563

31-Mar-2018

2,090

1,511

3,601

31-Mar-2019

2,406

1,627

4,033

31-Mar-2020

3,578

1,609

5,187

31-Mar-2021

3,914

1,642

5,557

31-Dec-2021

4,119

1,753

5,872

  1. As with all HR databases, extracts are taken at a fixed point in time, to ensure consistency of reporting. However the database itself is dynamic and where updates to the database are made late, subsequent to the taking of the extract, these updates will not be reflected in figures produced by the extract. For this reason, HR data are unlikely to be precisely accurate.
  2. In June 2010 approximately 1,500 NOMS HQ staff transferred to the central Ministry of Justice.
  3. In April 2017 certain corporate functions were moved out of HMPPS HQ and Area services to the central Ministry of Justice under functional leadership changes.
Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) total and (b) full-time equivalent prison officers were employed in each of the Prison Service Establishment Regions in each year since 2010.

The number of band 3-5 officers in post, by Prison Service Structure each year since 2010 can be found in the attachement: Table 1 (headcount) and Table 2 (full time equivalent).

The number of prison officers has increased by more than 4,000 in the last four years and we have committed to hiring an extra 5,000 officers by the mid-2020s.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much (a) his Department (b) Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service and (c) the National Offender Management Service has spent on prison officer recruitment in each year since 2010.

The delivery model for prison officer recruitment in the Ministry of Justice (MoJ), HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) and formerly, the National Offender Management Service (NOMS), has changed several times since 2010 to align with business need. This has spanned local, regional and centralised management of campaigns, as well as the current blended approach of central and local management, with recruitment costs delegated across roles in individual prisons, regional delivery areas, centralised teams and contracted suppliers.

Therefore, we do not hold complete figures in each year since 2010 as this information is held in a number of different areas and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. We have included spend for centralised prison officer campaigns since 2019/20.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) staff in total and (b) full-time equivalent civil service staff were employed to manage prison officer numbers in each year since 2010; and how many of those staff were (a) SCS4, (b) SCS3, (c) SCS2, (d) SCS1, (e) grade 6, (f) grade 7, (g) SEO, (h) HEO, (i) EO and (j) AA.

In the last 12 years there have been a number of different teams managing Prison Officer Recruitment. Due to these changes to the teams, and how the data is recorded, it would be deemed a disproportionate cost to undertake the manual data collection required to answer this PQ.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
3rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department plans to conduct an evaluation of the impact and effectiveness of the expansion of powers under s28 Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1984.

Section 28 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 gives victims the opportunity to have their cross-examination pre-recorded, without the ordeal of having to take part in a live trial, subject to judicial discretion.

We are looking at data from the pilots and working with partners to understand the operational changes we need to make to proceed with our plan to rollout of s.28 for victims of sexual and modern slavery offences in all Crown Courts.

This autumn, we aim to publish the results of a process evaluation conducted with victims and criminal justice practitioners who have used this provision.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has to review the Human Rights Act 1998 in lieu of the Independent Human Rights Act Review Panel publishing its conclusions.

As the Deputy Prime Minister has set out, we will overhaul the Human Rights Act (HRA) to make sure it meets the needs of the society it serves and commands public support. The Government has established the Independent Human Rights Act Review to examine the framework of the HRA, how it is operating in practice and whether any change is required. We look forward to receiving the Panel’s report, and will be carefully considering the Panel’s conclusions as part of any wider reform programme. We will publish the Panel’s report and have already committed to consulting on proposed changes to the Act.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has had discussions with his counterparts in the (a) Republic of Ireland and (b) US Administration on plans to review the Human Rights Act 1998 and the potential effect those plans might have on the Good Friday Agreement.

In the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, the UK committed to completing incorporation of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) into Northern Ireland law. We remain a signatory of the ECHR, and in carrying out our programme of reforms we will continue to ensure that our obligations under the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement are being met.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to make any amendment to the Human Rights Act which will require changes to the Good Friday Agreement.

In the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, the UK committed to completing incorporation of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) into Northern Ireland law. We remain a signatory of the ECHR, and in carrying out our programme of reforms we will continue to ensure that our obligations under the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement are being met.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of sections (a) 2(1) and (b) 2(A) of the Suicide Act 1961 between 1 April 2009 and 31 July 2020.

The Government has not made, and has no plans to make, an assessment of the effectiveness of provisions in the Suicide Act 1961.

The Government’s view remains that if there is a requirement for any change to the law in this area it must be for individual Parliamentarians to consider as an issue of conscience, rather than a decision for Government.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners in HMP Wormwood Scrubs have (a) been tested and (b) tested positive for covid-19 in each of the last six months.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) has been working closely with the Department of Health and Social Care, the NHS, and health authority colleagues in England and Wales for a number of months on providing access to Covid-19 tests in a prison environment. More recently, additional testing capacity has been made available to limit the importation of infection into prisons. This includes the regular testing of staff across all prisons and carrying out testing of all new receptions to stop the virus spreading into and between jails.

The most recently published figures included in the HMPPS workforce quarterly statistics provided data for HMPPS staff in post by establishment, as at 30 September 2020. On that date there were 485 directly employed staff in post, by headcount, at HMP Wormwood Scrubs, 91 of which were off sick for non-COVID reasons. The average non-COVID days lost at the prison were lower for the 12 months ending in September 2020, the most recently published data, compared to the prior period ending in March for 2020.

30 staff were absent from work due to self-isolation or quarantine on official health advice on 30th October. This includes both directly and non-directly employed staff. It does not, however, include staff who were off work due to COVID related sickness, caring responsibilities due to COVID or any other COVID related absences.

The table below shows the most recent verified data for HMP Wormwood Scrubs. HMPPS do not hold complete data for the number of individual staff members or prisoners who have been tested. It should be noted that staff numbers include both those directly and non-directly employed. Where values of two or fewer are present they have been suppressed (~) in order to prevent disclosure of personal information. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system. Much of the data collected during the COVID-19 pandemic has been done at pace, with recording practices evolving as we understand more about the requirements and conditions we are facing. In order to present the timeliest information, the data presented has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics.

May 20

Jun 20

Jul 20

Aug 20

Sep 20

Oct 20

Staff testing positive

~

0

~

~

0

19

Jul 20

Aug 20

Sep 20

Oct 20

Nov 20

Dec 20

Prisoners testing positive

0

0

0

55

7

6

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many staff employed in HMP Wormwood Scrubs have (a) been tested and (b) tested positive for covid-19 in each of the last six months.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) has been working closely with the Department of Health and Social Care, the NHS, and health authority colleagues in England and Wales for a number of months on providing access to Covid-19 tests in a prison environment. More recently, additional testing capacity has been made available to limit the importation of infection into prisons. This includes the regular testing of staff across all prisons and carrying out testing of all new receptions to stop the virus spreading into and between jails.

The most recently published figures included in the HMPPS workforce quarterly statistics provided data for HMPPS staff in post by establishment, as at 30 September 2020. On that date there were 485 directly employed staff in post, by headcount, at HMP Wormwood Scrubs, 91 of which were off sick for non-COVID reasons. The average non-COVID days lost at the prison were lower for the 12 months ending in September 2020, the most recently published data, compared to the prior period ending in March for 2020.

30 staff were absent from work due to self-isolation or quarantine on official health advice on 30th October. This includes both directly and non-directly employed staff. It does not, however, include staff who were off work due to COVID related sickness, caring responsibilities due to COVID or any other COVID related absences.

The table below shows the most recent verified data for HMP Wormwood Scrubs. HMPPS do not hold complete data for the number of individual staff members or prisoners who have been tested. It should be noted that staff numbers include both those directly and non-directly employed. Where values of two or fewer are present they have been suppressed (~) in order to prevent disclosure of personal information. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system. Much of the data collected during the COVID-19 pandemic has been done at pace, with recording practices evolving as we understand more about the requirements and conditions we are facing. In order to present the timeliest information, the data presented has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics.

May 20

Jun 20

Jul 20

Aug 20

Sep 20

Oct 20

Staff testing positive

~

0

~

~

0

19

Jul 20

Aug 20

Sep 20

Oct 20

Nov 20

Dec 20

Prisoners testing positive

0

0

0

55

7

6

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison officers are employed at HMP Wormwood Scrubs; how many are absent on grounds of sickness; and how many are absent as a result of having to self-isolate or having tested positive for covid-19 as of 11 January 2021.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) has been working closely with the Department of Health and Social Care, the NHS, and health authority colleagues in England and Wales for a number of months on providing access to Covid-19 tests in a prison environment. More recently, additional testing capacity has been made available to limit the importation of infection into prisons. This includes the regular testing of staff across all prisons and carrying out testing of all new receptions to stop the virus spreading into and between jails.

The most recently published figures included in the HMPPS workforce quarterly statistics provided data for HMPPS staff in post by establishment, as at 30 September 2020. On that date there were 485 directly employed staff in post, by headcount, at HMP Wormwood Scrubs, 91 of which were off sick for non-COVID reasons. The average non-COVID days lost at the prison were lower for the 12 months ending in September 2020, the most recently published data, compared to the prior period ending in March for 2020.

30 staff were absent from work due to self-isolation or quarantine on official health advice on 30th October. This includes both directly and non-directly employed staff. It does not, however, include staff who were off work due to COVID related sickness, caring responsibilities due to COVID or any other COVID related absences.

The table below shows the most recent verified data for HMP Wormwood Scrubs. HMPPS do not hold complete data for the number of individual staff members or prisoners who have been tested. It should be noted that staff numbers include both those directly and non-directly employed. Where values of two or fewer are present they have been suppressed (~) in order to prevent disclosure of personal information. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system. Much of the data collected during the COVID-19 pandemic has been done at pace, with recording practices evolving as we understand more about the requirements and conditions we are facing. In order to present the timeliest information, the data presented has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics.

May 20

Jun 20

Jul 20

Aug 20

Sep 20

Oct 20

Staff testing positive

~

0

~

~

0

19

Jul 20

Aug 20

Sep 20

Oct 20

Nov 20

Dec 20

Prisoners testing positive

0

0

0

55

7

6

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many proven offences were committed by children who turned 18 prior to conviction in the 12 months to March (a) 2019 and (b) 2020.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions, convictions and sentences for offences committed by children up to December 2019; 2020 data is not yet available.

Published information is available in the ‘Outcomes by Offence’ data tool, available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/888664/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2019.xlsx

Detailed information on the circumstances of cases, including age at time of offence vs. age at time of conviction, may be held on court record. However, to be able to identify these cases, we would have to access individual court records, which would be of disproportionate cost.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to publish a final proposed tariff for compensation for whiplash injuries.

The Whiplash Injury Regulations 2021 will include the tariff for compensation for whiplash injuries and will be published in due course.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the number of staff absences by establishment throughout the youth secure estate as a result of the covid-19 outbreak for each month since 1 April 2020.

Published data on staff absent due to Covid-19 was first published in August on gov.uk for the period up to 31 July 2020. These figures can be found under the Covid annex, via the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/her-majestys-prison-and-probation-service-workforce-quarterly-june-2020

Number of staff absent due to COVID-19 from April 2020

Establishments

30.04.2020

29.05.2020

30.06.2020

31.07.2020

Adel Beck

6

13

12

12

Aldine House

~

0

0

0

Aycliffe

4

6

~

~

Barton Moss

24

22

23

23

Clayfields House

0

4

4

5

Cookham Wood

47

28

30

29

Feltham A

12

4

~

~

Hillside

4

4

5

4

Lincolnshire

~

~

0

~

Oakhill (STC)

8

10

11

8

Parc (YOI)

5

6

4

4

Rainsbrook (STC)

~

4

0

~

Vinney Green

11

8

6

4

Werrington

5

~

19

12

Wetherby

38

36

59

53

Total

171

149

178

160

(1) Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system. Much of the data collected during the COVID-19 pandemic has been done at pace, with recording practices evolving as we understand more about the requirements and conditions we are facing. In order to present the timeliest information, the data presented has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics.

(2) Numbers of 3 or less have been supressed and so have totals where the supressed number could be calculated.

(3) The types of COVID absences recorded are Sickness Absence, Self Isolation or Quarantine on Official Health Advice, Caring Responsibilities and Other reasons.

Closed settings such as prisons pose particular challenges in managing outbreaks, but we have had to introduce a number of necessary restrictions, guided by public health advice to limit the spread of COVID-19 in establishments and to protect both staff and residents, with necessary adaptions to manage infection.

We will be introducing a testing regime for staff and those in our care across all establishments in England and Wales to help identify and isolate cases early and control the spread of coronavirus. Routine staff testing will also be rolled out from November for both directly employed and non-directly employed staff who work with service users on a weekly basis.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 28 October 2020 to Question 106239 on Civil Proceedings, if he will publish details of the new accessible bespoke court process which will be used to settle disputes in cases made through the Official Injury Claims portal.

The Government will publish details of its new accessible bespoke court process alongside the new Civil Procedure Rules and Pre-action Protocol in due course.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the number of hours of time out-of-cell per child by establishment throughout the youth secure estate for each day since 1 April 2020.

Data on ‘time out of room’ is not collected centrally across the whole of the youth secure estate, as Secure Training Centres and Secure Children’s Homes operate standardised regimes where children and young people are ‘unlocked’ throughout the course of an establishment’s daily regime.

The Youth Custody Service collects ‘time out of room’ information from under 18 Young Offender Institutions (YOIs) for management information purposes. Improvements to data collection processes were made in August this year to ensure data robustness and to enable comparability between the YOIs. There are no current plans to publish YOI ‘time out of room’ figures as a specific dataset.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to section 3(11) of the Civil Liability Act 2018, what consultation has taken place with the Lord Chief Justice about the proposed tariff for compensation for whiplash injuries; and if he will publish the details of that consultation.

A consultation is currently underway with the Lord Chief Justice as required by section 3 paragraph (11) of the Civil Liability Act 2018. We will carefully consider the response received and will publish details of the tariff of damages.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans the Government has to reduce the small claims limit for (a) employer liability and (b) public liability injuries to a maximum of £2,000 for (i) vulnerable road users, (ii) children, (iii) protected parties and (iv) other claimants.

The Government consulted on increasing the small claims track (SCT) limit for all personal injury claims in November 2016. Following consideration of the responses received, the Government announced its decision in February 2017 that the SCT limit for road traffic accident (RTA) related personal injury claims would be increased from £1,000 to £5000 and for all other personal injury claims, including employment and public liability, from £1,000 to £2,000 in line with inflation.

This issue was raised and debated in both Houses during the Parliamentary passage of the Civil Liability Act 2018, where the Government re-stated its position.

The RTA related personal injury claims SCT limit will be increased to £5,000 in April 2021.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners held in HMP Wormwood Scrubs have (a) been tested and (b) tested positive for covid-19 in each of the last six months.

Closed settings such as prisons pose particular challenges in managing outbreaks, but we have implemented strong measures to mitigate this risk, guided by public health advice, and with the safety of staff and prisoners remaining the absolute priority.

As of 30 September, there were six positive prisoner cases at HMP Wormwood Scrubs. Out of the six cases, three of these received their result in April and the other three in May.

As mentioned in the previous answer, verified data on the number of prisoners that have tested positive for Covid-19 for September and October is due to be published in November, as part of Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) national Covid-19 statistics and workforce statistics on gov.uk:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hm-prison-and-probation-service-covid-19-statistics-monthly

Out of 1118 prisoners at Wormwood Scrubs, 866 of those prisoners who are not required to isolate or quarantine for reasons linked to Covid-19, have access to between 2-3 hours out of their cell each day.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners held in HMP Wormwood scrubs are permitted to leave their cells for two or more hours a day as at 21 October 2020.

Closed settings such as prisons pose particular challenges in managing outbreaks, but we have implemented strong measures to mitigate this risk, guided by public health advice, and with the safety of staff and prisoners remaining the absolute priority.

As of 30 September, there were six positive prisoner cases at HMP Wormwood Scrubs. Out of the six cases, three of these received their result in April and the other three in May.

As mentioned in the previous answer, verified data on the number of prisoners that have tested positive for Covid-19 for September and October is due to be published in November, as part of Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) national Covid-19 statistics and workforce statistics on gov.uk:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hm-prison-and-probation-service-covid-19-statistics-monthly

Out of 1118 prisoners at Wormwood Scrubs, 866 of those prisoners who are not required to isolate or quarantine for reasons linked to Covid-19, have access to between 2-3 hours out of their cell each day.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many inmates of HMP Wormwood Scrubs are confined to their cells as a result of covid-19 infection in the prison; and for what period they will remain confined.

Closed settings such as prisons pose particular challenges in managing outbreaks, but we have implemented strong measures to mitigate this risk, guided by public health advice, and with the safety of staff and prisoners remaining the absolute priority.

Between ‘five and fewer’ required external hospitalisation but it is reported that they were not receiving hospital treatment as a result of covid-19. We do not hold medical records for any individual and therefore cannot disclose underlying medical conditions.

Verified data on the number of prisoners that have tested positive for Covid-19 in September and October is due to be published in November, as part of Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) national Covid-19 statistics and workforce statistics on gov.uk:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hm-prison-and-probation-service-covid-19-statistics-monthly

As of 23 October a total of 59 prisoners at HMP Wormwood Scrubs were in isolation for a period of 14 days as a result of being symptomatic or similar COVID related conditions. This is in line with the Government contact tracing policies. The establishment continues to isolate prisoners displaying symptoms, as set out in the HMPPS compartmentalisation strategy.

Prisoners, including those who are isolating have unlimited access to washing and toilet facilities. They also have access to in-cell telephony so that they can maintain family contact which is vital for their mental wellbeing and rehabilitation. Since the onset of covid-19, all prisoners have been provided with additional telephone credit to encourage contact with their families. Those in isolation have also been given further credit during this period.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what access inmates of HMP Wormwood Scrubs confined to their cells as a result of covid-19 infection in the prison have to (a) washing and toilet facilities and (b) telephone calls to family members.

Closed settings such as prisons pose particular challenges in managing outbreaks, but we have implemented strong measures to mitigate this risk, guided by public health advice, and with the safety of staff and prisoners remaining the absolute priority.

Between ‘five and fewer’ required external hospitalisation but it is reported that they were not receiving hospital treatment as a result of covid-19. We do not hold medical records for any individual and therefore cannot disclose underlying medical conditions.

Verified data on the number of prisoners that have tested positive for Covid-19 in September and October is due to be published in November, as part of Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) national Covid-19 statistics and workforce statistics on gov.uk:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hm-prison-and-probation-service-covid-19-statistics-monthly

As of 23 October a total of 59 prisoners at HMP Wormwood Scrubs were in isolation for a period of 14 days as a result of being symptomatic or similar COVID related conditions. This is in line with the Government contact tracing policies. The establishment continues to isolate prisoners displaying symptoms, as set out in the HMPPS compartmentalisation strategy.

Prisoners, including those who are isolating have unlimited access to washing and toilet facilities. They also have access to in-cell telephony so that they can maintain family contact which is vital for their mental wellbeing and rehabilitation. Since the onset of covid-19, all prisoners have been provided with additional telephone credit to encourage contact with their families. Those in isolation have also been given further credit during this period.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many cases of covid-19 have been identified in HMP Wormwood Scrubs; how many of those identified are receiving hospital treatment; how many require intensive care or ventilation; and how many are people who are vulnerable or have an underlying medical condition.

Closed settings such as prisons pose particular challenges in managing outbreaks, but we have implemented strong measures to mitigate this risk, guided by public health advice, and with the safety of staff and prisoners remaining the absolute priority.

Between ‘five and fewer’ required external hospitalisation but it is reported that they were not receiving hospital treatment as a result of covid-19. We do not hold medical records for any individual and therefore cannot disclose underlying medical conditions.

Verified data on the number of prisoners that have tested positive for Covid-19 in September and October is due to be published in November, as part of Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) national Covid-19 statistics and workforce statistics on gov.uk:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hm-prison-and-probation-service-covid-19-statistics-monthly

As of 23 October a total of 59 prisoners at HMP Wormwood Scrubs were in isolation for a period of 14 days as a result of being symptomatic or similar COVID related conditions. This is in line with the Government contact tracing policies. The establishment continues to isolate prisoners displaying symptoms, as set out in the HMPPS compartmentalisation strategy.

Prisoners, including those who are isolating have unlimited access to washing and toilet facilities. They also have access to in-cell telephony so that they can maintain family contact which is vital for their mental wellbeing and rehabilitation. Since the onset of covid-19, all prisoners have been provided with additional telephone credit to encourage contact with their families. Those in isolation have also been given further credit during this period.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what modelling he has undertaken on the potential effect of changes in trends in the number of low-value personal injury cases coming before HM Civil Courts in the event that an alternative dispute mechanism is not available through the small claims portal before April 2021.

Civil claims backlog data is not held by the Department. However, a revised impact assessment in relation to the forthcoming Statutory Instruments will be published in due course.

The Official Injury Claims portal is designed to be simple and easy to use. However, there will be occasions where claimants will need to be able to resolve disputes with the at-fault compensator. Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) was initially proposed to resolve these, but as announced in a written Ministerial Statement published on 27 February 2020 no practicable solution for ADR could be found and it would not form part of the service. The full statement can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/implementation-of-the-whiplash-reform-programme

The Government remains committed to ensuring access to justice, and unrepresented claimants will have access to a new accessible bespoke court process to enable any such disputes to be settled.

We are also working closely with Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service to understand the operational impacts of these new processes on the civil justice system and we will keep this matter under review, following implementation.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the small claims portal will be launched to the general public in 2021; what resources he has made available for communications to the public on how to make a minor injury claim under that new regime; and if he will he make a statement.

As confirmed in a Written Ministerial statement on 21 April 2020 the Government remains committed to implementing the Whiplash Reform Programme by April 2021.

The Portal will be accompanied by comprehensive and clear guidance for the public and if at any stage users need assistance, they can call a dedicated Portal Support Centre.

We intend to engage with the public, third sector, representative organisations and professional users during the pre-launch, launch and post launch periods to ensure that those who need to access the service know how to do so.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he is making an assessment of the potential effect on (a) the backlog of civil cases and (b) access to justice of a mechanism for the alternative dispute resolution of minor personal injury cases for the new small claims portal.

Civil claims backlog data is not held by the Department. However, a revised impact assessment in relation to the forthcoming Statutory Instruments will be published in due course.

The Official Injury Claims portal is designed to be simple and easy to use. However, there will be occasions where claimants will need to be able to resolve disputes with the at-fault compensator. Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) was initially proposed to resolve these, but as announced in a written Ministerial Statement published on 27 February 2020 no practicable solution for ADR could be found and it would not form part of the service. The full statement can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/implementation-of-the-whiplash-reform-programme

The Government remains committed to ensuring access to justice, and unrepresented claimants will have access to a new accessible bespoke court process to enable any such disputes to be settled.

We are also working closely with Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service to understand the operational impacts of these new processes on the civil justice system and we will keep this matter under review, following implementation.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many civil cases are awaiting a hearing in (a) each and (b) all civil courts in England and Wales; and what the quarterly increase was in cases awaiting a hearing between January and March, April and June and July and September 2020.

The information requested is not held.

We use a variety of management information to measure the work in the civil courts, including but not limited to, the volume of incoming receipts and defences along with timeliness of case progression. However, specific data relating to backlog is not held. Quarterly statistics are held at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/civil-justice-statistics-quarterly

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when part two of the Criminal Legal Aid Review is planned to conclude.

We are working to ensure that the next phase of the Criminal Legal Aid Review is set up as quickly as possible and are planning for the Independent Review to conclude in 2021. However, this timeframe will be subject to the agreement of the Chair, once appointed. We will seek to confirm the timeframe at the launch of the Independent Review.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to announce the Chair of part two of the Criminal Legal Aid Review.

We are working closely with stakeholders, including the criminal defence representative bodies, to ensure that the Independent Review is set up as quickly as possible and that we appoint the right chair and advisory panel so that the review can deliver a robust, evidence-based assessment of the criminal legal aid market.

This means ensuring that the chair of the review has the right skillset, expertise and experience. At present, we are working to identify and appoint the right candidate for the role and will say more in due course.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Department's guidance notes and forms for requesting transcription of Tribunal proceedings, requiring that appellants will usually have to pay for those transcripts unless the court believes there are special circumstances, what financial criteria people are required to meet in their EX105 form to demonstrate such poor financial circumstances that the cost of obtaining a transcript would be an excessive burden, qualifying them for a free transcript paid at public expense.

Following an applicant’s EX105 form, the decision to grant a transcript paid at public expense in Tribunal proceedings remains a judicial one. It would not be appropriate for Ministers to comment on how such decisions are made. Information on financial criteria requirements are published at: https://www.gov.uk/get-help-with-court-fees.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Department's guidance notes and forms for requesting transcription of Tribunal proceedings requiring appellants to submit an EX105 form to request that a court transcript of proceedings be paid at the public expense, what would qualify a request as not being necessary in the interests of justice for such a transcript to be obtained.

Open justice is a fundamental principle in our Courts and Tribunals system, and we continue to uphold that principle. The decisions of the First-tier and the Upper Tribunal are published on www.gov.uk when they are deemed of legal or public interest.

Whether a transcript should be released in the interests of justice, remains a judicial decision. It is not appropriate for Ministers to comment on how such decisions are made. There are currently no plans to provide transcripts throughout Tribunals at no cost, unless directed by a judge.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to publish the second part of the Government's response to the Reforming the Soft Tissue Injury (whiplash) Claims Process consultation.

The government announced on 21 April 2020 that work related to the implementation of the whiplash reforms in the Civil Liability Act 2018, and the raising of the small claims limit for road traffic accident claims, has been paused and the implementation timetable moved to April 2021. This will enable the personal injury sector to focus on delivering their response to Covid-19, as well as allowing the government to focus on providing key justice services.

Implementing these reforms in April 2021 will remain the Government’s priority. We are aware of the continued interest in the issues raised in Part 2 of the ‘Reforming the Soft Tissue Injury (whiplash) Claims Process’ consultation paper and will be considering our response to that consultation after the April 2021 implementation.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timeframe is for the introduction of secondary legislation in relation to the (a) increase in the small claims limit for road traffic accident claims from £1,000 to £5,000 and (b) Government’s proposed tariff structure for minor injury claims.

The government announced on 21 April 2020, by way of Written Ministerial Statement (WMS), that all work related to the implementation of the whiplash reforms has been paused and the implementation timetable has been moved to April 2021. This will enable the personal injury sector to focus on delivering their response to Covid-19, as well as allowing the government to focus on providing key justice services.

The government will make further announcements, including on the Parliamentary timetable for the relevant Statutory Instruments, in due course. The full WMS can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/update-on-the-implementation-of-the-whiplash-reform-programme

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to ensure that the new small claims portal will not create an incentive for insurers to deny a claims liability as a result of the Government's decision not to establish an alternative dispute resolution mechanism.

The government announced on 21 April 2020 that all work related to the implementation of the whiplash reforms has been paused and the implementation timetable has been moved to April 2021 because of the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Generally, the online whiplash claims service is being designed to be simple and easy to operate for all users. Once we resume work on the whiplash reform programme, the government will continue its work with the Civil Procedure Rule Committee on new and revised Rules, Pre-action Protocol and Practice Direction to underpin the reforms and the system. This will include consideration of incentives and controls for all users of the online claims service where it is appropriate to do so.

Currently, motor insurers accept liability for damages in the majority of whiplash claims and we do not expect insurer behaviour to change after implementation. However, claimants will have the option to go to court to establish liability where this is necessary.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much HM Courts and Tribunals Service has received for the sale of the court estate.

Since the start of the reform programme in 2015/16, approximately £130m has been raised from the sales of surplus buildings. We are reinvesting every penny into modernising the justice system to provide swifter and easier access to justice for all.

The closure of any court is not taken lightly – it only happens following full public consultation and when communities have reasonable access to alternative courts. Courts that have closed were either underused, dilapidated or too close to one another.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much money from the public purse HM Courts & Tribunals Service spent on (a) the common platform and (b) other digital projects in relation to the Crown Court in the financial year 2018-19.

I can confirm that Her Majesty’s Courts & Tribunals Service spend on (a) the development of the Common Platform was £37.3m (this includes both Crown and Magistrates systems) and (b) £5.2m on other digital projects in relation to the Crown Court in the financial year 2018-19. This excludes ongoing support charges.

The Common Platform is intended to deliver a unified way of digital working for HMCTS and CPS staff and the wider participants in the criminal case management process. Through digital working, we will improve the experience for court users and those working within the criminal justice system, whilst reducing cost and maintaining transparency.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the cost to the public purse was of the maintenance of the court estate in each year since 2015.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service expenditure on maintenance each year since 2016 is provided below:

£000s

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

Maintenance and repairs

71,274

80,478

90,890

48,600

1 Maintenance and repairs expenditure includes fixed maintenance, variable and planned works.

2 2019-20 figures are actual costs until December 2019 and are not full year maintenance costs for 2019-20.

Information relating to annual maintenance costs for 2015/16 financial year is not available on our current systems and we are unable to extract on a similar basis. Therefore we have not provided here due to the disproportionate cost of doing so.

HM Courts & Tribunals Service seeks to make sure that the court and tribunal estate is in the best possible condition to provide appropriate court and hearing room facilities.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)