James Murray Portrait

James Murray

Labour (Co-op) - Ealing North

Shadow Financial Secretary (Treasury)

(since October 2020)
1 APPG membership (as of 17 Nov 2021)
Council Housing
3 Former APPG memberships
Armenia, London's Planning and Built Environment, Youth Affairs
Opposition Whip (Commons)
14th Apr 2020 - 16th Oct 2020
Health and Social Care Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020


Department Event
Monday 29th November 2021
HM Treasury
Motion - Main Chamber
Motion to approve a Ways and Means Resolution relating to the Animals (Penalty Notices) Bill
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Monday 29th November 2021
HM Treasury
Motion - Main Chamber
Motion to approve a Money Resolution relating to the Approved Premises (Substance Testing) Bill
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Wednesday 1st December 2021
14:30
HM Treasury
Sixth Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
1 Dec 2021, 2:30 p.m.
The draft Financial Services Act 2021 (Prudential Regulation of Credit Institutions and Investment Firms) (Consequential Amendments and Miscellaneous Provisions) Regulations 2021
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Tuesday 7th December 2021
11:30
HM Treasury
Oral questions - Main Chamber
7 Dec 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Treasury (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 17th November 2021
Strengthening Standards in Public Life
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 172 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 231 Noes - 282
Speeches
Thursday 25th November 2021
Draft Double Taxation Relief and International Tax Enforcement (Taiwan) Order 2021

Thank you for the opportunity to respond on behalf of the Opposition, Ms Rees, as we consider this order on …

Written Answers
Friday 29th October 2021
Digital Technology: Taxation
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the total amount of tax that will …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 1st November 2021
6. Land and property portfolio: (i) value over £100,000 and/or (ii) giving rental income of over £10,000 a year
From 8 October 2020, flat in London: (i) and, between 16 October 2020 and 15 October 2021, (ii). (Registered 13 …
EDM signed
Monday 8th November 2021
Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, James Murray has voted in 284 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All James Murray Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jesse Norman (Conservative)
(79 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(22 debate interactions)
Nigel Evans (Conservative)
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(120 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(13 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(6 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all James Murray's debates

Ealing North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Ealing North signature proportion
Petition Open
285
of 9,232 signatures (3.09%)
Petition Open
115
of 16,126 signatures (0.71%)
Petitions with most Ealing North signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

We ask Parliament to repeal the High Speed Rail Bills, 2016 and 2019, as MPs voted on misleading environmental, financial and timetable information provided by the Dept of Transport and HS2 Ltd. It fails to address the conditions of the Paris Accord and costs have risen from £56bn to over £100bn.


Latest EDMs signed by James Murray

23rd September 2021
James Murray signed this EDM on Monday 8th November 2021

Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall

Tabled by: Afzal Khan (Labour - Manchester, Gorton)
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; notes that this memorial now includes over 150,000 hand-painted hearts to symbolise all those who lost their lives during the coronavirus pandemic; praises the work of Covid-19 Bereaved Families for …
132 signatures
(Most recent: 16 Nov 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 95
Scottish National Party: 13
Liberal Democrat: 10
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Conservative: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
21st July 2020
James Murray signed this EDM on Tuesday 1st September 2020

Town and Country Planning

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that The Town and Country Planning (Permitted Development and Miscellaneous Amendments) (England) (Coronavirus) Regulations 2020 (S.I., 2020, No. 632), dated 23 June 2020, a copy of which was laid before this House on 24 June 2020, be annulled.
55 signatures
(Most recent: 28 Sep 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 43
Liberal Democrat: 9
Conservative: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
Green Party: 1
View All James Murray's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by James Murray, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


James Murray has not been granted any Urgent Questions

James Murray has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

James Murray has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

James Murray has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


105 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that the Green Homes Grant is spent effectively.

We are continually evaluating the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme against broad policy criteria (including value for money, job creation and carbon savings) and will make improvements to the scheme on an ongoing basis.

The Scheme also has robust measures in place against fraud, as well as requiring installers to be Trustmark registered and carry the appropriate (PAS/MCS) certification, ensuring work is done to a high-quality standard.

There will be an evaluation of the processes and outcomes of the Voucher Scheme. An independent research organisation, Ipsos MORI, was contracted in December 2020 to undertake the evaluation. This will run until 2023, with interim publications released prior to the final evaluation report.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of (a) fuel poor, (b) social rented and (c) private rented homes that will reach EPC Band C by (i) 2025 and (ii) 2030.

As of the most recent fuel poverty statistics, 10% of fuel poor, 56% of social rented and 33% of private rented homes are EPC Band C or above. As set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, the Government remains committed to fuel poor homes being upgraded to energy efficiency Band C by 2030, and our aspiration is that as many homes as possible are EPC Band C by 2035, where practical, cost effective and affordable.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to his Answer to Question 39781 on Construction: Coronavirus, how the Health and Safety Executive will be made aware of whether construction sites have considered introducing staggered start and finish times.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is responsible for ensuring that Public Health England (PHE) social distancing guidance is implemented on construction sites. It is not the role of the HSE to seek information about whether sites have considered staggered start times. The Site Operating Procedures recommend that the firms responsible for managing sites should consider staggering start and finish times to reduce pressure on public transport. However, this is not mandated by Government guidance.

The HSE has powers to take enforcement action if a site is not consistently implementing PHE guidance. Individuals can report problems to the HSE via an online form, or by telephone.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason (a) version 2 of the Construction Leadership Council’s guidance stated that no construction work should be carried out on site if social distancing could not be enforced and (b) that guidance was relaxed in version 3 of that publication.

The Construction Leadership Council has developed Site Operating Procedures (SOP), which align with Public Health England (PHE) guidance on social distancing. The SOP provides practical advice to those seeking to implement the guidance on construction sites.

Following consultation with the industry, Version 3 was published to better align with PHE guidance. Version 3 provides more detailed advice on safe working, based on the latest guidance and incorporating an approach based on the Health and Safety Executive Hierarchy of Controls for work planning to mitigate risks.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to enforce staggered start times for construction sites to enable social distancing for construction workers on public transport during rush hour.

The health and safety of construction workers is a priority for the Government. To help ensure that it is safe for construction workers to operate in their workplace, the Government has worked with Public Health England to develop sector-specific guidance on social distancing, and has also worked with the Construction Leadership Council to develop Site Operating Procedures (SOP) which provide practical advice to those seeking to implement the guidance.

The SOP set out that sites should consider introducing staggered start and finish times to reduce congestion and contact, and plan site access and egress points to enable social distancing. The Government has asked the Health and Safety Executive to consider enforcement action if a site is not consistently implementing the measures set out by PHE.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, under what conditions registered (a) charities and (b) societies will be able to apply for support through the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme .

Both registered charities and societies are able to apply for support through the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme so long as more than 50% of their income comes from trading.

The scheme was made live on 23rd March and all details can be found on the British Business Bank website at www.british-business-bank.co.uk/ourpartners/coronavirus-business-interruption-loan-scheme-cbils/

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department holds data on the number of disconnections as a result of unpaid bills of (a) broadband, (b) mobile phone and (c) landline services on a (i) daily, (ii) weekly, (iii) monthly and (iv) any other basis over the last two years.

Ofcom, the independent telecoms regulator, monitors and carries out research on issues faced by vulnerable consumers, including those around debt and affordability. Ofcom is currently monitoring the affordability of communications services, looking at households which have difficulty paying for these, in particular in relation to broadband. It will publish its findings in Q3 2020/21.

Ofcom’s 2018 Access and Inclusion report found that around one in ten (9%) of those responsible for paying for their household’s communication services said they had experienced difficulties paying their bills.


More broadly, as part of Government’s response to Covid-19, we have agreed a package of measures with the UK’s major fixed and mobile providers to support and protect consumers with their connectivity needs. This package was agreed on 29 March 2020, with further companies signing up on 18 May. As part of the commitments, providers have agreed to work with customers who find it difficult to pay their bill as a result of Covid-19, to ensure that they are treated fairly and appropriately supported.

18th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether (a) primary school teachers and (b) other teaching staff who have been in contact with a school bubble in which there has been a confirmed case of covid-19 and who have been asked to self-isolate but are asymptomatic are eligible for a covid-19 test.

Unless an individual has been specifically asked to do so by a clinician, it is vital that only those who have developed symptoms of COVID-19 get tested. The NHS Test and Trace system must stay focused on testing those with symptoms of COVID-19. The test is most effective for those who are experiencing symptoms.

Anyone who is self isolating as a result of being a close contact of a confirmed case but does not have symptoms should not request a test. This includes if that case was identified in school or college.

The latest clinical advice is that testing of individuals without symptoms should only be used where clinically appropriate, predominantly for outbreak investigation and infection control. This risk based approach ensures that testing is targeted where it is most effective.

All children, young people and staff have access to a test if they display symptoms of COVID-19 and should get tested in this scenario.

28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the costs to schools who wish to access free school meals vouchers from retailers not listed on the Government’s National Voucher Scheme will be reimbursed in full.

As both my right hon. Friends the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer have made clear, the government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID-19.

During this period, we are asking schools to support children who are eligible for and claiming benefits related free school meals, by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. We know that many schools are successfully delivering food parcels or arranging food collections for eligible children, and we encourage this approach where it is possible. However, we recognise that providing meals and food parcels is not a practicable option for all schools. That is why on 31 March we launched a national voucher scheme as an alternative option, with costs covered by the Department for Education.

Through the national voucher scheme, schools and families could initially access eGift cards for Morrisons, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda, Waitrose and M&S. On Monday 27 April Aldi were added to this list and on Wednesday 29 April McColl’s were also added. We recognise that it may not be convenient or possible for some families to visit one of these supermarkets and we are continuing to work to see if additional supermarkets can be added to this list.

Where none of these supermarkets are convenient for families, schools can directly purchase vouchers for alternative supermarkets and be reimbursed for the costs.

Full details are available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

These are rapidly developing circumstances; we continue to keep the situation under review and will keep Parliament updated accordingly.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what support the Government is giving to schools who wish to access free school meals vouchers from a retailer not listed on the Government’s National Voucher Scheme.

As both my right hon. Friends the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer have made clear, the government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID-19.

During this period, we are asking schools to support children who are eligible for and claiming benefits related free school meals, by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. We know that many schools are successfully delivering food parcels or arranging food collections for eligible children, and we encourage this approach where it is possible. However, we recognise that providing meals and food parcels is not a practicable option for all schools. That is why on 31 March we launched a national voucher scheme as an alternative option, with costs covered by the Department for Education.

Through the national voucher scheme, schools and families could initially access eGift cards for Morrisons, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda, Waitrose and M&S. On Monday 27 April Aldi were added to this list and on Wednesday 29 April McColl’s were also added. We recognise that it may not be convenient or possible for some families to visit one of these supermarkets and we are continuing to work to see if additional supermarkets can be added to this list.

Where none of these supermarkets are convenient for families, schools can directly purchase vouchers for alternative supermarkets and be reimbursed for the costs.

Full details are available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

These are rapidly developing circumstances; we continue to keep the situation under review and will keep Parliament updated accordingly.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the import of (a) fresh fruit, (b) vegetables and (c) dairy products, from Israel, whether HMRC accepts Israeli certificates of conformity with marketing standards (i) where the place of origin is within the internationally recognised borders of Israel and (ii) where goods originate from settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs take steps to exclude the possibility that goods of West Bank origin enter the United Kingdom incorrectly described as being Israeli. This is to prevent them benefitting from preferential tariffs in accordance with the terms of EU-Israel Association Agreement and the technical arrangements which flow from this.

EU rules do not allow the authorities in any exporting third country (such as the State of Israel) to issue valid certificates of conformity with EU marketing standards for fruit and vegetables originating outside that third country. This includes territories under Israeli administration since June 1967, for example, the West Bank. The situation referred to by the hon. Member in respect of imports originating in Israeli settlements on the West Bank cannot, therefore, arise.

EU rules allow third countries to issue a certificate of conformity, confirming compliance with marketing standards. However, that does not mean that every import consignment will be accompanied by such a document. Importers can also apply for a certificate directly from an EU Member State’s authority.

For dairy products, certificates of conformity with marketing standards are not required regardless of the origin of imports. The EU marketing standards legislation will form part of UK statute and will continue to apply in the UK after the transition period.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the effect of Israel’s blockade of Gaza on Gaza’s capacity to respond to the covid-19 outbreak.

The UK has pledged £744 million to support the global humanitarian response to COVID-19. We?have?delivered?additional vital support in the Occupied Palestinian Territories by providing funding to WHO and UNICEF to purchase and co-ordinate the delivery of?medical equipment,?treat critical care patients, train frontline public health personnel and scale up laboratory testing capacity.

The UN assesses that although the current number of detected cases remains relatively low, the capacity of the Palestinian health system to cope with an expected increase in COVID-19 cases is poor. The situation is particularly severe in Gaza, where the health system has shortages in specialised staff, drugs and equipment. We continue to monitor the situation and are working closely with the UN and the international community to ensure a co-ordinated response.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether she holds information on the proportion of humanitarian assistance sent to Gaza which is delivered through non-governmental organisations.

DFID provides support to the health system in Gaza and contributes to the provision of emergency food aid for around 1.2 million vulnerable people.

DFID does not hold information on what proportion of overall humanitarian assistance is delivered through NGOs.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 12 May to Question 42243 on Overseas Trade: Israel, what processes her Department has put in place to exclude from the trade and investment promotion activities, businesses (a) operating and (b) investing in illegal settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

The United Kingdom does not treat the Occupied Palestinian Territories as part of Israel. The settlements are not covered by the EU-Israel Association Agreement nor by the United Kingdom-Israel Trade and Partnership Agreement. Products produced in the settlements are, therefore, not entitled to benefit from preferential tariff treatment.

The Department for International Trade does not provide direct support to business activity in the settlements and my officials work closely with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to encourage companies to put rights and responsibilities at the centre of everything they do.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 12 March 2020 to Question 26894 on Imports: Israeli Settlements, whether goods imported into the UK that originate in Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories are excluded from (a) import duty relief and (b) other preferential benefits under (i) the EU-Israel Association Agreement and (ii) the UK-Israel Trade and Partnership Agreement.

The United Kingdom does not treat the Occupied Palestinian Territories as part of Israel. The settlements are not covered by the EU-Israel Association Agreement nor by the United Kingdom-Israel Trade and Partnership Agreement. Products produced in the settlements are, therefore, not entitled to benefit from preferential tariff treatment.

The Department for International Trade does not provide direct support to business activity in the settlements and my officials work closely with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to encourage companies to put rights and responsibilities at the centre of everything they do.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether compliance with the technical arrangements of the EU-Israel Association Agreement is replicated in the UK-Israel Trade and Partnership Agreement which will enter into force at the end of the transition period.

All committee decisions made within the framework of the European Union-Israel Association Agreement were carried across into the United Kingdom-Israel Trade and Partnership Agreement, which will enter into force after the end of the Transition Period on 1st January 2021.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the environmental impact of carbon emissions from UK Economy and Finance’s investment in oil and gas projects abroad.

I am unaware of any organisation called UK Economy and Finance.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) is committed to high standards of environmental, social and human rights (ESHR) risk management. It rigorously follows the requirements of the OECD Common Approaches and Equator Principles, which set the framework for export credit agencies and international financial institutions in managing such risks and impacts.

UKEF’s specialist ESHR risk management team reviews relevant projects prior to UKEF taking a decision on whether to support. ESHR monitoring takes place throughout the lifetime of UKEF’s support for such projects.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she takes to assess the environmental impact of projects receiving funding from UK Economy and Finance.

I am unaware of any organisation called UK Economy and Finance.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) is committed to high standards of environmental, social and human rights (ESHR) risk management. It rigorously follows the requirements of the OECD Common Approaches and Equator Principles, which set the framework for export credit agencies and international financial institutions in managing such risks and impacts.

UKEF’s specialist ESHR risk management team reviews relevant projects prior to UKEF taking a decision on whether to support. ESHR monitoring takes place throughout the lifetime of UKEF’s support for such projects.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the trends in the rate of homelessness exemptions to the Shared Accommodation Rate for people aged between 25 to 35 years olds.

No assessment has been made of the trends in the rate of homelessness exemptions to the Shared Accommodation Rate for people aged between 25 to 35 years old.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, for what reasons exemptions from the shared accommodation rate are not available for people aged under 25 who have experienced homelessness.

An exemption from the shared accommodation rate for those aged 25-34 who have spent three months or more in homeless hostel was introduced in 2012 when the age limit for the shared accommodation rate was increased from 25 to 35. The exemption addressed concerns raised by the Social Security and Advisory Committee about the impact of these changes on rough sleepers. The exemption is designed to target people receiving a sustained programme of rehabilitation rather than people who have sporadic, short term says.

Housing Benefit rules should reflect the housing expectations of people of a similar age not in receipt of benefits. For other individuals who may require more support and whose circumstances may make it difficult for them to share accommodation, Discretionary Housing Payments are available. DHP funding, from 2011 over £1 billion to date and an additional £40 million for Discretionary Housing Payments in 2020/21, will enable local authorities to consider individual circumstances and provide longer-term support for more vulnerable claimants.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made has made of the potential cost to the public purse of extending the exemption from the shared accommodation rate for people aged between 25 and 35 years old who have experienced homelessness to people aged under 25 who have experienced homelessness.

The cost of extending the homelessness exemption from the shared accommodation rate to people aged under 25 would be £5m in 2021/22 rounded to nearest £5m.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what evidence base was used to determine that people aged between 25 and 35 who have experienced homelessness should be eligible for an exemption from the local housing allowance shared accommodation rate and that people aged under 25 should not.

An exemption from the shared accommodation rate for those aged 25-34 who have spent three months or more in homeless hostel was introduced in 2012 when the age limit for the shared accommodation rate was increased from 25 to 35. The exemption addressed concerns raised by the Social Security and Advisory Committee about the impact of these changes on rough sleepers. The exemption is designed to target people receiving a sustained programme of rehabilitation rather than people who have sporadic, short term says.

Housing Benefit rules should reflect the housing expectations of people of a similar age not in receipt of benefits. For other individuals who may require more support and whose circumstances may make it difficult for them to share accommodation, Discretionary Housing Payments are available. DHP funding, from 2011 over £1 billion to date and an additional £40 million for Discretionary Housing Payments in 2020/21, will enable local authorities to consider individual circumstances and provide longer-term support for more vulnerable claimants.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to surge testing for the South African variant of covid-19 which commenced on 1 February 2021, how many tests have been distributed; and what proportion of those tests were (a) not returned, (b) returned unopened and (c) returned spoiled in (i) EN10, (ii) W7, (iii) N17, (iv) CR4, (v) PR9, (vi) ME15, (vii) GU21 and (viii) WS2 areas and in each (A) postcode and (B) postcode sector in those areas.

The Department does not hold the information in the format requested. All polymerase chain reaction test results in surge testing regions are included in the weekly statistics published by Public Health England on the number of confirmed COVID-19 test results, which is available at the following link:

https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/details/testing

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, on what date his Department first became aware that a case of the South African variant of covid-19 had been identified in London W7, as confirmed by his Department on 1 February 2021.

Public Health England discovered a cluster linked to this variant in early December. The Department was notified on 11 December.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
29th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to make more people with cycstic fibrosis eligible for keftrio treatment; and what the timescale is for that work.

Kaftrio is available to National Health Service patients in line with its marketing authorisation through an interim access deal negotiated between NHS England and NHS Improvement and Vertex, the drug manufacturer. This deal will last for four years and means that eligible NHS patients are among the first in Europe to benefit from access to Kaftrio. The deal has been structured to allow patients access if the license is updated during the term of the agreement.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what improvements were made to the NHS Test and Trace contact tracing process from (a) 29 December 2020 to (b) 27 January 2021.

Between 29 December 2020 and 27 January 2021, the contact tracing service implemented numerous service improvements including automatic presentation of cases to agents, recorded voicemail messages, changes to scripting, enhanced tracing performance levels and outcomes on positive lateral flow tests, multi-skill training of agents, roll-out of a new quality assurance framework, and improvements to the CTAS (Contact Tracing and Advice Service Software) system including capturing international phone numbers.

The contact tracing service also introduced RTTS (Real Time Technology Services) at the beginning of the year which allowed for a median reduction time of over 6 hours from the time a case was uploaded into CTAS.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of NHS Test and Trace emails sent to people have included technical errors in each of the last 12 weeks.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he is putting in place to ensure that residential care homes do not experience a shortage of (a) covid-19 tests and (b) personal protective equipment in the event of a second wave of covid-19 infections.

The Adult Social Care Winter Plan outlines the Government’s commitment to provide free personal protective equipment for COVID-19 needs for adult social care until March 2021. The plan also provides advice and guidance on our testing strategy for adult social care.

We are issuing more than 100,000 tests a day to care homes across the country. As part of the drive to towards the target of a 500,000-a-day testing United Kingdom capacity by the end of October, the Government has announced the addition of new Lighthouse laboratories in Newport and Charnwood to the national lab network, and work is ongoing on plans to expand the UK’s laboratory capacity even further over the coming months. The recent £500 million investment will increase testing capacity and rollout new cutting-edge testing technology to deliver rapid tests.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much of the £6.6 billion of support for health services identified within the Government’s Coronavirus emergency response fund has been (a) accessed by NHS trusts and (b) used to fund supplier relief sick pay.

Of the £6.6 billion COVID-19 response funding for health services announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer on 13th April, approximately £4.2 billion will fund direct costs incurred by the National Health Service. The remaining will fund centrally-led initiatives such as personal protective equipment, testing and the ventilator programme that will also directly support the NHS’s COVID-19 response.

Spending data is collected on a monthly basis by NHS England and NHS Improvement. Initial data indicates that NHS providers (NHS trusts and foundation trusts) have collectively spent approximately £0.8 billion on COVID-19 related spending in April 2020, with similar levels expected in May 2020, all of which has been fully funded.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on musculoskeletal health of the Government guidance (a) issued on 23 March 2020 that permitted people to take one form of exercise a day and (b) updated on 11 May 2020 that permits people to exercise outside as often as they wish.

It is too early to make any assessment of the effect on musculoskeletal health and the Government guidance on outdoor exercises. The Government wants people to remain fit and active at all times. The Chief Medical Officer is clear that being physically active is very important to long-term health and crucial for keeping people healthy during the ongoing pandemic. Evidence suggests that regular physical activity can promote good physical health and help manage stress and anxiety.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish a White Paper on reforming the Mental Health Act 1983.

We have committed to publishing a White Paper which will set out the Government’s response to Sir Simon Wessely’s Independent Review of the Mental Health Act 1983 and pave the way for reform of the Act.

We will publish our White Paper as soon as it is possible to do so. We will consult publicly on our proposals and will bring forward a Bill to amend the Act when parliamentary time allows.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether data on the average waiting time standard for elective care being piloted by 12 NHS Trusts will continue to be collected during the postponement of elective surgery as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The monthly referral-to-treatment return continues to be collected from National Health Service trusts during COVID-19, including data on average waiting times at the 12 field test sites.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether (a) cleaners, (b) porters, (c) patient transport staff and (d) other outsourced NHS workers are eligible for the life assurance scheme for NHS and social care workers who die as a result of covid-19, announced on 27 April 2020.

The Government has launched a life assurance scheme for frontline National Health Service and social care staff. The scheme is non-contributory and pays a £60,000 lump sum where staff who had been recently working where personal care is provided to individuals who have contracted COVID-19 die as a result of the virus.

Cleaners, porters, patient transport staff and other outsourced NHS workers are eligible for the scheme, providing they satisfy the scheme eligibility criteria and were exposed to a high risk of contracting COVID-19, in circumstances where they could not reasonably avoid that risk because of the nature and location of their work.

As well as NHS employees, the scheme also covers staff who work for organisations that support the delivery of NHS services or work on an NHS contract, such as agency staff.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department holds data on (a) occupation and (b) gender of people who have requested a sick note from NHS 111 for self-isolation due to covid-19 symptoms.

The Department does not hold the data requested.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to make sure the instruction to ensure bank staff and subcontractors receive full pay when in self-isolation, as referred to by NHS England and NHS Improvement in a letter of 2 March 2020 to NHS Trust executives, is (a) funded, (b) monitored, and (c) enforced.

It is essential for infection control purposes that staff members who are told to self-isolate, do so as quickly as possible.

As such we have made sure that we have issued guidance to employers to ensure that all National Health Service staff, including bank workers and subcontracted staff who must be physically present at an NHS facility to fulfill their role, receive full pay should they need to self-isolate. Our guidance states that employers should use their usual methods for calculating full pay using agreed processes at a local level and in line with NHS terms and conditions.

NHS England and NHS Improvement wrote to NHS organisations and providers on 17 March 2020 with details of updates to financial arrangements during the 2020/21 financial year, stating that NHS providers and commissioners must carefully record the costs incurred in responding to the COVID-19 outbreak and report actual costs incurred on a monthly basis.

We are continuing to review our guidance and working closely with trade unions to monitor and address any related concerns as and when they arise.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the number of people resident in each (a) parliamentary constituency and (b) local authority area that were tested under (i) Pillar 1, (ii) Pillar 2 In-person routes and (ii) Pillar 2 Delivery routes.

All upper tier local authorities have access to record level (including sex, age, occupation and postcode) test and case data.

We also publish public dashboards at a national, regional and local authority level and the MSOA (Middle Layer Super Output Area) map, allows users to type in a postcode to see how many cases there are in small areas of around 7,000 people.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many of the 40,369 Pillar 2 covid-19 tests reported under delivery routes for 30 April 2020 were (a) ordered and (b) dispatched on (i) 26 April, (ii) 27 April, (iii) 28 April, (iv) 29 April and (v) 30 April 2020.

Between 26 – 30 April, over 73,000 home kits were ordered and over 64,000 were dispatched. The difference between the figures is due to the time at which an individual orders a home test, which subsequently impacts the time of its dispatch.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to recognise the marketing authorisation by the European Medicines Agency of any coronavirus (2019-nCoV) vaccine to ensure there is no risk of delay in the UK acquiring the vaccine in comparison to countries in the EU.

As of 31 January 2020, the United Kingdom is in the Transition Period. During this time the UK will continue to follow EU legislation which includes European Medicines Agency processes and decisions until 31 December 2020. As such any European Union centrally authorised medicines, including any COVID-19 vaccine, would also be authorised in the UK.

The UK is a world leader in preparing for and managing public health incidents and on 3 March the Government published its action plan to tackle the spread of coronavirus.

Both the EU and the UK are committed to agreeing a future partnership by the end of 2020 and are working to achieve this. The Government is working to ensure that UK patients can access the best and most innovative medicines, whatever the result of negotiations with the EU on our future relationship. It is in the interests of both the UK and the EU to agree a future partnership that keeps goods flowing, services being provided and business being done.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will issue guidance to employers who provide contracted services to NHS Trusts to provide full pay to staff members self-isolating from the first day of isolation.

No one should be penalised for doing the right thing.

As part of our emergency COVID-19 legislation measures, Statutory Sick Pay will be paid from day one of sickness to support those affected by coronavirus. Those on zero-hour contracts will also receive Statutory Sick Pay or will be able to claim Universal Credit dependent on their circumstances.

Those who aren’t entitled to sick pay, including those who are self-employed, can make a claim to Universal Credit and/or new-style Employment and Support Allowance.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) retention and (b) recruitment incentives NHS employers provide to registered nurses.

The final NHS People Plan will be released in the coming months and will set out how the National Health Service will recruit and retain a well skilled workforce, including how we will improve the support that all NHS staff can expect to receive from their employer. For instance, increasing the availability of flexible working and occupational health.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to respond to the Royal College of Nursing’s report entitled Living in the Red: the cost of living crisis for London’s nursing workforce published on 30 January 2020.

It is the responsibility of individual employers to consider the overall reward package for their staff, including any travel and accommodation benefits.

The Agenda for Change (AfC) contract on which nurses are employed includes an additional allowance if staff work in and around London. The High Cost Area Supplement provides an additional 20% of basic salary for working in inner London and 15% in outer London. This means the starting basic pay for a nurse will be nearly £30,000 in inner London and over £28,600 in outer London and pay will be over £36,700 for nurses with at least four years’ experience in inner London and over £35,000 in outer London.

The AfC contract also includes the flexibilities for employers locally to use Recruitment and Retention Premia of up to 30% of basic pay if there is a particular need.

The Homes for NHS Staff Policy aims to improve access to affordable housing for staff employed within the National Health Service by securing an offer of first refusal on affordable homes developed on land owned or being disposed by NHS estate owners. NHS trusts in London, as employing organisations, have also developed additional accommodation offers and partnerships to respond to the requirements of their staff including rental model partnerships with housing providers where appropriate.

We are aware of the Royal College of Nursing’s report, we are working with the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and are exploring options for the next Public-Sector Land programme and key worker accommodation. This includes how we might help tackle the NHS staff housing challenge and encourage the building of more homes, including an affordable housing contribution, in developments on public land.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to support registered nurses in London with (a) the cost of (i) housing and (ii) transport and (b) other costs of living.

It is the responsibility of individual employers to consider the overall reward package for their staff, including any travel and accommodation benefits.

The Agenda for Change (AfC) contract on which nurses are employed includes an additional allowance if staff work in and around London. The High Cost Area Supplement provides an additional 20% of basic salary for working in inner London and 15% in outer London. This means the starting basic pay for a nurse will be nearly £30,000 in inner London and over £28,600 in outer London and pay will be over £36,700 for nurses with at least four years’ experience in inner London and over £35,000 in outer London.

The AfC contract also includes the flexibilities for employers locally to use Recruitment and Retention Premia of up to 30% of basic pay if there is a particular need.

The Homes for NHS Staff Policy aims to improve access to affordable housing for staff employed within the National Health Service by securing an offer of first refusal on affordable homes developed on land owned or being disposed by NHS estate owners. NHS trusts in London, as employing organisations, have also developed additional accommodation offers and partnerships to respond to the requirements of their staff including rental model partnerships with housing providers where appropriate.

We are aware of the Royal College of Nursing’s report, we are working with the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and are exploring options for the next Public-Sector Land programme and key worker accommodation. This includes how we might help tackle the NHS staff housing challenge and encourage the building of more homes, including an affordable housing contribution, in developments on public land.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing travel and housing subsidies in order to retain and attract more registered nurses to London.

It is the responsibility of individual employers to consider the overall reward package for their staff, including any travel and accommodation benefits.

The Agenda for Change (AfC) contract on which nurses are employed includes an additional allowance if staff work in and around London. The High Cost Area Supplement provides an additional 20% of basic salary for working in inner London and 15% in outer London. This means the starting basic pay for a nurse will be nearly £30,000 in inner London and over £28,600 in outer London and pay will be over £36,700 for nurses with at least four years’ experience in inner London and over £35,000 in outer London.

The AfC contract also includes the flexibilities for employers locally to use Recruitment and Retention Premia of up to 30% of basic pay if there is a particular need.

The Homes for NHS Staff Policy aims to improve access to affordable housing for staff employed within the National Health Service by securing an offer of first refusal on affordable homes developed on land owned or being disposed by NHS estate owners. NHS trusts in London, as employing organisations, have also developed additional accommodation offers and partnerships to respond to the requirements of their staff including rental model partnerships with housing providers where appropriate.

We are aware of the Royal College of Nursing’s report, we are working with the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and are exploring options for the next Public-Sector Land programme and key worker accommodation. This includes how we might help tackle the NHS staff housing challenge and encourage the building of more homes, including an affordable housing contribution, in developments on public land.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Mar 2020
NHS
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what stakeholder engagement his Department undertook on legislative proposals to support the NHS Long Term Plan.

The Government’s priority is to support the National Health Service to improve patient outcomes by delivering the Long Term Plan.

Last year, NHS England and NHS Improvement carried out an engagement process before making recommendations to the Government for legislative change. We are currently considering the NHS’s recommendations thoroughly and will bring forward detailed proposals shortly.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the Starting Well programme on improving children’s dental attendance in the Borough of Ealing.

The Government is committed to improving access to dental services and improving the oral health of children. NHS England is responsible for commissioning dental services to meet the needs of the local population.

The Starting Well Programme is due to end on 31 March 2020. A final evaluation will be undertaken at the end of the scheme.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment his Department has made of the factors that prevent children from accessing NHS dental services.

The Government is committed to improving access to National Health Service dental services and improving the oral health of children in England. The Government continues to carefully consider the barriers that children, particularly those most at risk, have in accessing NHS dental services.

NHS England is responsible for commissioning primary dental services according to local need.

NHS England is also supporting children to access NHS dental services with outreach schemes such as Starting Well run by NHS England targeting children in 13 high needs areas not yet in touch with a dentist.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of trends in the level of domiciliary for dental care in (a) Ealing North constituency and (b) England.

NHS England is responsible for commissioning primary care dental services, including domiciliary care. Domiciliary care may be delivered by any dentist holding a contract to deliver general dental services or it may be specifically commissioned by NHS England locally as an additional service. NHS England is working very closely with stakeholders, inclusive of the Care Quality Commission and Healthwatch, to ensure that patients receive the appropriate care within the appropriate setting.

Where such services have been specifically commissioned any concerns about delivery should be raised with NHS England. NHS England has a duty to provide services to meet local need, including domiciliary services so any perceived gaps in service should also be raised with NHS England.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to increase access to domiciliary dental care for older people in (a) Ealing North constituency and (b) England.

NHS England is responsible for commissioning primary care dental services, including domiciliary care. Domiciliary care may be delivered by any dentist holding a contract to deliver general dental services or it may be specifically commissioned by NHS England locally as an additional service. NHS England is working very closely with stakeholders, inclusive of the Care Quality Commission and Healthwatch, to ensure that patients receive the appropriate care within the appropriate setting.

Where such services have been specifically commissioned any concerns about delivery should be raised with NHS England. NHS England has a duty to provide services to meet local need, including domiciliary services so any perceived gaps in service should also be raised with NHS England.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, will he take steps to ensure that health clinics in England are funded to test for (a) mycoplasma genitalium and (b) trichomoniasis.

The Government provides funding to local authorities for public health services, including sexual health services, through the public health grant. It is for local authorities to determine how the public health grant is allocated in their local areas to meet their needs. Sexual health service providers should ensure commissioned services are in line with current national guidance, standards of training and care and quality indicators. British Association for Sexual Health and HIV guidelines recommend testing for mycoplasma genitalium and trichomonas vaginalis where clinically indicated. Further information is available at the following link:

https://www.bashh.org/media/4429/bashh-standards-for-sti-management-2019.pdf

The Department has made no estimate of the cost of treating antibiotic resistant gonorrhoea and treating strains of gonorrhoea that are not resistant to commonly used antimicrobials.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the cost of (a) successfully treating antibiotic resistant gonorrhoea and (b) treating strains of gonorrhoea that are not resistant to commonly used antimicrobials.

The Government provides funding to local authorities for public health services, including sexual health services, through the public health grant. It is for local authorities to determine how the public health grant is allocated in their local areas to meet their needs. Sexual health service providers should ensure commissioned services are in line with current national guidance, standards of training and care and quality indicators. British Association for Sexual Health and HIV guidelines recommend testing for mycoplasma genitalium and trichomonas vaginalis where clinically indicated. Further information is available at the following link:

https://www.bashh.org/media/4429/bashh-standards-for-sti-management-2019.pdf

The Department has made no estimate of the cost of treating antibiotic resistant gonorrhoea and treating strains of gonorrhoea that are not resistant to commonly used antimicrobials.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what funding he will make available for community pharmacies in each financial year from 2019-20 to 2023-24.

In July 2019, we set out our landmark five-year Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework (CPCF) deal to deliver an expanded role for community pharmacy. This outlined our ambition for community pharmacies to be fully integrated in to the National Health Service, support patients get the best from their medicines and provide advice to the public to help them stay healthy for longer. The deal commits £2.592 billion per year to community pharmacy from 2019-20 to 2023-24. This amounts to almost £13 billion across the 5 years.

We are reprioritising funding, moving to a more service based contractual framework. Through increased capacity and efficiency from modern dispensing methods, better utilising the skills of pharmacists, decommissioning Medicines Use Reviews, and phasing out the establishment payment, we have the opportunity to redistribute funding to support more services which are fairly remunerated. These changes will not only provide value for money but also support pharmacies in making this transformation.

A more detailed breakdown of the funding can be found in the CPCF at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/819601/cpcf-2019-to-2024.pdf

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of recent demolitions and seizures of Palestinian (a) homes, (b) water and hygiene structures and (c) clinics on the Palestinian Authority's ability to contain the spread of covid-19 in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

The UK is seriously concerned by any demolition and seizure of Palestinian property by Israeli authorities. In all but the most exceptional circumstances demolitions are contrary to International Humanitarian Law (IHL). We are particularly concerned that demolitions are continuing at this time. Such actions weaken the capacity of Palestinians to withstand the impact of COVID-19. Under IHL, an occupying power has the duty of ensuring and maintaining public health and hygiene in the occupied territory to the fullest extent of the means available to it. We call on both parties to avoid any provocative action which might undermine the cooperation that is so critical.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to his Israeli counterpart on the increase in settler violence against Palestinians and their property reported by the United Nations Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs since the outbreak of covid-19 in the occupied Palestinian territory.

We are concerned by reports that settler violence is continuing at this time. We called on both parties to avoid any provocative action which might undermine the cooperation that is so critical in response to COVID-19, including settler violence, at the UN Security Council remote meeting on the Middle East Peace Process on 23 April. We condemn any incidents of violence by settlers against Palestinians.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 26 February 2020 to Question 13562 on Politics and Government, whether he has made an assessment of the adherence of the US Administration's framework for a Palestinian state to the statehood criteria of (a) ability to exercise effective control of territory and (b) independence in their external relations.

The United Kingdom supports Palestinians in realising self-determination through a negotiated settlement leading to a safe and secure Israel living alongside a viable and sovereign Palestinian state. We hope that the US initiative may lead to a first step on the road back to negotiations. It is through such negotiations that the parties will determine the specifics of how the aim of two states is to be achieved.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that the Israeli Government (a) implements and (b) adheres to UN Security Council Resolution 2334.

We have long supported balanced UN resolutions, including UN Security Council Resolution 2334 that addressed incitement and settlements. We do not hesitate to raise instances of incitement. We have a regular dialogue with the Israeli Government and the Palestinian Authority in which we reiterate the need for both sides to prepare their populations for peaceful coexistence, including by promoting a more positive portrayal of each other. As I made clear in my statement on 24 February, the UK's position on Israeli settlements is clear: they are illegal under international law and damaging to renewed efforts to launch peace negotiations. I last raised settlements with the Israeli Ambassador to the UK on 26 February. We urge Israel to halt its settlement expansion immediately.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what (a) criteria and (b) guidance his Department uses to define the (i) characteristics, (ii) security and (iii) borders of a sovereign state.

The criteria for statehood were set out in a written answer to a PQ on 16 November 1989 by Sir Tim Sainsbury, then a Foreign and Commonwealth Office Minister, who provided that "we consider a State should have, and seem likely to continue to have, a clearly defined territory with a population, a Government who are able of themselves to exercise effective control of that territory, and independence in their external relations". This is based on the criteria for statehood set out in the Montevideo Convention on the Rights and Duties of States 1933, namely: (a) a permanent population; (b) a defined territory; (c) government; and (d) capacity to enter into relations with other states.

Recognition is a unilateral, political act and there is no legal obligation to recognise another entity as a state. Recognition is something that Her Majesty's Government can choose to grant at a time of her choosing, if at all.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the tax that will be owed in the UK under Pillar 2 of the OECD/G20 Inclusive Framework in the first full year of Pillar 2 implementation by (a) all companies within the scope of Pillar 2, (b) those companies within the scope of Pillar 2 that are currently headquartered in the UK and (c) those companies within the scope of Pillar 2 that are currently not headquartered in the UK.

The Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) published its revenue forecast for the Digital Services Tax (DST) today. The DST will be repealed once the new globally agreed solution is in place.

Reaching a Two-Pillar Solution on global tax reform which reallocates taxing rights and introduces a global minimum tax has been a long-standing priority for the UK.

With overwhelming support from across the international spectrum, the Government is delighted that final political agreement on a Two-Pillar Solution has now been reached amongst 136 countries of the OECD Inclusive Framework.

These proposals represent a major reform of the international tax framework and will help to ensure multinational businesses pay their fair share, with the right companies paying the right amount of tax in the right place. The Government looks forward to continuing discussions with its global partners in the coming months as we look towards implementation.

Both pillars will be subject to the standard tax policymaking process, with their impacts formally assessed through the OBR forecast process.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the tax that will be owed in the UK under Pillar 2 of the OECD/G20 Inclusive Framework in the first full year of Pillar 2 implementation by (a) all companies within the scope of Pillar 2, (b) those companies within the scope of Pillar 2 that are currently liable to pay the Digital Services Tax and (c) those companies within the scope of Pillar 2 that are currently not liable to pay the Digital Services Tax.

The Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) published its revenue forecast for the Digital Services Tax (DST) today. The DST will be repealed once the new globally agreed solution is in place.

Reaching a Two-Pillar Solution on global tax reform which reallocates taxing rights and introduces a global minimum tax has been a long-standing priority for the UK.

With overwhelming support from across the international spectrum, the Government is delighted that final political agreement on a Two-Pillar Solution has now been reached amongst 136 countries of the OECD Inclusive Framework.

These proposals represent a major reform of the international tax framework and will help to ensure multinational businesses pay their fair share, with the right companies paying the right amount of tax in the right place. The Government looks forward to continuing discussions with its global partners in the coming months as we look towards implementation.

Both pillars will be subject to the standard tax policymaking process, with their impacts formally assessed through the OBR forecast process.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the tax that will be owed in the UK under Pillar 1 of the OECD/G20 Inclusive Framework in the first full year of Pillar 1 implementation by (a) all companies within the scope of Pillar 1, (b) those companies within the scope of Pillar 1 that are currently liable to pay the Digital Services Tax and (c) those companies within the scope of Pillar 1 that are currently not liable to pay the Digital Services Tax.

The Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) published its revenue forecast for the Digital Services Tax (DST) today. The DST will be repealed once the new globally agreed solution is in place.

Reaching a Two-Pillar Solution on global tax reform which reallocates taxing rights and introduces a global minimum tax has been a long-standing priority for the UK.

With overwhelming support from across the international spectrum, the Government is delighted that final political agreement on a Two-Pillar Solution has now been reached amongst 136 countries of the OECD Inclusive Framework.

These proposals represent a major reform of the international tax framework and will help to ensure multinational businesses pay their fair share, with the right companies paying the right amount of tax in the right place. The Government looks forward to continuing discussions with its global partners in the coming months as we look towards implementation.

Both pillars will be subject to the standard tax policymaking process, with their impacts formally assessed through the OBR forecast process.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the total amount of tax that will be owed in the UK by (a) companies liable to the Digital Services Tax, (b) companies liable to the Digital Services Tax who are expected to fall within the scope of Pillar 1 of the OECD/G20 Inclusive Framework and (c) companies liable to the Digital Services Tax who are expected to fall outside the scope of Pillar 1 of the OECD/G20 Inclusive Framework for the calendar years (i) 2022 and (ii) 2023.

The Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) published its revenue forecast for the Digital Services Tax (DST) today. The DST will be repealed once the new globally agreed solution is in place.

Reaching a Two-Pillar Solution on global tax reform which reallocates taxing rights and introduces a global minimum tax has been a long-standing priority for the UK.

With overwhelming support from across the international spectrum, the Government is delighted that final political agreement on a Two-Pillar Solution has now been reached amongst 136 countries of the OECD Inclusive Framework.

These proposals represent a major reform of the international tax framework and will help to ensure multinational businesses pay their fair share, with the right companies paying the right amount of tax in the right place. The Government looks forward to continuing discussions with its global partners in the coming months as we look towards implementation.

Both pillars will be subject to the standard tax policymaking process, with their impacts formally assessed through the OBR forecast process.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the agreement between G7 Finance Ministers made on 5 June 2021, what estimate he has made of the potential additional UK tax liability for firms currently subject to the Digital Services Tax (DST), in the event that the DST is replaced by a system of reallocating taxing rights to at least 20 per cent of profit exceeding a 10 per cent margin for the largest and most profitable multinational enterprises.

I refer the hon Member to the answer that I gave on 12 July to PQ UIN 28089 .

14th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of UK domiciled enterprises that would be affected by a global minimum corporate rate of taxation of at least 15 per cent, as agreed between G7 Finance Ministers on 5 June 2021.

I refer the hon Member to the answer that I gave on 12 July to PQ UIN 28089 .

14th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the potential additional revenue that will accrue to the public purse as a result of the tax measures within the communique agreed between G7 Finance Ministers on 5 June 2021.

I refer the hon Member to the answer that I gave on 12 July to PQ UIN 28089 .

14th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what meetings have taken place between his Department and representatives of British Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies on the ongoing international tax negotiations discussed between G7 Finance Ministers on 4 to 5 June 2021.

I refer the hon Member to the answer that I gave on 10 June to PQ UIN 11636.

24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether negotiators acting on behalf of the Government at meetings of the Steering Group of the Inclusive Framework on base erosion and profit shifting as part of the OECD/ G20 international tax negotiations held in the week of in the week commencing 17 May 2021 were instructed to support a global corporate minimum tax rate for large multinational firms of (a) 21 per cent, (b) 15 per cent and (c) any other rate.

OECD proposals to update the international tax framework have been under negotiation for a number of years and the UK has been at the forefront of these talks.

A global minimum tax (Pillar 2) is an important part of the package being developed by the OECD.

The Government supports agreement on a global minimum tax. It is also crucial that this is agreed alongside changes to profit allocation rules (Pillar 1). Pillar 1 is needed to ensure that large digital businesses pay more tax in the UK, commensurate with their economic activities.

The final agreement is still subject to international negotiation and it would not be appropriate for the Government to provide a detailed commentary on its approach to these discussions.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many FTE officials were working predominantly or entirely on VAT evasion by overseas sellers on online platforms in (a) February 2020 and (b) February 2021; and how many are planned to be working in that policy area in (c) February 2022.

The Government takes the issue of VAT evasion by overseas sellers on online platforms very seriously. In September 2016 the Government introduced new legal powers allowing HMRC to hold online marketplaces jointly liable for future VAT liabilities of non-compliant overseas sellers on their platforms.

One of HMRC’s methods for tackling this problem is to make both bulk and individual data requests of online marketplaces about the sellers on their platforms, to inform enquiries into any possible non-compliance.

HMRC began making such requests after the introduction of the new powers in September 2016. Over time, the quality of the bulk data being provided by online marketplace platforms has improved, significantly reducing the need for HMRC to make additional data requests on individual sellers.

As a result, the number of compliance enquiries HMRC have completed into overseas online sellers is not directly related to the number of individual data requests. In 2020-21, where there has been a significant reduction of individual data requests, the number of actual enquiries completed has increased from just under 7,000 in 2019-20 to more than 9,400 in 2020-21 so far.

Where, following compliance enquiries using bulk or individual data and other information, HMRC have made an online marketplace liable for the future VAT of a non-compliant seller, the marketplace has the option instead to remove that seller and prevent them from selling on their platform. This significantly disrupts the trade of that non-compliant seller.

Number of data requests

In order to inform enquiries about potential non-compliance by overseas sellers on online market places, HMRC send both bulk and individual data requests to online platforms. The number of bulk requests and individual requests on sellers using their service in each of the tax years specified are:

Year

Bulk

Individual

2016-17

0

299

2017-18

9

1,556

2018-19

10

2,317

2019-20

7

2,684

2020-21 (to date)

7

80

HMRC did not make data requests prior to 2016, when new powers relating to online marketplaces were introduced. As explained above, with the quality of bulk data improving over time, HMRC have been able to improve their processes in 2020-21 and reduce their reliance on individual data requests while still completing more enquiries.

Revenue measured and sellers disrupted

Rather than ‘VAT recouped’, and in line with other compliance activity, revenue measured by HMRC when using their powers to tackle online marketplace sellers is tracked both in terms of the amount of revenue loss from the Exchequer that has been prevented (Revenue Loss Prevented, RLP) and the amount of VAT assessed and collected (Cash Collectable, CC). For this compliance activity, HMRC also track the number of non-compliant overseas sellers disrupted following removal from an online marketplace platform.

HMRC began using the new powers introduced by the Government in September 2016 (and so no results are available for 2015-16). While HMRC started to disrupt non-compliant sellers in the first year the powers were introduced, results are primarily seen after compliance cases were concluded, starting in 2017-18. For the years requested, from 2016-17, the results are:

Year

CC (£m)

RLP (£m)

Sellers disrupted

2016-17

0

0

40

2017-18

106

10

2,019

2018-19

34

86

3,977

2019-20

13

40

4,780

2020-21 (to Jan)

21

51

4,000

Officials working on the activity

Rather than the number of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) employees deployed at a specific point in time on this compliance activity, HMRC track this using Staff Year Usage (SYU), which shows the resource used averaged out over a financial year.

In total in 2019-20, HMRC used 176 staff years on this activity. Year to date in 2020-21 (end of January 2021), HMRC have used 150 staff years on this activity.

HMRC expect to use the same level of staff years on this activity in 2021-22.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many individual data requests his Department has sent to online platforms on sellers using their service in each of the tax years (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17, (c) 2017-18, (d) 2018-19, (e) 2019-20 and (f) 2020-21 to date.

The Government takes the issue of VAT evasion by overseas sellers on online platforms very seriously. In September 2016 the Government introduced new legal powers allowing HMRC to hold online marketplaces jointly liable for future VAT liabilities of non-compliant overseas sellers on their platforms.

One of HMRC’s methods for tackling this problem is to make both bulk and individual data requests of online marketplaces about the sellers on their platforms, to inform enquiries into any possible non-compliance.

HMRC began making such requests after the introduction of the new powers in September 2016. Over time, the quality of the bulk data being provided by online marketplace platforms has improved, significantly reducing the need for HMRC to make additional data requests on individual sellers.

As a result, the number of compliance enquiries HMRC have completed into overseas online sellers is not directly related to the number of individual data requests. In 2020-21, where there has been a significant reduction of individual data requests, the number of actual enquiries completed has increased from just under 7,000 in 2019-20 to more than 9,400 in 2020-21 so far.

Where, following compliance enquiries using bulk or individual data and other information, HMRC have made an online marketplace liable for the future VAT of a non-compliant seller, the marketplace has the option instead to remove that seller and prevent them from selling on their platform. This significantly disrupts the trade of that non-compliant seller.

Number of data requests

In order to inform enquiries about potential non-compliance by overseas sellers on online market places, HMRC send both bulk and individual data requests to online platforms. The number of bulk requests and individual requests on sellers using their service in each of the tax years specified are:

Year

Bulk

Individual

2016-17

0

299

2017-18

9

1,556

2018-19

10

2,317

2019-20

7

2,684

2020-21 (to date)

7

80

HMRC did not make data requests prior to 2016, when new powers relating to online marketplaces were introduced. As explained above, with the quality of bulk data improving over time, HMRC have been able to improve their processes in 2020-21 and reduce their reliance on individual data requests while still completing more enquiries.

Revenue measured and sellers disrupted

Rather than ‘VAT recouped’, and in line with other compliance activity, revenue measured by HMRC when using their powers to tackle online marketplace sellers is tracked both in terms of the amount of revenue loss from the Exchequer that has been prevented (Revenue Loss Prevented, RLP) and the amount of VAT assessed and collected (Cash Collectable, CC). For this compliance activity, HMRC also track the number of non-compliant overseas sellers disrupted following removal from an online marketplace platform.

HMRC began using the new powers introduced by the Government in September 2016 (and so no results are available for 2015-16). While HMRC started to disrupt non-compliant sellers in the first year the powers were introduced, results are primarily seen after compliance cases were concluded, starting in 2017-18. For the years requested, from 2016-17, the results are:

Year

CC (£m)

RLP (£m)

Sellers disrupted

2016-17

0

0

40

2017-18

106

10

2,019

2018-19

34

86

3,977

2019-20

13

40

4,780

2020-21 (to Jan)

21

51

4,000

Officials working on the activity

Rather than the number of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) employees deployed at a specific point in time on this compliance activity, HMRC track this using Staff Year Usage (SYU), which shows the resource used averaged out over a financial year.

In total in 2019-20, HMRC used 176 staff years on this activity. Year to date in 2020-21 (end of January 2021), HMRC have used 150 staff years on this activity.

HMRC expect to use the same level of staff years on this activity in 2021-22.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the amount of VAT evaded by overseas sellers on online platforms that has been recouped following individual data requests by the his Department in each of the tax years (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17, (c) 2017-18, (d) 2018-19, (e) 2019-20 and (f) 2020-21 to date.

The Government takes the issue of VAT evasion by overseas sellers on online platforms very seriously. In September 2016 the Government introduced new legal powers allowing HMRC to hold online marketplaces jointly liable for future VAT liabilities of non-compliant overseas sellers on their platforms.

One of HMRC’s methods for tackling this problem is to make both bulk and individual data requests of online marketplaces about the sellers on their platforms, to inform enquiries into any possible non-compliance.

HMRC began making such requests after the introduction of the new powers in September 2016. Over time, the quality of the bulk data being provided by online marketplace platforms has improved, significantly reducing the need for HMRC to make additional data requests on individual sellers.

As a result, the number of compliance enquiries HMRC have completed into overseas online sellers is not directly related to the number of individual data requests. In 2020-21, where there has been a significant reduction of individual data requests, the number of actual enquiries completed has increased from just under 7,000 in 2019-20 to more than 9,400 in 2020-21 so far.

Where, following compliance enquiries using bulk or individual data and other information, HMRC have made an online marketplace liable for the future VAT of a non-compliant seller, the marketplace has the option instead to remove that seller and prevent them from selling on their platform. This significantly disrupts the trade of that non-compliant seller.

Number of data requests

In order to inform enquiries about potential non-compliance by overseas sellers on online market places, HMRC send both bulk and individual data requests to online platforms. The number of bulk requests and individual requests on sellers using their service in each of the tax years specified are:

Year

Bulk

Individual

2016-17

0

299

2017-18

9

1,556

2018-19

10

2,317

2019-20

7

2,684

2020-21 (to date)

7

80

HMRC did not make data requests prior to 2016, when new powers relating to online marketplaces were introduced. As explained above, with the quality of bulk data improving over time, HMRC have been able to improve their processes in 2020-21 and reduce their reliance on individual data requests while still completing more enquiries.

Revenue measured and sellers disrupted

Rather than ‘VAT recouped’, and in line with other compliance activity, revenue measured by HMRC when using their powers to tackle online marketplace sellers is tracked both in terms of the amount of revenue loss from the Exchequer that has been prevented (Revenue Loss Prevented, RLP) and the amount of VAT assessed and collected (Cash Collectable, CC). For this compliance activity, HMRC also track the number of non-compliant overseas sellers disrupted following removal from an online marketplace platform.

HMRC began using the new powers introduced by the Government in September 2016 (and so no results are available for 2015-16). While HMRC started to disrupt non-compliant sellers in the first year the powers were introduced, results are primarily seen after compliance cases were concluded, starting in 2017-18. For the years requested, from 2016-17, the results are:

Year

CC (£m)

RLP (£m)

Sellers disrupted

2016-17

0

0

40

2017-18

106

10

2,019

2018-19

34

86

3,977

2019-20

13

40

4,780

2020-21 (to Jan)

21

51

4,000

Officials working on the activity

Rather than the number of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) employees deployed at a specific point in time on this compliance activity, HMRC track this using Staff Year Usage (SYU), which shows the resource used averaged out over a financial year.

In total in 2019-20, HMRC used 176 staff years on this activity. Year to date in 2020-21 (end of January 2021), HMRC have used 150 staff years on this activity.

HMRC expect to use the same level of staff years on this activity in 2021-22.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the revenue lost to the public purse as a result of VAT evasion by overseas sellers on online platforms in each of the tax years (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17, (c) 2017-18, (d) 2018-19, (e) 2019-20 and (f) 2020-21 to date.

The information requested is not held. HMRC estimate the tax gap, which includes VAT evasion, and publish this in the ‘Measuring tax gaps’ publication. However, HMRC do not specifically hold estimates for VAT evasion by overseas sellers on online marketplaces for the periods requested. HMRC estimate that the tax loss from VAT fraud and error on online marketplaces was between £1 billion and £1.5 billion in 2016/17. The department estimates that overseas sellers contributed to approximately 60% of that VAT loss.

From 1 January 2021, the Government introduced changes to the VAT treatment of overseas goods making online marketplaces directly liable for UK VAT on many of the sales they facilitate - ensuring that overseas online marketplace sellers cannot outcompete UK High Street stores and UK online retailers by evading their VAT liabilities.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reason the zero-rate of value-added tax for women's sanitary products is not applied to period pants.

A zero rate of VAT has applied to women’s sanitary products since 1 January 2021. This applies to those products which were previously subject to the reduced rate of 5 per cent, for example, tampons and pads, and to reusable menstrual products, such as keepers.

The relief specifically excludes articles of clothing, such as “period pants”. Such exclusions are designed to ensure that the relief is properly targeted, since difficulties in policing the scope of the relief create the potential for litigation, erosion of the tax base and a reduction in revenue. Under existing rules “period pants” may already qualify for the zero rate, if they have been specifically designed to be worn by a child, meet the sizing criteria, and are held out for sale specifically for use by girls under the age of 14 years old.

Details are provided in VAT Notice 714: young children's clothing and footwear: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/vat-notice-714-zero-rating-young-childrens-clothing-and-footwear/vat-notice-714-zero-rating-young-childrens-clothing-and-footwear#items-suitable-only-for-young-children.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many second self-assessment payments on account for the 2019-20 tax year were not paid by 31 July 2020; and what proportion those payments represent of all payments on account due for the 2019-20 tax year.

2.9 million Self Assessment taxpayers were due to pay a second Self Assessment Payment on Account for the 2019/20 tax year. Under one of the COVID-19 easements announced by the Chancellor in March 2020, taxpayers were given the option of deferring this payment until 31 January 2021. 1.5 million Payments on Account were deferred, amounting to £6 billion in tax revenues.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many FTE staff HMRC plans to (a) recruit externally and (b) redeploy internally, to help process appeals of fines issued for late submission of 2019-20 tax returns.

HMRC deal with appeals of fines issued for late submission of tax returns as part of their normal customer service activity and do not plan to recruit any staff specifically for this purpose. In order to help to process these appeals and the associated contact, HMRC are planning to deploy internal staff of up to 450 FTE primarily in the months of March and April but with smaller numbers in May and June as well.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many self assessment tax returns were filed late in each of the financial years (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17, (c) 2017-18 and (d) 2018-19; and what estimate HMRC has made of the number of self assessment tax returns for 2019-20 they expect to be filed late.

The filing deadline for Self-Assessment tax returns is typically 31 October after the end of the tax year for paper returns; 31 January after the end of the tax year for online returns; and three months after a notice to file has been issued, if that is later.

As such a return is defined as late in the following circumstances:

  • It is filed after the relevant deadline
  • The relevant deadline has elapsed, it has not yet been filed, and the taxpayer has not notified HMRC that they do not need to file a return

Not all returns filed after the deadline will technically be classed as late because there are certain circumstances where HMRC apply a different due date. Due to data limitations these variations are not reflected in the figures below.

The volume of returns that have missed the deadline for return years 2015-16 to 2018-19 inclusive are as shown in the following table:

Tax Year

Missed deadline

Filed after deadline

Not yet filed

2015-16

632,000

360,000

2016-17

624,000

413,000

2017-18

591,000

479,000

2018-19

414,000

641,000

These numbers relate to Self-Assessment returns for individuals, partnerships and trusts as at 1 January 2021. All numbers have been rounded to the nearest thousand. These figures have been produced using an extract of the data provided for analytical purposes, and there may be small differences between this and the live Self-Assessment system.

The numbers do not include unsolicited returns or those of Self-Assessment registered taxpayers informing HMRC they do not need to file a return after the relevant deadline.

While these numbers are correct as at 1 January 2021 they are not final, as returns continue to be issued and filed, or notifications that the taxpayer does not need to file a return for earlier tax years received for many years after the filing deadlines.

It has not been possible to estimate accurately the number of 2019/20 Self-Assessment returns that could be filed late but the Government is aware that the numbers may be appreciably higher than in previous years. HMRC announced on 25 January that taxpayers who file their return online by 28 February will not be charged a late filing penalty.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what guidance has been produced by HMRC on (a) the covid-related circumstances that will be accepted as reasons for waiving fines issued for 2019-20 tax returns not being filed by 31 January 2021 and (b) the process by which someone will be able to appeal a fine for late filing on the basis of a covid-related circumstance.

HMRC’s penalty notices give guidance on how to appeal in writing or online and currently include guidance on reasonable excuses and COVID-19. Anyone who receives a penalty notice is now informed that HMRC will accept an appeal up to three months after the normal 30 day appeal period. GOV.UK guidance advises that HMRC will consider coronavirus as a reasonable excuse for missing some tax obligations (such as payments or filing dates) and states that the taxpayer should explain how they were affected by coronavirus in their appeal.

However, HMRC have recognised that many taxpayers will have a reasonable excuse for not filing on time due to COVID-19 and have decided not to issue late filing penalties for 2019-20 online tax returns that are filed by 28 February 2021.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many staff by (a) headcount and (b) full-time equivalent were employed by HMRC on 1 January in each year from 2010 to 2020.

In accordance with their HR data retention policy, HMRC do not retain headcount data for more than six years. The table below details the headcount and full-time equivalent in HMRC on 1 January 2016–2020:

Year

Headcount

FTE

2016

67,195

60,035.83

2017

69,280

62,587.98

2018

67,088

60,689.55

2019

63,390

57,337.74

2020

65,679

59,572.91

YTD 30 Nov 20

64,110

58,466.88

HMRC do measure and publish annually in their accounts, information on FTE on a fiscal year basis (1 April – 31 March). The table below details the FTE in HMRC from 2010/11 to 2015/16 as published in their accounts:

Year

FTE

2010/11

67,553

2011/12

64,483

2012/13

61,568

2013/14

59,494

2014/15

57,510

2015/16

60,036

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many of the approximately 7,000 additional staff that HMRC aimed to recruit by 1 January 2021 to manage post-transition period processes (a) have been recruited, (b) will be based in call centres and (c) will be directly employed by HMRC.

HMRC had c.7,000 permanent (directly employed) staff by 1 January to deliver post-transition requirements.

HMRC forecast that about 200 telephony advisers would be required to meet customer demand. However, HMRC developed deployment plans to make 300 staff available, who had the capacity to answer about 8,000 calls per day, with the capability to flex more resource if required. HMRC have put in place streamlined routes for customers to support more complex customs arrangements.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what roles will be filled by the approximately 7,000 additional staff whom HMRC aimed to recruit by 1 January 2021 to manage post-transition period processes; and how many hours of training an employee will have received by the time they start work in each role.

HMRC had c.7,000 permanent staff by 1 January to support delivery of post-transition requirements, sourced through both redeployment and external recruitment. The post-transition roles comprise specialist and non-specialist, and operational and support, roles. Not all roles require additional training and HMRC do not track their training requirements against all 7,000 staff. HMRC are therefore unable to provide a breakdown of training time across the full permanent complement without incurring significant additional costs. Newly recruited operational staff will have received five weeks of training, including induction.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment (a) his Department and (b) the Office for Budget Responsibility have made of the (i) direct and (ii) indirect effect on jobs of the decision to end the VAT Retail Export Scheme on 31 December 2020.

Ahead of the end of the transition period, the Government has announced the VAT and excise duty treatment of goods purchased by individuals for personal use and carried in their luggage arriving from or going overseas (passengers). The following rules will apply from 1 January 2021:

- Passengers travelling from Great Britain to any destination outside the United Kingdom (UK) will be able to purchase duty-free excise goods once they have passed security controls at ports, airports, and international rail stations.

- Personal allowances will apply to passengers entering Great Britain from a destination outside of the UK, with alcohol allowances significantly increased.

- The VAT Retail Export Scheme (RES) in Great Britain will not be extended to EU residents and will be withdrawn for all passengers.

- The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales for non-excise goods will be removed across the UK.

The Government published a consultation which ran from 11 March to 20 May. During this time the Government held a number of virtual meetings with stakeholders to hear their views and received 73 responses to the consultation. The Government is also continuing to meet and discuss the changes with stakeholders following the announcement of these policies.

The detailed rationale for these changes are included in the written ministerial statement and summary of responses to the recent consultation: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2020-09-11/hcws448 and https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/a-consultation-on-duty-free-and-tax-free-goods-carried-by-passengers. A technical note has also been issued to stakeholders to expand on this document and to respond to issues raised by stakeholders.

On 25 November the independent Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) set out their assessment of the fiscal impact of the withdrawal of the VAT RES. Factoring in a higher-than-usual elasticity of 1.9 to account for spending on luxury goods, the OBR estimate that the withdrawal of the VAT RES will result in a significant direct Exchequer saving of around £400 million per year, once passenger numbers recover from the impacts of COVID-19. Based on the 1.2 million users of the scheme who received a refund in 2019, this includes an assumption that approximately 20,000 – 30,000 fewer tourists visit Great Britain a year. That is 0.07% of the 40 million visitors to the UK in 2019.

The OBR also looked at this package in the round when assessing the indirect impact on the economy – including the effects of extending duty-free sales – alongside the substantial support provided to the economy and retail industry.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his Department's policy paper of 8 July 2020 entitled, A Plan for Jobs 2020 and the estimated £3.8 billion cost of the temporary reduction in Stamp Duty Land Tax set out in Table 1: Plan for Jobs policy decisions of that policy paper, what estimate he has made of the proportion of that sum that will benefit (a) first-time buyers, (b) existing owner-occupiers moving home, (c) buy-to-let investors, (d) people buying second homes and (e) overseas buyers.

This information is not readily available.

8th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many requests for information have been raised by HM Revenue and Customs with the Israeli Customs Authorities to establish whether consignments have been imported from (a) Israel and (b) Israeli settlements under the technical arrangements of the EU-Israel Association Agreement, in each of the last three years.

Under the technical arrangement of the EU-Israel Association Agreement a proof of preferential origin document is required that must contain the postal code and the name of the city, village or industrial zone in which the goods were produced. Where HMRC’s risk assessment indicates that the goods may have been produced in non-eligible locations, HMRC perform physical examinations of goods or check proof documents. HMRC refuse preference where the goods cannot be shown to be produced in an eligible location. HMRC can also request that the Israeli Customs Authorities verify the accuracy of the information provided on the proof of preferential origin document.

HMRC raised verification requests with the Israeli Customs Authorities to confirm that claims to preferential tariff treatment were made in compliance with the EU-Israel Association Agreement and the technical arrangement on:

  • 17 occasions in 2017
  • 10 occasions in 2018, and
  • 7 occasions in 2019.

The number of agricultural consignments imported from Israel claiming preferential tariff treatment under the EU-Israel Association Agreement and checked by HMRC was:

  • 52 in 2017
  • 70 in 2018, and
  • 29 in 2019

In accordance with the terms of EU-Israel Association Agreement and the technical arrangement, when confirming eligibility to preferential treatment, HMRC should only verify the details on the preferential proof of origin. A certificate of marketing standards is not a preferential proof of origin.

8th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many consignments of agricultural produce imported from Israel and claiming preference under the EU-Israel Association Agreement have been checked by HM Revenue and Customs to ensure they did not originate in settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories, in each of the last three years.

Under the technical arrangement of the EU-Israel Association Agreement a proof of preferential origin document is required that must contain the postal code and the name of the city, village or industrial zone in which the goods were produced. Where HMRC’s risk assessment indicates that the goods may have been produced in non-eligible locations, HMRC perform physical examinations of goods or check proof documents. HMRC refuse preference where the goods cannot be shown to be produced in an eligible location. HMRC can also request that the Israeli Customs Authorities verify the accuracy of the information provided on the proof of preferential origin document.

HMRC raised verification requests with the Israeli Customs Authorities to confirm that claims to preferential tariff treatment were made in compliance with the EU-Israel Association Agreement and the technical arrangement on:

  • 17 occasions in 2017
  • 10 occasions in 2018, and
  • 7 occasions in 2019.

The number of agricultural consignments imported from Israel claiming preferential tariff treatment under the EU-Israel Association Agreement and checked by HMRC was:

  • 52 in 2017
  • 70 in 2018, and
  • 29 in 2019

In accordance with the terms of EU-Israel Association Agreement and the technical arrangement, when confirming eligibility to preferential treatment, HMRC should only verify the details on the preferential proof of origin. A certificate of marketing standards is not a preferential proof of origin.

8th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what documentary information is required under the technical arrangements of the EU-Israel Association Agreement for goods entering the UK from Israel to enable differentiation between goods produced within Israel’s internationally recognised borders and Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

Under the technical arrangement of the EU-Israel Association Agreement a proof of preferential origin document is required that must contain the postal code and the name of the city, village or industrial zone in which the goods were produced. Where HMRC’s risk assessment indicates that the goods may have been produced in non-eligible locations, HMRC perform physical examinations of goods or check proof documents. HMRC refuse preference where the goods cannot be shown to be produced in an eligible location. HMRC can also request that the Israeli Customs Authorities verify the accuracy of the information provided on the proof of preferential origin document.

HMRC raised verification requests with the Israeli Customs Authorities to confirm that claims to preferential tariff treatment were made in compliance with the EU-Israel Association Agreement and the technical arrangement on:

  • 17 occasions in 2017
  • 10 occasions in 2018, and
  • 7 occasions in 2019.

The number of agricultural consignments imported from Israel claiming preferential tariff treatment under the EU-Israel Association Agreement and checked by HMRC was:

  • 52 in 2017
  • 70 in 2018, and
  • 29 in 2019

In accordance with the terms of EU-Israel Association Agreement and the technical arrangement, when confirming eligibility to preferential treatment, HMRC should only verify the details on the preferential proof of origin. A certificate of marketing standards is not a preferential proof of origin.

8th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the import of (a) fresh fruit, (b) vegetables and (c) dairy products from Israel, what checks are made by HMRC to ensure that the place of origin given on the certificate of marketing standards is consistent with the post codes given on the relevant invoice/EUR1.

Under the technical arrangement of the EU-Israel Association Agreement a proof of preferential origin document is required that must contain the postal code and the name of the city, village or industrial zone in which the goods were produced. Where HMRC’s risk assessment indicates that the goods may have been produced in non-eligible locations, HMRC perform physical examinations of goods or check proof documents. HMRC refuse preference where the goods cannot be shown to be produced in an eligible location. HMRC can also request that the Israeli Customs Authorities verify the accuracy of the information provided on the proof of preferential origin document.

HMRC raised verification requests with the Israeli Customs Authorities to confirm that claims to preferential tariff treatment were made in compliance with the EU-Israel Association Agreement and the technical arrangement on:

  • 17 occasions in 2017
  • 10 occasions in 2018, and
  • 7 occasions in 2019.

The number of agricultural consignments imported from Israel claiming preferential tariff treatment under the EU-Israel Association Agreement and checked by HMRC was:

  • 52 in 2017
  • 70 in 2018, and
  • 29 in 2019

In accordance with the terms of EU-Israel Association Agreement and the technical arrangement, when confirming eligibility to preferential treatment, HMRC should only verify the details on the preferential proof of origin. A certificate of marketing standards is not a preferential proof of origin.

12th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the life assurance scheme provided by the Government to the families of health and care workers on the frontline during the covid-19 outbreak will be extended to cover (a) bus drivers and (b) other frontline workers.

The new life assurance scheme announced on 27th April covers frontline NHS and social care workers who die from coronavirus. This recognises the increased risks faced by these staff during the course of their essential and lifesaving work during the crisis, and the need to encourage retired doctors and nurses to fill staff shortages and boost service capacity.

It pays a £60k tax-free lump sum where staff die as a result of coronavirus and had been recently working in frontline roles and locations where personal care is provided to individuals who have contracted coronavirus.

The government will continue to review the support provided to key workers on the front-line.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
19th Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he will take to ensure (a) circuses and (b) other leisure businesses who do not have fixed premises with a rateable value can potentially benefit from the cash grants being made available to other leisure businesses with a rateable value of £51,000 or less.

The Government has set out a package of measures to support businesses through this period of disruption caused by COVID-19, including those businesses not eligible for the small business grant or the retail, leisure and hospitality grant.

This support for business includes the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan scheme for small and medium-sized businesses, a statutory sick pay relief package, the HMRC Time To Pay Scheme, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help firms continue to keep people in employment and a new lending facility from the Bank of England for larger firms.

These measures provide a comprehensive, coordinated and coherent response to what is a serious and evolving economic situation. As the wider economic picture becomes clearer, the Government will do whatever it takes to get the nation through the impacts of COVID-19 and the Government stands ready to announce further action wherever necessary.

15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many (a) entries, (b) offences, (c) landlords, and (d) letting agents are currently included in his Department’s rogue landlord database.

The Government intends to continue to develop and implement measures to widen access to and expand the scope of the database of rogue landlords and property agents. We will also give greater powers to drive improvements in standards, and empower tenants to make an informed choice about who they rent from. We intend to bring forward this legislation as part of the Renters Reform Bill.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many entries were added to his Department’s rogue landlord database in each month since April 2018.

The Government intends to continue to develop and implement measures to widen access to and expand the scope of the database of rogue landlords and property agents. We will also give greater powers to drive improvements in standards, and empower tenants to make an informed choice about who they rent from. We intend to bring forward this legislation as part of the Renters Reform Bill.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department plans to make the database of rogue landlords and property agents introduced in April 2018 publicly accessible.

The Government intends to continue to develop and implement measures to widen access to and expand the scope of the database of rogue landlords and property agents. We will also give greater powers to drive improvements in standards, and empower tenants to make an informed choice about who they rent from. We intend to bring forward this legislation as part of the Renters Reform Bill.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much of the funding available for the Affordable Homes Programme 2016-21 will be included in the £12.2 billion announced in Budget 2020.

At Budget 2020 the Government announced we are investing £12.2 billion to build affordable homes between 2021/22 and 2025/26.

Of this, £9.5 billion is new funding and £2 billion is for long-term strategic partnerships previously announced in September 2018.

This will form the new Affordable Homes Programme. A further £700 million was already allocated as part of the 2016-22 Affordable Homes Programme.

The existing Affordable Homes Programme?will be extended by one year. This will help to mitigate the impact of site closures due to COVID-19.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the March 2020 Budget, whether the £12.2 billion available for affordable housing from 2021-22 includes funds from the £9 billion Affordable Homes Programme 2016-21.

At Budget 2020 the Government announced we are investing £12.2 billion to build affordable homes between 2021/22 and 2025/26.

Of this, £9.5 billion is new funding and £2 billion is for long-term strategic partnerships previously announced in September 2018.

This will form the new Affordable Homes Programme. A further £700 million was already allocated as part of the 2016-22 Affordable Homes Programme.

The existing Affordable Homes Programme?will be extended by one year. This will help to mitigate the impact of site closures due to COVID-19.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans he has to publish a social housing White Paper.

The Government will publish the Social Housing White Paper later this year.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 16 June 2020 to Question 58821 on High Rise Flats: Insulation, in relation to how many of the 10 buildings, against which the Department is aware of enforcement action having been taken, the Joint Inspection Team provided support to local authorities.

Of those that only had an 'intent' to remediate in December 2019, the Joint Inspection Team provided support to local authorities for enforcement on two of these buildings, resulting in two improvement notices being issued.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Building Safety Programme: 26th monthly data release, data as at 31 December 2019, published by his Department, how many of the 75 private sector residential buildings with ACM cladding systems unlikely to meet building regulations that were reported in that data release as having responded with an intent to remediate and are developing plans (a) do not yet have a remediation plan in place and (b) have had enforcement action taken against them.

As at 31 May 2020, there were 40 high-rise private sector residential buildings that had reported an intent to remediate and are developing plans. Where building owners are failing to make acceptable progress, those responsible should expect further action to be taken – including tougher enforcement action by local authorities and Fire and Rescue Services.

Of those that only had an 'intent' to remediate in December 2019, the Department is aware of enforcement action that has been taken against 10 of them, including those where the Joint Inspection Team has provided support to local authorities.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether (a) the £3.2 billion in funding allocated to help local authorities respond to the covid-19 outbreak and (b) any future funding to assist local authorities to support vulnerable groups during the covid-19 outbreak can be used to accommodate and support people with (i) conditions attached to their leave and (ii) no leave at all, and who have no recourse to public funds.

The Government is aware of concerns about those with no recourse to public funds experiencing homelessness during the COVID-19 crisis.

We are ensuring local authorities are supported, with £3.2 million in targeted funding to help support individuals who are sleeping rough off the streets, and an additional £3.2 billion provided to local authorities as part of the wider government response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

This funding has been provided to help local authorities to reduce risks to public health and to support individuals on the basis of need.

The legal position on those with no recourse to public funds has not been amended.

The Government recognises that these are unprecedented times, and expects local authorities to support people who are sleeping rough, and also to minimise unnecessary risks to public health, acting within the law.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what source of additional funding his Department has identified to meet the needs of homeless people accommodated through the Everyone In programme for (a) long-term secure accommodation, where people are (i) eligible for housing benefit but the accommodation costs result in them being affected by the benefit cap, and (ii) not eligible for housing benefit; (b) tenancy support services; and (c) mental health and other long-term support needs.

We are?bringing forward?over?£160 million?this year?to?provide?3,300?homes for rough sleepers. This marks a significant acceleration of the £381 million announced at Budget, ensuring that 6,000 new housing units will be put into the system? as part of the Rough Sleeping Accommodation Project. Of the £160 million in 2020/21, £130 million is capital funding for the acquisition or renovation of homes. £30 million is revenue funding to pay for tenancy-sustainment support, with further support funding available throughout the following years of the programme. In addition to accelerating this capital spend for investment in housing stock, the Government is also increasing the revenue support of the total programme by 37 per cent (£53 million) over the four-year lifetime of the programme to make sure that the rough sleepers have the support they need to stay off the streets for good.

Regarding other accommodation costs, individuals can approach their local authority for a Discretionary Housing Payment (DHP) if they need additional support to meet rental costs. The Government has raised DHP funding by £40 million this year, bringing the total to £180 million. The Government has also increased the Local Housing Allowance rates for Universal Credit and Housing Benefit claimants so that they are set at the 30th percentile of market rents.

There are no changes in respect of the benefit cap. However, the below exemptions continue to apply:

  • Universal Credit claimants with household earnings of at least £604 in an assessment period, which can include statutory sick pay, employer sick pay and earnings from self-employment, will continue to be exempt from the cap.
  • In addition, Universal Credit claimants may benefit from a nine-month ‘grace period’ where their benefit will not be capped if they have a sustained work record. i.e. monthly earnings of at least £569 (£604 from April 2020) for the past year.
  • Housing Benefit claimants who are entitled to Working Tax Credit will continue to be exempt from the cap.
  • Exemptions will continue to apply for the most vulnerable claimants that are entitled to disability benefits and carer benefits.

Regarding those not eligible for housing benefit or other public funds, we are ensuring local authorities are supported, with £3.2 million in targeted funding to help support individuals who are sleeping rough off the streets, and an additional £3.2 billion provided to local authorities as part of the wider Government response to the Covid-19 pandemic. This funding has been provided to help local authorities to reduce risks to public health and to support individuals on the basis of need. The Government recognises that these are unprecedented times and expects local authorities to support people who are sleeping rough, and also to minimise unnecessary risks to public health, acting within the law.

We are providing a further £262 million for substance misuse treatment and recovery services to meet the needs of rough sleepers and those at risk.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate his Department has made of the number of homeless people accommodated through the Everyone In programme who have no recourse to public funds in (a) the London Borough of Ealing, (b) London and (c) England.

Yesterday, the Government published the management information that supports the announcements from Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Rt Hon Robert Jenrick MP, and Dame Louise Casey that 15,000 people have been accommodated by local authorities in response to Covid-19.

We have collected management information from 302 local authorities nationally.?We are continuing to work with local authorities to understand the work they are doing to help the most vulnerable in our society.

£3.2 billion of additional Government funding has now been made available to help councils respond to coronavirus, including meeting the costs of accommodating some of the most vulnerable people in our society. This is in addition to £3.2 million specifically targeted to help rough sleepers during the coronavirus emergency and the £489 million committed in 2020 to 2021 to help rough sleepers, a £121 million increase in funding from the previous year.

This funding has been provided to help local authorities to reduce risks to public health and to support individuals on the basis of need.

The Government is aware of concerns about those with no recourse to public funds experiencing homelessness during the Covid-19 crisis.

The legal position on those with no recourse to public funds has not been amended.

The Government recognises that these are unprecedented times, and expects local authorities to support people who are sleeping rough, and also to minimise unnecessary risks to public health, acting within the law.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, from which budgets will funding be allocated to meet the (a) immediate and (b) long-term needs of people accommodated through the Everyone In programme and who have no recourse to public funds.

The Government is aware of concerns about those with no recourse to public funds experiencing homelessness during the Covid-19 emergency.

We are ensuring local authorities are supported, with £3.2 million in targeted funding to help support individuals who are sleeping rough off the streets, and an additional £3.2 billion provided to local authorities as part of the wider government response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

This funding has been provided to help local authorities to reduce risks to public health and to support individuals on the basis of need.

The legal position on those with no recourse to public funds has not been amended.

The Government recognises that these are unprecedented times, and expects local authorities to support people who are sleeping rough, and also to minimise unnecessary risks to public health, acting within the law.

While local authorities continue to provide accommodation to those that need it, it is only responsible that we work with partners to consider how best to support the rough sleepers who have been moved into accommodation once the immediate emergency has been resolved.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people who became homeless after 23 March 2020 who have been granted accommodation under the Everyone In programme; and what the cost of that accommodation has been, in (a) the London Borough of Ealing, (b) London, and (c) England.

Yesterday, the Government published the management information that supports the announcements from Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Rt Hon Robert Jenrick MP, and Dame Louise Casey that 15,000 people have been accommodated by local authorities in response to Covid-19.

We have collected management information from 302 local authorities nationally.?We are continuing to work with local authorities to understand the work they are doing to help the most vulnerable in our society.

£3.2 billion of additional Government funding has now been made available to help councils respond to coronavirus, including meeting the costs of accommodating some of the most vulnerable people in our society. This is in addition to £3.2 million specifically targeted to help rough sleepers during the coronavirus emergency and the £489 million committed in 2020 to 2021 to help rough sleepers, a £121 million increase in funding from the previous year.

This funding has been provided to help local authorities to reduce risks to public health and to support individuals on the basis of need.

The Government is aware of concerns about those with no recourse to public funds experiencing homelessness during the Covid-19 crisis.

The legal position on those with no recourse to public funds has not been amended.

The Government recognises that these are unprecedented times, and expects local authorities to support people who are sleeping rough, and also to minimise unnecessary risks to public health, acting within the law.

15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to his Department's Coronavirus (COVID-19): planning update published on 13 May 2020, whether it is the Government's policy to encourage local authorities to consider whether it would be appropriate to allow developers to defer delivery of section 106 planning obligations including (a) financial contributions, (b) on-site affordable housing requirements, or (c) other planning obligations.

Contributions from developers play an important role in delivering the infrastructure that new homes require. Local planning authorities already have significant flexibilities to defer section 106 payments of all kinds. We have published additional planning guidance to encourage local authorities to consider using these flexibilities to ensure that infrastructure and affordable housing is delivered at the right time. It remains for the local authority to determine what may be appropriate to defer.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the October 2019 consultation on the Future Homes Standard, whether proposals to restrict local planning authorities from setting energy efficiency standards for new homes higher than those required by national Building Regulations would restrict the Mayor of London from introducing policies in new London Plans that require on-site carbon reductions from major residential developments beyond the baseline of part L of Building Regulations.

The?proposed Future Homes Standard?aims to create?new build?homes?fit for the future through?low carbon?heating?and?energy efficiency,?from?2025.? The Future Homes Standard consultation closed on 7 February 2020. We are currently analysing over 3,000 responses and will publish the Government’s response in due course. We are consulting on an ambitious set of changes proposing minimum standards for building fabric that are higher than ever, which means there may no longer be a need for local planning authorities to set higher standards . Although I cannot comment on the specifics of the London Plan during its ‘Intention to Publish’ stage, I will carefully consider the Mayor of London’s response to my Department’s consultation alongside other responses received.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)