Shabana Mahmood Portrait

Shabana Mahmood

Labour - Birmingham, Ladywood

28,582 (67.9%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 6th May 2010

Shadow Secretary of State for Justice

(since September 2023)

Shabana Mahmood is not a member of any APPGs
4 Former APPG memberships
Bangladesh, Commonwealth Games, Commonweatlth Games, Hajj and Umrah
National campaign co-ordinator
9th May 2021 - 4th Sep 2023
Public Accounts Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 20th Apr 2021
Public Accounts Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
International Trade Committee
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Draft Investigatory Powers Bill (Joint Committee)
26th Nov 2015 - 11th Feb 2016
Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury
8th May 2015 - 14th Sep 2015
Shadow Minister (Treasury)
7th Oct 2013 - 8th May 2015
Shadow Minister (Business, Innovation and Skills)
7th Oct 2011 - 7th Oct 2013
Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Work and Pensions Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 2nd Nov 2010


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Shabana Mahmood has voted in 616 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Shabana Mahmood Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Alex Chalk (Conservative)
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
(9 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(5 debate interactions)
Edward Argar (Conservative)
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Ministry of Justice
(23 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(9 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Fire Safety Bill 2019-21
(1,628 words contributed)
Trade Bill 2019-21
(1,468 words contributed)
Finance Act 2020
(734 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Shabana Mahmood's debates

Birmingham, Ladywood Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Recognise the state of Palestine to help stop the conflict from Israel. Not recognising the Palestinian state allows Israel to continue their persecution of the Palestinians.

The Government should introduce sanctions against Israel, including blocking all trade, and in particular arms.

The UK Government plans to introduce “Magnitsky law”, a law which targets people who commit gross human rights violations. Through this law or alternative means, this petition urges the UK Government to impose sanctions on China for their human rights violations on the Uyghur people.


Latest EDMs signed by Shabana Mahmood

22nd January 2020
Shabana Mahmood signed this EDM on Wednesday 22nd January 2020

Max Freedman's service to parliamentary staff

Tabled by: John Cryer (Labour - Leyton and Wanstead)
That this House recognises Max Freedman's commitment over 10 years as the chair of the Parliamentary staff UNITE trade union branch representing staff of all parties in Parliament and constituency offices; appreciates that over the past decade he has worked tirelessly in representing staff of hon. Members both in individual …
77 signatures
(Most recent: 23 Sep 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 56
Scottish National Party: 7
Independent: 6
Conservative: 3
Liberal Democrat: 2
Plaid Cymru: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Green Party: 1
4th September 2019
Shabana Mahmood signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 4th September 2019

CONFLICT IN KASHMIR

Tabled by: Naz Shah (Labour - Bradford West)
That this House expresses huge concern about the revocation of Articles 370 and 35A in Kashmir by the Indian Government, stripping away the right to special status for the people of Kashmir; is extremely alarmed by the road to ethnic cleansing opened up by the ongoing communications blackout and the …
27 signatures
(Most recent: 30 Sep 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 23
Conservative: 1
Independent: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Shabana Mahmood's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Shabana Mahmood, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Shabana Mahmood

2 Adjournment Debates led by Shabana Mahmood

Shabana Mahmood has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4 Other Department Questions
6th Oct 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, pursuant to her oral contribution of 4 June 2020, official report, column 1003, on public health England review: covid-19 disparities, what recent progress has been made on the Government's review of its work to lessen disparities in infection and death rates of covid-19 between Black, Asian, and minority ethnic communities and the wider population.

I am leading cross-government work on the findings of the Public Health England Report “Disparities in the risk and outcomes of COVID-19”. The Race Disparity Unit (RDU) is supporting me in this


Following work undertaken by the RDU, the Office for National statistics, and the wider scientific community, we have made good progress in recent weeks in identifying the key drivers of these disparities and the relationships between the different risk factors for ethnic minority communities. I have also been reviewing the effectiveness and impact of current actions being undertaken by government departments and their agencies to directly lessen the disparities. I will shortly be sending the first quarterly progress report on my work to the Prime Minister and the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, as required by the terms of reference.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps her Department is taking to ensure people living in multi-generational households do not have an increased risk of contracting covid-19.

The Government has provided a range of guidance to support those living in multi-generational housing, alongside detailed advice to employers and key workers on how they can protect themselves and to reduce transmission. We will continue to ensure that our guidance is clear and enables people to protect themselves adequately, this includes guidance for those shielding. Supporting this guidance, we have given councils an additional £1.6bn COVID-19 budget fund to help them protect people during this national emergency.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent progress the Government has made on reducing the increased risk to Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities from covid-19.

The Government is implementing significant measures to reduce the spread of the virus in all communities, especially for people who may be at higher risk. This includes ensuring that those in high-contact professions get targeted testing, issuing updated guidance on workplace safety and translating key public health messages into multiple different languages.

I am also leading work on the findings of the Public Health England Report “Disparities in the risk and outcomes of COVID-19”. Following work undertaken by the scientific community, the Office for National Statistics and the Race Disparity Unit, we have made good progress in recent weeks in identifying the key drivers of these disparities and the relationships between the different risk factors for ethnic minority communities. I have also been reviewing the effectiveness and impact of current actions being undertaken by government departments and their agencies to directly lessen the disparities. I will shortly be sending the first quarterly progress report on my work to the Prime Minister.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what cross-departmental steps the Government is taking to reduce the increased risk posed by covid-19 to black, Asian, and minority ethnic communities.

The Government has implemented significant measures to reduce the spread of the virus in all communities, especially for people who may be at higher risk, and is working with COVID teams across departments and agencies to communicate and engage directly with ethnic minority communities.

I am also working with the Race Disparity Unit and the Department for Health and Social Care to carry forward work on the findings of the Public Health England Report “COVID-19: review of disparities in risks and outcomes”. This includes reviewing the effectiveness and impact of current actions being undertaken by relevant government departments and their agencies to directly lessen disparities in infection and death rates of COVID-19.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 11 January 2021 to Question 130678 on Import: Ethics, when his Department plans its next review on commercial policy and guidance advocating a systematic approach to identifying and tackling modern slavery and labour abuses in Government supply chains to be (a) undertaken and (b) completed.

Procurement Policy Note 05/19: Tackling Modern Slavery in Government Supply Chains was published in September 2019 and sets out how UK Government departments must take action to ensure modern slavery risks are identified and managed in government supply chains.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he has taken to ensure the Government does not procure (a) cotton from Xinjiang and (b) other unethically sourced products.

The UK has taken a leading international role in holding China to account for its entirely unacceptable human rights violations and in Xinjiang in particular, including in respect of credible evidence of forced labour. The UK led the first international joint statements on this issue at the UN Human Rights Council in June.

The Government is committed to working to improve action to tackle modern slavery in supply chains, and has published commercial policy and guidance which advocates a systematic approach to identifying and tackling modern slavery and labour abuses in government supply chains, focussing on areas of the highest risk. We are keeping this matter under close review.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that cross-government strategies to ease covid-19 public health restrictions do not put people living in multi-generational households at an increased risk of infection.

As set out in Our Plan to Rebuild, the Government is introducing a range of adjustments to social distancing measures, timing these carefully according to both the current transmission rate of the virus and the Government’s ability to ensure safety. The steps for modifying social distancing measures are set out in the plan, with strict conditions to safely move from each step to the next.

The government has committed to keeping social distancing measures under close review. As part of this work, we have been considering the impact of these measures on different groups in society or those from particular backgrounds.

We have published guidance for people with grandparents, parents and children living together which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance/guidance-for-households-with-grandparents-parents-and-children-living-together-where-someone-is-at-increased-risk-or-has-symptoms-of-coronavirus-cov

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Minister the Cabinet Office, what recent assessment he has made of whether social distancing measures implemented by the Government in response to covid-19 disproportionately put black, Asian, and ethnic minority communities at an increased risk of contracting covid-19.

We share concerns that COVID-19 may be adversely affecting BAME communities. That is why the Chief Medical Officer has commissioned Public Health England to review the impact on health that COVID-19 has on those from ethnic minority backgrounds.

The findings of this review will help to inform what further action we can take to better protect these communities.

24th Apr 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that Government strategies to ease social distancing measures take into account the living circumstances of multi-generational households.

The government has committed to keeping social distancing measures under close review. As part of this work, we have been considering the impact of these measures on different groups in society or those from particular backgrounds.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
18th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what estimate his Department has made of average amount of financial payment applied to consumers under the energy bill discount scheme.

The Energy Bills Discount Scheme (EBDS) discount is applied directly to the energy bills of eligible consumers by their energy providers. The Department does not hold information on the average payment made per consumer.

The Government has provided just under £26 million of support under the EBDS so far and will continue providing support until March 2024. Further data on payments made under the scheme was published on 18th July 2023 and is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-bills-discount-scheme-payments-made-under-the-scheme.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what the average financial award was to residential non-commercial consumers under the Non-Domestic Alternative Fuel Payment scheme.

The Non-Domestic Alternative Fuel Payment (NDAFP) scheme targeted non-domestic consumers including businesses and voluntary organisations. In some cases, residential consumers were able to benefit from the scheme, where their energy supply was provided through an intermediary who has a non-domestic energy contract (such as a landlord). In these cases, the intermediary was required to pass through support to end users. The Department does not hold information on the average financial award to residential consumers in this instance.

In total the Government provided just under £67 million of support under the NDAFP scheme. Further data on payments under the scheme were published on 18th July 2023 and can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/non-domestic-alternative-fuel-payment-ndafp-payments-made-under-the-scheme.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
30th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether domestic customers on private wire electricity networks will be included in the Energy Bill Discount Scheme.

The Energy Bill Discount Scheme supports non-domestic consumers with their energy bills, including those supplied via private wire arrangements. Domestic customers on private wire electricity are also eligible to apply for the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding (EBSS AF) if they meet the full eligibility requirements, which launched on 27 February and will close on 31 May 2023. Further information can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/non-domestic-alternative-fuel-payment-scheme-great-britain-guidance-for-electricity-suppliers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of people on Universal Credit who are no longer eligible for the Warm Homes Discount following the changes to eligibility in 2022.

As households on Universal Credit previously applied through their suppliers, who set their own application processes and eligibility criteria and selected successful applicants each year, the Government has not been able to assess how many households are no longer eligible.

In England and Wales, over 770,000 households in receipt of Universal Credit were identified as eligible to receive a rebate automatically. Additionally, the Government has contacted potentially eligible households that could not be provided with the rebate automatically. They may become eligible if they contact the Warm Home Discount helpline.

31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of people living in houses with an Energy Performance Certificate score of D or below who are no longer eligible for the warm homes discount following changes to eligibility in 2022.

As households previously applied through their suppliers, who set their own application processes and eligibility criteria and selected successful applicants each year, the Government has not been able to assess how many households are no longer eligible.

The Government does not have data available on eligibility by Energy Performance Certificate energy rating.

31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has been made of the number of people living in terraced houses who are no longer eligible for the warm homes discount following the changes to eligibility in 2022.

As households previously applied through their suppliers, who set their own application processes and eligibility criteria and selected successful applicants each year, the Government has not been able to assess how many households are no longer eligible.

3.9 million terraced properties in England and Wales were calculated as having a low energy cost score using property characteristic data from the Valuation Office Agency. Although 3.0 million had a high energy cost score, not all of the households living in these properties will be eligible, for instance if they do not meet the low-income criteria or were not named on the participating energy supplier’s electricity bill or account.

16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 December 2022 to Question 104179 on Energy Bills Rebate, what steps he will take against businesses that are not passing on the discount from the Energy Bills Support Scheme to non-domestic customers with private wire electricity networks.

The Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding will provide support of £400 for energy bills for around 900,000 households without a direct relationship with a domestic electricity supplier. This is expected to include households on private wire networks. On 19th December 2022, the Government announced that the application portal for the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding is due to open later in January, with a dedicated customer helpline available to assist customers without online access.

6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to help ensure that energy companies pass on Energy Bills Support Scheme payments to their customers.

The Energy Bills Support Scheme is delivering, via suppliers, a £400 non-repayable government discount in six instalments from October to March, to help with energy this winter. 29 million households are eligible. The Government is closely monitoring the scheme’s delivery, and requires suppliers to report to monthly. The most recent data shows 97% of the payments due have been issued.

6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of total spending on the Energy Bill Support Scheme in (a) England, (b) the West Midlands, (c) Birmingham.

The Energy Bills Support Scheme is an £11.7bn scheme which forms part of the £37bn cost-of-living assistance package announced in May 2022. The Department will publish location data shortly.

6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the mechanism for energy companies passing on Energy Bill Support Scheme payments to their customers.

The Energy Bills Support Scheme is delivering, via suppliers, a £400 non-repayable government discount in six instalments from October to March to help with energy bills this winter. 29 million households in GB are eligible. The Government is closely monitoring the scheme’s delivery and requires suppliers to report to Government monthly. Most recent data shows 97% of the payments due have gone out.

24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether residential flats that use private wire electricity networks will be included in the support provided by the Energy Bill Relief Scheme.

A landlord may be eligible for a reduction in energy bills under the Energy Bill Relief Scheme if they are on a non-domestic energy contract and meet the scheme eligibility criteria. Landlords and other intermediaries must pass the benefits of the scheme onto their tenants in a reasonable and proportionate way. This will help ensure homes and businesses are protected from excessively high energy bills over the winter period.

24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether people living in residential flats that use (a) heat networks and (b) private wire electricity networks will receive the £400 Energy Bills Support Scheme discount.

The Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding will provide support of £400 for energy bills for the small minority of households who will not be reached through the EBSS. This includes those who do not have a domestic electricity meter or a direct relationship with an energy supplier, including heat network consumers on a private wire system. Heat network consumers who have a domestic electricity meter will receive a £400 reduction in their energy bills through the Energy Bills Support Scheme.

The Government is working urgently with a range of organisations, such as local authorities, as well as Devolved Administrations and across UK Government, to finalise the details for these households and have the process up and running for applications this winter.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the criteria published on the Department for Work and Pension website which sets out that people are eligible for the warm homes discount only if they receive the Guarantee Credit element of Pension Credit, certain means-tested benefits or tax credits, whether any impact assessment was carried out before setting those criteria.

The Government consulted on the future of the scheme for England and Wales https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/warm-home-discount-better-targeted-support-from-2022 last summer and published Impact Assessments alongside the consultation and Government Response.

The Government also consulted on the scheme in Scotland https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/warm-home-discount-scotland this spring and published supporting analysis.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps to inform people who do not receive means-tested benefits that they are not eligible to receive the warm homes discount.

From this winter, the Government will reform the Warm Home Discount scheme in England and Wales. The Government is writing to households who are eligible to receive a rebate automatically, as well as households who need to call a helpline to determine if they are eligible.

There will be an online eligibility checker to help people understand if they may be eligible, and the Government is sharing information on the new scheme with energy suppliers and charities.

There is a separate Warm Home Discount scheme in Scotland. The Government will write to eligible households who are in receipt of Pension Credit Guarantee Credit, while other low-income households should check with their energy supplier how they may apply.

22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential combined effect of the removal of the £20 a week uplift to universal credit and increases in gas utility prices on estimated rates of fuel poverty in (a) Birmingham Ladywood constituency and (b) the West Midlands in the next 12 months.

Thanks to our price cap we are able to protect customers from higher bills.

The Government introduced a price cap in 2019 which saves 15 million households on default tariffs up to £100 a year on average. The level of the price cap is set by Ofgem, the independent regulator, and is based on a range of factors including regional network costs.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what contingency plans he has in place for customers in the event of a major gas provider collapsing.

The Government has robust processes in place to ensure continuity of supply for customers. These include the Supplier of Last Resort process, which is operated by Ofgem, the independent regulator. The Government also has powers under Special Administration. Government will continue to work closely with Ofgem to protect customers. For more information on this process visit the Ofgem website: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/supplier-last-resort-revised-guidance-2016.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions officials in his Department have had with representatives of energy companies on the effect of their potential collapse on consumers.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State and I have held a series of bilateral and roundtable events with leading energy suppliers, smaller and challenger suppliers and consumer groups to hear about the challenges they currently face and explore ways to protect consumers and businesses

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of creating a whitelist and blacklist of companies that do and do not meet their obligations to uphold human rights throughout their supply chains.

BEIS thanks the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Select Committee for its report on ‘Uyghur forced labour in Xinjiang and UK value chains’, published on 17 March 2021. The Government takes very seriously the concerns that the report highlights. On Tuesday 22 March, the UK Government, alongside the EU, US and Canada, placed sanctions on four Chinese officials and one public entity that are responsible for the egregious human rights violations taking place in Xinjiang. We have backed up our international action by robust domestic measures that help ensure that British businesses are not complicit in human rights violations in Xinjiang. The Government will formally respond to the report and its recommendations by 17 May 2021.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 January 2021 to Question 130679 on Imports: Ethics, how often the Government reviews its guidance to key stakeholders to underline the need for vigilance against supply chain abuses; and when the next such review is planned.

As set out in the previous answer, the Government is clear it expects UK businesses to act responsibly to ensure their products are sourced ethically, and to consider due diligence approaches for their supply arrangements as a means to ensure this. The Government keeps guidance under constant review. We published updated Overseas Business Risk Guidance for China on 12 January 2021, which urges businesses with links to Xinjiang to undertake careful and robust due diligence to ensure their operations do not directly or indirectly contribute to human rights violations.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that UK businesses do not use (a) cotton from Xinjiang and (b) other unethically sourced products.

The UK has taken a leading international role in holding China to account for its human rights violations in Xinjiang, including in respect of credible evidence of forced labour. As set out in our National Action Plan for the UN Guiding Principles on business and human rights, the Government’s clear and strong expectation is that businesses act responsibly to ensure their products are sourced ethically, that they conduct due diligence on their supply arrangements to ensure this, and that they are transparent about where their materials and products are sourced from.

The Government has issued guidance and Ministers and officials hold regular meetings with businesses and industry stakeholders to underline the need for vigilance against any supply chain abuses.

22nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress her Department has made on the implementation of the recommendations of the fan led review of football governance.

The Government published its response to the recommendations made by the Independent Fan Led Review of Football Governance in April 2022. We absolutely recognise the need for football to be reformed to ensure the game’s sustainability in the long term. We are now taking the time to consider the policy, but we remain committed to publishing a White Paper setting out our detailed response to the Fan Led Review of Football Governance, and will set this out in due course.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what her policy is on the increased regulation of English football.

The Government published its response to the recommendations made by the Independent Fan Led Review of Football Governance in April 2022. We absolutely recognise the need for football to be reformed to ensure the game’s sustainability in the long term. We are now taking the time to consider the policy, but we remain committed to publishing a White Paper setting out our detailed response to the Fan Led Review of Football Governance, and will set this out in due course.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress she has made on introducing legislative proposals for an independent regulator of professional football.

The Government published its response to the recommendations made by the Independent Fan Led Review of Football Governance in April 2022. We absolutely recognise the need for football to be reformed to ensure the game’s sustainability in the long term. We are now taking the time to consider the policy, but we remain committed to publishing a White Paper setting out our detailed response to the Fan Led Review of Football Governance, and will set this out in due course.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what support his Department is providing to the entertainment sector to help ensure that modern slavery is removed from its supply chains.

The prevalence of modern slavery and complexity of global supply chains means that it is highly unlikely that any sector or company is immune from the risks of modern slavery. The Government encourages companies to report transparently about how they are mitigating modern slavery risks and to use their modern slavery statements to demonstrate year on year progress.

Section 54 of the The Modern Slavery Act 2015 requires certain businesses in all sectors with a turnover of £36m or more (including within the arts, culture, entertainment industry) to report annually on the steps they have taken to prevent modern slavery in their operations and supply chains.

The transparency legislation was designed to enable consumers, investors and civil society to scrutinise business action. To improve the quality and detail of reporting and accelerate action to prevent modern slavery, the Government announced an ambitious package of changes to strengthen the reporting requirements on businesses and has committed to introduce financial penalties for those that fail to meet their obligations under section 54.

In March 2021, the Government launched a digital registry for modern slavery statements which will enhance transparency by making statements available in one place for the first time. It will provide greater visibility of the steps organisations are taking to prevent modern slavery in their global supply chains and empowering investors, consumers and civil society to scrutinise action and monitor progress.

These measures, including requiring organisations to publish their statement on the Government modern slavery registry, require primary legislation and will be introduced when parliamentary time allows.

DCMS, along with other government departments, will be publishing its own Modern Slavery statement in September 2021. This will extend to our Arms Length Bodies that have a budget of at least £36m.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what impact assessments his Department has conducted on modern slavery in supply chains in the arts and culture sector.

The prevalence of modern slavery and complexity of global supply chains means that it is highly unlikely that any sector or company is immune from the risks of modern slavery. The Government encourages companies to report transparently about how they are mitigating modern slavery risks and to use their modern slavery statements to demonstrate year on year progress.

Section 54 of the The Modern Slavery Act 2015 requires certain businesses in all sectors with a turnover of £36m or more (including within the arts, culture, entertainment industry) to report annually on the steps they have taken to prevent modern slavery in their operations and supply chains.

The transparency legislation was designed to enable consumers, investors and civil society to scrutinise business action. To improve the quality and detail of reporting and accelerate action to prevent modern slavery, the Government announced an ambitious package of changes to strengthen the reporting requirements on businesses and has committed to introduce financial penalties for those that fail to meet their obligations under section 54.

In March 2021, the Government launched a digital registry for modern slavery statements which will enhance transparency by making statements available in one place for the first time. It will provide greater visibility of the steps organisations are taking to prevent modern slavery in their global supply chains and empowering investors, consumers and civil society to scrutinise action and monitor progress.

These measures, including requiring organisations to publish their statement on the Government modern slavery registry, require primary legislation and will be introduced when parliamentary time allows.

DCMS, along with other government departments, will be publishing its own Modern Slavery statement in September 2021. This will extend to our Arms Length Bodies that have a budget of at least £36m.

4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what financial support his Department has made available to (a) museums and (b) art galleries during the covid-19 outbreak.

My department is in constant contact with sector bodies and museums directly to assess impacts and are working to develop support for the sector in response to COVID-19. We are also in close contact with counterparts in the devolved nations with culture being a devolved matter. Significant support has been delivered at speed by DCMS arm’s-length bodies. Arts Council England having launched a £160m Emergency Funding Package, the National Lottery Heritage Fund launching a £50m Heritage Emergency Fund, and Historic England launching a £2m Emergency Fund. All of which are delivering support across the sector.


We are also pleased that there has already been support pledged for the sector including through the Job Retention Scheme and the availability of grants of up to £25,000 to leisure businesses, including museums operating from smaller premises through the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund. The Government continues to monitor the impact of these and other measures.

10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what data her Department holds on the number of further education (a) arts, (b) vocational, (c) science and (d) technical courses that have been discontinued in the last two years.

The government’s qualifications reforms are designed to ensure that qualifications at level 3 and below are necessary, high quality, and have a clear purpose. A levels and T Levels should be at the heart of level 3 study programmes going forward. We do allow for other small, alternative academic qualifications in strategically important areas, and additional technical qualifications in areas not covered by T Levels, in specialist occupations and in cross cutting areas, such as health and safety. Our new system places the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education occupational standards at the heart of technical education, because these have been designed by employers and will give young people the knowledge, skills and behaviours that employers need.

The number of further education qualifications from which the department has removed funding approval in the last two years is 5,768 (2021/22 and 2022/23 funding years).

This includes qualifications where funding approval has been removed as a result of the qualification having no or low publicly funded demand, or where qualifications have been reformed and newer qualifications developed in their place, for instance the introduction of new Essential Digital Skills Qualifications, which replaced older ICT qualifications.

This does not cover where an awarding organisation decides to discontinue one of its qualifications or where a college, or other education and training provider, decides to stop offering a qualification.

The department has not removed funding approval from any higher-level qualifications in the last two years.

Where the department intends to remove funding approval from qualifications, further education (FE) colleges or other education and training providers are made aware through the publication and communication of initial lists of qualifications in scope. There is a process for awarding organisations to appeal the decision to remove funding approval, and FE colleges or other education and training providers are encouraged to work with awarding organisations to submit evidence for appeals.

It is also important to point out that the department has and continues to consult on broader qualifications reform with colleges and other education and training providers.

In the last two funding years, 450 arts qualifications and 36 science qualifications have had funding approval removed. 5,282 other vocational and technical qualifications have also had funding approval removed during this period.

10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department consulted with Further Education colleges on the discontinuation of courses.

The government’s qualifications reforms are designed to ensure that qualifications at level 3 and below are necessary, high quality, and have a clear purpose. A levels and T Levels should be at the heart of level 3 study programmes going forward. We do allow for other small, alternative academic qualifications in strategically important areas, and additional technical qualifications in areas not covered by T Levels, in specialist occupations and in cross cutting areas, such as health and safety. Our new system places the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education occupational standards at the heart of technical education, because these have been designed by employers and will give young people the knowledge, skills and behaviours that employers need.

The number of further education qualifications from which the department has removed funding approval in the last two years is 5,768 (2021/22 and 2022/23 funding years).

This includes qualifications where funding approval has been removed as a result of the qualification having no or low publicly funded demand, or where qualifications have been reformed and newer qualifications developed in their place, for instance the introduction of new Essential Digital Skills Qualifications, which replaced older ICT qualifications.

This does not cover where an awarding organisation decides to discontinue one of its qualifications or where a college, or other education and training provider, decides to stop offering a qualification.

The department has not removed funding approval from any higher-level qualifications in the last two years.

Where the department intends to remove funding approval from qualifications, further education (FE) colleges or other education and training providers are made aware through the publication and communication of initial lists of qualifications in scope. There is a process for awarding organisations to appeal the decision to remove funding approval, and FE colleges or other education and training providers are encouraged to work with awarding organisations to submit evidence for appeals.

It is also important to point out that the department has and continues to consult on broader qualifications reform with colleges and other education and training providers.

In the last two funding years, 450 arts qualifications and 36 science qualifications have had funding approval removed. 5,282 other vocational and technical qualifications have also had funding approval removed during this period.

10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make an estimate of the number of (a) further and (b) higher education courses that have been discontinued in England in the last two years.

The government’s qualifications reforms are designed to ensure that qualifications at level 3 and below are necessary, high quality, and have a clear purpose. A levels and T Levels should be at the heart of level 3 study programmes going forward. We do allow for other small, alternative academic qualifications in strategically important areas, and additional technical qualifications in areas not covered by T Levels, in specialist occupations and in cross cutting areas, such as health and safety. Our new system places the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education occupational standards at the heart of technical education, because these have been designed by employers and will give young people the knowledge, skills and behaviours that employers need.

The number of further education qualifications from which the department has removed funding approval in the last two years is 5,768 (2021/22 and 2022/23 funding years).

This includes qualifications where funding approval has been removed as a result of the qualification having no or low publicly funded demand, or where qualifications have been reformed and newer qualifications developed in their place, for instance the introduction of new Essential Digital Skills Qualifications, which replaced older ICT qualifications.

This does not cover where an awarding organisation decides to discontinue one of its qualifications or where a college, or other education and training provider, decides to stop offering a qualification.

The department has not removed funding approval from any higher-level qualifications in the last two years.

Where the department intends to remove funding approval from qualifications, further education (FE) colleges or other education and training providers are made aware through the publication and communication of initial lists of qualifications in scope. There is a process for awarding organisations to appeal the decision to remove funding approval, and FE colleges or other education and training providers are encouraged to work with awarding organisations to submit evidence for appeals.

It is also important to point out that the department has and continues to consult on broader qualifications reform with colleges and other education and training providers.

In the last two funding years, 450 arts qualifications and 36 science qualifications have had funding approval removed. 5,282 other vocational and technical qualifications have also had funding approval removed during this period.

27th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he plans to take to help ensure that students from disadvantaged backgrounds are not impacted adversely by the withdrawal of funding for Applied General Qualifications.

The department will continue to fund a range of qualifications similar to current Applied General qualifications that can be taken alongside and as alternatives to A levels where they meet new criteria for quality and necessity. These qualifications will continue to play an important role for students taking mixed programmes with A levels and to support progression to higher education in areas where there are no A levels or T Levels.

Overall, we expect the impacts of our reforms to be positive because students will have access to higher quality qualifications in future, including new T Levels. This will put students, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds, in a stronger position to progress into further study or skilled employment. We are committed to supporting students to progress onto T Levels in future and have launched the T Level Transition Programme for those who are not yet ready to progress to a T Level but have the potential to succeed on it after some further preparation. We will also be exploring further through the upcoming consultation on study at level 2 and below what additional forms of support students may need to be ready to move onto A levels and other academic qualifications at level 3.

The impact assessment published alongside the response to the level 3 review consultation recognises that there will be some cost to providers in implementing changes, but we have not made an estimate of the overall cost to providers of changes stemming from the review. The updated impact assessment published alongside the Skills and Post-16 Education Bill in October 2021 provided some estimates of costs of providers familiarising themselves with the new qualification categories. However, the most significant costs are likely to come from the implementation of T Levels and we have provided significant support for providers to enable them to switch. This includes over £400 million in capital funding to put in place the industry standard equipment and facilities needed to deliver the first four T Level waves, over £200 million to build capacity for industry placements delivery, and the launch of the T Level Professional Development offer, which has so far ensured that almost 8,500 teachers and leaders have the support they need to deliver T Levels well.

Our reforms to the qualifications landscape are rightly ambitious, but we know that we would be wrong to push too hard and risk compromising quality. In November, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, adjusted the reform timetable to allow an additional year of T Level implementation before overlapping qualifications are removed. This extra year will allow us to continue to work hard to support the growth of T Levels and gives more notice to providers, awarding organisations, employers, students and parents so that they can prepare for the changes when they come in from August 2024.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
27th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has been made of the potential cost to (a) providers and (b) the public purse for the changes to providers’ curriculum offer that will be necessary following the withdrawal of funding for Applied General Qualifications.

The department will continue to fund a range of qualifications similar to current Applied General qualifications that can be taken alongside and as alternatives to A levels where they meet new criteria for quality and necessity. These qualifications will continue to play an important role for students taking mixed programmes with A levels and to support progression to higher education in areas where there are no A levels or T Levels.

Overall, we expect the impacts of our reforms to be positive because students will have access to higher quality qualifications in future, including new T Levels. This will put students, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds, in a stronger position to progress into further study or skilled employment. We are committed to supporting students to progress onto T Levels in future and have launched the T Level Transition Programme for those who are not yet ready to progress to a T Level but have the potential to succeed on it after some further preparation. We will also be exploring further through the upcoming consultation on study at level 2 and below what additional forms of support students may need to be ready to move onto A levels and other academic qualifications at level 3.

The impact assessment published alongside the response to the level 3 review consultation recognises that there will be some cost to providers in implementing changes, but we have not made an estimate of the overall cost to providers of changes stemming from the review. The updated impact assessment published alongside the Skills and Post-16 Education Bill in October 2021 provided some estimates of costs of providers familiarising themselves with the new qualification categories. However, the most significant costs are likely to come from the implementation of T Levels and we have provided significant support for providers to enable them to switch. This includes over £400 million in capital funding to put in place the industry standard equipment and facilities needed to deliver the first four T Level waves, over £200 million to build capacity for industry placements delivery, and the launch of the T Level Professional Development offer, which has so far ensured that almost 8,500 teachers and leaders have the support they need to deliver T Levels well.

Our reforms to the qualifications landscape are rightly ambitious, but we know that we would be wrong to push too hard and risk compromising quality. In November, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, adjusted the reform timetable to allow an additional year of T Level implementation before overlapping qualifications are removed. This extra year will allow us to continue to work hard to support the growth of T Levels and gives more notice to providers, awarding organisations, employers, students and parents so that they can prepare for the changes when they come in from August 2024.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
27th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the impact on providers of the Department’s proposed timeline of one year for withdrawing funding for Applied General Qualifications.

The department will continue to fund a range of qualifications similar to current Applied General qualifications that can be taken alongside and as alternatives to A levels where they meet new criteria for quality and necessity. These qualifications will continue to play an important role for students taking mixed programmes with A levels and to support progression to higher education in areas where there are no A levels or T Levels.

Overall, we expect the impacts of our reforms to be positive because students will have access to higher quality qualifications in future, including new T Levels. This will put students, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds, in a stronger position to progress into further study or skilled employment. We are committed to supporting students to progress onto T Levels in future and have launched the T Level Transition Programme for those who are not yet ready to progress to a T Level but have the potential to succeed on it after some further preparation. We will also be exploring further through the upcoming consultation on study at level 2 and below what additional forms of support students may need to be ready to move onto A levels and other academic qualifications at level 3.

The impact assessment published alongside the response to the level 3 review consultation recognises that there will be some cost to providers in implementing changes, but we have not made an estimate of the overall cost to providers of changes stemming from the review. The updated impact assessment published alongside the Skills and Post-16 Education Bill in October 2021 provided some estimates of costs of providers familiarising themselves with the new qualification categories. However, the most significant costs are likely to come from the implementation of T Levels and we have provided significant support for providers to enable them to switch. This includes over £400 million in capital funding to put in place the industry standard equipment and facilities needed to deliver the first four T Level waves, over £200 million to build capacity for industry placements delivery, and the launch of the T Level Professional Development offer, which has so far ensured that almost 8,500 teachers and leaders have the support they need to deliver T Levels well.

Our reforms to the qualifications landscape are rightly ambitious, but we know that we would be wrong to push too hard and risk compromising quality. In November, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, adjusted the reform timetable to allow an additional year of T Level implementation before overlapping qualifications are removed. This extra year will allow us to continue to work hard to support the growth of T Levels and gives more notice to providers, awarding organisations, employers, students and parents so that they can prepare for the changes when they come in from August 2024.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of the 18 January 2021 to Question 134396 on Children: Computers, how many schools in Birmingham have been in contact with his Department regarding a shortage of electronic devices during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services. The Department is securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged and vulnerable children and young people through the Get Help With Technology programme. This programme enables schools to support disadvantaged children in Years 3 to 11 who would not otherwise have access to an appropriate device for online learning.

As of Monday 8 February 2021, this includes over 980,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to schools, academy trusts and local authorities.

All schools, academy trusts, and local authorities have now been given the opportunity to order devices. Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts or local authorities to lend to children and young people who need them most during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

Figures on the number of devices already delivered is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data.

The Department is also able to supply routers and mobile data through this scheme. We have partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home. We are grateful to EE, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, Vodafone, BT Mobile and Lycamobile for their collaboration. The Department is currently engaged with additional mobile network operators and continues to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer.

Information and guidance for schools on how to register with the scheme and apply for devices and connectivity support can be found at: https://get-help-with-tech.education.gov.uk/.

Where schools need additional devices, above their allocations, they should contact the Department’s service team at covid.technology@education.gov.uk. They should include the number of disadvantaged pupils in Years 3 to 13 who require support and an explanation of how they have gathered this evidence.

This injection of devices is on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions his Department has with local education authorities on children with no access to remote learning equipment during the covid-19 outbreak who will be designated as vulnerable children and the'r local schools' ability to provide face-to-face learning in schools during the January 2021 lockdown.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

This includes over 750,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to schools, trusts and local authorities by the end of last week.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, trusts or local authorities who can lend these to children and young people who need them most during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

Some pupils who have difficulty engaging in remote education may be considered to be vulnerable children and therefore eligible to attend school. It is up to the child’s school or local authority to make this decision. The decision would be based on the needs of the child and their family, and a range of other factors, as set out in our published guidance.

The Department understands that schools may face staffing pressures that can create challenges in trying to deliver both high quality on site and remote education, especially where pupil attendance on site remains high due to high numbers of key worker and vulnerable children. Leaders in schools and colleges should ensure the balance of on site and remote teaching is manageable for staff and reflect this in the offer posted on their school or college website.

For schools that do not already have a full remote education curriculum or resources in place, or where they may face staffing pressures, the Department strongly recommends that they consider using Oak National Academy or other high quality resource providers.

9,294 laptops have been delivered directly to Birmingham local authority this academic year. Further devices have also been delivered to academy trusts that include schools located in Birmingham local authority which are not included in this figure.

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how will parents will be notified that they have a right for their children to attend school if they do not have access to remote learning equipment during the January 2021 covid-19 lockdown period.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

This includes over 750,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to schools, trusts and local authorities by the end of last week.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, trusts or local authorities who can lend these to children and young people who need them most during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

Some pupils who have difficulty engaging in remote education may be considered to be vulnerable children and therefore eligible to attend school. It is up to the child’s school or local authority to make this decision. The decision would be based on the needs of the child and their family, and a range of other factors, as set out in our published guidance.

The Department understands that schools may face staffing pressures that can create challenges in trying to deliver both high quality on site and remote education, especially where pupil attendance on site remains high due to high numbers of key worker and vulnerable children. Leaders in schools and colleges should ensure the balance of on site and remote teaching is manageable for staff and reflect this in the offer posted on their school or college website.

For schools that do not already have a full remote education curriculum or resources in place, or where they may face staffing pressures, the Department strongly recommends that they consider using Oak National Academy or other high quality resource providers.

9,294 laptops have been delivered directly to Birmingham local authority this academic year. Further devices have also been delivered to academy trusts that include schools located in Birmingham local authority which are not included in this figure.

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions his Department has had with schools in Birmingham on access to remote learning equipment during the January 2021 covid-19 lockdown period.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

This includes over 750,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to schools, trusts and local authorities by the end of last week.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, trusts or local authorities who can lend these to children and young people who need them most during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

Some pupils who have difficulty engaging in remote education may be considered to be vulnerable children and therefore eligible to attend school. It is up to the child’s school or local authority to make this decision. The decision would be based on the needs of the child and their family, and a range of other factors, as set out in our published guidance.

The Department understands that schools may face staffing pressures that can create challenges in trying to deliver both high quality on site and remote education, especially where pupil attendance on site remains high due to high numbers of key worker and vulnerable children. Leaders in schools and colleges should ensure the balance of on site and remote teaching is manageable for staff and reflect this in the offer posted on their school or college website.

For schools that do not already have a full remote education curriculum or resources in place, or where they may face staffing pressures, the Department strongly recommends that they consider using Oak National Academy or other high quality resource providers.

9,294 laptops have been delivered directly to Birmingham local authority this academic year. Further devices have also been delivered to academy trusts that include schools located in Birmingham local authority which are not included in this figure.

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has published for teachers and teaching assistants to ensure that they are aware that children who cannot access remote learning equipment will be classified as vulnerable children and will have the right to attend face-to-face education in the school environment during the January 2021 covid-19 lockdown.

During the national lockdown, schools should only allow vulnerable children and young people and the children of critical workers to attend. Guidance for this is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-educational-provision/guidance-for-schools-colleges-and-local-authorities-on-maintaining-educational-provision. The definition of vulnerable children has been in place since March, has been consistent throughout our response to the COVID-19 outbreak, and includes those children who may be vulnerable for a reason at local discretion. Several examples of the sorts of factors that may contribute to vulnerability are included, but it is not an exhaustive or definitive list.

On 8 January 2021, the Department published updated guidance on remote education, available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/950510/School_national_restrictions_guidance.pdf. In this guidance, we refer to the definition of vulnerable children, which notes that some children who have difficulty engaging in remote education may be considered vulnerable and, therefore, eligible to attend provision. It is up to the child’s education provider or local authority to make this decision. The decision would be based on the needs of the child and their family, and a range of other factors, as set out in the following guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-educational-provision/guidance-for-schools-colleges-and-local-authorities-on-maintaining-educational-provision#vulnerable-children-and-young-people.

The updated remote education guidance also sets outs that where pupils continue to experience barriers to digital remote education, the Department expect schools to work to overcome these barriers. This could include distributing school-owned laptops or supplementing digital provision with different forms of remote education, such as printed resources or textbooks. This should be supplemented with other forms of communication to keep pupils and students on track, or answer questions about work.

The Department has also published a good practice guide, which provides advice to teachers and school leaders to support effective delivery of the curriculum remotely. This is available here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/remote-education-good-practice/remote-education-good-practice. This is part of our broader package of support for schools, accessible via the following ‘Get Help with Remote Education’ page: https://get-help-with-remote-education.education.gov.uk/good-teaching-practice.html.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to help increase student numbers at the National College for Advanced Transport and Infrastructure.

The Department for Education is working closely with the Department for Transport and High Speed 2 (HS2) Ltd to encourage more learners to take up opportunities to gain key skills needed across the transport and infrastructure sectors. As a National College, it is expected that students will not just be located in the local constituency but will have a different travel to learn pattern given their specialist national higher level skills offer.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education