Nickie Aiken

Conservative - Cities of London and Westminster

First elected: 12th December 2019


Supported Housing (Regulatory Oversight) Bill
14th Dec 2022 - 11th Jan 2023
Carer’s Leave Bill
2nd Nov 2022 - 9th Nov 2022
Protection from Redundancy (Pregnancy and Family Leave) Bill
26th Oct 2022 - 2nd Nov 2022
British Sign Language Bill
9th Feb 2022 - 23rd Feb 2022
Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill [HL]
9th Feb 2022 - 10th Feb 2022
Leasehold Reform (Ground Rent) Bill [HL]
1st Dec 2021 - 9th Dec 2021
Highgate Cemetery Bill Committee
16th Jun 2021 - 16th Jun 2021
Backbench Business Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 20th Jul 2020
Women and Equalities Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 20th Jul 2020


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Nickie Aiken has voted in 845 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Nickie Aiken voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
View All Nickie Aiken Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Penny Mordaunt (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(25 debate interactions)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
(14 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(14 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(55 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(30 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Nickie Aiken's debates

Cities of London and Westminster Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

The Government should class in-person interaction with family members and unmarried partners abroad as an essential reason to travel.

The Government is refusing to release official research on the characteristics of grooming gangs, claiming it is not in the “public interest”.

We, the British public, demand the release of the official research on grooming gangs undertaken by the Government in full.

The Home Secretary said what happened to victims of child sexual exploitation gangs was “one of the biggest stains on our country’s conscience.” Last year local authorities identified 18,700 suspected victims of child sexual exploitation. We want an independent public inquiry into Grooming Gangs.

To not decide to scrap free travel for those who are under 18. As a teenager who has relied so much on free travel, it has allowed for me to go to school without the worry of an extra expense and explore around the beautiful city of London also. Destroying free travel would hurt so many of us.


Latest EDMs signed by Nickie Aiken

Nickie Aiken has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Nickie Aiken, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Nickie Aiken has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Nickie Aiken has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by Nickie Aiken


A Bill to require employers to allow employees to take time off from work for appointments for fertility treatment; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 25th November 2022

A Bill to provide for the regulation of the carrying of passengers in Greater London by pedal cycles and power-assisted pedal cycles for hire or reward; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 19th November 2021

A Bill to require employers to allow employees to take time off from work for appointments for fertility treatment; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Monday 11th December 2023
Next Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 7th June 2024
Order Paper number: 6
(Unlikely to be Debated - would require unanimous consent to progress)

A Bill to provide for the regulation of the carrying of passengers in Greater London by pedal cycles and power-assisted pedal cycles for hire or reward; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 9th June 2020
(Read Debate)

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of adopting British Summer Time permanently on road traffic accidents involving pedestrians and cyclists.

The Government believes that the current daylight-saving arrangements represent the optimal use of the available daylight across the UK.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of job losses in the wedding industry sector in the event that additional fiscal support from his Department is not made available to that sector in response to the third national covid-19 lockdown.

We have provided an unprecedented package of financial support since March 2020 to businesses, including those in the weddings sector. We keep this regularly under review, through discussions with HM Treasury.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what fiscal steps his Department is taking to ensure that (a) wedding venues and (b) wedding suppliers are supported during the third covid-19 national lockdown.

We have provided an unprecedented package of financial support since March 2020 to businesses, including those in the weddings sector. We keep this regularly under review, through discussions with HM Treasury.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether hair, beauty and wellness services in (a) salon and (b) mobile settings will be allowed to reopen in Tier 3 areas after the national lockdown ends on 2 December.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister addressed the nation on Monday 23 November setting out Government’s COVID-19 Winter Plan. The COVID-19 Winter Plan sets out that the current national restrictions will be lifted on 2 December. Close Contact Services can open in all tiers.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential effect of the extended closure of hair, beauty and wellness services beyond the end of the national lockdown on 2 December would have on (a) businesses and (b) jobs in that sector.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister addressed the nation on Monday 23 November setting out Government’s COVID-19 Winter Plan. The COVID-19 Winter Plan sets out that the current national restrictions will be lifted on 2 December. Close Contact Services can open in all tiers.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of distributing the November 2020 local authority discretionary grant on the basis of per head of population (a) in urban centres where the ratio of businesses to residents is significantly higher than other areas and (b) more widely.

The Additional Restrictions Grant is allocated at £20 per head of residential population in line with wider support to areas, subject to Local Covid Alert Level ‘Very High’ restrictions, including Contain Outbreak Management Funds.

Overall, there is a strong positive correlation between business count and population. As a result, we see a fairly equal distribution of Additional Restrictions Grant value per business under the proposed allocation method.

The Additional Restrictions Grant is one of several grant funds being made available to local authorities to support businesses that are either being asked to close or have had their trade affected as restrictions are put in place to tackle Covid-19 and save lives. All businesses required to close will receive grants of up to £3,000 per four-week period.

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 14 September 2020 to Question 87582 on Travel Agents: Coronavirus, what support his Department is providing to travel agents whose focus is on inbound travel from (a) the US and (b) other countries.

The Government recognises the travel sector has been particularly hard hit by COVID-19, and we know quarantine measures are having an impact on inbound travel, but the measures are necessary to mitigate the risk of imported cases.

Businesses in the travel sector whose focus is on inbound travel have access to the Government extensive support package previously mentioned, including the Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme, the business interruption loan schemes, VAT deferrals and cash grants of up to £25,000 for retail, hospitality and leisure businesses.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of amending British Business Bank lending criteria to allow businesses which have accumulated losses greater than half of their share capital access to loans under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme.

Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) lending criteria relating to accumulated losses are driven by State Aid rules. The Government continues to hold a regular dialogue with the British Business Bank and CBILS lenders to monitor its implementation.

We continue to receive feedback on all our support for businesses and will seek to identify any areas for improvement.

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that infrastructure projects support the Government’s commitment to bring greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050.

The Government is committed to reduce UK greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050. Reaching this target will end the UK’s contribution to global warming.

Our decisions on infrastructure will help us to deliver net zero. At the Spring Budget we announced an ambitious support package worth over £2bn for low carbon infrastructure, including £800m fund for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and £1bn in support for ultra-low emission vehicles. In addition, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister recently announced plans for 4,000 new zero-emission buses and a new plan for cycleways as part of upgrades to transport infrastructure.

The replacement of traditional gas and electricity meters with smart meters is a vital national infrastructure upgrade that will enable a more flexible energy system, without which modelling for the Committee on Climate Change estimates the costs of delivering net zero emissions by 2050 could be up to £16 billion higher each year. We have been working with industry to re-mobilise smart meter installations after the disruption caused by COVID-19, and last month confirmed a new four-year policy framework which will take effect from 2021 to drive a market-wide rollout of smart meters across Great Britain.

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he is taking steps to maximise human wellbeing and minimise environmental harms under a sustainable programme of economic recovery from the covid-19 outbreak.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has undertaken an intensive programme of engagement to inform the Government's approach to economic recovery from the COVID-19 outbreak. One of the five key themes guiding this process is that of creating a 'green recovery'. In his speech of June 30, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister made clear that in recovering from COVID-19, we must build back greener. The UK has shown that growing our economy and cutting emissions can be achieved at the same time. Last week, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a package of over £3 billion to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from buildings, which will support up to 140,000 green jobs. This includes £50m to demonstrate innovative approaches to retrofitting social housing at scale, to start the decarbonisation of social housing over 20/21; a £2 billion ‘Green Homes Grant’ to help people improve the efficiency of their homes accelerating progress towards net zero, while supporting jobs and reducing energy bills; and, £1 billion investment over the next year in a new Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme to upgrade public sector buildings, including schools and hospitals, making them fit to help meet net zero with energy efficiency and low carbon heat measures. This comes as part of our commitment to ensuring that the UK's economic recovery is sustainable, placing human well-being centre stage by promoting a safe, clean and healthy environment for citizens to live and work in.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the guidance published by his Department in respect of offices and contact centres, entitled Working safely during coronavirus, whether he has plans to amend that guidance to encourage staff to return to work in the event that occupiers have undertaken risk assessments and developed safe working environments and practices in line with that guidance.

We will keep the guidance under review and will consider updating it as circumstances change. We are being led by the science and we will make changes to the guidance when they are needed and as we learn best practices from businesses.

We know that every organisation is different. Employers can use the guidance to create specific plans for their business in consultation with those who are affected by their operations, including workers and contractors. Return to work plans will depend on the nature of each business, such as the sector, and the details of the workforce and operations.

1st Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to widen access to culture and heritage.

The Government is committed to ensuring as many people as possible can access our world-class museums, galleries and heritage sites, regardless of their background or where they live. Our Arm’s-Length Bodies deliver much of this good work.

For example, following a request from HM Government to ensure that the taxpayer subsidy it allocates is more equitably spread around the country, Arts Council England will be investing £446 million each year in 2023-2026 to support 990 organisations across the whole of England. This is more than ever before, and in more places than ever before.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent progress her Department has made on the consultation on the introduction of a Tourist Accommodation Registration Scheme in England.

Prior to Covid-19, we had been planning to explore the merits and feasibility of introducing a Tourist Accomodation Registration Scheme.

The Government intends to publish a call for evidence on matters associated with short term holiday lettings in early 2022.

This will assist in developing proportionate, evidence-based policy options for a subsequent consultation.

The Government is committed to hearing the views of all interested parties as part of this call for evidence.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 15 December 2020 to Question 128274, what support allocated to the cinema sector remains unallocated as at 25 January 2021; and how his Department plans to distribute the remaining funding.

The government recognises the significant cultural and economic value of cinemas, and has supported them through both sector-specific and economy-wide measures during the COVID-19 crisis.

In the first round of the £1.57bn Culture Recovery Fund, more than 200 independent cinemas have so far received funding. As of 25 January 2021, £16.6m has been awarded from the Culture Recovery Fund for Independent Cinemas, managed by the British Film Institute on behalf of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. This is from the £30m pot allocated as part of the Fund’s first round.

We have agreed a thorough and robust assessment process for the Fund and are confident in the process established to support the sector. The BFI are continuing to process and assess a small number of outstanding applications, so we cannot confirm the final round one award total at this stage.

Further to this funding, we announced in December that cinemas will be able to apply to a pot of up to £14 million in grants as part of the second round of the Culture Recovery Fund in 2021. This will support cinemas as they transition back to a viable and sustainable operating model from April to June 2021.

In addition to the Culture Recovery Fund, cinemas have also benefited from economy-wide measures including the VAT cut on tickets and concessions, a business rates holiday, access to Bounce Back Loans, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and Local Restrictions Support Grants.

10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much of the £1.57 billion Cultural Recovery Fund has yet to be allocated; to what programmes and projects funding has already been allocated; and when he plans to announce the mechanism for allocating the remaining funding.

As of 11 December, £1 billion worth of funding from the Culture Recovery Fund has been allocated across all four nations of the UK. That includes:

  • Direct support to national institutions and the Devolved Administrations, who have received £188 million through the Barnett formula;

  • Over £500million in recovery grants to almost 3000 arts and heritage organisations in England;

  • Over £100million in capital grants;

  • And over £160million in generous repayable finance to some of our most iconic national institutions

Some capital awards and independent cinema recovery grant awards are still to be allocated - this will happen over the coming weeks.

Additionally, a second round of funding was announced on 11 December, which utilises the remaining Culture Recovery Fund funding. There will be over £300m available in grants delivered by DCMS’ delivery partners, and £100m of repayable finance delivered by Arts Council England specifically.

Further information on this will be available shortly.

16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the (a) effectiveness and (b) equity of the distribution of the grants awarded under the Culture Recovery Fund; and if he will make a statement.

The Culture Recovery Fund has so far awarded grants to over 2000 cultural organisations, both big and small, with more funding to be awarded in the coming weeks.

This is public money, so rigorous criteria have rightly been applied to ensure we are supporting organisations that have national and local importance, and those that play a key role in the levelling up agenda. Criteria included applicants being able to show that they have a sustainable, viable plan and that this funding would help them to continue trading. The Arm’s Length Bodies delivering the funding (Arts Council England, British Film Institute, National Lottery Heritage Fund, Historic England) are confident they have applied them in all decision making.

In addition, the independent Culture Recovery Board, chaired by Sir Damon Buffini, was created to increase assurance over the delivery of the Culture Recovery Fund programme, and to bring a range of external expertise across culture, heritage, creative industries and museums sectors to support decision making. The board members' role is to offer regional, sectoral and commercial expertise and to bring rigour to decision-making.


The split of organisations who have already been allocated funding demonstrates a balanced picture across regions. The last round of funding was announced on 7 November and allocated over £33 million to 170 arts and heritage organisations, of which 70% was allocated outside London.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department plans to support and ratify the Beijing Treaty on Audio-Visual Performances to extend the economic and moral rights of actors and performers in audio-visual performances including films, videos and television programmes.

The UK fully supports the Beijing Treaty on Audio-Visual Performances (BTAP) and signed it on 11 June 2013. The UK has now left the EU, and the Government will consider when and how to ratify and implement BTAP as part of its future policy agenda. Any future changes to UK legislation in this area will need to be subject to public consultation and impact assessment.

11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if his Department will publish guidance on the safe re-opening of dance studios; and whether those studios will be allowed to reopen before the end of June 2020.

The ambition is to reopen the arts sector as part of Step 3 of the government’s roadmap, no earlier than the 4th July, subject to the scientific and medical advice at the time.

In order to ensure appropriate support and guidance is given to the cultural sector, DCMS has established the Cultural Renewal Taskforce and the Entertainment and Events working group which include extensive membership from artists and performers. These groups specifically include representatives for the dance sector, such as One Dance UK. Full details of the Taskforce can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/news/culture-secretary-announces-cultural-renewal-taskforce, and the Entertainment and Events Working Group can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/cultural-renewal-taskforce-and-supporting-working-groups#entertainment-and-events-members.

DCMS officials and ministers have also held regular calls with representatives from across the arts and cultural sector and these have included a number of dance organisations and representatives including Sadler’s Wells and Northern Ballet.

The Taskforce and Working Groups will be focusing on ensuring that COVID-19 secure guidelines are developed in line with the phasing ambitions and public health directions, building on the existing guidance and providing intelligence and sector-specific expert input.

15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what support his Department is providing to the commercial theatre sector during the covid-19 outbreak.

In order to support the sustainability of the Arts sector, including commercial theatre, DCMS has worked closely with Arts Council England (ACE) to provide a tailored package of financial support. In March, ACE announced a £160m emergency response package to complement the financial measures already announced by the Government and to ensure immediate resilience of this vital sector.

£90 million is being made available to National Portfolio Organisations (NPOs) and Creative People and Places (CPPs) lead organisations. £50 million is being made available to organisations that are not in receipt of regular funding from the Arts Council in order to maintain their survival through this crisis. Finally £20 million of financial support is being made available to individuals, so they can better sustain themselves, and their work, in the coming months. DCMS and ACE are continuing to work closely to consider the additional measures that are needed to ensure the long-term recovery and growth of the cultural sector.

The Secretary of State, myself and officials continue to consult the Arts sector extensively to ensure we fully understand the financial impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on the sector. DCMS is engaging with other departments to support the economic response, by ensuring that the needs of its sectors, and those who work in them, are understood. DCMS will continue to work with this valuable sector to understand the difficulties it faces and help it access support through these challenging times and through recovery.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of universities that are continuing to run classes remotely, rather than returning to in-person learning.

We expect all universities to continue to deliver excellent learning, in line with guidance from the Office for Students (OfS), to provide students with a full experience. The OfS, as regulator of Higher Education in England, will be monitoring to ensure this is the case, and universities should be open about what students can expect.

As autonomous institutions, it is for HE providers to determine their own provision, taking account of government guidance. However, as we have now lifted restrictions on HE, providers should not be limiting access to face-to-face teaching based on COVID-19 controls.

Online learning should only be offered to enhance the student experience, not detract from it, by making learning more accessible for students, including those who cannot yet attend face-to-face lectures. It should not be used as a cost cutting measure.

Any policies and terms, or changes to existing policies and terms, must be clearly communicated to students. If students have concerns, they should first raise them with their HE provider. If their concerns remain unresolved, students at HE providers in England or Wales can ask the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education to consider their complaint.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken to encourage a higher number of universities to adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance's working definition of antisemitism.

This government abhors antisemitism and has been clear that we expect universities to be at the forefront of tackling the challenge of antisemitism, making sure that higher education is a genuinely fulfilling and welcoming experience for everyone.

The government has asked all English higher education providers registered with the Office for Students (OfS) to adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) working definition of antisemitism. The IHRA definition is an important tool in tackling antisemitism. Adopting this widely recognised definition sends a strong signal that higher education providers take these issues seriously. My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, wrote to higher education leaders most recently in October 2020 to reiterate the importance of the definition and to urge all providers to consider adopting it.

The government is pleased to report that at least 91 providers have now adopted the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of antisemitism, with many more preparing to adopt. The decision on adoption of the definition rests with individual providers, but the government will continue to urge them to adopt the definition, and ensure that higher education is a genuinely fulfilling and welcoming experience for everyone.

I am proud that so many providers have taken a positive step towards eradicating antisemitism by adopting the IHRA definition, but further progress is still needed to stamp it out. This is why, in the Secretary of State’s most recent strategic guidance letter to the OfS, the government asked the OfS to undertake a scoping exercise, to identify providers which are reluctant to adopt the definition. The letter asked them to consider introducing mandatory reporting of antisemitic incident numbers by providers, with the aim of ensuring a robust evidence base, which the OfS can then use to effectively regulate in this area.

The Secretary of State also asked the OfS to ensure that, if antisemitic incidents do occur at a provider, they should consider if it is relevant in a particular case whether the provider has adopted the IHRA definition when considering what sanctions, including monetary penalties, would be appropriate to apply.

We will continue to work across government to ensure that racism and religious hatred of any kind is not tolerated anywhere, including in our world-leading universities.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the number of universities that have adopted the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance's working definition of antisemitism.

This government abhors antisemitism and has been clear that we expect universities to be at the forefront of tackling the challenge of antisemitism, making sure that higher education is a genuinely fulfilling and welcoming experience for everyone.

The government has asked all English higher education providers registered with the Office for Students (OfS) to adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) working definition of antisemitism. The IHRA definition is an important tool in tackling antisemitism. Adopting this widely recognised definition sends a strong signal that higher education providers take these issues seriously. My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, wrote to higher education leaders most recently in October 2020 to reiterate the importance of the definition and to urge all providers to consider adopting it.

The government is pleased to report that at least 91 providers have now adopted the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of antisemitism, with many more preparing to adopt. The decision on adoption of the definition rests with individual providers, but the government will continue to urge them to adopt the definition, and ensure that higher education is a genuinely fulfilling and welcoming experience for everyone.

I am proud that so many providers have taken a positive step towards eradicating antisemitism by adopting the IHRA definition, but further progress is still needed to stamp it out. This is why, in the Secretary of State’s most recent strategic guidance letter to the OfS, the government asked the OfS to undertake a scoping exercise, to identify providers which are reluctant to adopt the definition. The letter asked them to consider introducing mandatory reporting of antisemitic incident numbers by providers, with the aim of ensuring a robust evidence base, which the OfS can then use to effectively regulate in this area.

The Secretary of State also asked the OfS to ensure that, if antisemitic incidents do occur at a provider, they should consider if it is relevant in a particular case whether the provider has adopted the IHRA definition when considering what sanctions, including monetary penalties, would be appropriate to apply.

We will continue to work across government to ensure that racism and religious hatred of any kind is not tolerated anywhere, including in our world-leading universities.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will (a) provide access to counselling for all children in secondary schools and (b) extend access to counselling in further education colleges.

It is important for schools and colleges to have the freedom to decide what support to offer pupils based on their particular needs and drawing on an evidence base of effective practice. Our survey of mental health provision in schools and colleges in 2016 and 2017 found that 61% of schools and colleges (56% of primary schools, 84% of secondary schools and 93% of colleges) reported offering a counselling service for their pupils.

The department have published guidance on how to put in place effective school-based counselling, which schools can use to identify where further counselling support is appropriate for their pupils. The guidance is available at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/counselling-in-schools.

As children and young people return to school and college, staff need to be equipped to understand that some pupils may be experiencing feelings, such as anxiety, stress or low mood, as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, that these are normal responses to an abnormal situation, and how to respond.

From September, the government is investing £8 million to launch the new Wellbeing for Education Return training programme, which will provide schools and colleges all over England with the knowledge and practical skills they need to support teachers, students and parents, to help improve how they respond to the emotional impact of the COIVD-19 outbreak. The programme is providing £8 million to local authorities to enable schools and colleges in England to have access to training during the autumn and spring terms, and expert advisers who will be able to support schools and colleges and can make links to available local authority provision, including counselling.

We have worked hard to ensure that all pupils and learners were able to return to a full
high-quality education programme in September. Our £1 billion COVID-19 catch-up package, with £650 million shared across schools over the 2020-21 academic year, is supporting education settings to put the right catch-up and pastoral support in place.

In further education, the department has provided £5.4 million of competitive grant funding to certain colleges through the College Collaboration Fund. Five of the projects funded support student and staff mental health and wellbeing through online programmes and remote support.

Outside of school and college, access to mental health support has been more important than ever during the COVID-19 outbreak. Leading mental health charities are being supported to deliver additional services through the £5 million Coronavirus Mental Health Response Fund. During Mental Health Awareness Week, the government also announced that a further
£4.2 million will be awarded to mental health charities, including the Samaritans, Young Minds, and Bipolar UK.

All NHS mental health trusts have ensured that there are 24/7 open access telephone lines to support people of all ages. Public Health England and Health Education England have also developed advice and guidance for parents and professionals on supporting children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing, which is available at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-on-supporting-children-and-young-peoples-mental-health-and-wellbeing.

In the long-term, we remain committed to our joint green paper delivery programme with the Department of Health and Social Care and the NHS England. This includes introducing new mental health support teams linked to schools and colleges, providing training for senior mental health leads in schools and colleges, and testing approaches to faster access to NHS specialist support.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to help support home schooled pupils who were due sit exams in summer 2020 in the event that those pupils are unable to provide a sufficient level of evidence for exam centres to allocate assessment grades and rankings for those pupils unable to sit those exams as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

Not all external candidates will be able to be awarded a calculated grade this summer because some will not have been in a position to provide sufficient evidence to enable their exam centre to include them in their centre assessment grades and rankings. The Department has therefore announced that there will be an opportunity for these and other students to sit exams in the autumn. Following Ofqual’s consultation on this autumn series, it has been confirmed that students will be able to sit exams in all subjects at A, AS level and GCSE.

Ofqual has also asked university and college representatives associations to consider the steps that universities and colleges could take when making admissions decisions this summer for any external candidates who do not receive a grade. They have said that they believe institutions will consider a range of other evidence and information for these students to allow them to progress wherever possible.

13th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to promote community cohesion in (a) local authority schools, (b) free schools and (c) academies; and if he will make a statement.

Schools are at the heart of our communities and they have a crucial role to play in promoting integration and bringing families from all walks of life together. All schools must promote community cohesion; and are required to actively promote our shared values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance for those of different faiths and beliefs. These values are an important part in ensuring our children and young people understand how, as citizens, they can play a positive role in shaping cohesive and integrated communities; and providing them with the skills, and knowledge that will prepare them for life in a modern, diverse Britain.

Promotion of these values is part of Ofsted’s inspection framework, and the Department has published guidance to schools on promoting these important values as part of pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. In 2016, the Department also launched the Educate Against Hate website, through which we continue to provide free resources for teachers and school leaders to support their promotion of these values. This includes the Department’s Respectful School Communities toolkit; a self-review and signposting tool to support schools to develop a whole- school approach which promotes respect and discipline, helping to combat bullying, harassment and prejudice of any kind.

The Department is also introducing compulsory relationships education for all primary aged pupils, relationships and sex education for all secondary aged pupils, and health education for all pupils in state funded schools from September 2020. These subjects are designed to give pupils the knowledge they need to lead happy, safe and healthy lives and to foster respect for other people and for difference.

As part of our commitments in the Government’s Integrated Communities Action Plan, the Department has also funded an expanded national school linking programme, which seeks to encourage meaningful social mixing between different types of schools, and foster understanding of those with different backgrounds, faiths and beliefs. In the last year, The Linking Network has worked with over 540 schools, leading to over 22,500 pupils taking part in activities to support integration and community cohesion.

As part of this same package, the Department has also strengthened expectations for all new free schools on the promotion of community cohesion and integration, to make sure they are doing all that they can to ensure children and young people are able to participate fully in life in modern Britain. To support this, the Department has introduced updated application criteria, and as part of our assessment process are considering the potential impact on integration and community cohesion, including the intake of neighbouring schools, before approving a new school.

26th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of supporting further investment in the development of sustainable alternatives to neonicotinoids, in order to avoid their use in emergency authorisations in circumstances where diseases or pests cannot be controlled by other reasonable means.

Three neonicotinoids including the one covered by the sugar beet emergency authorisation, were banned by the EU in 2018, a decision the Government supported and so we have already moved decisively away from their use. British sugar is already developing alternative approaches to neonicotinoid seed treatments. It has stated that it may make applications for emergency authorisations for neonicotinoid seed treatments until 2023, by which time it intends to have developed alternative approaches. This includes the development of resistant plant varieties, measures to improve seed germination and new practices for growers.

Defra investment is not focused on the development of sustainable alternatives to specific pesticides such as neonicotinoids. The department has funded important research into other areas that will ensure pesticides can be used sustainably in the future.

We have funded research into the exposure of honeybees to pesticides, both over time and at national scale, through chemical analysis of pesticide residues found in honey samples. Using genetic techniques, such as DNA metabarcoding, this research can assess the plants foraged by exposed bees and highlight common pesticide exposure routes for this key pollinator species. We expect the results of this work to be published in the coming months.

We are also funding research exploring how we could further develop our monitoring to better understand the effects, and the impacts, of pesticides on pollinators, such as expanding residue assessments to include wild pollinator species of bumblebees and solitary bees.

Finally, in 2019 Defra commissioned the report 'Review of Evidence on Integrated Pest Management', which was published in 2020. This report assessed several themes including the effectiveness of IPM measures for reducing pesticide use, what combinations of IPM measures are most beneficial, and barriers and enablers to the uptake of IPM approaches. Research such as this will help Defra to meet its commitment to increase the uptake of Integrated Pest Management and sustainable crop protection, and therefore reduce any future reliance of emergency authorisation applications for neonicotinoids.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what long term estimates his Department has made of the level of risk of flooding in the proposed Holocaust Memorial and Learning Centre site in Victoria Tower Gardens from a potential (a) breach of river wall or (b) overtopping of the river wall if water levels were to rise as a result of global warming.

a) The Flood Risk Assessment required under paragraph 163 of the National Planning Framework, together with other associated assessments submitted by the applicant, has satisfactorily demonstrated that the integrity of the flood defence can be maintained throughout construction. This is subject to the actions of a detailed monitoring plan outlined within the application.

b) The applicant has demonstrated, through design and loading calculations, that the proposal will not preclude the requirement to raise the flood defences in the future as required by the Thames Estuary 2100 Plan.

It should be noted that while it may be impacted by this proposal, the flood defence is outside of the application boundary and will require cooperation between the applicant and the riparian owner to ensure that a continuous defence is maintained at all times.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department has taken to (a) coordinate with the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government to ensure the latter Department duly considers the risk of flooding to the proposed Holocaust Memorial and Learning Centre site in Victoria Tower Gardens in its planning consultation process, and (b) ensure that sufficient measures are taken to protect buildings in Thames Flood Zone 3 from an excessive risk of damages from potential flooding.

a) The Environment Agency is a statutory consultee as outlined in the Development Management Procedure Order (DMPO) 2015. The Environment Agency formulates its response based on evidence and the requirements set out in the National Planning Policy Framework and associated Planning Practice Guidance (Flood Risk and Costal Change). This was created by the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government.

b) Within the Thames Estuary, a complex network of defences, including nine major barriers, around 330km of walls and embankments, and more than 900 other structures (such as flood gates, outfalls and pumps), work together to protect over 1.4 million people and £321 billion worth of property from tidal flooding.

The current tidal flood defences protect to a one in 1000 year flood event. To meet the challenge of climate change and sea level rises, the Thames Estuary 2100 plan details the requirements to raise flood defences in order to protect homes and businesses.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what long term risk assessment his Department has made of the (a) likelihood and (b) severity of possible flooding scenarios of the proposed Holocaust Memorial and Learning Centre site in Victoria Tower Gardens over the next 100 year period.

a) Victoria Tower Gardens, the location of the proposed Holocaust Memorial, is located within Flood Zone 3 but is protected by the Thames Tidal flood defences up to a 1 in 1000 (0.1%) chance in any year flood event. However, the Environment Agency’s most recent breach hazard modelling study shows the site to be impacted by flooding if there was to be a breach in the defences or they were to be overtopped.

The applicant has satisfactorily demonstrated that the structural integrity of the wall can be maintained throughout the construction phase of the development and that a continuous monitoring plan will be in place to identify any unacceptable movement within the wall together with contingency actions. The Environment Agency has requested that the requirements of the monitoring plan be secured by way of planning condition.

b) The Environment Agency’s modelling highlights that a breach in the tidal flood defences, while a low probability, could have an impact due to the depth and velocity of the flood water, increasing risk to life. The applicant, in discussion with the Local Authority’s Local Emergency Planning team, should asses the risks of internal flooding, access and exits of the building as part of a Flood Emergency Plan.

The Environment Agency does not assess or approve the adequacy of flood emergency response procedures accompanying development proposals as it does not carry out these roles during a flood.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the operational effect on port health authorities of the new rules and guidance on inspections of animal and animal product imports from the EU following the end of the transition period; and what consequential support his Department has provided to those authorities.

SPS controls on animals and animal products imported into GB from the EU are being introduced in stages. From April, Port Health Authorities (PHA) will be required to carry out remote documentary checks on POAO, with physical and identity checks on animal products being carried out at BCPs from 1 July 2021.

Defra has provided £14 million funding to 21 local authorities in England to support PHAs with the recruitment and training of over 500 new staff. Defra continues to work closely with PHAs to develop the necessary training and guidance needed to deliver SPS controls on the import of animal products, and has a dedicated team in place to provide tailored support.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what support her Department plans to provide to UK-based international charities during the covid-19 outbreak.

DFID is engaging with civil society partners to understand the delivery and operational challenges they face as a result of COVID-19. We will work collaboratively with civil society partners in receipt of DFID funding to find pragmatic solutions to support both our partners and continuation of our programmes where appropriate.

The COVID-19 response will continue to develop rapidly, and we are assessing and monitoring the overall financial health of supply partners to identify organisations we believe are at risk due to COVID-19.

We will deliver a comprehensive COVID-19 response through programming to support the global health and economic response, funding for further vaccine development, preparing for the recovery phase and leadership within the international community.

20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if her Department will take steps to reduce bureaucratic requirements for UK-based international charities during the covid-19 outbreak.

DFID’s approach, in line with the government’s overall approach, is to work collaboratively with partners, including UK based international charities, to find flexible solutions that maintain delivery of essential programmes as far as possible. This applies across grants and contracts, and we are working hard to develop more comprehensive guidance for our partners in these areas.

DFID Smart Rules and programme delivery processes are kept under constant review to ensure that they are appropriate, both for partners and in meeting our responsibilities for spending public money.

20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether her Department plans to promote an inclusive humanitarian response to COVID-19 to meet deliverable 5 of her Department's Strategy for Disability Inclusive Development 2018-23, published in December 2018.

The UK is playing a leading role in the global response to COVID-19. The UK has, so far, pledged £744 million of UK aid to help end this pandemic as quickly as possible. In addition, we are urgently redirecting existing support and programmes to be more responsive to COVID-19.

The UK continues to work with international partners, including the United Nations and its agencies, to ensure aid reaches those most in need. We are providing expert advice to governments and international partners to act quickly to assess how and where social protection or humanitarian cash systems could be best used to support an efficient, coordinated response. We are prioritising inclusion across this support and ensuring that the needs of the most vulnerable, including people with disabilities, are central to our discussions with partners and governments.

Through DFID’s co-chairing role for the Global Action on Disability (GLAD) donor Network, DFID is pushing for a coordinated response to COVID-19 by GLAD members, comprising of bilateral and multilateral donors, foundations and the private sector.

29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what his Department’s policy objectives are on preventing sexual violence in conflict.

Preventing and responding to all forms of violence against women and girls (VAWG), including conflict-related sexual violence, is a priority for DFID. The FCO leads HMG’s work on this important agenda through the Prevention of Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative (PSVI). DFID contributes towards PSVI’s objectives through investing in evidence revealing both the scale of the problem and effective interventions to prevent it. This has shown that violence is preventable.

In communities in the DRC, a project with faith leaders and community action groups resulted in domestic violence halving from 70% to 30% in less than three years, while conflict-related sexual violence reduced from 21% to just 4%. We are sharing this evidence across Government and with international partners to encourage increased investment globally in effective approaches to tackle sexual violence.

In November 2019, the Secretary of State announced a new £67.5 million programme to scale up interventions to prevent VAWG across development and humanitarian contexts, and to continue expanding the evidence base as a global public good.

The UK is also a leading member of the Call to Action on Protection from Gender-based Violence in Emergencies – a global initiative working to drive system change to protect women and girls in emergency situations.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of extending the international exhibitor funding scheme to domestic events as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Tradeshow Access Programme (TAP) is designed to assist UK companies in learning about overseas tradeshows and how they can be used to help a business’s export development plans.

The Department for International Trade is currently reviewing TAP and looking at a number of possible changes to the support it will offer in the future.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of a trade agreement with the US on the environmental sustainability of UK agriculture.

The Government’s negotiating objectives, published 2nd March, included an impact assessment on the environmental implications of a UK-US Free Trade Agreement (FTA.) We are clear that we will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards.

Recently, the Department for International Trade (DIT) and the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) launched the Trade and Agriculture Commission, an advisory group that will provide recommendations to the government. The Commission will help further ensure that the UK’s trade policy fully considers our agricultural industry, including our commitment to maintain our high standards.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking with Transport for London to help ensure the safe operation of pedicabs in London.

The Government is introducing the Pedicabs (London) Bill which will give Transport for London powers to regulate London’s pedicab industry. This Bill, which corrects a longstanding legal anomaly in London, will ensure that passengers, pedestrians and other road users can go about their daily business in the Capital safe in the knowledge that these vehicles and their operators are properly licensed and fully regulated.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, in reference to the rising use of electrical vehicles on roads, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of increasing the use of (a) rumble strips and (b) other methods to make pedestrians aware of areas where pavements intersect roads.

Local highway authorities have a duty under Section 41 of the Highways Act 1980 to maintain the highways network in their area. It is for each highway authority to decide on the most suitable materials to be used for surfacing, as well as the standards that should be applied, based upon their local knowledge and circumstances. The Department for Transport’s guidance on rumble strips is set out in section 5 of our Local Transport Note (LTN) 1/07 ‘Traffic Calming’, the LTN is available at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-transport-notes.

24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment the Government has made of the potential merits of exempting parents who are separated and whose children live abroad from international travel quarantine restrictions, to allow such working parents to visit their children without the need to take a considerable amount of annual leave.

International travel is now governed by a new traffic light system. Health measures at the border, after arrival, will vary depending on whether travelling from a green, amber or red country. The decision to implement additional border measures is in direct response to scientific and medical data, which represents an increased risk to UK public health and an increased risk of community transmission of COVID-19 variants of concern identified in those countries. There are a range of border measures in place to protect the UK from the importation of coronavirus and variants of concern (VoCs). These are intended to be temporary measures and the government keeps data for countries and territories under constant review.

We have made enormous progress this year in tackling the pandemic across Britain. That progress has been hard won and it is important that we don't risk undermining it now. International travel is vital. It connects families who have been kept apart, boosts businesses and underpins the UK economy. It is absolutely essential that any steps we take now, lay the groundwork for a sustainable return to travel, as the situation improves globally.

The government has however put in place measures to reduce the impact of border measures on families. For arrivals who have not been in a red-list country in the previous 10 days children are required to self-isolate, however they can do so in the family home and may also move between family homes during that period of isolation. For managed quarantine facilities, family groups will be able to quarantine together as long as the hotel is able to accommodate them. This includes couples and parents with children.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the implications for its policies of the proposal by the online travel agent TravelUp to ringfence civil aviation fares until departure to prevent customers having to wait long periods of time to be reimbursed for cancelled trips.

The Department has been clear that airlines and travel agents should not deny consumers their legal right to a refund, if it is requested and this should be done in a timely manner. The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) undertook a review of the refund policies of all UK airlines, as well as a number of international airlines that operate flights to and from the UK. The CAA has utilised this review to influence airlines to change their processes and practices in order to improve performance in providing refunds. The CAA’s actions have led to an improved quality of service and performance from most airlines. The CAA continues to work with carriers to drive down waiting times, but balancing the support businesses need during this unprecedented situation.

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted a number of challenges. The department is keen to work with the regulator, industry and consumer groups to learn lessons from pandemic, to make changes that are practicable and deliverable.

15th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to his Departments response to the consultation entitled Child Maintenance: modernising and improving our service, published 18 June 2021, when he plans to implement the changes to secondary legislation set out in that response.

In May 2022 the government made changes to the Child Support Information Regulations 2008 to expand information regulations to include private pension providers, academy proprietors, the Motor Insurers’ Bureau and all types of companies that offer, promote or sell investment management services or facilitate share trading. The government also updated all the Child Maintenance regulations that deal with communications, to enable the Secretary of State to serve notice or notifications to customers and third parties, such as employers, in writing by post or by electronic means.

We are planning to make changes in secondary legislation as parliamentary time allows, to bring into force changes to:

  • Automatically take into account unearned income in the child maintenance calculation
  • Extinguish low level debt and maintenance not collected when an employer becomes insolvent
Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has made an assessment of (a) the effect of the local housing allowance cap on the affordability of rented accommodation in Central London and (b) the potential merits of further increasing that cap to allow a higher proportion of tenants to afford rented accommodation in Central London.

Local Housing Allowance (LHA) rates determine the maximum amount of housing benefit or universal credit housing costs available for renters in the private rented sector. LHA rates were increased in April 2020 to the 30th percentile of local market rents costing almost £1 billion and providing 1.5 million claimants with around £600 more housing support per year than they would otherwise have received.

At the same time, we increased the national maximum caps, ensuring all rates including those in central and inner London received an increase. This year the monthly Central London rates were increased by:

Central London Increase in LHA monthly rate April 2020

Room

1 Bed

2 Bed

3 Bed

4 Bed

£40.63

£82.47

£196.32

£286.01

£657.57

In 2021/22 all LHA rates will be maintained at their increased level, meaning claimants renting in the private rented sector will continue to benefit from the significant increase in the rates applied this year.

3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she plans to make permanent the offer of phone or paper assessments for benefits currently in place during covid-19 outbreak.

Paper based reviews have always been a feature of Personal Independence Payment assessments and Work Capability Assessments and wherever possible Assessment Providers will conduct a paper-based review. Telephone-based assessments for suitable cases are a temporary measure replacing face-to-face assessments, which were suspended across all health and disability benefits from 17 March due to Covid-19. We are currently in the process of reviewing this measure in light of the latest public health advice and will confirm next steps as soon as possible.

19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether she has had discussions with the NHS on the potential merits of providing access to licensed gene therapies manufactured in the UK free of charge on the NHS.

We have had no such discussions with NHS England. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) makes recommendations on whether all new medicines, including gene therapies, should be routinely funded by the National Health Service based on an assessment of their costs and benefits. The NHS is legally required to make funding available for NICE recommended treatments, usually within three months of the publication of final guidance. NICE has been able to recommend several gene therapies for use on the NHS, often subject to commercial agreements proposed through the NICE appraisal process, that are now available for the treatment of eligible patients.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average cost was for a (a) new hospital, (b) hospital upgrade, (c) MRI machine, (d) CT scanner and (e) GP appointment in the latest period for which data is available.

The following table shows information relating to the average costs of a new hospital, hospital upgrade, Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine, computerised tomography (CT) scan and a general practitioner (GP) appointment.

Average cost

New hospital

It is not possible to define an average cost of a new hospital, as the cost is dependent on significant variables relating to the type of hospital (and therefore complexity of plant, ventilation systems, etc.), size and its associated physical conditions.

Hospital upgrade

The average cost of a scheme in the National Health Service upgrades programme is around £20 million, with significant variation across schemes on cost and type of upgrade.

MRI machine

There are different specifications of machine and therefore a range of prices, but current purchase costs before the cost of fitting is approximately £1 million.

CT scanner

There are different specifications of machine and therefore a range of prices, but current purchase costs before the cost of fitting is approximately £800,000.

GP appointment

Data not held.

22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to allow vaccines administered in France to be recorded in the UK National Immunisation Management System to allow people vaccinated abroad to access an NHS Covid Pass.

Vaccines administered in France can already be recorded in vaccination records and displayed in the NHS COVID Pass. English residents vaccinated in France should contact their general practitioner or 119 to book an appointment at a regional vaccination centre to record their vaccinations through the National Immunisation Management Service. There are currently seven sites capable of reviewing vaccination evidence with an additional 13 pending. Further expansion of the service is planned in due course.

22nd Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to (a) reduce inequalities in healthcare and (b) prevent the avoidable death of Asian and Asian British babies.

The NHS Long Term Plan (2019) sets out a systematic approach to reducing health inequalities and addressing unwarranted variation in care by targeting a higher share of funding towards geographies with high health inequalities than would have been allocated using solely the core needs formulae. As a condition of receiving Long Term Plan funding, all major national programmes and every local area across England is required to set out specific measurable goals and mechanisms by which they will contribute to narrowing health inequalities by 2029.

On 1 October, we launched the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities. Reducing health disparities is one of the core aims of the office and it will set out its plans for delivering on this objective in due course

To improve equity for mothers and babies from Black, Asian and Mixed ethnic groups, NHS England and NHS Improvement published ‘Equity and Equality: Guidance for Local Maternity Systems’ on 6 September, which can be found at the following link: https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/equity-and-equality-guidance-for-local-maternity-systems/

This guidance asks Local Maternity Systems (LMS) to produce an equity and equality analysis (covering health outcomes, community assets and staff experience) by 30 November 2021; and to co-produce an action plan to improve equity for mothers and babies from minority ethnic and other backgrounds, and race equality for NHS maternity staff by 28 February 2022. The guidance is supported by a £6.8 million investment.

LMS are being asked to include four interventions to prevent avoidable deaths of babies in their action plans: (1) targeted and enhanced continuity of carer with 75% of women from Black, Asian and Mixed ethic groups receiving continuity of carer by 2024 and additional midwifery time to support women from the most deprived areas, (2) smoke-free pregnancy pathways for mothers and their partners, (3) breastfeeding strategies to improve breastfeeding rates for women living in the most deprived areas, and (4) culturally-sensitive genetics services for consanguineous couples. The guidance is supported by a £6.8 million investment, which will support Local Maternity Systems to implement Equity and Equality Action Plans and implement targeted and enhanced Continuity of Carer.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)