Lilian Greenwood Portrait

Lilian Greenwood

Labour - Nottingham South

Liaison Committee Sub-committee on the effectiveness and influence of the select committee system
13th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
National Policy Statements Sub-Committee
13th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
National Policy Statements Sub-Committee 2017-19
13th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Transport Committee
12th Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Education Committee
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
14th Sep 2015 - 26th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Transport)
7th Oct 2011 - 14th Sep 2015
Regulatory Reform
26th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Opposition Assistant Whip (Commons)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Transport Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 2nd Nov 2010


Oral Question
Monday 17th May 2021
15:15
Department for Work and Pensions
Topical Question No. 7
If she will make a statement on her departmental responsibilities.
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Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 18th May 2021
15:00
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 19th May 2021
09:30
Transport Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: The roll-out and safety of smart motorways
19 May 2021, 9:30 a.m.
At 9.30am: Oral evidence
Edmund King - President at Automobile Association
Mr Nicholas Lyes - Head of Roads Policy at RAC Motoring Services
Elizabeth de Jong - Director of Policy at Logistics UK
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 25th May 2021
12:30
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 8th June 2021
12:30
Division Votes
Wednesday 28th April 2021
Fire Safety Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 194 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 256
Speeches
Wednesday 12th May 2021
Violence in Israel and Palestine

My constituents have watched with growing anxiety, anger and, frankly, horror the spiralling events in Israel and the Occupied Palestinian …

Written Answers
Thursday 29th April 2021
NHS Trusts: Standards
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many prosecutions the Care Quality Commission has brought …
Early Day Motions
Monday 24th October 2016
REGENERATING NOTTINGHAM CASTLE AND THE NOTTINGHAMSHIRE VISITOR ECONOMY
This House notes that tourism is a key economic driver for Nottinghamshire, creating £1.6 billion in income and generating over …
Bills
Wednesday 24th June 2015
On-demand Audiovisual Services (Accessibility for People with Disabilities affecting Hearing or Sight or both) Bill 2015-16
A Bill to require the appropriate regulatory authority of on-demand audiovisual programme services to draw up a Code relating to …
Tweets
Wednesday 12th May 2021
22:39
MP Financial Interests
Saturday 11th January 2020
2. (b) Any other support not included in Category 2(a)
Name of donor: Nottingham City Transport
Address of donor: Lower Parliament Street, Nottingham NG1 1GG
Amount of donation, or nature …
EDM signed
Monday 18th January 2021
Godfrey Colin Cameron
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 19th July 2017
Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act 2018
To make provision about offences when perpetrated against emergency workers, and persons assisting such workers; to make certain offences aggravated …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lilian Greenwood has voted in 229 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lilian Greenwood Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
(26 debate interactions)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(14 debate interactions)
Gavin Williamson (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Education
(14 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(20 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(19 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(18 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(16 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lilian Greenwood's debates

Nottingham South Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

During the pandemic government workers have delivered vital public services and kept our country safe and secure. After ten years in which the real value of civil service pay has fallen, many face hardship. The Government must start to restore the real value of their pay with a 10% increase in 2020.

The government is helping private firms to protect jobs by paying up to 80% of staff wages through this crisis. If it can do this why can it not help key workers who will be putting themselves/their families at risk and working extra hard under extremely challenging and unprecedented circumstances.


Latest EDMs signed by Lilian Greenwood

14th January 2021
Lilian Greenwood signed this EDM on Monday 18th January 2021

Godfrey Colin Cameron

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary security staff and member of the PCS trade union who passed away aged just 55 after contracting covid-19; extends our sincere condolences to his devoted wife Hyacinth, children Leon and …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 117
Scottish National Party: 15
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
4th June 2020
Lilian Greenwood signed this EDM on Monday 15th June 2020

Legal Aid and Advice

Tabled by: David Lammy (Labour - Tottenham)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Civil Legal Aid (Remuneration) (Amendment) (Coronavirus) Regulations 2020 (S.I., 2020, No. 515), dated 15 May 2020, a copy of which was laid before this House on 18 May 2020, be annulled.
138 signatures
(Most recent: 11 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 115
Liberal Democrat: 9
Scottish National Party: 5
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Alliance: 1
View All Lilian Greenwood's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lilian Greenwood, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lilian Greenwood has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lilian Greenwood has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Lilian Greenwood


A Bill to require the appropriate regulatory authority of on-demand audiovisual programme services to draw up a Code relating to the provision of subtitles, signing and audio-description for persons with disabilities affecting their hearing or their sight or both; to require the appropriate regulatory authority to consult before issuing any such Code; to make provision for minimum requirements to be included in the Code; to require that on-demand programme services providers observe the requirements of the Code; to provide for regular consultation about and review of the minimum requirements; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 24th June 2015

218 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Explanation of written questions
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support bus manufacturing in the UK; and when he or his Ministerial team last met with representatives of UK bus manufacturers.

My noble Friend Lord Grimstone recently met with representatives of bus manufacturers at an automotive sector roundtable on 10 February.

The Government is continuing its longstanding programme of support to ensure that the UK automotive sector remains at the forefront of technological developments. Government and Industry have jointly committed almost £1.5 billion through the Advanced Propulsion Centre and Faraday Battery Challenge to support the research, development, and manufacture of zero and low-emission technologies. The Advanced Propulsion Centre is supporting a number of projects aimed at developing technologies to reduce emissions in bus applications.

In addition, as part of my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan for a green industrial revolution, nearly £500m of funding for the Automotive Transformation Fund will be made available in the next four years to build an internationally competitive electric vehicle supply chain.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
What estimate he has made of the number of self-employed people who do not qualify for covid-19 support.

We have prioritised helping the greatest number of people as quickly as possible and it is difficult to come up with reliable criteria that apply to all the relevant sectors of the economy. We are aware some people will not be eligible for the scheme, but they may still benefit from a number of other support schemes available.

The Department is engaging a wide range of stakeholders in relation to Covid-19, and in addition to the Business Secretary’s regular meeting with business representative organisations, I recently hosted a call with stakeholders on support for the self-employed and will continue to engage on the issue.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps she plans to take to tackle fuel poverty in Nottingham South constituency.

Improving energy efficiency is the best long-term solution to tackle fuel poverty and the Energy Company Obligation Scheme provides such support for low income and vulnerable households. Since ECO launched it has delivered energy efficiency measures to more than 2 million households.

ECO has delivered improvements to more than 6000 homes in Nottingham South, representing 14% of households in the area.

Tenants living in energy inefficient properties are some of the most at risk of fuel poverty. The Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards now require landlords spend up to £3500 improving their properties to energy efficiency Band E before renting them out.

In addition to support to improve energy efficiency, the Warm Home Discount provides support to more than 2 million low income and vulnerable households each year through a £140 rebate. Over £2.7 billion has been provided by the scheme over the last nine years.

Our 2020 Fuel Poverty Strategy will set out further detail around our future plans to tackle fuel poverty.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many applications to the Culture Recovery Fund from applicants in the East Midlands have been (a) received, (b) accepted and (c) rejected.

The Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) has now awarded over £500million in grant funding to organisations across England. The attached table details the number of CRF applications (a) received (b) accepted and (c) rejected for recovery grants and capital grants by region.

This data does not include applications for which decision-making is yet to conclude, including some applications to the BFI’s Culture Recovery Fund for Independent Cinemas (which closed to applications on 31st October) and some capital grants.

The Government has always been clear that this funding would not be enough to help every organisation, and that it is important there was a robust set of criteria which applicants had to meet. This included applicants being able to show that they have a sustainable, viable plan, and that this funding would help them to continue trading.

Further announcements about CRF allocations will be made in the coming weeks as we provide additional financial support to assist England’s culture, heritage, arts and creative industries.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many applications to the Culture Recovery Fund have been (a) received, (b) accepted and (c) rejected by region in England.

The Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) has now awarded over £500million in grant funding to organisations across England. The attached table details the number of CRF applications (a) received (b) accepted and (c) rejected for recovery grants and capital grants by region.

This data does not include applications for which decision-making is yet to conclude, including some applications to the BFI’s Culture Recovery Fund for Independent Cinemas (which closed to applications on 31st October) and some capital grants.

The Government has always been clear that this funding would not be enough to help every organisation, and that it is important there was a robust set of criteria which applicants had to meet. This included applicants being able to show that they have a sustainable, viable plan, and that this funding would help them to continue trading.

Further announcements about CRF allocations will be made in the coming weeks as we provide additional financial support to assist England’s culture, heritage, arts and creative industries.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what proportion of Operation Sleeping Beauty funding he plans to allocate to productions in (a) London, (b) regions outside London and (c) the East Midlands.

Operation Sleeping Beauty aims to bring some theatre and Panto back by Christmas and support local theatres whilst they face a very challenging backdrop. As part of this, the National Lottery has teamed up with Qdos Entertainment for a promotional event and provided £6m of funding to support a number of panto productions to get up and running this winter across the country. This promotional activity is in addition to the ongoing support the National Lottery provides to good causes through the National Lottery Distribution Fund. Approval of National Lottery promotional spend is a matter for the Gambling Commission. DCMS does not hold a decision making role in the allocation of the funds.

We welcome this announcement from the National Lottery, who have found innovative ways to support sectors that have been hit hardest by Covid.

The National Lottery funding is in addition to the £1.57billion support the Government is already providing the arts through the Cultural Recovery Fund.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the criteria are for applications to the Operation Sleeping Beauty fund.

Operation Sleeping Beauty aims to bring some theatre and Panto back by Christmas and support local theatres whilst they face a very challenging backdrop. As part of this, the National Lottery has teamed up with Qdos Entertainment for a promotional event and provided £6m of funding to support a number of panto productions to get up and running this winter across the country. This promotional activity is in addition to the ongoing support the National Lottery provides to good causes through the National Lottery Distribution Fund. Approval of National Lottery promotional spend is a matter for the Gambling Commission. DCMS does not hold a decision making role in the allocation of the funds.

We welcome this announcement from the National Lottery, who have found innovative ways to support sectors that have been hit hardest by Covid.

The National Lottery funding is in addition to the £1.57billion support the Government is already providing the arts through the Cultural Recovery Fund.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether not-for-profit productions are eligible to apply for the Operation Sleeping Beauty fund.

Operation Sleeping Beauty aims to bring some theatre and Panto back by Christmas and support local theatres whilst they face a very challenging backdrop. As part of this, the National Lottery has teamed up with Qdos Entertainment for a promotional event and provided £6m of funding to support a number of panto productions to get up and running this winter across the country. This promotional activity is in addition to the ongoing support the National Lottery provides to good causes through the National Lottery Distribution Fund. Approval of National Lottery promotional spend is a matter for the Gambling Commission. DCMS does not hold a decision making role in the allocation of the funds.

We welcome this announcement from the National Lottery, who have found innovative ways to support sectors that have been hit hardest by Covid.

The National Lottery funding is in addition to the £1.57billion support the Government is already providing the arts through the Cultural Recovery Fund.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, for what reason bowling alleys were not included in the reopening of businesses on 4, 11 and 13 July 2020.

Physical activity facilities play a crucial role in supporting adults and children to be active. From 1 August, we will reopen bowling alleys.

The Government is committed to reopening leisure facilities and visitor attractions, including bowling alleys, as soon as it is safe to do so. The Sport Working Group and the Visitor Economy Working Group both feed into the Cultural Renewal Taskforce, and ensure strong sector and expert support for the co-development of guidance. This will help ten pin bowling alleys become Covid-19 Secure and re-open as early as possible.

As with all aspects of the Government’s response to Covid-19, our decisions will continue to be based on scientific evidence and public health assessments.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of facilities in cinemas for deaf children and young people who require subtitles.

I refer the hon. Member for Nottingham South to the answer given by my hon. Friend, the previous Minister for Sport, Media and Creative Industries (Nigel Adams) on 11 February, in response to question 13526.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of facilities in cinemas for deaf children and young people that require subtitles.

The Government recognises the importance of ensuring that the cinema experience is accessible to as wide a range of people as possible, including the deaf and hard of hearing. We welcome steps taken by industry, including the UK Cinema Association's Technology Challenge Fund, to explore solutions to enable this, for example through specially adapted glasses. We also welcome the fact that the National Deaf Children's Society are advisors on this project.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which step of the Government’s covid-19 roadmap will allow all university students to return to their term-time addresses.

Following the review into when the remaining higher education students can return to in-person teaching and learning, the government has announced that the remaining students should return to in-person teaching no earlier than 17 May 2021, alongside Step 3 of the roadmap. Students and institutions will be given at least a week’s notice of any further return in accordance with the timing of Step 3 of the roadmap.

The government roadmap is designed to maintain a cautious approach to the easing of restrictions to reduce public health risks and ensure that we can maintain progress towards full reopening. However, the government recognises the difficulties and disruption that this may cause for many students and their families and that is why the government is making a further £15 million of additional student hardship funding available for this academic year 2020/21. In total we have made an additional £85 million of funding available for student hardship.

We are supporting universities to provide regular twice weekly asymptomatic testing for all students and staff on-site and, from May, at home. This will help break chains of transmission of the virus.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when in-person teaching and learning for students at university will resume.

Following the review into when the remaining higher education students can return to in-person teaching and learning, the government has announced that the remaining students should return to in-person teaching no earlier than 17 May 2021, alongside Step 3 of the roadmap. Students and institutions will be given at least a week’s notice of any further return in accordance with the timing of Step 3 of the roadmap.

The government roadmap is designed to maintain a cautious approach to the easing of restrictions to reduce public health risks and ensure that we can maintain progress towards full reopening. However, the government recognises the difficulties and disruption that this may cause for many students and their families and that is why the government is making a further £15 million of additional student hardship funding available for this academic year 2020/21. In total we have made an additional £85 million of funding available for student hardship.

We are supporting universities to provide regular twice weekly asymptomatic testing for all students and staff on-site and, from May, at home. This will help break chains of transmission of the virus.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the Government’s plans are for the return of university students; and if he will make a statement.

Following the review into when the remaining higher education students can return to in-person teaching and learning, the government has announced that the remaining students should return to in-person teaching no earlier than 17 May 2021, alongside Step 3 of the roadmap. Students and institutions will be given at least a week’s notice of any further return in accordance with the timing of Step 3 of the roadmap.

The government roadmap is designed to maintain a cautious approach to the easing of restrictions to reduce public health risks and ensure that we can maintain progress towards full reopening. However, the government recognises the difficulties and disruption that this may cause for many students and their families and that is why the government is making a further £15 million of additional student hardship funding available for this academic year 2020/21. In total we have made an additional £85 million of funding available for student hardship.

We are supporting universities to provide regular twice weekly asymptomatic testing for all students and staff on-site and, from May, at home. This will help break chains of transmission of the virus.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 18th March 2021 to Question 168885 on Pupils: Hearing Impairment, what specific guidance and advice has been issued to (a) schools, (b) colleges and (c) nurseries on how to meet the duties they have to make reasonable adjustments for deaf and disabled pupils since 8 March 2021.

The Department’s advice on face coverings is outlined clearly in our guidance, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak; https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-further-education-provision; and https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-early-years-and-childcare-closures.

As the guidance outlines, those who rely on visual signals for communication, or communicate with or provide support to such individuals, are currently exempt from any requirement to wear face coverings in education and childcare settings or in public places. The same exemptions apply in education and childcare settings and we expect staff, pupils and students to be sensitive to those needs, noting that some people are less able to wear face coverings and that the reasons for this may not be visible to others.

Education and childcare settings should follow the system of controls as outlined in our guidance and put in place proportionate control measures that suit their individual circumstances, based on a thorough risk assessment. This should include making reasonable adjustments for disabled pupils and students to support them to access education successfully.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether it is his policy that education setting providers should make all necessary reasonable adjustments to ensure that deaf children are not disadvantaged by the use of face coverings in classrooms during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has recently published updated guidance to support the full opening to education from 8 March, which includes updated advice on face coverings. The guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/schools-coronavirus-covid-19-operational-guidance and https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/face-coverings-in-education.

As the guidance outlines, where pupils and students in Year 7 and above are educated, we recommend that face coverings should be worn by adults, pupils and students when moving around the premises, outside of classrooms, such as in corridors and communal areas where social distancing cannot easily be maintained.

In addition, the Department now also recommend that in schools where pupils and students in Year 7 and above are educated, face coverings should be worn in classrooms unless social distancing can be maintained.

In primary schools, the Department recommends that face coverings should be worn by staff and adult visitors in situations where social distancing between adults is not possible (for example, when moving around in corridors and communal areas). Children in primary school do not need to wear a face covering.

The Department is recommending these additional precautionary measures for a time limited period until Easter. As with all measures, we will keep this under review and update guidance as necessary.

Some individuals are exempt from wearing face coverings. This includes people who cannot put on, wear, or remove a face covering because of a physical or mental illness or impairment, or disability, or if you are speaking to or providing assistance to someone who relies on lip reading, clear sound or facial expressions to communicate. The same legal exemptions that apply to the wearing of face coverings in shops and on public transport also apply in schools, colleges and nurseries.

Schools, colleges and nurseries have duties to make reasonable adjustments for disabled pupils and students to support them to access education successfully. We have made this point clear in guidance.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that vision impaired pupils have fair and equal access to learning at home during the covid-19 school closures.

Children with vision impairment may be vulnerable children, such as those with education health and care plans, and as such were strongly encouraged to attend school. Where pupils with vision impairment were not in school we expected schools to provide suitable remote learning materials.

We are funding National Star College to provide specialist online training on assistive technology to strengthen remote education provision for pupils with special educational needs.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure vision impaired children are able to access (a) specialist equipment, (b) materials in large print and (c) audio described online learning materials at home during the covid-19 lockdown.

Where pupils with vision impairment are not in school, we expect schools to provide suitable remote learning materials, which could include large print materials and other alternative learning formats. Schools know their pupil’s needs best, and the Children and Families Act 2014 sets out that schools and other institutions must use their best endeavours to ensure that the special educational provision called for by the pupil’s or student’s special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) is made.

We have funded National Star College’s SEND Hub, focused on training school leaders, teachers, and SEND coordinators on ways that assistive technology can further enhance an inclusive curriculum.

Peer support, advice and training is available through the EdTech demonstrator network, where schools and colleges are on hand to offer guidance on ways that technology can be used to support remote education arrangements.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that education settings have supply of clear face coverings to support communication with deaf students during the covid-19 outbreak.

Some individuals are exempt from wearing face coverings, including those who are speaking to or providing assistance to someone who relies on lip reading, clear sound or facial expression to communicate, or those who cannot put on, wear or remove a face covering because of a physical or mental illness or impairment or disability. No one should be excluded from education on the grounds that they are not wearing a face covering. Guidance on individuals who are exempt from wearing face coverings can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/face-coverings-when-to-wear-one-and-how-to-make-your-own/face-coverings-when-to-wear-one-and-how-to-make-your-own.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to improve supported internship schemes for disabled young people.

Supported internships are a key part of our offer to support young people with SEND into employment. Since its introduction, the Supported Internships programme has grown year on year. The most recent report in January 2020 showed that 2,231 young people with Education Health Care plans were undertaking Supported Internships, an increase from 1,646 from the same time in 2019 and 1,186 in 2018.

We anticipate that the COVID-19 outbreak is likely to negatively impact this growth. Department officials are looking into how we can sustain and strengthen the Supported Internship Programme, which we know will be all the more important in light of the challenges to the labour market brought about by the COVID-19 outbreak.

In September 2019 we launched a review of SEND policy, which includes looking at how we can provide the highest quality support that enables children and young people with SEND to thrive, prepare for adulthood, and secure high quality outcomes. Officials from across the government are working to inform the development of the National Strategy for Disabled people, in particular consideration of what more can be done to support young people with SEND to prepare for and successfully transition to adulthood, including employment.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Answer of 7 September 2017 to Question 8320, on classroom assistants: average earnings, if he will provide the same salary data for (a) 2017, (b) 2018 and (c) 2019.

The attached table shows the average salary for all full-time general teaching assistants, higher level teaching assistants and all teaching assistants in local authority maintained schools, academy schools and free schools in England, as at November each year.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
2nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of reimbursing tuition fees for the spring 2020 term for nursing, midwifery and allied healthcare students.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 1 July 2020 to Question 63492.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
2nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will take steps to ensure that (a) nursing, (b) midwifery and (c) healthcare students are reimbursed their tuition fees for the 2019-20 academic year.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 1 July 2020 to Question 63492.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when dance schools will be permitted to reopen as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

A dance school which operates for fewer than 18 hours per week would generally be considered to be an out-of-school setting. As my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, confirmed in his announcement on 23 June, out-of-school settings which run community activities, holiday clubs, after-school clubs, tuition and other out-of-school provision for children can operate over the summer holiday, with safety measures in place. Providers of these settings have been able to open since 4 July, provided that they follow the protective measures set out by Government. However, providers should check the latest government guidelines on which businesses and venues can open and for which purposes as some premises may only be able to open for certain limited purposes:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/further-businesses-and-premises-to-close/further-businesses-and-premises-to-close-guidance.

As announced on the 9 July, indoor gyms, sports courts and fitness and dance studios will be able to reopen from 25 July. They cannot be used for holiday clubs and activities for children until that point.

Protective measures guidance for out-of-school settings can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

Providers who offer indoor sports activities for children should also refer to the guidance for keeping workers, volunteers and customers safe during COVID-19 for providers of grassroots sports, gym or leisure facilities:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/providers-of-grassroots-sport-and-gym-leisure-facilities.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to permit the re-opening of dance schools as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

A dance school which operates for fewer than 18 hours per week would generally be considered to be an out-of-school setting. As my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, confirmed in his announcement on 23 June, out-of-school settings which run community activities, holiday clubs, after-school clubs, tuition and other out-of-school provision for children can operate over the summer holiday, with safety measures in place. Providers of these settings have been able to open since 4 July, provided that they follow the protective measures set out by Government. However, providers should check the latest government guidelines on which businesses and venues can open and for which purposes as some premises may only be able to open for certain limited purposes:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/further-businesses-and-premises-to-close/further-businesses-and-premises-to-close-guidance.

As announced on the 9 July, indoor gyms, sports courts and fitness and dance studios will be able to reopen from 25 July. They cannot be used for holiday clubs and activities for children until that point.

Protective measures guidance for out-of-school settings can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

Providers who offer indoor sports activities for children should also refer to the guidance for keeping workers, volunteers and customers safe during COVID-19 for providers of grassroots sports, gym or leisure facilities:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/providers-of-grassroots-sport-and-gym-leisure-facilities.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the French government's Maitre-Restaurater designation scheme to promote the sale of meals prepared from fresh ingredients; and whether he has plans to introduce that scheme in the UK.

We are delivering our manifesto commitment to promote British food and drink through a range of measures to boost the capability and consumer reach of local producers and SMEs, as well as a refreshed approach to public procurement focusing on local, seasonal and sustainable food.

No assessment has been made of the French government's Maitre-Restaurateur designation scheme to promote the sale of meals prepared from fresh ingredients, and there are currently no plans to introduce the scheme.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to increase awareness of The Countryside Code as covid-19 restrictions are eased and more people visit the countryside.

Natural England has a statutory duty to produce and promote the Countryside Code which provides three levels of information: short and long versions for the public plus additional information for land managers and owners for areas of open country.

Natural England has worked with a broad range of stakeholders to refresh the Countryside Code and a relaunch of advice to the public took place over Easter. The launch at Easter marked the beginning of a year-long piece of work with stakeholders and partners to promote the Code more widely and look at how we can best encourage positive behaviours. We want to make the code inclusive and welcoming, to make sure that people are aware that nature is available to all, and that they understand how they can respect and protect the countryside.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure all communities have access to a quality park to allow people to exercise in a safe outdoors space.

Defra recognises the crucial importance of having good access to green spaces for people’s health and well-being. The 25 Year Environment Plan sets out our comprehensive and long-term approach to protecting and enhancing our natural landscapes in England for the next generation, and to helping people improve their health and wellbeing by using green spaces.

There are a wide range of initiatives within Defra which are helping to increase access to green spaces across the whole of England. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Trees for Climate programme
  • Green Recovery Challenge Fund
  • Green Social Prescribing Project
  • Engagement with Protected Landscapes to improve access
  • Nature for Climate Fund
  • Schemes that reward environmental land benefits
  • National Framework of Green Infrastructure Standards
  • Development of the England Coast Path and a new north coast to coast National Trail

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) has responsibility for urban parks and green spaces. MHCLG is aiming to explore how it can best support all urban parks and green spaces, taking into account the Government’s environmental, social, and health priorities.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much and what proportion of the Government's £40 million Green Recovery Challenge Fund will be allocated to the funding of parks and green spaces.

The Green Recovery Challenge Fund has provided much needed funding to environmental charities and their partners, enabling them to deliver projects across England to restore nature, tackle climate change and connect people with the natural environment. So far, funding totalling over £37.5 million has been awarded to 68 projects.

A £40 million second round of funding was launched on 9 March 2021. All applications to the Green Recovery Challenge Fund will be assessed against their ability to deliver at least one of the Fund’s three themes: nature conservation and restoration, nature-based solutions, particularly for climate change mitigation and adaptation; and connecting people with nature. Projects awarded grants will be those that best meet the criteria of the Fund. There is no pre-allocation for specific types of projects.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on the potential for the National Bus Strategy to deliver improved air quality and carbon emissions.

My department works closely with the Department for Transport through our shared Joint Air Quality Unit. As a result, officials in both departments have regular engagement to ensure evolving bus policy considers the potential impacts on air quality. The Joint Air Quality Unit also engages directly with the bus sector to understand how to reduce emissions from buses in those areas currently exceeding legal NO2 limits, particularly through the ongoing delivery of Government-funded retrofit schemes to fit technologies to buses to reduce their tailpipe emissions.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how he plans to ensure that the national habitat map for England is (a) accurate and (b) comprehensive.

My officials are currently planning for how to deliver this new duty. We wish to make the best use of recent advances in satellite imagery, increased computational power and ground survey including using citizen scientists, to deliver a good standard of National Habitat Map (NHM).

We intend to bid for further resources to deliver the NHM as part of an extensive science assessment programme in the planning round for next year.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the resourcing needed to ensure that the proposed Local Nature Recovery Strategies are (a) of a high standard and (b) cover the whole of England.

The Government undertook an Impact Assessment of the Biodiversity Net Gain and Local Nature Recovery (LNR) Strategy provisions in the Environment Bill which was published on 15 October 2019. My officials are continuing to work with counterparts in the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and to engage stakeholders to refine our estimates and work towards a more comprehensive assessment of resources required to ensure delivery to a high standard. The Environment Bill requires that, collectively, LNR Strategies cover the whole of England.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to publish a strategy that will set out how a national nature recovery network is to be established.

Our 25 Year Environment Plan marked a step-change in ambitions for wildlife and the natural environment. It committed the Government to establishing a nature recovery network in England and developing a new strategy for nature, setting out how we will implement our international commitments under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

The coronavirus outbreak has impacted on our plans. Key international meetings to develop global biodiversity targets, including the CBD Conference in China (originally planned for the end of 2020), have been postponed. At the same time, many of our stakeholders no longer have the capacity to engage on the strategy at the moment.

This means that we have slowed the process of drafting the strategy so that we have extra time to engage with stakeholders, and properly reflect on the emerging international framework. We expect the main CBD Conference of the Parties to be rescheduled for some time in 2021 and will update our domestic plans once this is finalised.

Although work on the strategy has been delayed, we are bringing forward policies and funding now that will deliver real change for nature and to establish a Nature Recovery Network (NRN).

Our Environment Bill lays the foundation for the NRN. It sets the framework for at least one legally binding biodiversity target. It establishes spatial mapping and planning tools to inform nature recovery. It also creates duties and incentives, such as biodiversity net gain, to drive change on the ground.

These measures will complement our plans for new funding for nature announced in March this year.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what his timescale is for publication of the first national habitat map for England.

My officials will be working with Natural England and local partners to pilot approaches to the production of Local Nature Recovery Strategies (LNRS) in up to five areas in England. In these pilots we will explore how national data can best inform the production of LNRSs. We will then bring forward proposals for the national habitat map as soon as possible after Royal Assent of the Environment Bill.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what his timescale is for launching the Nature for Climate Fund announced in the Budget 2020; what the duration of that fund will be; and how much funding will be available through that fund.

The £640 million Nature for Climate Fund, announced in the Budget, will increase tree planting and peat restoration in England over this Parliament. Plans to deliver this will be set out in the forthcoming England Tree Strategy and Peat Strategy later this year. We are currently consulting on the Tree Strategy and engaging stakeholders further on a future Peat Strategy.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans his Department has to consult on the procedure for (a) preparation, (b) publication and (c) review of local nature recovery strategies.

Clause 96 of the Environment Bill proposes giving power to the Secretary of State to bring forward regulations specifying the procedure to be followed in preparing, publishing, reviewing and republishing Local Nature Recovery Strategies. In developing these regulations we will seek views from stakeholders and partners. We will be considering our approach to this following Royal Assent of the Bill.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what funding he plans to make available to responsible authorities for local nature recovery strategies.

We have worked closely with local authorities and other public bodies to develop the Environment Bill, and are committed to engaging with them to bring forward a sensible implementation plan for the Bill that maximises effective delivery and minimises additional burdens.

We will fully fund all new burdens arising from the Bill to ensure these flagship measures become a reality. We will be bidding through the next spending review to secure necessary funds.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to conduct pilots for local nature recovery strategies.

We are exploring options to pilot Local Nature Recovery Strategies in up to five locations this year and are in the early stages of discussions with local partners. We will issue further information shortly.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Government plans to publish its plan to reduce air pollution on the Strategic Road Network to within legal limits; and whether that plan will include Highways England’s recently approved Road Investment Strategy 2.

The Government’s UK Plan for tackling roadside nitrogen dioxide concentrations was published in July 2017 and detailed the approach that would be taken forward by Highways England in order to deliver compliance on the Strategic Road Network (SRN) in the shortest possible time. Since the publication of the 2017 Plan, the Government has been working closely with Highways England (HE) on the delivery of their air quality programme of work. Some measures to tackle illegal roadside nitrogen dioxide concentrations have already been implemented on the SRN by HE.

The second Road Investment Strategy (RIS2) also refers to HE bringing road links on the SRN into compliance with legal nitrogen dioxide limits in the shortest possible time.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many of each type of air quality monitors Highways England have put into operation along the Strategic Road Network; whether the pollution concentrations at each monitoring location have been published by Highways England.

Highways England (HE) currently has 74 air quality monitoring stations alongside the Strategic Road Network. 57 of these are part of its National Air Quality Monitoring Network. The type and number of stations is set out in the table below.

Type of air quality monitoring station*

Number

MCERTS nitrogen oxide chemiluminescent analyser

61

MCERTS ozone analyser

11

MCERTS Beta Attenuation Mass Measuring particulate analyser

2

*MCERTS (Monitoring Certification Scheme) is the Environment Agency’s Monitoring Certification Scheme.

HE annual site monitoring reports have not been published; however, information from the reports has been provided on request. HE has annual monitoring reports for the number of sites set out in the table below.

Year**

Number of sites for which annual monitoring reports are held

2016

15

2017

31

2018

43

2019

57 (in draft)

**2016 is the first year of data for the first monitoring sites installed.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the effect on pedestrian and cyclist safety of the differences in vehicle safety standards between vehicles produced in (a) the USA and (b) the EU; and what safety standard vehicles will have to meet for import to the UK after the transition period.

The Department has considered the differences in the technical standards designed to provide protection for both vulnerable road users, such as pedestrians and cyclists, and vehicle occupants in the USA and UK.

In the UK, new passenger cars and light goods vehicles must meet minimum levels of protection for pedestrian leg and head impacts.

Vehicles operating on British roads must adhere to British safety standards.

Graham Stuart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions she has had with her counterparts in (a) the US and (b) Australia on vehicle safety standards during negotiations on free trade agreements.

Both Britain and Australia are signatories of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) 1958 agreement. This allows automotive manufacturers to export to the Australian market with relative ease, as type approval certificates issued in the UK are accepted by Australia without the need for additional testing.

With the US, negotiators are seeking to reduce technical barriers to trade by removing and preventing trade-restrictive measures in goods markets overall, while upholding the safety and quality of all products on the British market and promoting the use of international standards, to further facilitate trade between the parties. Britain hopes to reduce regulatory obstacles faced when exporting to the US, facilitate market access for British businesses and investors, and improve trade flows by ensuring a transparent, predictable, and stable regulatory framework to give confidence and stability to British exporting businesses and investors.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what progress has been made in negotiations on free trade agreements covering the automotive sector with (a) the US and (b) Australia.

The third UK-U.S. Free Trade Agreement negotiating round took place from 27 July to 7 August 2020. Positive progress continues to be made.

Further talks will be held between the third and fourth negotiating round, which is expected to take place in early September.

Trade negotiators from the UK and Australia held the first round of negotiations for a UK-Australia Free Trade Agreement from 29 June to 10 July 2020, through virtual means.

Discussions between negotiators were productive and reflected our shared ambition to secure a comprehensive deal to boost trade and investment between our like-minded economies.

Teams discussed their respective objectives and agreed a forward plan for future talks. Our positive discussions in round one have laid the groundwork for the UK and Australia to achieve high-quality outcomes across the agreement.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will take steps to ensure that vehicles that do not meet current UK vehicle safety standards would not be permitted to be (a) sold and (b) registered in the UK as a result of an international free trade agreement.

Vehicles that do not meet British regulations are not permitted to use British roads. There are no plans to change this.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 22 April 2021 to Question 183124, what assessment he has made of the level of funding necessary to make flat fares the norm on bus services.

The National Bus Strategy sets out what we want to see on fares, including low flat fares (or maximum fares and daily price caps) to be the norm within cities and towns. We expect to see Bus Service Improvement Plans from local transport authorities set out how they will achieve these objectives, including their plans and costs for implementing new fares and ticketing policies.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 22 April 2021 to Question 183125 on bus services, what plans he has for a public consultation on the meaning of socially necessary services.

The Government has committed to issuing guidance on the meaning and role of socially necessary services. Further details will be announced in due course.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the National Bus Strategy, what criteria the Government plans to use to make an assessment of whether a bus journey is socially necessary.

The National Bus Strategy sets out how we expect Local Transport Authorities in collaboration with bus operators to deliver more comprehensive, socially necessary services, including services to smaller and isolated places and more services in the evenings and at weekends.

We will issue further guidance on the meaning and role of socially necessary services in due course.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the National Bus Strategy, what steps the Government plans to take to implement low flat fares in cities and towns.

The National Bus Strategy sets out that within cities and towns, we want low flat fares (or maximum fares and daily price caps) to be the norm. Bus Service Improvement Plans (BSIPs), which we expect local transport authorities to produce by the end of October, will need to set out ambitious visions for travel by bus, meeting the goals and expectations in the strategy. BSIPs will influence the share of the £3 billion transformation that each authority receives, and we will expect to see fares policy as an integral part of the plans. We will publish detailed guidance on preparing BSIPs shortly.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to provide support for the purchase of used electric vehicles; and if he will make a statement.

The second-hand electric vehicle market will have an important role in the UK’s transition to zero emission vehicles (ZEVs). We already have various financial incentives to stimulate the new ZEV market and increase the supply of these vehicles feeding through to the second-hand market. Additionally, our funding for chargepoint infrastructure at homes, workplaces, residential streets and across the wider roads network is also supporting consumers to buy used ZEVs.

Fleet operator businesses buy over half of the new vehicles sold each year and are major suppliers to the used market, therefore encouraging them to go zero emission will spur the used ZEV market. As confirmed in March 2020, users of zero and ultra-low emission cars will continue to benefit from favourable company car tax rates (compared to conventionally fuelled vehicles) until 2024-25. In addition, buyers of both new and used ZEVs do not pay vehicle excise duty.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department's forthcoming decarbonisation strategy will include carbon reduction targets for the (a) aviation and (b) shipping sectors.

The Transport Decarbonisation Plan will include plans to tackle emissions in every form of transport, including maritime and aviation, and how these plans come together to deliver transport’s contributions to carbon budgets and net zero.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he made prior to 18 March 2021 of the potential effect of a reduction in plug-in grant funding on electric van adoption.

Our assessment is that the changes to the van grant will mean funding will last longer and be available to more drivers, while still offering a substantial discount on upfront price. There are now over twenty models of electric vans (including HGVs) eligible for the van grant, with a wide variety of specifications and lower running costs than internal combustion engine vans. We expect the market to continue to grow. Zero emission vans are exempt from vehicle excise duty, and from 6 April 2021 zero emission company vans will be exempt from the van benefit charge.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the number of electric (a) vans and (b) cars that will be funded through the new plug-in vehicle grant allocation.

Estimates of the number of zero emission cars and vans to receive plug-in vehicle grant funding are commercially sensitive to Government.

The Plug-in Car Grant rate has been reduced from £3,000 to £2,500 per car with the price cap reducing from £50,000 to £35,000, enabling the funding to last longer and making it available to more drivers. The increasing choice of new vehicles, growing demand from customers, and rapidly rising number of chargepoints means that we are re-focusing our vehicle grants on the more affordable zero emission vehicles – where most consumers will be looking and where taxpayers’ money will make more of a difference.

We have also changed the Plug-in Van Grant eligibility criteria to focus only on vans with zero emission ranges of over 60 miles. We have provided over £100m in funding through the Plug-in Van Grant since its launch in 2012, supporting the purchase of over 15,000 ultra-low emission vans and trucks, the majority of which are zero emission vehicles. As the market for electric vans increases, the revised Plug-In Van Grant rates ensure we can continue to support the highest number of vehicles, while still offering a substantial discount on the upfront price.

We will continue to review both grant schemes as the market grows. Generous tax incentives, including favourable company car tax rates, which can save drivers over £2,000 a year, remain in place.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to involve Local Access Forums in the evaluation of his Department's e-scooter trials.

The evaluation will include interviews with national and local organisations ensuring that a broad sample of expertise and perspectives are included in its findings. Additionally, the project is in regular contact with the implementing local authorities and the evaluation is interviewing a sample of representatives from these areas.

Local Access Forums (LAFs) are concerned with local issues and engage directly with local authorities who are best placed to deal with those concerns. The views of the LAFs will be represented through the local authority interviews and through our engagement with other organisations that span LAFs responsibilities.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to support people to purchase used electric vehicles; and if he will make a statement.

The second-hand electric vehicle market will have an important role in the UK’s transition to zero emission vehicles (ZEVs). We already have various financial incentives to stimulate the new ZEV market and increase the supply of these vehicles feeding through to the second-hand market. Additionally, our funding for chargepoint infrastructure at homes, workplaces, residential streets and across the wider roads network is also supporting consumers to buy used ZEVs.

Fleet operator businesses buy over half of the new vehicles sold each year and are major suppliers to the used market, therefore encouraging them to go zero emission will spur the used ZEV market. As confirmed in March 2020, users of zero and ultra-low emission cars will continue to benefit from favourable company car tax rates (compared to conventionally fuelled vehicles) until 2024-25. In addition, buyers of both new and used ZEVs do not pay vehicle excise duty.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to publish the report on road safety targets that was commissioned by his Department in conjunction with WSP and Loughborough University.

The report will be published in full later this year.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the Eastern leg of HS2 goes ahead.

The Government is committed to ensuring the East Midlands, Yorkshire, and the North East reap the benefits of high-speed services. The Integrated Rail Plan (IRP), will consider the sequencing and delivery of HS2, Northern Powerhouse Rail and other rail investment projects to ensure the benefits of these investments are delivered to passengers and communities more quickly. We will publish the IRP this Spring.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of reducing the number of HS2 platforms planned at Euston Station from 11 to 10 on the (a) overall capacity on (i) HS2 and (ii) the HS2 Eastern route and (c) reliability and resilience of HS2 services.

Work is ongoing to develop an optimised design and delivery strategy for Euston Station, including consideration of opportunities, efficiencies and scope reductions to address identified cost pressures. As part of this work, the Department and HS2 Ltd have, with the involvement of other partners, been investigating whether building the HS2 station in a single phase would speed up delivery and reduce the overall cost. This work is currently indicating that moving to a slightly smaller, simpler HS2 station at Euston would have some benefits in terms of terms of reducing costs and risks. This work will help inform the way forward, with a final decision expected in Spring 2021.

Initial HS2 Ltd analysis indicates that moving to a slightly smaller HS2 station at Euston maintains the station infrastructure capacity to run all of the services in the planned HS2 Phase 2b Train Service Specification. The future development of the final HS2 timetable, in due course, will have close regard to optimising resilience and capacity.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to increase rail connectivity between Nottingham and the rest of the UK.

We are always looking to improve rail connectivity and am pleased to say that the new Midland Mainline timetable in May will reduce journey times for peak trains between Nottingham and London St. Pancras by up to 10 minutes.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to revise his Department’s Road Traffic Forecasts to take account of the Government’s commitment to increase cycling and walking to 50 per cent of short journeys in towns and cities by 2030.

The Department regularly updates its Road Traffic Forecasts to provide a strategic view of how road travel demand may develop in future, with a focus on exploring the uncertainty around key drivers of demand. In planning future forecasts, consideration is given to relevant transport policies that may impact on road travel demand. The impact of the government’s walking and cycling commitments on motorised road traffic will be considered when the forecasts are next updated.

The forecasts are produced using the Department’s National Transport Model (NTM). To produce the forecasts, the NTM takes account of the travel choice between walking, cycling, rail and bus as well as car. However, the NTM is not designed to forecast cycling levels, which will be influenced by a range of factors not included in the model.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the implications for road and public transport use of his target to increase cycling and walking to 50 per cent of short journeys in towns and cities by 2030; and what assessment he has made of the potential effect of that target on (a) carbon dioxide emissions, (b) pollutant emissions, (c) urban congestion, (d) road safety and (e) ill-health due to physical inactivity.

The Department has not yet made a detailed assessment of the wider impacts of meeting the 2030 vision set out in Gear Change. These and other matters will be considered as part of the development of the next Cycling & Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS) in due course. The impacts will depend on what journeys are replaced by cycling and walking journeys, which is likely to vary from one place to another. The Department’s existing CWIS active travel investment models explore different scenarios for increasing cycling and walking and their impacts, including those related to carbon dioxide emissions, urban congestion, road safety and health. These are available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cycling-and-walking-investment-strategy-active-travel-investment-models .

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an estimate of the potential annual gross income stream across all train operating companies after the covid-19 lockdown from (a) weekly seasons tickets and (b) 3-day or part time period tickets and (c) season tickets for travel on specific days of the week.

Passenger demand has fallen dramatically over the last year in response to COVID-19. Due to this and a potential future shift in passenger behaviours, future rail income is also uncertain. Any new flexible season ticket products will aim to encourage and support passengers returning to the railway when it is safe to do so.

We are working closely with industry to develop a solution that offers better value and convenience for those who commute flexibly and will provide further details in due course.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans for the successor scheme to the Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy to (a) retain the existing targets to double cycling trips and to increase walking trips to school journeys, (b) include a strengthened target to boost overall walking and (c) include and clarify the target from the Government’s Gear Change vision document, for half of all journeys in towns and cities being cycled or walked by 2030.

The second Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS 2) will be published after the Government has agreed and set out its long-term spending plans for active travel at the next multi-year Spending Review. It will reflect and build on the commitments outlined in the Prime Minister’s Cycling and Walking Plan of July 2020, as well as setting out the financial resources available for cycling and walking and the other matters required by the Infrastructure Act 2015, including targets for cycling and walking.

These plans will be formally set out to Parliament in due course, as is required by the Infrastructure Act 2015.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to put in place a new Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy, before the current strategy period ends at the beginning of April 2021.

The second Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS 2) will be published after the Government has agreed and set out its long-term spending plans for active travel at the next multi-year Spending Review. It will reflect and build on the commitments outlined in the Prime Minister’s Cycling and Walking Plan of July 2020, as well as setting out the financial resources available for cycling and walking and the other matters required by the Infrastructure Act 2015, including targets for cycling and walking.

These plans will be formally set out to Parliament in due course, as is required by the Infrastructure Act 2015.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the extent to which the objectives of the 2017 Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy to (a) increase cycling and walking activity and (b) reduce the rate of cycling casualties by 2020 have been met; and if he will publish comparative data on those matters for each year since 2017.

The Government will report in detail on this matter in due course once the relevant statistics for 2020 are available.

In the meantime, the Government published its first report on the progress towards meeting the objectives of the Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS) in February 2020. The report highlights the delivery of actions, outputs and outcomes since 2016/17 with accompanying statistical analysis.

In 2019 people in England made an average of 332 walking stages, which is an 11% increase since 2015. This follows a reweighting of the data due to a methodological change to the National Travel Survey in 2016. In 2019, people in England cycled an estimated total of 964 million stages, an increase of 17% since 2013 (the CWIS baseline).

Adjusting for changes in severity reporting, total pedal cyclists killed or seriously injured per billion miles cycled in 2019 was 1,280 with levels falling since 2012.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many zero-emission buses his Department plans to provide funding for in the financial years (a) 2021-22, (b) 2022-23 and (c) 2023-24.

As set out in the Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution and the Spending Review 2020, the Government will invest £120 million in 2021-22 to start the delivery of the 4,000 zero emission buses announced by the Prime Minister last year.

Together with existing funding for the All Electric Bus Town or City, Government funding for 2021/22 could support the purchase of 800 zero emission buses and the infrastructure needed to support them.

Further details on how funding in 2021-22 will be distributed will be announced in the spring.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he estimates the 800 zero-emission buses, for which funding was announced in the 2020 Spending Review, will be (a) ordered and (b) in use.

As set out in the Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution and the Spending Review 2020, the Government will invest £120 million in 2021-22 to start the delivery of the 4,000 zero emission buses announced by the Prime Minister last year.

Together with existing funding for the All Electric Bus Town or City, Government funding for 2021/22 could support the purchase of 800 zero emission buses and the infrastructure needed to support them.

Further details on how funding in 2021-22 will be distributed will be announced in the spring.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment was made of the circumstances of UK-based private hire drivers who give tours to the EU as part of negotiations on the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

During UK-EU negotiations, market access provisions for passenger transport operators were discussed at length. Prior to these negotiations, the Government also discussed provisions with relevant passenger transport stakeholders.

Following the conclusion of the Trade Cooperation Agreement between the UK and EU, the GOV.UK page https://www.gov.uk/guidance/run-international-bus-or-coach-services-and-tours has been updated to reflect the current rules for passenger transport services that operate to Europe and other countries. We have also been working with the industry to provide bespoke guidance.

The UK also acceded to the Interbus Agreement in its own right on 1 January 2021. This provides reciprocal rights for UK and EU operators to provide ‘occasional services’ (holiday tours and private trips) to and from respective territories.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if private hire drivers giving tours to customers can enter the EU without an International Driving Permit.

The Government is committed to establishing arrangements with EU countries that facilitate motoring with the minimum of bureaucracy. In 2020, all EU countries, as well as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein have confirmed recognition of UK driving licences which means that International Driving Permits will not be required by UK visitors with photocard driving licences from 1 January 2021.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish guidance on the rules for UK private hire drivers who enter the EU while giving tours to customers.

Following the conclusion of the Trade Cooperation Agreement between the UK and EU, the GOV.UK page https://www.gov.uk/guidance/run-international-bus-or-coach-services-and-tours has been updated to reflect the current rules for passenger transport services that operate to Europe and other countries.

The UK also acceded to the Interbus Agreement in its own right on 1 January 2021. This provides reciprocal rights for UK and EU operators to provide ‘occasional services’ (holiday tours and private trips) to and from respective territories.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to include in his Transport Decarbonisation Plan (a) targets to halt and reverse the growth of traffic in line with the Government’s aim to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and (b) corresponding targets and spending plans to increase cycling, walking and public transport usage.

The Government is developing a Transport Decarbonisation Plan (TDP) that puts transport on a path to delivering its contributions to carbon budgets and net zero by 2050. The plan will take a holistic and cross-modal approach to decarbonising the entire transport system for the first time, setting out a credible and ambitious pathway to cut emissions. The Plan is will be published in Spring 2021.

We are investing £2bn in cycling and walking over the next 5 years. In July 2020 the Prime Minister launched ambitious plans to boost cycling and walking in England, with a vision for half of all journeys in towns and cities to be cycled or walked by 2030.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he is planning for the publication of reported road casualties in Great Britain for the year ending June 2020 to be delayed until March 2021.

The publication date for Reported road casualties in Great Britain, provisional estimates for the year ending June 2020 has now been confirmed as 28 January 2021 and pre-announced via Department’s forthcoming publications schedule: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-transport/about/statistics#forthcoming-publications

This publication has been delayed from the initially scheduled date of November 2020 in response to delays in the submission of data to DfT from some police forces whose ability to process their respective records has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. In November 2020, at least one month of data was missing for the following forces, none of which has adopted the CRASH system: Avon and Somerset, Derbyshire, Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, Lincolnshire, North Wales, Northamptonshire, South Wales, Thames Valley and Wiltshire.

CRASH is provided free to police forces in England and Wales who wish to use it. We continue to engage with the forces not using CRASH to understand the barriers to adopting the system. We anticipate new forces will be moving to using CRASH in 2021. However, this is a decision for Chief Constables as the Home Office does not mandate the use of specific police IT systems.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which 10 police forces were unable to provide casualty data to his Department leading to the delay in the planned publication of that data in November 2020.

The publication date for Reported road casualties in Great Britain, provisional estimates for the year ending June 2020 has now been confirmed as 28 January 2021 and pre-announced via Department’s forthcoming publications schedule: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-transport/about/statistics#forthcoming-publications

This publication has been delayed from the initially scheduled date of November 2020 in response to delays in the submission of data to DfT from some police forces whose ability to process their respective records has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. In November 2020, at least one month of data was missing for the following forces, none of which has adopted the CRASH system: Avon and Somerset, Derbyshire, Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, Lincolnshire, North Wales, Northamptonshire, South Wales, Thames Valley and Wiltshire.

CRASH is provided free to police forces in England and Wales who wish to use it. We continue to engage with the forces not using CRASH to understand the barriers to adopting the system. We anticipate new forces will be moving to using CRASH in 2021. However, this is a decision for Chief Constables as the Home Office does not mandate the use of specific police IT systems.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which of the 10 police forces which were unable to provide casualty data to his Department leading to the delay in publication of that data in November 2020 operate CRASH, the new casualty reporting system.

The publication date for Reported road casualties in Great Britain, provisional estimates for the year ending June 2020 has now been confirmed as 28 January 2021 and pre-announced via Department’s forthcoming publications schedule: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-transport/about/statistics#forthcoming-publications

This publication has been delayed from the initially scheduled date of November 2020 in response to delays in the submission of data to DfT from some police forces whose ability to process their respective records has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. In November 2020, at least one month of data was missing for the following forces, none of which has adopted the CRASH system: Avon and Somerset, Derbyshire, Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, Lincolnshire, North Wales, Northamptonshire, South Wales, Thames Valley and Wiltshire.

CRASH is provided free to police forces in England and Wales who wish to use it. We continue to engage with the forces not using CRASH to understand the barriers to adopting the system. We anticipate new forces will be moving to using CRASH in 2021. However, this is a decision for Chief Constables as the Home Office does not mandate the use of specific police IT systems.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to encourage police forces that have not yet adopted the CRASH system to do so.

The publication date for Reported road casualties in Great Britain, provisional estimates for the year ending June 2020 has now been confirmed as 28 January 2021 and pre-announced via Department’s forthcoming publications schedule: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-transport/about/statistics#forthcoming-publications

This publication has been delayed from the initially scheduled date of November 2020 in response to delays in the submission of data to DfT from some police forces whose ability to process their respective records has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. In November 2020, at least one month of data was missing for the following forces, none of which has adopted the CRASH system: Avon and Somerset, Derbyshire, Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, Lincolnshire, North Wales, Northamptonshire, South Wales, Thames Valley and Wiltshire.

CRASH is provided free to police forces in England and Wales who wish to use it. We continue to engage with the forces not using CRASH to understand the barriers to adopting the system. We anticipate new forces will be moving to using CRASH in 2021. However, this is a decision for Chief Constables as the Home Office does not mandate the use of specific police IT systems.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what modelling has been undertaken on the requirements for new flexible season tickets.

The Department considered a range of surveys and evidence on expected commuting patterns post-COVID.

We are working closely with industry to develop a solution that offers better value and convenience for those who commute flexibly, including assessing the commercial impact of introducing the new products.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with local authorities on support for (a) taxi drivers and (b) private hire companies during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises the difficulties those working in the taxi and private hire vehicle sector face during the pandemic. The Department has maintained close contact with representatives from the taxi and private hire vehicle trade throughout the pandemic, including those representing local authorities responsible for the licensing of the taxi and private hire vehicle sector. Local authorities are best placed to understand local demand and driver need and we are aware that some local authorities are supporting the sector.

From 2 December councils in England in Tier 2 and Tier 3 will receive funding to provide grants to closed businesses (Local Restriction Support Grants) and to be able to run local discretionary grant schemes to provide support to affected businesses. These allocations will be published shortly and are in addition to the £2.3bn already provided to local councils since the start of the pandemic. The Local Authority administers the scheme and determines on a case-by-case basis where to allocate this funding.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the £120 million for zero emission buses in 2021-22 in the Spending Review 2020, if he will publish details of the scheme his Department will use to deliver 800 zero emission buses.

As set out in the Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution and the Spending Review 2020m, the Government will invest £120 million in 2021-22 to start the delivery of the 4,000 zero emission buses announced by the Prime Minister in February.

Together with existing funding for the All Electric Bus Town, the Government funding could support the purchase of 800 cleaner, greener, quieter zero emission buses and the infrastructure needed to support them.

Further details on how funding will be distributed will be announced in due course. The Department is considering all funding mechanisms in delivering the zero emission buses.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of adopting the leasing model proposed by the Confederation of Passenger Transport to deliver the 800 zero emission buses committed to in the Spending Review 2020.

As set out in the Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution and the Spending Review 2020m, the Government will invest £120 million in 2021-22 to start the delivery of the 4,000 zero emission buses announced by the Prime Minister in February.

Together with existing funding for the All Electric Bus Town, the Government funding could support the purchase of 800 cleaner, greener, quieter zero emission buses and the infrastructure needed to support them.

Further details on how funding will be distributed will be announced in due course. The Department is considering all funding mechanisms in delivering the zero emission buses.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the £120 million for zero emissions buses in the Spending Review 2020 combined with all-electric bus towns for delivering 800 zero emission buses in 2021-22.

As set out in the Spending Review 2020, the £120 million investment in zero emission buses, together with existing funding for the All-Electric Bus Town, will support both the introduction of 800 zero emission buses and the necessary local infrastructure. Further details on how funding will be distributed to fulfil this ambition will be announced in due course.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on (a) Eurostar’s and High Speed One’s financial sustainability and (b) the long-term consequences for UK connectivity with mainland Europe.

The Government recognises the significant financial challenges facing Eurostar and HS1 as a result of Covid-19 and the unprecedented circumstances currently faced by the international travel industry.

The Government has been engaging extensively with Eurostar?and HS1 since the outbreak of Covid-19 earlier?this year, closely monitoring the ongoing impact on demand for international rail services. Department for Transport officials have also worked with Eurostar to access the various Government support schemes where appropriate, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

As Rail Minister I have also recently met with both Eurostar and HS1 to discuss these challenges. The Government will continue to engage closely with Eurostar and HS1 as we move towards the next phase of our Covid-19 response, and in particular as we look to restart our travel sectors when it is safe to do so.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with (a) Eurostar and (b) HS1 on international travel (i) during and (ii) after the covid-19 pandemic.

The Government recognises the significant financial challenges facing Eurostar and HS1 as a result of Covid-19 and the unprecedented circumstances currently faced by the international travel industry.

The Government has been engaging extensively with Eurostar?and HS1 since the outbreak of Covid-19 earlier?this year, closely monitoring the ongoing impact on demand for international rail services. Department for Transport officials have also worked with Eurostar to access the various Government support schemes where appropriate, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

As Rail Minister I have also recently met with both Eurostar and HS1 to discuss these challenges. The Government will continue to engage closely with Eurostar and HS1 as we move towards the next phase of our Covid-19 response, and in particular as we look to restart our travel sectors when it is safe to do so.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on introducing a bespoke financial support package for (a) Eurostar and (b) High Speed One.

The Government recognises the significant financial challenges facing Eurostar and HS1 as a result of Covid-19 and the unprecedented circumstances currently faced by the international travel industry.

The Government has been engaging extensively with Eurostar?and HS1 since the outbreak of Covid-19 earlier?this year, closely monitoring the ongoing impact on demand for international rail services. Department for Transport officials have also worked with Eurostar to access the various Government support schemes where appropriate, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

As Rail Minister I have also recently met with both Eurostar and HS1 to discuss these challenges. The Government will continue to engage closely with Eurostar and HS1 as we move towards the next phase of our Covid-19 response, and in particular as we look to restart our travel sectors when it is safe to do so.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing financial support to international rail operators with UK connections during the covid-19 pandemic.

We recognise that the international rail sector, as with the rest of the international travel sector, has been significantly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

DfT officials have engaged extensively and supported operators across transport sectors, including the international rail sector, to make full use of the various government support schemes available where appropriate, including the Coronavirus job retention scheme.

We continue to engage regularly with international rail stakeholders including Eurostar, Eurotunnel and HS1 Ltd, and monitor very closely the impacts of Covid-19 on this sector, as well as the decisions taken by companies in response.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to announce the local authority selected to become England's first All Electric Bus Town.

The Department has progressed two bids to Phase 2 of the All-Electric Bus Town competition: Coventry, submitted by Transport for West Midlands; and Oxford, submitted by Oxfordshire County Council. During Phase 2, bidders are required to develop a business case for their scheme that demonstrates appropriate value for money before any funding is awarded. Further details will be available in due course.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of amending the eligibility conditions of the Bus Service Operator's Grant to include hydrogen fuelled buses.

As announced in the ‘Better Deal for Bus Users’ package, the Government remains committed to the reform of the Bus Service Operators Grant (BSOG) in order to support the environment and improve passenger journeys.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Prime Minister on the Government's commitment of 4,000 UK-made zero emission buses by 2024.

The Secretary of State has not had any specific discussions with the Prime Minister regarding the timeline for the 4,000 zero emission buses.

Details of how the 4,000 zero emission buses commitment will be delivered will be announced after the Spending Review.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his planned timescale is for bringing forward legislative proposals to legalise the use of e-scooters.

The Department has taken steps to allow trials of rental e-scooters in a number of local areas across the country. The trials will run across the next 12 months and will be closely monitored and evaluated by officials. This will build an evidence base to guide any future decisions about whether or not to legalise e-scooter use in the long-term and – if so – on what basis. It is not yet possible to determine the outcome of the trials and how they may influence timescales of future legislative proposals, if indeed they determine that e-scooters should be legalised.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to enable members of the public to report incidents involving e-scooters to researchers conducting e-scooter trials.

Incidents in e-scooter trials can be reported to the e-scooter operator, the local authority hosting the trial or, if necessary, to the police. All e-scooters have a unique identifier and in some areas have small plates - similar to registration plates - to help identify the e-scooters involved in any incidents. The Department is regularly gathering evidence from local authorities and operators about incidents and how these are being addressed.

In addition to reported incidents, the Department is letting a contract for central monitoring and evaluation across all trial areas. The primary areas of focus include:

  • safety outcomes for e-scooter users and what influences this,
  • interaction with, and effect on, other road users,
  • public perceptions of e-scooters, including directly from people with disabilities and related groups.
Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with operators of state-owned motorway service areas on renewing their leases.

In November 2018 and March 2019 ministers met all three operators who directly hold leasehold interests, MOTO, Welcome Break, and Roadchef, to seek their general views about the options on expiry of the current lease for the state-owned Motorway Service Area (MSA) sites. There has also been frequent engagement between the operators and officials regarding site improvements.

In September this year, Baroness Vere met Roadchef, to hear their current proposals for lease renewal. Topics discussed included how best to unlock investment to modernise the ageing sites, including the upgrades to electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure, provision of additional HGV parking.

Ministers are considering which approach will secure best value for the taxpayer and enhance the experience for future road users and have requested that the operators work with officials to help understand how the timelines for each option could affect the timing of any investment.

In the March 2020 Budget, the Government announced the Rapid Charging Fund as part of a £500 million commitment for EV charging infrastructure.

It will be available to fund a portion of costs at strategic sites across the strategic road network where upgrading connections to meet future demand for high powered chargepoints would be prohibitively expensive and uncommercial. Timing and process for delivery of this funding will be confirmed in due course.

The Government will be working with the operators of MSAs to ensure that charging provision is in place ahead of customer demand. The aim is to help support early adoption of EVs and remove range anxiety concerns for drivers on long journeys.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with operators of state-owned motorway service areas on those operators accessing investment in (a) site improvements, (b) HGV parking facilities and (c) electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

In November 2018 and March 2019 ministers met all three operators who directly hold leasehold interests, MOTO, Welcome Break, and Roadchef, to seek their general views about the options on expiry of the current lease for the state-owned Motorway Service Area (MSA) sites. There has also been frequent engagement between the operators and officials regarding site improvements.

In September this year, Baroness Vere met Roadchef, to hear their current proposals for lease renewal. Topics discussed included how best to unlock investment to modernise the ageing sites, including the upgrades to electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure, provision of additional HGV parking.

Ministers are considering which approach will secure best value for the taxpayer and enhance the experience for future road users and have requested that the operators work with officials to help understand how the timelines for each option could affect the timing of any investment.

In the March 2020 Budget, the Government announced the Rapid Charging Fund as part of a £500 million commitment for EV charging infrastructure.

It will be available to fund a portion of costs at strategic sites across the strategic road network where upgrading connections to meet future demand for high powered chargepoints would be prohibitively expensive and uncommercial. Timing and process for delivery of this funding will be confirmed in due course.

The Government will be working with the operators of MSAs to ensure that charging provision is in place ahead of customer demand. The aim is to help support early adoption of EVs and remove range anxiety concerns for drivers on long journeys.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of renewing or extending the leases at state-owned motorway service areas on levels of private sector investment in (a) electric vehicle charging infrastructure, (b) HGV parking and (c) site improvements.

In November 2018 and March 2019 ministers met all three operators who directly hold leasehold interests, MOTO, Welcome Break, and Roadchef, to seek their general views about the options on expiry of the current lease for the state-owned Motorway Service Area (MSA) sites. There has also been frequent engagement between the operators and officials regarding site improvements.

In September this year, Baroness Vere met Roadchef, to hear their current proposals for lease renewal. Topics discussed included how best to unlock investment to modernise the ageing sites, including the upgrades to electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure, provision of additional HGV parking.

Ministers are considering which approach will secure best value for the taxpayer and enhance the experience for future road users and have requested that the operators work with officials to help understand how the timelines for each option could affect the timing of any investment.

In the March 2020 Budget, the Government announced the Rapid Charging Fund as part of a £500 million commitment for EV charging infrastructure.

It will be available to fund a portion of costs at strategic sites across the strategic road network where upgrading connections to meet future demand for high powered chargepoints would be prohibitively expensive and uncommercial. Timing and process for delivery of this funding will be confirmed in due course.

The Government will be working with the operators of MSAs to ensure that charging provision is in place ahead of customer demand. The aim is to help support early adoption of EVs and remove range anxiety concerns for drivers on long journeys.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to make a decision on whether to renew or extend the leases at state-owned motorway service areas with leases expiring in 2020-32.

In November 2018 and March 2019 ministers met all three operators who directly hold leasehold interests, MOTO, Welcome Break, and Roadchef, to seek their general views about the options on expiry of the current lease for the state-owned Motorway Service Area (MSA) sites. There has also been frequent engagement between the operators and officials regarding site improvements.

In September this year, Baroness Vere met Roadchef, to hear their current proposals for lease renewal. Topics discussed included how best to unlock investment to modernise the ageing sites, including the upgrades to electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure, provision of additional HGV parking.

Ministers are considering which approach will secure best value for the taxpayer and enhance the experience for future road users and have requested that the operators work with officials to help understand how the timelines for each option could affect the timing of any investment.

In the March 2020 Budget, the Government announced the Rapid Charging Fund as part of a £500 million commitment for EV charging infrastructure.

It will be available to fund a portion of costs at strategic sites across the strategic road network where upgrading connections to meet future demand for high powered chargepoints would be prohibitively expensive and uncommercial. Timing and process for delivery of this funding will be confirmed in due course.

The Government will be working with the operators of MSAs to ensure that charging provision is in place ahead of customer demand. The aim is to help support early adoption of EVs and remove range anxiety concerns for drivers on long journeys.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the National Bus Strategy; and when those discussions took place.

The Department will be working closely with colleagues from across Government on the National Bus Strategy, which is currently under development and which we are aiming to publish by the end of the year.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on the National Bus Strategy of the National Audit Office report entitled, Improving local bus services in England outside London, published on 2 October 2020.

We will be considering a wide range of evidence, including the National Audit Office report, as we continue to develop the National Bus Strategy which we are aiming to publish by the end of this year.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 22 September 2020 to Question 91626, if he will publish a list of projects and programmes he has tasked the Acceleration Unit with speeding up the delivery of.

The Director of the Acceleration Unit Darren Shirley takes his post in October 2020. The programme of work and list of projects will not be determined until after Darren Shirley is established.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the number of staff (a) employed by or (b) under contract to Network Rail to undertake rail electrification construction work from October to December 2020.

The Department does not hold this information.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans publish a white paper on the future of UK railways.

The Government is committed to reforms that deliver a railway that is focused on passengers, with reliable, safe services on a network built around them. We have now ended the franchising system, paving the way for the wider reforms which will be set out in the Williams Review White Paper. We will publish this as soon as the course of the Covid-19 pandemic allows.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he plans to take to evaluate the effectiveness of the Transport Acceleration Unit.

The members of the Acceleration Unit will engage positively with key stakeholders and colleagues across the department, government, and industry on a range of projects and programmes at varying stages of their lifecycle to deliver the best possible outcome from accelerating their delivery.

The Acceleration Unit aims to speed up the delivery of key projects and programmes which will be determined by the Secretary of State. A key element of the Unit’s work will be to put in place a means to judge the effectiveness of its interventions.

The Acceleration Unit Director Darren Shirley will assess the effectiveness of its activities in accordance with these criteria and report to the Secretary of State.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what e-scooter trials are (a) operational and (b) in the planning phase.

E-scooter trials are underway in Tees Valley, Milton Keynes, Northamptonshire, the West Midlands and Staffordshire. Trials have been approved in Norfolk, York, Buckinghamshire, Gloucestershire, Cambridge and Peterborough, Liverpool, Nottingham and Derby, Redditch, Kent and Slough and these will start soon. The Department is also assessing proposals for trials in some other local areas.

Data sharing agreements have been or will be put in place between the Department and the e-scooter operator(s) before a trial can commence. This will provide data on the number and types of journeys completed by e-scooters. The Department is in the process of setting up a large multi-disciplinary contract for the national evaluation of the trials. This will consist of data analysis as well as qualitative and quantitative primary research.

The evaluation will assess some key issues:?the safety risks presented by e-scooters; the mode shift?to e-scooters from other forms of transport;?public perceptions around their use; and other identified impacts from their use. These will inform a decision on whether e-scooters should be legalised and what a suitable form of regulation for e-scooters would be.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress he has made on establishing the evaluation arrangements for e-scooter rental trials.

E-scooter trials are underway in Tees Valley, Milton Keynes, Northamptonshire, the West Midlands and Staffordshire. Trials have been approved in Norfolk, York, Buckinghamshire, Gloucestershire, Cambridge and Peterborough, Liverpool, Nottingham and Derby, Redditch, Kent and Slough and these will start soon. The Department is also assessing proposals for trials in some other local areas.

Data sharing agreements have been or will be put in place between the Department and the e-scooter operator(s) before a trial can commence. This will provide data on the number and types of journeys completed by e-scooters. The Department is in the process of setting up a large multi-disciplinary contract for the national evaluation of the trials. This will consist of data analysis as well as qualitative and quantitative primary research.

The evaluation will assess some key issues:?the safety risks presented by e-scooters; the mode shift?to e-scooters from other forms of transport;?public perceptions around their use; and other identified impacts from their use. These will inform a decision on whether e-scooters should be legalised and what a suitable form of regulation for e-scooters would be.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what criteria his Department will use to determine whether e-scooter rental trials are successful.

E-scooter trials are underway in Tees Valley, Milton Keynes, Northamptonshire, the West Midlands and Staffordshire. Trials have been approved in Norfolk, York, Buckinghamshire, Gloucestershire, Cambridge and Peterborough, Liverpool, Nottingham and Derby, Redditch, Kent and Slough and these will start soon. The Department is also assessing proposals for trials in some other local areas.

Data sharing agreements have been or will be put in place between the Department and the e-scooter operator(s) before a trial can commence. This will provide data on the number and types of journeys completed by e-scooters. The Department is in the process of setting up a large multi-disciplinary contract for the national evaluation of the trials. This will consist of data analysis as well as qualitative and quantitative primary research.

The evaluation will assess some key issues:?the safety risks presented by e-scooters; the mode shift?to e-scooters from other forms of transport;?public perceptions around their use; and other identified impacts from their use. These will inform a decision on whether e-scooters should be legalised and what a suitable form of regulation for e-scooters would be.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether members of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council have been appointed; on what basis those appointments will be made; and if he will publish that Council’s relationship to (a) Transport for the North and (b) the Department’s Transport Acceleration Unit.

The Secretary of State has invited all Northern Metro Mayors and leaders to be members of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council.

The Council is a forum to discuss priority transport projects and make sure they are being progressed at pace, providing a mechanism for speeding up decision making. The work of the Acceleration Unit will support it in doing so. TfN will continue its role of bringing together members and developing strategic advice for the Department.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he intends to publish an updated Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline list, which was last updated on 21 October 2019.

The Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline showing the status of rail enhancement schemes at different stages of development will be published on an annual basis. An update of this will be published following the Spending Review.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what rail schemes are listed at any stage of the Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline as of September 2020.

The Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline Schemes Update was last published in October 2019, and can be found at the following link: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/840709/rail-network-enhancements-pipeline.pdf

The schemes currently in the Pipeline are at different stages of development and spread across the country. The Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline will be updated on an annual basis and will be published in due course.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he has taken to accelerate projects listed in the Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline.

We want to see rail infrastructure projects delivered faster and as efficiently as possible.

We have implemented the Small Operational Enhancements Fund which will allow smaller schemes that give rapid operational benefits to progress quickly through the pipeline.

In order to deliver all transport infrastructure projects better, greener and faster DfT has established a new Acceleration Unit. It will seek to ensure that we unblock issues that impact the delivery of infrastructure projects, with close Ministerial support and oversight.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, (a) who are the members of the new Transport Acceleration Unit and (b) how were those members selected.

The DfT Acceleration Unit is a new team within the Department. The team is being established and is anticipated to comprise five members of staff. Darren Shirley (current Campaign for Better Transport, Chief Executive) will be the Director of the Unit, the remainder of the team are not members of the Senior Civil Service and therefore are not named. All five appointments are being made on a temporary basis whilst the Unit is established.

Applications from transport organisations and others were sought. Role profiles setting out the required skills and experience were developed. Potential candidates were assessed against these criteria. Where fair and open competition has not been used, all appointments have been in line with the agreed Exceptions to the Civil Service Recruitment Principles.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the Canal and River Trust’s proposals for 30 towpath improvement schemes across the country.

On 28 July the Prime Minister launched ambitious plans to boost cycling and walking, where half of all journeys in towns and cities are cycled or walked by 2030. This includes a £2 billion package of funding for active travel.

This will significantly increase the funding available for local authorities to deliver cycling and walking infrastructure, including on canal towpaths. Further details of funding for the different commitments in the Plan will be determined as part of the Spending Review process in the autumn.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of using canal towpaths to provide safe walking and cycling routes to deprived neighbourhoods.

On 28 July the Prime Minister launched ambitious plans to boost cycling and walking, where half of all journeys in towns and cities are cycled or walked by 2030. This includes a £2 billion package of funding for active travel.

This will significantly increase the funding available for local authorities to deliver cycling and walking infrastructure, including on canal towpaths. Further details of funding for the different commitments in the Plan will be determined as part of the Spending Review process in the autumn.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the role of canal towpaths in his plans to increase walking and cycling.

On 28 July the Prime Minister launched ambitious plans to boost cycling and walking, where half of all journeys in towns and cities are cycled or walked by 2030. This includes a £2 billion package of funding for active travel.

This will significantly increase the funding available for local authorities to deliver cycling and walking infrastructure, including on canal towpaths. Further details of funding for the different commitments in the Plan will be determined as part of the Spending Review process in the autumn.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to ensure the transport system is safe and accessible to disabled passengers as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are lifted.

The Government remains as committed to delivering inclusive transport for all passengers as they were before the COVID-19 pandemic. Transport operators should continue to assist disabled passengers where appropriate. I made this clear in my open letter to the rail industry on 8 April 2020.

On 9 May the Department published statutory guidance to local authorities on reallocating road space which makes clear that local authorities must consider the needs of disabled people and those with other protected characteristics when making changes to their transport networks. Public-Sector Equality Duty requirements apply to temporary measures in the same way as they do to permanent ones.

I am also meeting regularly with key disability stakeholders, to hear directly from them about the experiences of disabled people using public transport. This means we will be able to take action quickly if we find that passengers are not receiving the assistance to which they are entitled.

The Government has launched an active communications campaign which advises people about exemptions to the face coverings rules for disability and health reasons. The publication reminds people that not all disabilities are visible and includes a non-compulsory exemption card should people want to use it.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the needs of disabled passengers as lockdown restrictions are lifted on the transport system.

The Government remains as committed to delivering inclusive transport for all passengers as lockdown restrictions are lifted, as they were before the COVID-19 pandemic.

Officials and ministers consider the needs of disabled people in all of their decisions, alongside other protected characteristics, in line with their duties under the Equalities Act and Public Sector Equality Duty. We work closely with stakeholders, including disability organisations, and our statutory advisors, the Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee (DPTAC), to understand the needs of disabled people and ensure those views are reflected in policy decisions.

On 9 May the Department published statutory guidance to local authorities on reallocating road space which makes clear that authorities must consider the needs of disabled people and those with other protected characteristics when making changes to their transport networks. Public Sector Equality Duty requirements apply to temporary measures as they do to permanent ones.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has made an assessment of the effect on levels of (a) pedestrian and cyclist safety and (b) passenger safety of vehicle construction standards in the (i) US and (ii) UK.

The Department for Transport has considered the differences in the technical standards designed to provide protection for both vulnerable road users, such as pedestrians and cyclists, and vehicle occupants in the USA and the UK.

In the UK, new passenger cars and light goods vehicles must meet minimum levels of protection for pedestrian leg and head impacts, but there are no equivalent tests in the USA.

Occupant safety is more complex as there are several standards in both countries designed to improve safety for those inside vehicles. Research carried out by the European Union in preparation for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership negotiations suggests that occupant protection in both countries is broadly similar. However, differences in both the way vehicles are categorised and the make-up of the vehicle fleets make direct comparison difficult.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of using tour operators' coaches to (a) increase public transport capacity and (b) reduce overcrowding on the national rail network.

The Department has been working closely with the transport sector to plan for an increase in passenger numbers, while facilitating social distancing where possible. Train operators have increased service levels to approximately 70 per cent of pre-Covid-19 levels as of 18 May. We continue to work closely with the industry to identify and implement solutions that protect key passenger and freight flows.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to require employers to publish travel plans for their employees which minimise the use of public transport during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government guidance asks employers to consider changes to their working environments to make sure employees are safe while at work. This includes getting to and from their workplace. Workforce travel planning can play an important role in reducing demand on the transport system and controlling the virus. This will keep workers safe and ensuring space on the network for those who need to use it most. Ensuring as many people as possible can continue to work from home, staggering start and finish times for those who need to travel in and enabling those journeys to be on foot or by bicycle wherever possible, or by car, will all help.

Our guidance is not mandatory, but we look to employers to consider the advice closely and make the right decisions for their organisations and employees. We are working with employer organisations to ensure they draw their employees attention to the new guidance.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on taxis and private hire drivers; and what steps his Department is taking to support that sector.

The Department is aware of the issues being faced by the taxi and private hire vehicle (PHV) sector and are working with the industry to understand the particular pressures they are facing. The Self-employment Income Support Scheme will allow taxi and PHV drivers to claim a taxable grant worth 80% of their trading profits up to a maximum of £2,500 per month for the 3-month period from April to June. This may be extended if needed.

More information on the scheme is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-coronavirus-covid-19-self-employment-income-support-scheme.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 27 February 2020 to Question 19851 on the Rail Review, on what date the Williams Rail Review was delivered to his Department; and for what reason the Government has not made a statement on that Review.

The Williams Rail Review’s recommendations are currently being finalised by their independent chair, Keith Williams, working with the Department. We intend to publish these recommendations before the summer recess as a government white paper to allow us to implement the reforms as soon as possible.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 27 February 2020 to Question 19852 on bus services, what external persons and bodies he (a) has met with and (b) plans to meet with to develop his plans for the National Bus Strategy.

Our National Bus Strategy, which was announced alongside the ‘Better Deal for Bus Users’ package, aims to transform bus services across the country. We intend to publish the strategy later this year; I am keen to engage widely on our plans. We are currently finalising our approach to this.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much funding he plans to allocate from the public purse to improving bus services in the financial years (a) 2020-2021, (b) 2021-2022, (c) 2022-2023 and (d) 2023-2024.

Allocations for future funding for 2021/22 and beyond are subject to the upcoming Spending Review due to conclude in July. On February 2020 the PM announced a 5-year package of £5 billion of new funding to overhaul bus and cycling links across England outside of London.

The Department for Transport has set the following budget for 2020/21:

£259 million for Bus Service Operators Grant (BSOG) and a budget of £220m for the ‘Better Deal for Bus Users’ package.

Further to this, in previous years local authorities have spent:

  • Around £1 billion spent by local authorities on Concessionary Travel for disabled and older people using non-ringfenced funding provided by MHCLG; and

  • £930 million of support that local authorities provide for bus services from their own funds, including Government's grant to them.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the announcement by the Prime Minister on 11 February 2020 of £5 billion to improve bus and cycling services over the next five years, how much and what proportion of that amount will be allocated to bus services.

The details of the £5 billion of new funding to overhaul bus and cycle links for every region outside London will be announced in the upcoming National Bus Strategy, to be published later this year at the Comprehensive Spending Review.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to reduce bus journey times in urban areas in England.

Local Authorities are responsible for the management of their local highway networks and the Bus Services Act 2017 provides the tools local authorities need to improve local bus services.

Notwithstanding that, as part of the £220 million Better Deal for Bus Users package the Government announced in September 2019, it has set aside up to £70 million for ‘Superbus’ pilots. The primary objective of this fund is “to increase bus patronage in an area through a package of measures covering bus priority”. The fund is currently open for expressions of interest.

The Government has also set out that £5 billion of funding will be provided to overhaul bus services and cycle links across the country. Further details of how this funding will be allocated will be set out in the National Bus Strategy later this year.

This is all in addition to the £2.5 billion Transforming Cities Fund which will provide an opportunity for the industry to work with local authorities on tackling congestion.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding he plans to allocate to the Light Rail Safety and Standards Board in each of the next five years.

The Department for Transport has met with the Light Rail Standards and Safety Board to discuss their work programme following the Rail Investigation Accident Board report into the Sandilands tram accident. This included a discussion at the UK Tram annual conference in September last year.

The Department has provided over £1.8 million to help the Board take forward safety of light rail systems and is shortly to provide a further £1.5 million in this regard. Further funding for future years will be determined following the next Spending Review. It is also expected the sector provide funding in parallel to ensure the safety of the systems they operate.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he last met with the Light Rail Safety and Standards Board to discuss progress in implementing improvements to safety on UK light rail systems.

The Department for Transport has met with the Light Rail Standards and Safety Board to discuss their work programme following the Rail Investigation Accident Board report into the Sandilands tram accident. This included a discussion at the UK Tram annual conference in September last year.

The Department has provided over £1.8 million to help the Board take forward safety of light rail systems and is shortly to provide a further £1.5 million in this regard. Further funding for future years will be determined following the next Spending Review. It is also expected the sector provide funding in parallel to ensure the safety of the systems they operate.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with (a) the Office of Rail and Road, (b) Network Rail and (c) Train Operating Companies on suicide prevention.

Regular and on-going communication takes place between the Department and all agencies that have a role to play in safeguarding the vulnerable. There is concerted activity by the rail industry to manage the risk and put in place suicide prevention strategies.

DfT has a leadership role across the industry and drives a variety of regular meetings and working groups. In addition to the work of the National Suicide Prevention Working Group, the department chairs a regular working group meeting (DfT and aligned agencies suicide prevention meeting) that is attended by Network Rail, TfL, and the wider transport sector. This group now meet regularly to share good practice, update on activity and look for shared opportunities for suicide prevention initiatives.

A specific example of a forthcoming workshop is the Suicide Prevention (Dissuasion) Workshop being held on 26 March 2020 which will bring together Network Rail, Transport for London, Train Operators, the ORR, and the wider transport sector, to promote new thinking and developments in the prevention arena.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 29 January 2020 to Question 7619 on Railways: Carbon Emissions, what the (a) terms of reference are for the Traction Decarbonisation Network Strategy and (b) what criteria Network Rail will use to identify projects for inclusion within that strategy.

The remit of the Network Rail-led industry Traction Decarbonisation Network Strategy (TDNS) is to provide decarbonisation options for the Department and other funders by examining the suitability of different traction options for each part of the rail network, and the cost and timing of their possible deployment.

Analysis conducted for TDNS will inform Government decisions about the scale and pace of rail decarbonisation between now and 2050 as part of our Transport Decarbonisation Plan. Individual schemes will be developed through the Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline to deliver an affordable and deliverable programme of decarbonisation.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with Highways England on the effect on the local road network of the partial closure of the A52 Clifton Bridge in Nottingham.

During a routine structural inspection of Clifton Bridge in 2018, Highways England identified a number of safety critical repairs were needed. During these planned works, further structural repairs were found to be necessary which led to the closure of the bridge.

I understand how busy this stretch of the A52 is and Highways England did not take the decision to close the bridge lightly. The Department is working with Highways England to make sure everything possible is being done to resolve the situation and get traffic moving across the Clifton bridge as quickly and as safely as possible. One lane has already re-opened.

Highways England is working closely with local authorities to ensure there are no restrictions on the diversion routes.

Highways England invited all Local Resilience Forums (LRF), Nottingham City and County, to attend a briefing on the timings / stages necessary to safely restore the bridge capacity to normal.

Highways England also meets weekly with local authorities and the emergency services to discuss mitigation measures, share progress, and plan works.

Restrictions will be in place for some time until permanent repairs are completed. Highways England continue to liaise with local authorities to explore how the impact of the Clifton Bridge closure on the publics journey, can be further reduced.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the immediacy of the steps required to tackle the effect of the partial closure of the A52 Clifton Bridge on Nottingham's road network.

During a routine structural inspection of Clifton Bridge in 2018, Highways England identified a number of safety critical repairs were needed. During these planned works, further structural repairs were found to be necessary which led to the closure of the bridge.

I understand how busy this stretch of the A52 is and Highways England did not take the decision to close the bridge lightly. The Department is working with Highways England to make sure everything possible is being done to resolve the situation and get traffic moving across the Clifton bridge as quickly and as safely as possible. One lane has already re-opened.

Highways England is working closely with local authorities to ensure there are no restrictions on the diversion routes.

Highways England invited all Local Resilience Forums (LRF), Nottingham City and County, to attend a briefing on the timings / stages necessary to safely restore the bridge capacity to normal.

Highways England also meets weekly with local authorities and the emergency services to discuss mitigation measures, share progress, and plan works.

Restrictions will be in place for some time until permanent repairs are completed. Highways England continue to liaise with local authorities to explore how the impact of the Clifton Bridge closure on the publics journey, can be further reduced.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions (a) he and (b) his officials have had with (a) Nottingham City Council and (b) Nottinghamshire County Council on the effect of the partial closure of the A52 Clifton Bridge on the resilience of the local roads network.

Officials from the Department facilitated conversations between Highways England and the local Highway Authority, Nottingham City Council, so that the effects of the emergency closure of the A52 Clifton Bridge could be managed as carefully as possible.

The Secretary of State has not discussed this matter with the Chancellor of the Exchequer. Highways England continue to collaborate closely with the Local Highways Authority.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the allocation of funds to tackle traffic congestion on Nottingham's local road network arising from the partial closure of the A52 Clifton Bridge.

Officials from the Department facilitated conversations between Highways England and the local Highway Authority, Nottingham City Council, so that the effects of the emergency closure of the A52 Clifton Bridge could be managed as carefully as possible.

The Secretary of State has not discussed this matter with the Chancellor of the Exchequer. Highways England continue to collaborate closely with the Local Highways Authority.

25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many single track kilometres of rail electrification will be delivered in each year of Network Rail's Control Period 6.

Electrification can deliver benefits for rail users and will play a significant role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions to net-zero by 2050. Since the beginning of Control Period 6 (CP6) in April 2019, we have delivered over 130 single track miles of electrification, with around 120 more single track miles planned by March 2021.

Electrification for the remainder of CP6 will be committed as business cases for each scheme are approved. This is a standard feature of the Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline, which ensures an affordable, deliverable programme of investment by assessing schemes continuously throughout the Control Period.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the timescale is for the publication of the Williams Rail Review.

A White Paper based on the Williams Rail Review’s recommendations will be published in due course.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the timescale is for the publication of the National Bus Strategy; and whether he plans to hold a consultation on that strategy before it is implemented.

We intend to publish the strategy later this year and are currently developing our plans how best to proceed.

24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the planned publication date is for Network Rail's Traction Decarbonisation Network Strategy.

Network Rail’s Traction Decarbonisation Network Strategy (TDNS) will be complete later this year. TDNS will inform our Transport Decarbonisation Plan, to be published this year, which will set out a credible and ambitious plan for the UK to ensure transport delivers its contribution to net zero greenhouse gas emissions.

No date has been agreed for publication of TDNS.

24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to his oral evidence of 16 October 2019 to the Transport Committee, Questions 13 and 14, what progress has been made on resolving the problems relating to platforms 13 and 14 at Manchester Piccadilly station.

The Department is working closely with Network Rail, train operators, and stakeholders, to develop options for improving rail capacity and performance through Central Manchester, especially affecting Manchester Piccadilly station Platforms 13 and 14. Some work to these platforms has already been carried out to improve performance and passenger experience, including better customer information systems, and improvements to passenger circulation areas.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to respond to the report of the Rail Industry Decarbonisation Task Force, entitled Final report to the Minister for Rail, published on 20 July 2019.

The Government is ensuring that the railways play their part in delivering our ambitions to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, and to reduce the air pollution created by transport. The work of the Rail Industry Decarbonisation Taskforce has informed the Government and rail industry’s approach to decarbonisation over the last year.

I accept the recommendations in the taskforce’s final report. In line with those recommendations, Network Rail is developing a Traction Decarbonisation Network Strategy, with the Department and industry partners. The Strategy will inform Government decisions in 2020 about the scale and pace of further rail decarbonisation.

Alongside this work, the Government announced the Transport Decarbonisation Plan on 15 October last year to bring together a bold and ambitious programme of coordinated action needed to end the UK’s transport emissions by 2050. We are aiming to publish a call for engagement document in due course.

22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress he has made on developing market-led proposals for rail infrastructure investment.

We continue to welcome market led proposals and the Market Led Guidance remains live at www.gov.uk/government/publications/rail-market-led-proposals. Where proposals have been received we have engaged with backers and where appropriate supported their engagement with Network Rail and the Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline process.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many and what proportion of rail replacement services that take place on vehicles that are compliant with the Persons of Reduced Mobility Technical Specification for Interoperability.

The Government is committed to ensuring that everybody has the same opportunity to use the rail network. According to the data collated by the Office of Rail and Road, for the last 13 rail periods, 38,102 vehicles out of a total of 98,232 (or 38.8%) that were used as rail replacement services were compliant with Public Service Vehicle Accessibility Regulations.

I met with industry on 14 January to discuss this issue and tasked it with producing a robust, achievable plan with a series of milestones and delivery points to show how train operators will move to providing fully compliant rail replacement services. I expect to receive a copy of this plan by the Easter recess.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the number and proportion of rail passenger journeys that take place on vehicles exempt from compliance with the Persons of Reduced Mobility Technical Specification for Interoperability.

The Department for Transport does not hold any information on passenger journeys on vehicles exempt from compliance with the Persons of Reduced Mobility Technical Specification for Interoperability (PRM-TSI). There are no vehicles in scheduled passenger service which are fully exempted from the requirements of the PRM-TSI. There are around 1,300 vehicles (9%) in the national fleet with short term, time-limited dispensations against a range of non-compliances with standards in the PRM-TSI. As these vehicles are upgraded and replaced the number in service diminishes throughout the coming months. Data on the volume of passengers and the frequency of service for vehicles with time-limited dispensations would be a matter for the operators to monitor.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the capability of the Operator of Last Resort to manage additional rail franchises.

The Department is confident that the Operator of Last Resort (OLR) has the capacity to step into Train Operating Companies where necessary and keeps this capacity under review. In addition, the OLR has the capability to expand where needed.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to publish his Department's response to the consultation entitled Bus Services Act 2017: accessible information that closed on 16 September 2018.

In Summer 2018 the Government published a public consultation on proposals to require the provision of accessible on-board information on local bus services throughout Great Britain.

We are currently analysing responses to the consultation and expect to announce our next steps regarding the making of Regulations and publication of guidance later in the year.

21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to implement the recommendations of the Government's Task and Finish Group on Taxi and Private Hire Vehicle Licensing

The Government will continue to engage with the sector on our plans for reforming the regulation of taxis and private hire vehicles including options to introduce new legislation. We are supporting licensing authorities to make use of their extensive existing powers; statutory guidance will shortly be issued to licensing authorities on protecting passengers and updated best practice guidance on other matters will follow later this year.

21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how TUPE regulations apply to staff at different grades where a rail franchise has transferred to the Operator of Last Resort.

Where a rail franchise is transferring to the Operator of Last Resort, the Department would follow the TUPE regulations. Consultation with all levels of a Train Operating Company’s staff would take place.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 4 February 2021 to Question 146856, on Disability Employment Advisors, by how much she plans to increase the number of disability employment advisers during the financial year 2021-22.

DWP aims to increase the number of Disability Employment Advisers during the 21/22 financial year. We are currently working through the planning process and will make an announcement once this has been completed.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 6 January 2021 to Question 133801 on Disability Employment Advisors, how many disability employment advisors were employed in 2019-20; and what estimate she has made of the number who will be in employment by the end of the 2021-22 financial year.

During the 19/20 financial year, DWP employed approximately 685 Disability Employment Advisers across England, Scotland and Wales. DWP aims to increase this number during the 21/22 financial year.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 6 January 2021 to Question 133802 on Kickstart Scheme: Disability, what plans she has to record the main disability of participants ​by type of disability; and whether deafness will be one of the types of disability recorded.

The Universal Credit system collects data on claimants disabilities but as this is voluntary we do not currently record specific type of disability or health condition of Kickstart participants. While we do plan to evaluate the experiences of disabled people participating in Kickstart, it will not be possible to quantify specific types of disability owing to the small sample sizes involved.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many young people have (a) applied for and (b) started a Kickstart scheme placement in (i) Nottingham, (ii) East Midlands and (iii) the UK.

Eligible young people are referred to the Department for Work and Pensions’ Kickstart Scheme by their Work Coach. The Work Coach will work with the young person to find Kickstart jobs that might be a good fit, and they will be able apply for the position.

As of 15/01/21, there has been 6368 applications with potential of hundreds of thousands of roles and 1868 new starts in the UK. We are not yet able to break starts data down below regional level.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she plans to increase the number of disability employment advisors.

Disability Employment Advisers are an integral part of our services and we remain absolutely committed to supporting disabled people, including ensuring access to Disability Employment Advisers. We are planning to increase resourcing levels of Disability Employment Advisers during 21/22. Alongside this we are doubling the number of Work Coaches who provide support to all claimants including those who are disabled, and continue to provide support for disabled people through the Work and Health Programme and Access to Work.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether further engagement events are planned as part of the national strategy for disabled people.

The Government is committed to transforming the lives of disabled people, and will publish the National Strategy for Disabled People this year.


It will be informed by insights from the lived experience of disabled people. The Government has already engaged widely to support the development of the National Strategy and future work. This has taken place with a diverse range of stakeholders, including: the Disability Charities Consortium, Disabled People’s Organisations Forum and Regional Stakeholder Network (which includes disability organisations and individual disabled people), as well as businesses and business organisations, regulators, academia, professional bodies and the Devolved Administrations.


This engagement will include online surveys and virtual round tables across the UK to enable disabled people to share views and insights on key challenges as the National Strategy is developed and implemented.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of people (a) with hearing loss, and (b) who list their primary medical condition as difficulty in hearing who were (i) in employment, (ii) economically inactive and (iii) unemployed in the last 12 months.

The latest available statistics are for the year 2018/19. These show that of working age disabled people who self-reported difficulty with their hearing there were 38% (166,000) in employment and 62% (270,000) not in employment in the UK. Amongst those who reported difficulty with their hearing, 61% (42,000) were in employment and 39% (27,000) were not in employment who self-reported reported difficulty with their hearing as their main health condition.

These figures are shown in table 3.3 of ‘The employment of disabled people 2019’ official statistics publication which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/the-employment-of-disabled-people-2019. The next release of these statistics, covering 2019/20, is due in Spring 2021.

The not in employment category includes people who are unemployed and economically inactive. Reliable estimates for these two sub-categories are not possible due to small sample sizes.


Background

Source: Annual Population Survey, April 2018 to March 2019.

Notes:

  • Reliable data on ‘Difficulty with hearing’ is only available using annual estimates due to sample sizes.
  • Numbers shown are to the nearest 1,000 percentages to the nearest 1 per cent.
  • Figures are for the working age population, comprised of people aged 16 to 64.
  • Disability is defined according to the Government Statistical Service harmonised standard, in line with the Equality Act 2010 core definition.


Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many families with children have received the £20 per week uplift in universal credit standard allowance payments in (a) Nottingham South and (b) the UK in each month since that uplift was introduced.

The available information on the number of households with children with Universal Credit in payment, by parliamentary constituency, is published and can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 24 February 2020 to Question 592 on Social Security Benefits, on what dates the Independent Serious Case Panel has met since 7 November 2019.

The Serious Case Panel now considers systemic themes and issues taken from serious cases, rather than the specific cases themselves. The Serious Case Panel in its new form met on 19 March 2020 and 2 July 2020. The Terms of Reference for the Panel and the minutes of the meetings from the 19 March and the 2 July are published on Gov.uk (https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/dwp-serious-case-panel).

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 24 February 2020 to Question 18385 on Independent Serious Case Panel, if she will publish the agenda for each meeting of the Independent Serious Case Panel since 2018.

The Serious Case Panel now considers systemic themes and issues taken from serious cases, rather than the specific cases themselves. The Serious Case Panel in its new form met on 19 March 2020 and 2 July 2020. The Terms of Reference for the Panel and the minutes of the meetings from the 19 March and the 2 July are published on Gov.uk (https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/dwp-serious-case-panel).

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 26 February 2020 to Question 18385 on Independent Serious Case Panel, if she will publish the qualifications the independent members have for membership of the panel.

The Serious Case Panel is comprised of the DWP Permanent Secretary, DWP Directors General and the Independent Case Examiner. The membership of the Senior Executive Team on the Panel ensures views from all parts of DWP business are represented. This allows actions and recommendations at the Panel to be driven through the Department. Independent members provide additional external expertise. External experts might be invited to support specific discussions at the Panel where this is appropriate.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what progress her Department has made on its Safeguarding Policy Review which was due for completion in Autumn 2019.

It would be inappropriate to comment on the Safeguarding review due to current legal proceedings. However, as part of our commitment to improving vulnerable customers’ experience with the Department; we currently have 10 Senior Safeguarding Leaders in place and plan to have 25 in place by Autumn. They will work across all services and with key partners to support and deliver a consistent service to vulnerable customers. We have also established the Customer Experience Directorate to co-ordinate policy development, guidance and learning as well as monitor the implementation of change.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when her Department plans to update its British Sign Language translation of the Access to Work factsheet for customers.

Access to Work (ATW) is a demand-led, discretionary grant scheme administered by Jobcentre Plus (JCP). The scheme de-risks the recruitment and retention of disabled people for employers by contributing towards covering the costs of support above the level of reasonable adjustment for disabled people at work.

Since the Access to Work factsheet was published in October 2012, it has been amended 12 times in subsequent years. Access to Work recognises the importance of providing information in accessible formats and works with stakeholders to gain an understanding of the key issues. To ensure accessible information was made available during the coronavirus pandemic. British Sign Language (BSL) videos reflecting the new measures Access to Work introduced to support disabled people were developed. These videos can be accessed via the following link:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC0aQWFFHARyXcQd-0mz0lOTZOfI15L8H

To provide accessible information Access to Work continues to work with stakeholders including UK Council on Deafness (UKCOD) to ensure key communications are translated into British Sign Language. Access to Work engages regularly with stakeholders to prioritise communications, and will be publishing advice on Access to Work “Reconsiderations” in the near future, with more communications to follow.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what criteria her Department uses when deciding which Access to Work materials are translated into British Sign Language.

Access to Work (ATW) is a demand-led, discretionary grant scheme administered by Jobcentre Plus (JCP). The scheme de-risks the recruitment and retention of disabled people for employers by contributing towards covering the costs of support above the level of reasonable adjustment for disabled people at work.

Access to Work guidance is available in English and Welsh in html, word and PDF formats on the gov.uk website, and in addition information on DWP services is produced in accessible formats, including BSL videos.

When deciding which communications are translated into British Sign Language, Access to Work will consider the following:

  • Direct feedback from Access to Work British Sign Language users,
  • Stakeholder engagement with disability charities and organisations, including the UK Council on Deafness (UKCOD),
  • Feedback from the Access to Work Stakeholder Forum, and
  • Departmental communication priorities.

Using feedback from these groups and taking account of the wider Departmental communication priorities, Access to Work will identify communications that are causing the most concern and will be the most beneficial for British Sign Language users.

Disabled people who are British Sign Language users who have queries about Access to Work can contact Access to Work via the BSL video relay service (Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm) to discuss queries.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the accuracy of the current British Sign Language translation published in 2015 of the Access to Work factsheet for customers.

Access to Work have been working hard to ensure high standards of their British Sign Language (BSL) translations, including working with the British Deaf Association (BDA) to obtain feedback on their videos and BSL translations and to better understand what matters to BSL users.

Access to Work works with one professional translator when developing BSL products. Recognising the need to ensure the translator has enough time to understand the key messages and interpret them in a way that can be easily understood by BSL users, additional time is built into the contract. The additional times enables Access to Work to work closely with the translator to go through the draft scripts and ensure information is accurately translated and that key messages are interpreted in a way that makes sense for BSL users whilst ensuring accuracy.

Wherever possible, post-production testing is included as part of the assurance process, to ensure user comprehension. This has been more difficult during the COVID-19 outbreak, due to the pace of change and social distancing measures.

Please note that the Access to Work factsheet was not published in 2015 – it was first pub-lished on 1 October 2012 and has been amended 12 times in subsequent years.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 10 September to Question 12927 on the Independent Serious Case Panel, what qualifications the independent members have for membership of the panel.

We are absolutely committed to improving our services, especially to the most vulnerable, which is why we have set up the Serious Case Panel. The panel was developed to take themes and systemic issues that come out of various case reviews and make recommendations for improvements.

More information about the Serious Case Panel will be published in due course.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 10 September 2019 to Question 12926 on Social Security Benefits, on what dates the Independent Serious Case Panel has met in each year since 2018.

We are absolutely committed to improving our services, especially to the most vulnerable, which is why we have set up the Serious Case Panel. The panel was developed to take themes and systemic issues that come out of various case reviews and make recommendations for improvements.

The Serious Case Panel met on 30 September 2019 and 7 November 2019 and will meet quarterly from now on.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 10 September 2019 to Question 12926 on Social Security Benefits, if she will publish the agendas of the Independent Serious Case Panel meetings for each meeting that panel has held since 2018.

More information about the Serious Case Panel will be published in due course.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, in what circumstances the Independent Serious Case Panel is instigated.

The Serious Case Panel meets quarterly.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, who sits on the Independent Serious Case Panel.

Membership comprises of Civil Servants and independent members.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what processes the Independent Serious Case Panel uses when investigating cases.

The Serious Case Panel takes themes and systemic issues that come out of case reviews, and makes recommendations for improvements across the relevant areas of the department.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the remit is of the Independent Serious Case Panel.

The Serious Case Panel takes themes and systemic issues that come out of case reviews, and makes recommendations for improvements across the relevant areas of the department.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average number of days was between a final safeguarding visit to a vulnerable benefits claimant and that claimant's payments being stopped in each year from 2010.

DWP Visiting undertakes safeguarding visits for customers who are deemed to be vulnerable in relation to benefit claims.

DWP cannot provide figures exclusively for payments stopped in relation to safeguarding visits as the Department does not hold this information centrally and to do so would incur disproportionate costs.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many benefit claimants assessed as vulnerable had their payments stopped after two failed safeguarding visits from her Department in each year from 2010.

DWP Visiting undertakes safeguarding visits for customers who are deemed to be vulnerable in relation to benefit claims.

DWP cannot provide figures exclusively for payments stopped in relation to safeguarding visits as the Department does not hold this information centrally and to do so would incur disproportionate costs.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average number of days was between a final warning being issued to a benefit claimant and that claimant's payments being stopped in each year from 2010.

The Department does keep this information centrally and to provide it would incur disproportionate costs.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many benefit claimants assessed as vulnerable received (a) one and (b) two safeguarding visits from her Department in each year from 2010.

DWP Visiting undertakes safeguarding visits for customers who are deemed to be vulnerable in relation to benefit claims.

DWP cannot provide figures exclusively for payments stopped in relation to safeguarding visits as the Department does not hold this information centrally and to do so would incur disproportionate costs.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants assessed as vulnerable had their benefit payments stopped in each year from 2010 to 2019.

The information is not available.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she plans to take to tackle food poverty in Nottingham South constituency.

The government is committed to delivering a sustainable long-term solution to poverty in all its forms and in all parts of the UK by building a strong economy and ensuring that the benefit system works with the tax system and the labour market to support employment and higher pay.

The evidence shows that full time work substantially reduces the risk of being in poverty. Universal Credit is designed to help people move into work faster, stay in work longer and spend more time looking to increase their earnings, provides more financial help with childcare costs and removes the 16-hour ‘cliff edge for those who are working. To help families keep more of what they earn we have delivered another rise in the National Living Wage, increasing a full-time worker’s annual pay by over £2,750 since its introduction, and by nearly £3,700 with the recently announced rise from this April, with our tax changes making basic rate tax payers over £1,200 better off from April 2019, compared with 2010.

In order to develop a better understanding of the drivers of food insecurity and identify which groups are most at risk we have introduced a new set of food security questions in the Family Resources Survey questionnaire from April 2019 onwards. This will enable us in the future to monitor the prevalence and severity of household food insecurity across the UK and for specific groups.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of children in Nottingham South constituency living in (a) poverty and (b) absolute poverty have (i) one household member in full-time employment, (ii) two household members in full-time employment, (iii) one household member in part-time employment, (iv) two household members in part-time employment and (v) no household members in employment in the most recent period for which figures are available.

National Statistics on the number and percentage of children in low income are published annually in the “Households Below Average Income” publication. Statistics for the percentage of children in low income households is not available at constituency level in this publication because the survey sample sizes are too small to support the production of robust estimates at this geography. Statistics for the East Midlands region can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/households-below-average-income-199495-to-201718, “children-hbai-timeseries-1994-95-2017-18-tables” in tables 4.16ts and 4.17ts (for relative low income, before and after housing costs) and 4.22ts and 4.23ts (for absolute low income, before and after housing costs).

The statistics are only available for all children and cannot be broken down into the categories requested because the survey sample sizes are too small to support the production of robust estimates.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many children lived in (a) poverty and (b) extreme poverty in Nottingham in each of the last 10 years.

National Statistics on the number of children in low income households are published annually in the “Households Below Average Income” publication. Statistics for the number of children in low income households is not available at combined Local Authority level in this publication because the survey sample sizes are too small to support the production of robust estimates at this geography. Statistics for the East Midlands region can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/households-below-average-income-199495-to-201718, “children-hbai-timeseries-1994-95-2017-18-tables” in tables 4.17ts (for relative low income, before and after housing costs) and 4.23ts (for absolute low income, before and after housing costs).

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many prosecutions the Care Quality Commission has brought against (a) Nottingham University Hospitals Trust and (b) all NHS trusts in England for failure to comply with the duty of candour in each year since those regulations came into force.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has brought no prosecutions against Nottingham University Hospitals Trust for failure to comply with duty of candour regulations.

The CQC has brought one prosecution against an English NHS trust in September 2020. In addition, the CQC has taken criminal enforcement action via Fixed Penalty Notices issued to two trusts for failure to comply with duty of candour regulations in 2018 and 2019.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many joint parks and public health strategies have been produced by local authorities since 2016; and whether he plans to make the production of such strategies a statutory duty.

The information requested is not held centrally. We have no plans to make the production of joint parks and public health strategies a statutory duty. It is for local authorities to determine how they can most effectively act to improve the health of their local populations.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what scientific evidence informed his decision not to allow ice rinks to reopen under tier three local covid alert level restrictions.

The Government is committed to publishing data that has informed its decision making, including the tier allocations. The Department publishes a weekly watchlist giving epidemiological COVID-19 data for each lower-tier local authority in England. This is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/coronavirus-cases-by-local-authority-epidemiological-data

Detailed data on hospital activity is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-hospital-activity/

The dashboard on the progress of the virus across a range of metrics is updated every day at the following link:

https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk

The Contain framework sets out how national and local partners work with the public at a local level to prevent, contain and manage outbreaks, this includes the allocation of areas to the appropriate tier, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/containing-and-managing-local-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreaks/covid-19-contain-framework-a-guide-for-local-decision-makers

Epidemiological data and projection models on local restriction tiers, including commentary on individual tier allocation decisions, is available at the following link: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938964/Coronavirus_England_briefing_26_November.pdf

This provides further information and context beyond the headline metrics as to why areas are in particular tiers currently.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what scientific evidence informed his decision not to allow bowling alleys to reopen under tier three local covid alert level restrictions.

The Government is committed to publishing data that has informed its decision making, including the tier allocations. The Department publishes a weekly watchlist giving epidemiological COVID-19 data for each lower-tier local authority in England. This is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/coronavirus-cases-by-local-authority-epidemiological-data

Detailed data on hospital activity is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-hospital-activity/

The dashboard on the progress of the virus across a range of metrics is updated every day at the following link:

https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk

The Contain framework sets out how national and local partners work with the public at a local level to prevent, contain and manage outbreaks, this includes the allocation of areas to the appropriate tier, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/containing-and-managing-local-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreaks/covid-19-contain-framework-a-guide-for-local-decision-makers

Epidemiological data and projection models on local restriction tiers, including commentary on individual tier allocation decisions, is available at the following link: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938964/Coronavirus_England_briefing_26_November.pdf

This provides further information and context beyond the headline metrics as to why areas are in particular tiers currently.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of using anti-viral face masks in the NHS and social care settings.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) regulates ‘face masks’ that are medical devices, those intended to be used in a clinical/health care setting for the protection of the patient rather than the wearer. The MHRA has not conducted or participated in an assessment of anti-viral medical face masks for use in a health care setting.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have been approached by a number of suppliers claiming to have products or technologies with anti-viral properties. The Innovation and Sustainability Team within NHS England and NHS Improvement are currently looking into these claims and their potential application across a range of items.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the article in the British Medical Journal entitled, Covid-19: Timing is critical for antibody tests, published on 25th June 2020, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the Government's antibody testing strategy.

Antibody testing is a key part of the Government’s testing programme and will play an increasingly important role as we move into the next phase of responding to COVID-19. On 21 May the Government announced plans for a national roll-out of antibody testing in the National Health Service and care sector.

Although we do not yet know whether antibodies indicate immunity from reinfection or transmission, antibody tests are helping us better understand how COVID-19 is spreading across the country.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how data in relation to the (a) gender, (b) age, (c) ethnicity and (d) location of a person's antibody test result is (i) collected (ii), distributed and (iii) analysed.

On 21 May the Government announced plans for a national roll-out of antibody testing in the National Health Service and social care sector. All NHS and adult social care staff in England are being offered an antibody test, with patients and care residents eligible at their clinician’s request. To date we have performed over 1.7 million tests through this route.

Antibody testing data is held by Public Health England with trusts across England routinely reporting data. This will enable analysis broken down by age, gender, ethnicity and geographic area. The data will also be used extensively with other healthcare data in the SIREN study.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking with the Chief Scientific Officer to support the production of a CE-marked clear panel face mask.

The United Kingdom Government’s national personal protective equipment (PPE) procurement team has been working extremely hard in recent weeks to source clear facemasks which comply with UK safety standards. While the product is not CE marked, UK Government regulators have agreed that a particular mask can enter the National Health Service supply chain for use during COVID-19 and further details will be announced as soon as possible about availability to health and care settings.

Where regulators find that PPE (as regulated by the Health and Safety Executive) or medical devices (as regulated by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency) can ensure an adequate level of health and safety in accordance with the essential requirements laid down in Regulation (EU) 2016/425 or the requirements of Directive 93/42/EEC, they may authorise the making available of these products for supply to frontline healthcare.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Government press release dated 5 June 2020, Face masks and coverings to be worn by all NHS hospital staff and visitors, if he will issue guidance on whether staff will be permitted to conduct their appointment without a face mask at a 2 metre distance if a patient identifies themselves as requiring lip reading.

The recommendations for the use of face masks by hospital staff and face coverings for hospital visitors have been made for to help prevent the spread of infection. Evidence has shown that those infected with COVID-19 can have very mild or no respiratory symptoms (asymptomatic) and potentially transmit the virus to others without being aware of it, so it is important we take steps to reduce the risk of transmission from staff who may be asymptomatic.

Staff working alone in a private workspace will not be expected to wear a mask but when they leave the private work area to move through the hospital building, e.g. on an errand, or for meal breaks, they should put on a surgical face mask as outlined in the guidance.

For some, wearing of a face covering may be difficult, and therefore all other measures must also be considered and introduced e.g. social/physical distancing, timed appointments; being seen immediately and not kept in waiting rooms. Individual risk assessments should be undertaken where required; for example, patients with mental health and learning disabilities. Such risk assessments must be documented.

The use of face masks due to the COVID-19 pandemic may have an impact on patients who are deaf or have a hearing impairment as they can block the face of healthcare workers and prevent the ability to use visual cues such as facial expressions and lip reading.

The Government's personal protective equipment procurement team has sourced clear surgical face masks to support communication with patients who may be deaf or hearing impaired. They are working with regions to identify where those are best distributed.

Where clear masks are not possible, communication tactics should be considered to support patients and visitors who are deaf or have a hearing impairment.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of face coverings on accessibility for people who are deaf or have hearing loss.

We know that face coverings can cause significant communication challenges for those who rely on lip-reading, facial expressions or clear and unmuffled sounds such as people who are deaf or have hearing loss.

We are engaging with disability organisations to assess the impact of requirements to wear face coverings. We are working across Government to identify what reasonable adjustments can be made for disabled people.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Government's press release of 5 June 2020, on surgical masks worn in NHS hospitals, what provision his Department has made for NHS staff who are (a) deaf or (b) have hearing loss.

The Government recognise concerns about the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), particularly face masks when it comes to people who are deaf or have hearing loss. The United Kingdom’s Government’s national PPE procurement team has been working extremely hard to source clear facemasks which comply with UK safety standards and have procured stocks of clear masks into health and social care settings, to support those who need to lip read. Distribution solutions for these are currently being confirmed. Our priority remains saving lives, including those frontline staff who need to wear PPE as they go about their vital work.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Government's press release of 5 June 2020, Face masks and coverings to be worn by all NHS hospital staff and visitors, if he will issue guidance on if staff should remove face masks while conducting (a) video consultations and (b) telehealth appointments throughout hospital departments.

The recommendations for the use of face masks by hospital staff and face coverings for hospital visitors have been made for to help prevent the spread of infection. Evidence has shown that those infected with COVID-19 can have very mild or no respiratory symptoms (asymptomatic) and potentially transmit the virus to others without being aware of it, so it is important we take steps to reduce the risk of transmission from staff who may be asymptomatic.

Staff working alone in a private workspace will not be expected to wear a mask but when they leave the private work area to move through the hospital building, e.g. on an errand, or for meal breaks, they should put on a surgical face mask as outlined in the guidance.

For some, wearing of a face covering may be difficult, and therefore all other measures must also be considered and introduced e.g. social/physical distancing, timed appointments; being seen immediately and not kept in waiting rooms. Individual risk assessments should be undertaken where required; for example, patients with mental health and learning disabilities. Such risk assessments must be documented.

The use of face masks due to the COVID-19 pandemic may have an impact on patients who are deaf or have a hearing impairment as they can block the face of healthcare workers and prevent the ability to use visual cues such as facial expressions and lip reading.

The Government's personal protective equipment procurement team has sourced clear surgical face masks to support communication with patients who may be deaf or hearing impaired. They are working with regions to identify where those are best distributed.

Where clear masks are not possible, communication tactics should be considered to support patients and visitors who are deaf or have a hearing impairment.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, what steps he is taking to ensure that immunosuppressed people are not required to attend GP surgeries to collect prescriptions of controlled medication.

There are already e-prescriptions and medicine delivery services in place around the country. For controlled medications, someone can pick up the medicine for someone else, they just need to show their ID.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to simplify the process for immunosupressed people collecting controlled medication during the covid-19 outbreak.

There are already e-prescriptions and medicine delivery services in place around the country. For controlled medications, someone can pick up the medicine for someone else, they just need to show their ID.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to lift the requirement for pharmacists to be present when people sign prescriptions for controlled medication to reduce pressure on pharmacists during the covid-19 outbreak..

There is no legal requirement for a pharmacist to be present when a prescription for controlled drugs is signed. However, when a Schedule 2 controlled drug is collected from a pharmacy, the pharmacist is legally required to determine whether the person collecting is a patient, patient’s representative or healthcare professional, and maintain a record of the person supplied. These measures are important to prevent the misuse and diversion of controlled drugs.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of accessibility of hearing test appointments for care home residents.

No formal assessments have been made. NHS England published ‘The Commissioning Framework for Hearing Loss Services’ to provide guidance to the health and care system to address inconsistencies including in access and variation in provision. NHS England also produced national guidance for more local Joint Strategic Needs Assessments.

Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for the commissioning of hearing loss services based on the local needs of their population including for elderly people. They use a local commissioning process that determines how providers deliver care for the National Health Service area they are responsible for including in residential and nursing homes. This is not monitored nationally.

There is agreed national education and training for people working in hearing services.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of training for health care workers on treating people with hearing loss.

No formal assessments have been made. NHS England published ‘The Commissioning Framework for Hearing Loss Services’ to provide guidance to the health and care system to address inconsistencies including in access and variation in provision. NHS England also produced national guidance for more local Joint Strategic Needs Assessments.

Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for the commissioning of hearing loss services based on the local needs of their population including for elderly people. They use a local commissioning process that determines how providers deliver care for the National Health Service area they are responsible for including in residential and nursing homes. This is not monitored nationally.

There is agreed national education and training for people working in hearing services.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the (a) accessibility and (b) availability of hearing test appointments for elderly people.

No formal assessments have been made. NHS England published ‘The Commissioning Framework for Hearing Loss Services’ to provide guidance to the health and care system to address inconsistencies including in access and variation in provision. NHS England also produced national guidance for more local Joint Strategic Needs Assessments.

Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for the commissioning of hearing loss services based on the local needs of their population including for elderly people. They use a local commissioning process that determines how providers deliver care for the National Health Service area they are responsible for including in residential and nursing homes. This is not monitored nationally.

There is agreed national education and training for people working in hearing services.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress he has made on eliminating the use of coal for heating at City Hospital, Nottingham; and if he will make a statement.

According to published data from the Estates Return Information Collection, Nottingham City Hospital consumed 30 million kilowatt hours (kWh) of coal in 2018-19. This is a reduction of 50% when compared to the corresponding figure for 2014-15 (60 million). Data is available at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/estates-returns-information-collection/england-2018-19

The Government recognises the importance of reducing usage of non-renewable energy sources by public sector organisations, both in terms of meeting its commitment to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050 and reducing levels of air pollution. The National Health Service is taking several actions to support this, including the phasing out of primary heating from coal and oil fuel in NHS sites. Investment requirements to further transform the NHS estate will be considered as part of the multi-year capital budget the Department will receive at the next capital review.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what funding is available to Nottingham University Hospitals Trust to tackle its maintenance backlog.

Individual National Health Service organisations are responsible for maintaining their estates. NHS provider organisations invest more than £3 billion of capital annually. 2019-20 NHS planning guidance makes clear that providers should ensure capital investments are consistent with their clinical strategies and how they demonstrate the delivery of safe, productive services.

We recognise the challenge for providers in maintaining their existing estates and investing in new facilities. In August 2019, we announced £1.8 billion of additional funding, which included a £1 billion boost to NHS capital spending, allowing existing upgrade programmes to proceed and tackling the most urgent infrastructure projects.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has in 2021 to publish benefit in kind tax rates beyond the financial year 2024-25.

Company car tax appropriate percentages beyond 2024-25 remain under review and will be announced at future fiscal events. The Government aims to announce appropriate percentages at least two years ahead of implementation to provide certainty for employers, employees and fleet operators.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will appoint a representative from public transport to the Build Back Better Council.

All members of the Build Back Better Business Council were appointed by the Prime Minister in an individual capacity in January 2021. The Council is co-chaired by the Prime Minister and Chancellor, with the Business Secretary as a standing member, and other Cabinet Ministers attending as required. Members have been selected to bring together a broad range of business leaders from across the whole British economy to work in partnership with the government to unlock investment, boost job creation, promote Global Britain and level up the whole of the UK. The terms of reference will be published on Gov.uk. This council is in addition to the regular and ongoing engagement with the transport sector across Downing Street and other Government departments. The Public Transport sector and related bodies are important stakeholders and continue to feed into work across Government on economic recovery and future growth.
Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish the criteria by which members of the Build Back Better Council were appointed.

All members of the Build Back Better Business Council were appointed by the Prime Minister in an individual capacity in January 2021. The Council is co-chaired by the Prime Minister and Chancellor, with the Business Secretary as a standing member, and other Cabinet Ministers attending as required. Members have been selected to bring together a broad range of business leaders from across the whole British economy to work in partnership with the government to unlock investment, boost job creation, promote Global Britain and level up the whole of the UK. The terms of reference will be published on Gov.uk. This council is in addition to the regular and ongoing engagement with the transport sector across Downing Street and other Government departments. The Public Transport sector and related bodies are important stakeholders and continue to feed into work across Government on economic recovery and future growth.
Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on appointing a public transport representative to the Build Back Better Council.

All members of the Build Back Better Business Council were appointed by the Prime Minister in an individual capacity in January 2021. The Council is co-chaired by the Prime Minister and Chancellor, with the Business Secretary as a standing member, and other Cabinet Ministers attending as required. Members have been selected to bring together a broad range of business leaders from across the whole British economy to work in partnership with the government to unlock investment, boost job creation, promote Global Britain and level up the whole of the UK. The terms of reference will be published on Gov.uk. This council is in addition to the regular and ongoing engagement with the transport sector across Downing Street and other Government departments. The Public Transport sector and related bodies are important stakeholders and continue to feed into work across Government on economic recovery and future growth.
Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to his oral contribution of 25 November 2020, Official Report column 828, on public sector workers who earn below the median wage of £24,000 being guaranteed a pay rise of at least £250, whether that £250 award will be consolidated or non-consolidated.

The recommended £250 pay award provided to public sector workers earning less than £24,000 on a full-time equivalent basis will be consolidated.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on extending the uplift to universal credit beyond April 2021.

The temporary £20 per week increase to Universal Credit and Working Tax Credits was introduced specifically to provide support to those who have seen their income fall as a result of the pandemic. This is just one part of a wide-ranging package of support the Government has provided to protect people's jobs and incomes. We are continuing to respond to the economic situation as it evolves and are keeping all measures under review.

Making the £20 per week increase permanent would require a substantial ongoing increase in borrowing or tax rises, with 2020-21 spending on working-age benefits set to be the highest since records began as a share of national income.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when his Department plans to implement the mechanisms of financial support for small businesses announced in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

Officials are working at pace to deliver the measures for small businesses as announced by the Chancellor. The Covid-19 Business Interruption Loan Scheme, which will provide financing facilities for SMEs of up to £5 million, launched today (Monday 23rd March). The Small Business and Retail grants will be made available by local authorities in coming weeks - with extra resources being provided to them to help deal with the administration of such grant schemes. These measures are part of a wider, unprecedented package of support for businesses and workers to ensure as best we can that people remain employed and firms financially secure.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, which Minister has responsibility for parks and green spaces.

Parks and green spaces share joint responsibility between the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and the Department for Environment and Rural Affairs. MHCLG is responsible for urban parks and green spaces and the responsible minister is Luke Hall MP. The DEFRA minister responsible for green spaces is Rebecca Pow MP and Lord Gardiner is responsible for country parks.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many joint meetings the cross-departmental working group and park sector group have had; and what the outcomes of those meetings were.

The Parks Action Group has met four times since its inception in 2017. These meetings led to the development of a workplan that focused on: funding; quality standards; a shared vision for the futures of parks (including establishing a robust picture of their benefits); empowering local communities involvement and improving equitable access.

MHCLG provided £500,000 to support sector-led initiatives including:

  • Appointment of the Parks Action Group Coordinator.
  • Joint research delivered by APSE and academics ‘21stCentury Parks’ which aims to identify the knowledge and skills of existing park managers.
  • New Policy Institute research exploring parks funding, new funding models and to identify good practice:
  • Public Health England and Natural England research on accessibility of green spaces:
  • The Natural England Green Infrastructure project to improve benchmarking on standards for green spaces:
  • Locality and National Federation of Parks and Green Spaces Empowerment Programme
  • Skills: Using the 21stCentury Parks research mentioned above, the Skills Task & Finish group are developing a competency framework to form a greenprint for the parks profession.
Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to ensure adequate (a) staffing, (b) toilets and (c) other facilities are provided at parks and green spaces.

The Government has set up the Future Parks Accelerator, which is a joint National Lottery Heritage Fund and National Trust programme to support a cohort of eight local authority areas to transform their parks estates, testing and learning from new and innovative models of parks management and funding to create more sustainable parks estates for the future.

The learning from the programme will be shared widely across the parks sector.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to ensure sufficient funding is provided to maintain parks to the Government standard set out in the Green Flag Award.

The Green Flag Awards scheme recognises and rewards well managed parks and green spaces by setting a benchmark standard for the management of recreational outdoor spaces across the UK and internationally.

The Government announced in September 2020 a £40 million Green Recovery Challenge Fund in England as part of the Government’s wider green economic recovery, jobs and skills package, bringing forward funding for environmental charities and their partners to start work on projects across England to restore nature and tackle climate change.

The fund will help create up to 3,000 jobs and safeguard up to 2,000 others in areas such as protecting species, finding nature-based solutions to tackling climate change, conservation rangers and connecting people with nature. Up to 100% of project costs will be available whilst delivering against the goals of the Government’s 25 Year Environment Plan.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what direct financial support his Department is providing to local authority parks and green spaces.

The Government recognises the value of parks and green spaces in providing vibrant and inclusive locations for communities to socialise, volunteer, work, and exercise. It recognises that green spaces foster health, well-being, integration, and social engagement.

In 2021-22, local government will on average see a cash terms increase of up to 4.6% in Core Spending Power – a real-terms increase. This is in line with last year’s increase and recognises the resources councils need to meet their pressures and maintain current service levels.

The Settlement is unringfenced to ensure local areas can prioritise based on their own understanding of the needs of their local communities.

The Government has made £16.3 million available between 2017 - 2019 to support parks and green spaces.

This includes those in urban environments by funding; £9.7 million Local Authority Parks Improvement Fund; £5.1 million Pocket Parks and Pocket Parks Plus programmes; £1.41 million to test and pilot new management and funding models for parks through the Future Parks Accelerator programme; £55,000 to fund a Parks Action Group Coordinator; £30,000 on Green Infrastructure – working with Natural England to develop new standards for green spaces; £20,000 towards a skills event to promote continued professional development for parks professionals and £130,000 Community Empowerment Programme encouraging local communities become involved in the stewardship of community parks and green spaces.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many (a) deaths, (b) serious injuries and (c) near misses have been recorded as a result of people taking shelter in refuse bins which are then emptied into refuse vehicles; and what steps he plans to take to help prevent such incidents.

Every premature death of someone homeless is one too many and we take this matter extremely seriously.?It should not happen that people die prematurely?and on the street?because they are homeless.

We are absolutely committed to ending rough sleeping by the end of this parliament. To achieve this, we are providing £437 million to tackle homelessness and rough sleeping in 2020/2021.This marks a £69 million increase in funding from the previous year.

This year we have expanded the Rough Sleeping Initiative with investment of £46 million for 246 areas – providing funding for an estimated 2,600 bed spaces and 750 staff. Next year, we are allocating a further £112 million to around 270 areas, funding up to 6,000 bed spaces and 2,500 staff. And this is having an impact.?The RSI?impact evaluation?shows that the Initiative has reduced the number of people sleeping rough by 32 per cent in the areas funded, compared to the number it would have been had the RSI not been in place.

We do not hold data on the?number of deaths as a result of people taking shelter in refuse bins.?However, we understand some local councils and businesses have conducted research and supplied advice on this issue in recent years.

This Government is aware that a skilled frontline workforce is essential to delivering good services and ultimately reducing homelessness.?Delivery of the?Key Groups?Training programme launched in Summer 2019. ?The training programme is expected to cater for 3,450 members of the frontline homelessness workforce by the end of June 2020.

Local authorities and outreach teams work tirelessly to ensure that appropriate support is given to all rough sleepers regardless of where they are found, be that in tents, doorways, bins or on the street.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether Clause 164 of the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill would allow deaf people who need Speech to Text Reporting within the deliberation room to undertake jury service.

Individuals with hearing impairments currently have access to Induction Loop Systems and those who are able to lip read can and do serve as jurors. They also have access to shorthand writers who transcribe the proceedings in court. While Speech to Text Reporters (STTR) may be suitable for transcribing court proceedings, they are not considered an effective option to enable jurors to converse and engage with other jurors and fully participate in deliberations.

Clause 164 in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill has therefore been drafted to enable only British Sign Language (BSL) interpreters to be present in the jury deliberation room. We have also considered speech to text transcription using AI technology as an additional support which would not require a change in the law. However, the technology is not yet sufficiently advanced to accurately transcribe a real time written account of jury deliberations and enable a deaf juror to fully engage in discussions. We will continue to keep this under review as the technology develops.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what adjustments do HM Courts and Tribunal Service offer to deaf jurors who need speech to text reporting within a deliberation room.

Individuals with hearing impairments currently have access to Induction Loop Systems and those who are able to lip read can and do serve as jurors. They also have access to shorthand writers who transcribe the proceedings in court. While Speech to Text Reporters (STTR) may be suitable for transcribing court proceedings, they are not considered an effective option to enable jurors to converse and engage with other jurors and fully participate in deliberations.

Clause 164 in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill has therefore been drafted to enable only British Sign Language (BSL) interpreters to be present in the jury deliberation room. We have also considered speech to text transcription using AI technology as an additional support which would not require a change in the law. However, the technology is not yet sufficiently advanced to accurately transcribe a real time written account of jury deliberations and enable a deaf juror to fully engage in discussions. We will continue to keep this under review as the technology develops.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on what date (a) protective screens installed and (b) other covid-19 protective measures were introduced at Nottingham Crown Court.

HMCTS has in place a range of measures, developed in line with, and validated against, relevant public health standards, to help to prevent the transmission of Covid 19 across the court and tribunal estate. Details can be found in the published Organisational Risk Assessment, and in the site-specific risk assessments undertaken and reviewed regularly at each building, which are available on request. These measures have enabled HMCTS to run its vital public services, and so maintain access to justice, throughout the pandemic emergency.

Nottingham Crown Court had screens installed on the 25th September 2020 into two jury deliberation rooms and two court rooms.

Furthermore, as well as requiring anyone in public spaces within our buildings to wear a face covering (unless exempt), a series of other measures have been put into place since the 16th March 2020 to ensure that the building operates in a Covid secure way, including introducing revised entry and search procedures for all court users, the provision of hand sanitiser at convenient points across the building, and public concourses marked out with socially distanced floor markings and appropriate guidance signage. In addition, all work assessed as suitable by the judiciary can be managed by way of remote/virtual hearings, and staff who can work remotely are doing so to reduce footfall and ensure social distancing can be adhered to.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of court security staffing.

HM Courts & Tribunals Service keeps the security arrangements at its court and tribunal buildings under close review and we are satisfied that appropriate provision is in place to ensure that all of our sites are safe for our users.

In April 2020, OCS became the sole national provider for security services across the HMCTS estate, enhancing the day to day security provision at courts and tribunals. The new contract enables improved monitoring of security in our sites, provides enhanced training of security staff and delivers an improved experience for all users of our courts and tribunals.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he has taken to prioritise cases dealt with by the courts during the covid-19 outbreak.

The prioritisation of cases is a matter for the judiciary.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) has assisted the judiciary by providing analyses of caseload and case types for the most time-critical and sensitive cases.

HMCTS are investing record amounts, with £153m to improve court and tribunal buildings, as well as more than £80m on a range of emergency measures to tackle the impact of Covid-19, including the recruitment of 1,600 additional staff.

To enable judicial prioritisation HMCTS has rapidly rolled out technology to support far more remote hearings than could have been supported before the pandemic, set up Nightingale courts, conducted detailed risk assessments, and completed physical building works to enable hearings to take place safely where cases are prioritised for an in-person hearing.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)