Lord Mann Portrait

Lord Mann

Non-affiliated - Life peer


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Thursday 10th June 2021
Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development etc.) (England) (Amendment) Order 2021
voted Aye
One of 12 Independent Aye votes vs 7 Independent No votes
Tally: Ayes - 260 Noes - 229
Speeches
Wednesday 8th September 2021
Football Grounds: Safe Standing

I declare my interest as the elected chair of the Leeds United Supporters Club. Every supporters’ club in the Premier …

Written Answers
Tuesday 27th July 2021
Football: Safety
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority regarding the requirement for …
Early Day Motions
Wednesday 24th July 2019
BAN ON TRADE IN TROPHY HUNTING MEMORABILIA
That this House recognises the negative effect of the continued importation, sale and distribution of animal carcasses and body parts …
Bills
Tuesday 31st January 2012
Armed Forces (Germany) Bill 2010-12
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
Tweets
Wednesday 25th August 2021
23:35
MP Financial Interests
None available
EDM signed
Wednesday 15th May 2019
STATE-FUNDED LEGAL REPRESENTATION FOR VICTIMS OF TERRORISM
That this House expresses concern that victims of terrorist atrocities are not automatically eligible for legal aid; regrets that a …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Mann has voted in 123 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Mann Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
(24 debate interactions)
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
(23 debate interactions)
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(14 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(32 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(21 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Mann's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Mann, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Mann has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Mann has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

25 Bills introduced by Lord Mann


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to remove powers of the Secretary of State in relation to the location of and planning permission for new housing developments; to give local authorities powers to establish requirements on such developments in their area, including requirements on the proportion of affordable and social housing; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 13th March 2018
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make social media service providers liable for online publications in respect of civil proceedings in specified circumstances; to establish and confer functions upon a commissioner for online safety; to make provision about the disclosure of certain information by social media service providers; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 28th February 2018
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require pension providers to make lump sum payments and other pension benefits available to people with ill health, including people with a terminal diagnosis, prior to such people reaching minimum pension age; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 19th December 2017
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the authorisation by Parliament of corporate tax reductions by amounts exceeding £100,000 by Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills to Sheffield; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Communities and Local Government to Liverpool; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport to Manchester; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Education to Nottingham; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs to Bristol; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for International Development to Newcastle; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Transport to Birmingham; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Work and Pensions to Leeds; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to reduce the number of police forces in England to ten; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

A Bill to abolish the payment of grants to persons ceasing to hold Ministerial and other offices; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to repatriate to the United Kingdom before the end of 2015 all British military personnel serving on British military bases in Germany; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Child Benefit Act 2005 to disqualify nationals of European Union member states other than the United Kingdom who are resident in the United Kingdom with children living overseas from eligibility for child benefit payments; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Local Government Act 1992 to allow for the establishment of unitary authorities throughout England; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Local Government Finance Act 1992 to provide for an additional council tax band applicable to second homes; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Local Government Finance Act 1992 to provide for three additional council tax bands applicable to homes valued at over £500,000, £1 million and £1.5 million respectively; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision to limit the membership of the House of Lords to 300 unpaid members; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to provide that Ministerial salaries shall not exceed the basic salary paid to Members of Parliament by more than 25 per cent.; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to prohibit the payment of bonus payments to higher rate taxpayers working in the public sector; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to stipulate a maximum salary for public sector employees; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

A Bill to permit voters to recall their elected representatives in specified circumstances; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Sexual Offences Act 2003 to create an offence of paying for sexual services of a person under the age of 21 years; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 17th January 2012

Lord Mann has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


60 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
5 Other Department Questions
26th May 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many private businesses operating using facilities within the Palace of Westminster have been granted COVID-19 business support; and given that support based on business rates is not applicable, on what criteria money was allocated.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Finance Committee, to respond on his behalf. There are a number of private businesses that operate using facilities within the Palace of Westminster, including the Gym, Creche and Hairdressers, none of which have requested or received financial support from the House of Lords Administration. As these are private businesses, we are not aware of the extent to which they might have sought or received Government provided COVID-19 business support.

26th May 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how much additional accommodation or other facility space will become free once the parliamentary archives are removed from Victoria Tower; and on what date the completion of the removal is anticipated.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf. The Parliamentary Archives will be removed from the Victoria Tower by the beginning of September 2025. The Victoria Tower occupies seven percent of the Palace of Westminster. Future use of the space is yet to be determined.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many current members of the House have not (1) attended a sitting of the House, Grand Committee or committee meeting, (2) spoken, and (3) voted, since 1 January.

(1) 42

(2) 192

(3) 91

The answer is based on the total number of members who were members on 20 October (819). The total includes members on leave of absence and those yet to be introduced, and excludes those who were members from 1 January but have since died or retired.

Office holders, or the holders of ceremonial roles, may speak rarely or not at all, and for some voting is not appropriate to their role.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body what discussions they have had about (1) the combining, and (2) the rationalising, of facilities as part of the Palace of Westminster Restoration and Renewal Programme, including of (a) libraries, (b) refreshment facilities, (c) family rooms, and (d) car parking, (i) during, and (ii) after, any such restoration work.

The strategic review of the Restoration and Renewal Pogramme, which is currently being conducted by the Sponsor Body and Delivery Authority, has considered the possibility of the two Houses sharing some facillities during any period of decant, including catering and library functions. However, the desirability of doing so would be subject to the agreement of both Houses, if recommended as part of the decant strategy proposed by the strategic review. The strategic review's draft recommendations will be considered by the Sponsor Body Board in November. The report will then be discussed with both Houses before it is published.

The possibility of combining or rationalising facilities after the Palace has been restored has not been considered by the Sponsor Body and would be a matter for both Houses to determine rather than the Programme.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Leader of the House how much Cranborne money has been budgeted to (1) the Labour party, (2) the Liberal Democrat party, (3) the office of the Convenor of the Crossbench Peers, and (4) any other groups or parties in the House of Lords, in the current financial year.

For the 2020-21 financial year, the maximum amount available for financial assistance to opposition parties and the Convenor of the Crossbench Peers (“Cranborne money”) is as follows:

  • Labour - £656,948

  • Liberal Democrats - £328,008

  • Office of the Convenor of the Crossbench peers - £ 99,770

No other groups or parties are able to claim it.

Baroness Evans of Bowes Park
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which 10 councils have the highest number of solar panels installed on council properties.

The Government does not hold information on the number or size of solar PV installations on council properties. This information will be held by individual councils.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much they paid in fees to BBH Legal Services Limited for work relating to the compensation schemes for health problems caused by mining.

In total, the Department and its precursors have paid a total of £96,282.85 in costs to BBH Legal Services Limited. All payments have been made in respect of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss claims.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the publication of guidance on the COVID-19 Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund on 1 April, whether its reference to qualifying properties 'wholly or mainly being used as a hospitality, retail, or leisure venue’ refers to the rateable area of the business being used for such purposes or to its turnover.

Under the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF) businesses in England that would have been in receipt of the Expanded Retail Discount (which covers retail, hospitality and leisure) on 11 March 2020, with a rateable value of less than £51,000, will be eligible for cash grants of up to £25,000 per property.

It is for local authorities to decide, having regard to the Government’s guidance, whether individual properties are eligible for the RHLGF based on the circumstances of each case.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is taking to support employees who are still attending work and not shielding but have conditions that increase their vulnerability; and in particular in cases where employers are not willing, or able to support, such employees.

The Government has introduced important social distancing measures for all types of businesses to consider in order to minimise the risk of transmission in the workplace. The Government has been clear that it is vital that all employers follow this guidance, which is clinically led and based on expert advice.

The Government has stated that vulnerable people who are at increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19) need to be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures. Additionally, the government guidance sets out that members of staff who are vulnerable or extremely vulnerable, as well as individuals whom they live with, should be supported by their employers as they follow the required social distancing and shielding measures.

If a business is not operating in line with the government guidance, there is a role for the relevant health and safety enforcing authority – the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) or a Local Authority. Where the enforcing authority identifies employers who are not taking action to comply with the relevant public health legislation and guidance to control public health risks – for example, employers not taking appropriate action to socially distance or ensure workers in the shielded category can follow the NHS advice to self-isolate for the period specified – the enforcing authority will consider taking a range of actions to improve control of workplace risks. These actions include the provision of specific advice to employers through to issuing enforcement notices to help secure improvements with the guidance.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether new challenger banks have been accepted as an official lender by the British Business Bank; if not, why not; what estimate they have made of the time that it will take for small and medium sized companies to be able to speak to potential lenders to access the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme; and what plans they have to ensure that access is given promptly.

The priority for the British Business Bank (BBB) has been to get the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan scheme up and running, delivering urgently needed finance to UK SMEs. In order to achieve that, the Bank has worked with the already existing infrastructure and the 40 accredited lenders to make this operational as soon as possible. Existing lenders range from high-street banks to challenger banks, asset-based lenders and smaller specialist local lenders.

Now that the scheme has successfully launched, accrediting new partners is a top priority. The Bank has put in place substantial additional resource to assist with processing applications from new lenders as quickly as possible.

The scheme went live on Monday 23 March, so businesses are able to speak to lenders now and apply for facilities. Businesses should check on the British Business Bank’s webpage to find out which lenders are able to provide the type of finance they are looking for.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the basis for requiring parts of sports stands to have a form of rail seating to improve safe standing and other adjoining seats, in the same seating area, not to be included.

The Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) has already set out the technical requirements needed for seats with barriers or independent barriers in the current (6th) edition of its Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Additionally, the SGSA’s current all-seater policy enforcement approach details, amongst other things, how to identify risks to spectator safety arising from persistent standing in seated areas, and potential mitigation for such risks.

It is for a football club to decide, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, which parts of its ground would benefit from seats with barriers or seats with independent barriers to address the identified risks to spectator safety.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority regarding the requirement for a form of rail seating on spectator behaviour in the next football season; and when they will report on the requirement to move to the full rail seating required for safe standing.

The Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) has already set out the technical requirements needed for seats with barriers or independent barriers in the current (6th) edition of its Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Additionally, the SGSA’s current all-seater policy enforcement approach details, amongst other things, how to identify risks to spectator safety arising from persistent standing in seated areas, and potential mitigation for such risks.

It is for a football club to decide, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, which parts of its ground would benefit from seats with barriers or seats with independent barriers to address the identified risks to spectator safety.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Sports Ground Safety Authority regarding technical safety differences between requirements for a form of rail seating and the requirement for formal approval of safe standing areas.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Sports Ground Safety Authority about the form of rail seating; whether such seating is regarded as a temporary measure; and if so, when further changes by football clubs to adapt seating for the new season will be required.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Sports Ground Safety Authority regarding the form of rail seating required at some football clubs for the new season; and if these (1) will be a permanent solution, and (2) will be defined as safe standing areas.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether it is their policy to permit safe standing in football stadiums through rail seating when requested by clubs; and what is the timetable for doing so.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish their Standing at Football review.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what data exploitative technologies they are aware are in use in the UK; and what steps they are taking to ensure that such technologies cannot be exploited by anti-abortion activists.

The Government takes both the protection of personal data and the right to privacy extremely seriously. Organisations that are processing people's data for the purposes of providing online services should comply with data protection laws, including the Data Protection Act 2018 and the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations.


In February 2019, DCMS announced a programme of work to consider how online advertising is regulated in the UK and in January 2020, a call for evidence was launched to gather views on online advertising standards. The UK Government also established the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation, an independent advisory body, which provides advice on how we maximise the benefits of data-driven technologies.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the England and Wales Cricket Board about preparations for any future socially distanced spectators at cricket matches.

We are working closely with the sector to facilitate the return of spectators to elite sport, and we have noted the return of spectators in Hungarian football. A multidisciplinary working group, including a number of sports’ medical directors, has begun to consider the breadth of guidance needed in Stage 5 of the return of competitive sport. Guidance will include medical, sports, and venue expertise as well as the experience of other sectors that will reopen to audiences.

We will continue to be led by wider public health guidance, and we will reflect on all emerging best practice, both domestically and internationally, in future guidance on spectators at sports events.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had about the changes required to allow a limited number of socially distanced spectators to attend outdoor sporting events.

We are working closely with the sector to facilitate the return of spectators to elite sport, and we have noted the return of spectators in Hungarian football. A multidisciplinary working group, including a number of sports’ medical directors, has begun to consider the breadth of guidance needed in Stage 5 of the return of competitive sport. Guidance will include medical, sports, and venue expertise as well as the experience of other sectors that will reopen to audiences.

We will continue to be led by wider public health guidance, and we will reflect on all emerging best practice, both domestically and internationally, in future guidance on spectators at sports events.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the government of Hungary about the health impact and outcomes of Hungarian football allowing spectators to attend Hungarian football matches.

We are working closely with the sector to facilitate the return of spectators to elite sport, and we have noted the return of spectators in Hungarian football. A multidisciplinary working group, including a number of sports’ medical directors, has begun to consider the breadth of guidance needed in Stage 5 of the return of competitive sport. Guidance will include medical, sports, and venue expertise as well as the experience of other sectors that will reopen to audiences.

We will continue to be led by wider public health guidance, and we will reflect on all emerging best practice, both domestically and internationally, in future guidance on spectators at sports events.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Jan 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many members of the House of Lords did not attend any proceedings between 12 December 2019 and 20 December 2020.

29. The answer is based on the total number of members who were members on 6 January 2021 (817). The figure of 29 includes 10 members on leave of absence, 2 disqualified as members of the judiciary and 6 members who were yet to be introduced including two who joined the House after 20 December 2020.

10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what restrictions are being placed on international air passengers transiting through UK airports.

Transit passengers need to complete a passenger locator form with their journey and contact details. If they remain airside (do not pass border control) they do not need to self-isolate. However, if transit passengers pass through border control they must self-isolate for 14-days.

The regulations permit departure from England within 14 days of arrival.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what advice they provide on the steps to take to reclaim the cost of cancelled flights made through a travel agency in instances where the airline has refunded the travel agency and either (1) the travel agency has not refunded customers, or (2) the travel agency seeks to charge customers an additional administrative charge.

The Civil Aviation Authority has published guidance for businesses and consumers with respect to cancelled holidays and flights due to COVID-19.

The Government recognises the challenges businesses and consumers are experiencing with processing large volumes of refunds. In particular, we appreciate the frustration consumers may be experiencing. The Government’s position is clear - if a customer asks for a refund, that refund needs to be paid.

Most businesses are trying to do the right thing in these unprecedented circumstances, but where enforcement bodies have significant evidence that businesses are trying to take advantage of the crisis, we would expect them to take action.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which 10 UK hospitals have the highest financial deficit, including debts carried over from previous years.

During the last year, the government agreed a number of measures to improve the finances in the NHS provider sector in England. These included writing off £13.4 billion of NHS debt, as part of a major financial reset for NHS providers; temporary arrangements that saw trusts receive block payments to fund their spending through the pandemic, supported by c£18bn of additional funding to support the NHS response to COVID. As a result, the amount and levels of deficits across in the NHS provider sector fell significantly.

Work is ongoing to support the minority of trusts who ended 2020/21 in a deficit position and to develop solutions to secure future financial sustainability.

Final deficit figures for 2020-21 will be published as part of the NHS’s final accounts in due course.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which documents set out the triage policy in relation to a pandemic for (1) hospitals, and (2) care homes, as of January 2020.

Re-configuring service delivery to ensure sufficient National Health Service capacity was central to our preparedness for a pandemic and the COVID-19 response. However, the Department does not have - and did not have in January 2020 - a pandemic triage policy for hospitals and care homes, as this is a clinical matter. In the event that patient triage becomes necessary, clinical guidance would be produced to support decision-making.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been vaccinated against COVID-19 in (1) the Bassetlaw Clinical Commissioning Group area, (2) the Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Clinical Commissioning Group area, and (3) England, for the latest available date.

The information is not held in the format requested.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been tested for COVID-19 in Nottinghamshire since the announcement of mass testing in November 2020.

The total number of people tested for COVID-19 in Nottinghamshire between 29 October 2020 and 27 January 2021 is 329,057.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many GP practices have refused to participate in COVID-19 vaccinations.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have commissioned the general practice COVID-19 vaccination service in line with agreed national terms and conditions, as an enhanced service. Individual general practices opted in to delivering COVID-19 vaccinations, coming together in primary care network groupings to administer the vaccine as ‘local vaccination services’.

As of 10 January 2021, 785 local vaccination services had been stood up to deliver the vaccine. The number of individual practices that have and have not opted into the enhanced service is not collected or held centrally.

Where there are gaps in provision, NHS England will commission additional providers such as community pharmacy, hospital hubs, and mass vaccination centres to provide COVID-19 vaccinations. The first community pharmacy sites opened in the week commencing 11 January 2021. As more vaccines become available, there will be increased flexibility in local delivery.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the requirement or otherwise for DBS checks to be made on volunteers to assist with car parking and people movement in any forthcoming programme of mass vaccinations for COVID-19.

Non-clinical stewarding roles at vaccination centres will be filled by volunteers allocated through the Royal Voluntary Service, working with the National Health Service. The only role which requires a Disclosure and Barring Service check is a patient transport role.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been employed to assist in the roll out of mass COVID-19 testing in Nottinghamshire since lateral flow tests became available in the UK.

We do not publish data in the format requested.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been tested for COVID-19 in Nottinghamshire since the announcement of mass COVID-19 testing in that county.

We do not publish data in the format requested.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have had an antibody test to test for previous COVID-19 infection; and of those, how many had antibodies.

On 21 May the Government announced plans for a national roll-out of antibody testing in the National Health Service and social care sector, where, as of 19 July, over 1.31 million COVID-19 antibody tests have been carried out. Information is provided on GOV.UK in an online only format which explains how these tests are counted. Any additional information regarding the results of the results of the tests will be made available at the appropriate time.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have donated blood in England containing COVID-19 antibodies.

NHS Blood and Transplant does not routinely test blood donations for COVID-19 antibodies. However, NHS Blood and Transplant is providing a small proportion of randomised, anonymised samples taken from routine blood donations to Public Health England as part of its seroprevalence study. This will help understand how many people in the population have the antibody against COVID-19.

In addition, as part of the REMAP-CAP and RECOVERY trials, NHS Blood and Transplant is collecting convalescent plasma from donors who have had COVID-19, in order to treat patients with COVID-19. The plasma is currently being supplied to 88 hospitals. As of 14 June 2020, over 6,000 units of plasma have been collected, with over 600 units released to hospitals.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people in England remain in intensive care for COVID-19-related illness.

The data is not available in the format requested.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have registered for the COVID-19 track and trace application on the Isle of Wight; and how many individuals affected by COVID-19 have been traced to date using that application.

Over 50,000 people on the Isle of Wight downloaded and activated the app. Out of this number, on 18 June, 1,765 people had been notified that they had been in close contact with someone who had symptoms.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people who were traced under the NHS Test and Trace system were so traced due to a (1) their own, and (2) another person’s, positive COVID-19 test.

Experimental statistics were published on 18 June. Between 28 May and 10 June 2020 – 14,045 people who tested positive for COVID-19 had their case transferred to the contact tracing system, of whom 10,192 were reached and asked to provide details of recent close contacts (traced due to their own positive COVID-19 test); 96,746 contacts were identified and of these 87,639 were reached and advised to self-isolate (traced due to another person’s positive COVID-19 test).

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of people providing informal social care who are paid in cash; and what assessment they have made of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on (1) the provision of such care, and (2) the livelihoods of such carers.

The Department does not hold the data on the number of people providing informal social care who are paid in cash.

To support those who have personal budgets during COVID-19, the Department is developing guidance on Direct Payments, along with question and answer guidance for those who hold budgets, which will be published at the earliest opportunity.

We have announced £1.6 billion funding for local authorities to help support adult social care providers and staff to respond to COVID-19, and, are developing guidance for employers around redeployment of staff and the use of volunteers to help maintain the services that some of the most vulnerable in our society rely on.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidance they have provided to (1) employers, and (2) key workers, with (a) type 1, and (b) type 2, diabetes about self-isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Public Health England (PHE) has published guidance on social distancing for the United Kingdom population, including those with diabetes type 1 and 2. Those with diabetes are at an increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and so must be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures.

PHE has also published stay at home guidance which is applicable to anyone with diabetes, type 1 or 2. A copy of the guidance is attached.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of advances made by open sourcing research in relation to testing vaccines and treatments for COVID-19; what steps they have taken to ensure cooperation with scientific and research institutions in real time; with which countries such cooperation occurs; and in particular, whether they cooperate with such institutions in (1) South Korea, (2) Israel, (3) China, and (4) other G20 members.

Public Health England and other United Kingdom scientists and clinicians are members of several World Health Organization (WHO) working groups that cover new therapeutics, vaccines, diagnostics and sero-epidemiology. There is excellent collaboration across many countries, including those in the G20.

Data and presentations have been shared at these working groups by many countries including China, South Korea, Hong Kong, Australia, the Netherlands, France, Canada, the UK and the United States of America. There are publicly available outputs from these groups on the WHO Blueprint Research and Development website, one of which is the draft landscape of COVID-19 candidate vaccines.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to increase the availability of Ventolin; and what consideration they have given to enabling patients with symptoms of COVID-19 to purchase Ventolin without a prescription.

The Department has no current plans to enable salbutamol (for example, Ventolin by GSK) to be purchased over the counter without a prescription. The sale, supply and administration of prescription-only medicines, like Ventolin, are restricted by the Human Medicines Regulations 2012 which are designed to protect the public. The main route by which a pharmacist is able to sell or supply a prescription-only medicine is under the authority of a prescription.

The country is well prepared to deal with the impacts of COVID-19 and we have stockpiles of certain medicines, including salbutamol, in the event of any supply issues or significant increases in demand.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) local staff, and (2) UK nationals, have been vaccinated against COVID-19 in (a) the UK embassy in Tel Aviv, and (b) the UK consulate in Jerusalem.

Vaccinations received locally by staff in Tel Aviv or Jerusalem will have been arranged on a personal basis.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the average timescale between information being requested by UK law enforcement agencies from communication service providers in relation to criminal investigations and that information being provided.

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that law enforcement agencies have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.

The legal routes available to law enforcement agencies will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 allows the Government to place obligations on Telecommunications Operators to co-operate with Law Enforcement Agencies in providing specific data required for investigations.

The Act governs these powers and provides extensive privacy safeguards and a robust oversight regime, including approval of the most intrusive powers by an independent Judicial Commissioner and the Secretary of State.

During the parliamentary passage of the IPA, the UK Government set out, in detail, how IPA powers can be used, and continues to do so where appropriate.

The information concerning average timescales for data being requested by UK law enforcement agencies from communication service providers is not held centrally by the Home Office. Each Public Authority authorised to acquire data under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 will likely maintain records of their own average timescales. These timescales may depend on the Telecommunications Operator and the urgency of the investigation.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the current annual budget required to cover the cost of obtaining information, including IP addresses, from communication service providers in relation to criminal investigations.

Information relating to the cost of obtaining information from communication service providers in relation to criminal investigations is not held centrally by the Home Office.

Section 249 of the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 recognises that Telecommunications Operators and Postal Operators incur expenses in complying with requirements in the Act. The Act, therefore, allows for appropriate, minimal reimbursement to be made to them to cover these costs insofar as they do not suffer commercial disadvantage for complying with their notice. All other costs are expected to be met by the Telecommunications Operator. Section 22 of the Communications Data Code of Practice sets out further relevant detail in relation to Communications Data funding.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many requests for information from the UK police and law enforcement agencies for information from communications service providers are currently outstanding for longer than (1) one month, (2) three months, and (3) one year.

The Home Office do not hold this information centrally. Each Public Authority authorised to acquire data under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 will likely maintain their own records.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which communications service providers charge for information requests, such as IP addresses, from the UK police and law enforcement agencies for use in criminal investigations, and whether these include (1) Facebook, (2) Twitter, (3) Google, (4) TikTok, and (5) Parler.

It would be operationally and commercially sensitive to discuss the details of any specific company and their support in investigations. The IPA, in Section 249, provides a statutory cost recovery mechanism stating that the Telecommunications Operator should “receive an appropriate contribution in respect of such of their relevant costs” (s249(1)) and that any payment may be “subject to terms and conditions determined by the Secretary of State” (s249(3)).

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of which communications service providers do not (1) recognise, and (2) accept, the extraterritorial application of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000; and whether these include (1) Facebook, (2) Twitter, (3) Google, (4) TikTok, and (5) Parler.

Much of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 has been replaced by the Investigatory Powers Act 2016. The IPA regime enables the extraterritorial application of our laws so that requests can be made both domestically and overseas. Whilst HMG cannot comment on the opinion of private companies, the IPA is enforceable through civil proceedings.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government who keeps records of exit interviews of those leaving the Armed Forces; and how often the Ministry of Defence evaluates those records.

Responsibility for carrying out exit interviews (as well as analysing the results) sits with the Single Services, and data is held on their systems accordingly.

The Royal Navy stores exit interview information on Joint Personnel Administration system (JPA, the military intranet-based HR system), where it can be accessed by their People and Transformation team. The team generate six-monthly Leavers Intention surveys, from which themes and trends can be identified. A formal review process is being considered as part of the Navy People Transformation process.

The British Army operates a de-centralised process, with Regiments conducting their own exit surveys; the data is held and available for analysis at local level. In line with Army’s project on retention, work towards a structured exit interviews and surveys is due to be completed by September 2020.

Within the RAF, statistical information for voluntary exits is provided to Defence Statistics who use this detail to publish voluntary outflow rates, which inform retention work. All sources of exit information are routinely analysed by the RAF’s Workforce Requirements and Recruiting to assist in the management of staffing and forecasting. A six-monthly retention working group is held, where data is reviewed in depth.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what powers local councils have to ensure all those who attend council meetings provide a negative test result for COVID-19 before they are allowed entrance to those meetings in the period for which COVID-19 restrictions are in place.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what financial support they intend to provide to local councils to comply safely with holding council meetings in public.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, while national COVID-19 restrictions remain in force, what powers local councils have to ensure that all those who attend council meetings have tested negative for COVID-19 before they are permitted entry.

Ultimately it is for individual local authorities to satisfy themselves that they have met the requirements for public access and apply the COVID-19 guidance to ensure meetings take place safely. Government has published updated guidance to highlight ways in which councils can, if necessary, minimise the need for, or risks of, face-to-face meetings.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what financial support they will give to local councils to enable them to safely comply with the Government's guidance on returning to holding council meetings in public.

As councils now need to meet in person, we have published updated guidance on how to minimise the risks of face-to-face meetings, supported by unprecedented emergency funding to manage the impact of the pandemic.

The Government has committed over £45 billion to help local authorities support their communities and local businesses during the pandemic, including over £12 billion directly to councils in England to tackle the impacts of COVID-19. Over £6 billion of this is unringfenced and so, where needed, it can be used to ensure that appropriate arrangements are in place to manage any risks involved in face-to-face meetings while COVID-19 restrictions remain in place.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in relation to establishing housing allocation numbers for local authorities, what is the current assumed net immigration for each of the next 15 years.

The Government does not set housing allocation numbers. The Government’s Local Housing Need formula, otherwise known as “the standard method” is set out in guidance and is used by local authorities to determine the starting point when planning for housing. Local planning authorities should take into account land supply considerations and environmental constraints (such as Green Belt) before determining the number of homes likely to be delivered in the area.

The standard method is based on the 2014 household projections, these projections incorporate population projections and therefore migration data. Population data is published by the ONS, see attached: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/populationprojections/bulletins/nationalpopulationprojections/2015-10-29.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the annual budget for reception centres for Hong Kong residents seeking to live in the UK; where they plan to locate any such reception centres; and how many, if any, are currently operational.

MHCLG is providing over £5 million to fund 12 new Welcome Hubs across the UK – nine in England, mapped to the nine English regions, and one each in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. By utilising existing Strategic Migration Partnerships and other important local connections, these hubs will help to ensure a warm welcome for all Hong Kong BN(O) status holders by providing practical advice and assistance to all BN(O)s who require it.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Youth Hostel Association about its offering of 150 properties to be used by key workers and vulnerable members of society during the COVID-19 pandemic.

We have been working with a number of hotel chains across the country to secure accommodation for rough sleepers. We are pleased that the Youth Hostel Association offered to provide properties to be used by key workers and vulnerable members of society during the COVID-19 pandemic. They are now working with local authorities in Manchester and Brighton to house rough sleepers.

We are working intensively with councils and the sector to help get those who are sleeping rough off the streets and into appropriate accommodation.

Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which solicitors were (1) fined, (2) struck off, and (3) received other disciplinary action from the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal, for charging coalminers out of the compensation scheme for (a) vibration white finger, and (b) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. [T]

The Government does not hold the information requested. The Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal is an independent Tribunal established under the Solicitors Act 1974.

10th Jun 2020
The Senior Deputy Speaker what discussions have taken place about the option of on-site testing for COVID-19 for those entering the Palace of Westminster in relation to the work of the House of Lords.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf.

Some preliminary discussions regarding on site testing for those required to attend the Palace of Westminster for the work of both Houses were held, however, NHS testing is available to all members and staff exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms, by post and at sites across the country, and staff and members have been directed to these services. The nature of the work carried out on the estate and the current restrictions on non-passholders has meant that further testing on site is currently not recommended as being required. A number of steps have been taken, in line with Public Health England guidance, to mitigate the risk to members and staff required to attend in person.