Lord Mann Portrait

Lord Mann

Labour - Bassetlaw

Became Member: 28th October 2019



Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Mann has voted in 341 divisions, and 18 times against the majority of their Party.

23 Oct 2023 - Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 4 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 183 Noes - 198
27 Nov 2023 - Immigration (Age Assessments) Regulations 2023 - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 2 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 164 Noes - 75
27 Nov 2023 - Justification Decision (Scientific Age Imaging) Regulations 2023 - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 2 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 165 Noes - 86
6 Dec 2023 - Strikes (Minimum Service Levels: Passenger Railway Services) Regulations 2023 - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 3 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 144
6 Dec 2023 - Strikes (Minimum Service Levels: Border Security) Regulations 2023 - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 2 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 151 Noes - 167
23 Jan 2024 - Investigatory Powers (Amendment) Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 3 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 201 Noes - 227
11 Mar 2024 - Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 4 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 209 Noes - 193
11 Mar 2024 - Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 5 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 199 Noes - 199
13 Mar 2024 - Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 2 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 165 Noes - 154
20 Mar 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 7 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 248 Noes - 209
23 Apr 2024 - Victims and Prisoners Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 4 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 144 Noes - 154
23 Apr 2024 - Victims and Prisoners Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 3 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 168 Noes - 177
23 Apr 2024 - Victims and Prisoners Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 4 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 203 Noes - 192
23 Apr 2024 - Victims and Prisoners Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 4 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 200 Noes - 192
16 Apr 2024 - Victims and Prisoners Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 5 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 176 Noes - 197
16 Apr 2024 - Victims and Prisoners Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 5 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 185 Noes - 192
14 May 2024 - Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 6 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 221 Noes - 222
21 May 2024 - Victims and Prisoners Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Mann voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 4 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 203 Noes - 198
View All Lord Mann Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(25 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(25 debate interactions)
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(18 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(27 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(25 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(25 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Elections Act 2022
(1,967 words contributed)
Agriculture Act 2020
(1,769 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lord Mann's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Mann, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


26 Bills introduced by Lord Mann


A Bill to make provision for local authorities to determine their short-term housing needs and housing allocation numbers; and for connected purposes

Lords - 40%

Last Event - Order Of Commitment Discharged
Monday 13th March 2023
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to remove powers of the Secretary of State in relation to the location of and planning permission for new housing developments; to give local authorities powers to establish requirements on such developments in their area, including requirements on the proportion of affordable and social housing; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 13th March 2018
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make social media service providers liable for online publications in respect of civil proceedings in specified circumstances; to establish and confer functions upon a commissioner for online safety; to make provision about the disclosure of certain information by social media service providers; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 28th February 2018
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require pension providers to make lump sum payments and other pension benefits available to people with ill health, including people with a terminal diagnosis, prior to such people reaching minimum pension age; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 19th December 2017
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Transport to Birmingham; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

A Bill to abolish the payment of grants to persons ceasing to hold Ministerial and other offices; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to reduce the number of police forces in England to ten; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Work and Pensions to Leeds; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for International Development to Newcastle; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs to Bristol; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Education to Nottingham; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport to Manchester; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Communities and Local Government to Liverpool; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to relocate the headquarters of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills to Sheffield; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the authorisation by Parliament of corporate tax reductions by amounts exceeding £100,000 by Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Local Government Finance Act 1992 to provide for an additional council tax band applicable to second homes; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Sexual Offences Act 2003 to create an offence of paying for sexual services of a person under the age of 21 years; and for connected purposes

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 17th January 2012

A Bill to permit voters to recall their elected representatives in specified circumstances; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to stipulate a maximum salary for public sector employees; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to prohibit the payment of bonus payments to higher rate taxpayers working in the public sector; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to provide that Ministerial salaries shall not exceed the basic salary paid to Members of Parliament by more than 25 per cent.; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision to limit the membership of the House of Lords to 300 unpaid members; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Local Government Finance Act 1992 to provide for three additional council tax bands applicable to homes valued at over £500,000, £1 million and £1.5 million respectively; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to repatriate to the United Kingdom before the end of 2015 all British military personnel serving on British military bases in Germany; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Local Government Act 1992 to allow for the establishment of unitary authorities throughout England; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Child Benefit Act 2005 to disqualify nationals of European Union member states other than the United Kingdom who are resident in the United Kingdom with children living overseas from eligibility for child benefit payments; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st January 2012

Lord Mann has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
5 Other Department Questions
26th May 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how much additional accommodation or other facility space will become free once the parliamentary archives are removed from Victoria Tower; and on what date the completion of the removal is anticipated.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf. The Parliamentary Archives will be removed from the Victoria Tower by the beginning of September 2025. The Victoria Tower occupies seven percent of the Palace of Westminster. Future use of the space is yet to be determined.

26th May 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many private businesses operating using facilities within the Palace of Westminster have been granted COVID-19 business support; and given that support based on business rates is not applicable, on what criteria money was allocated.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Finance Committee, to respond on his behalf. There are a number of private businesses that operate using facilities within the Palace of Westminster, including the Gym, Creche and Hairdressers, none of which have requested or received financial support from the House of Lords Administration. As these are private businesses, we are not aware of the extent to which they might have sought or received Government provided COVID-19 business support.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many current members of the House have not (1) attended a sitting of the House, Grand Committee or committee meeting, (2) spoken, and (3) voted, since 1 January.

(1) 42

(2) 192

(3) 91

The answer is based on the total number of members who were members on 20 October (819). The total includes members on leave of absence and those yet to be introduced, and excludes those who were members from 1 January but have since died or retired.

Office holders, or the holders of ceremonial roles, may speak rarely or not at all, and for some voting is not appropriate to their role.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Leader of the House how much Cranborne money has been budgeted to (1) the Labour party, (2) the Liberal Democrat party, (3) the office of the Convenor of the Crossbench Peers, and (4) any other groups or parties in the House of Lords, in the current financial year.

For the 2020-21 financial year, the maximum amount available for financial assistance to opposition parties and the Convenor of the Crossbench Peers (“Cranborne money”) is as follows:

  • Labour - £656,948

  • Liberal Democrats - £328,008

  • Office of the Convenor of the Crossbench peers - £ 99,770

No other groups or parties are able to claim it.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body what discussions they have had about (1) the combining, and (2) the rationalising, of facilities as part of the Palace of Westminster Restoration and Renewal Programme, including of (a) libraries, (b) refreshment facilities, (c) family rooms, and (d) car parking, (i) during, and (ii) after, any such restoration work.

The strategic review of the Restoration and Renewal Pogramme, which is currently being conducted by the Sponsor Body and Delivery Authority, has considered the possibility of the two Houses sharing some facillities during any period of decant, including catering and library functions. However, the desirability of doing so would be subject to the agreement of both Houses, if recommended as part of the decant strategy proposed by the strategic review. The strategic review's draft recommendations will be considered by the Sponsor Body Board in November. The report will then be discussed with both Houses before it is published.

The possibility of combining or rationalising facilities after the Palace has been restored has not been considered by the Sponsor Body and would be a matter for both Houses to determine rather than the Programme.

10th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government which board members of the Post Office Limited or Fujitsu have been appointed to roles in the public sector since 2005.

The Government is not responsible for and does not hold information on appointments made across the whole of the public sector, which would include appointments to local authorities, education establishments, the NHS and other public bodies. The Cabinet Office holds data on appointments made to bodies listed in the Public Appointments (No. 2) Order in Council 2023, as well as some other categories of public sector roles. Public appointments are announced on GOV.UK.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether criminals in China are setting up companies by fraudulently registering addresses in the UK through Companies House in order to bypass Chinese restrictions on cryptocurrency trading.

Companies House is working increasingly closely with law enforcement to understand filing patterns. While I cannot comment on the detail of that, I am confident it will, over time, significantly improve the ability to identify and combat attempts systematically to abuse the company register.

Where Chinese nationals, or others, have registered companies using addresses which they have no authority to use, the Registrar has a suite of powers - recently strengthened by the Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Act 2023 - which allow the misappropriated address to be replaced with a default address. Where companies persistently fail to provide an appropriate address, the Registrar has the power to strike them off the register altogether.

Lord Johnson of Lainston
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what free and fast track process is available for a householder to remove their address from the register at Companies House when that address has been used fraudulently by a company.

If a person finds that their address has been used by a company without their authorisation, they should contact Companies House providing details of the address and supporting evidence. There is no charge for applying to the Registrar of Companies to remove a person’s address from the register if it has been used without consent. Companies House does not offer a fast-track process.

Lord Offord of Garvel
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many fake companies were registered in each of the last 12 months for which there are records, unbeknownst to the householder at the address used.

Companies House does not have a means of accurately measuring the volume of companies used for illegitimate purposes or an approved statistical method to estimate it. However, Companies House does act on reports of unexpected activity that may indicate that an incorporated entity is being used illegitimately.

Following the commencement of the Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Act 2023 on 4 March Companies House has begun to act proactively cleanse the Register of Companies of disputed information. It has also been empowered to proactively share information with law enforcement partners where potentially illegitimate activity is identified.

Lord Offord of Garvel
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
10th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many sub-postmasters have been referred for prosecution for issues relating to the Horizon software.

983 Post Office-related convictions have been identified during the relevant period.

Lord Offord of Garvel
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
10th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many sub-postmasters repaid money to cover shortfalls in the first 10 years of the Post Office's use of the Horizon computer system.

To date, 2745 former postmasters have applied to the Horizon Shortfall Scheme for those who suffered losses due to the Horizon IT System. There were 555 postmasters as members of the original Group Litigation Order against the Post Office. There were over 900 prosecutions during the relevant period. Therefore, around 4000 people could potentially have been affected by Horizon shortfalls, albeit over a longer time period than 10 years.

Lord Offord of Garvel
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which 10 councils have the highest number of solar panels installed on council properties.

The Government does not hold information on the number or size of solar PV installations on council properties. This information will be held by individual councils.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much they paid in fees to BBH Legal Services Limited for work relating to the compensation schemes for health problems caused by mining.

In total, the Department and its precursors have paid a total of £96,282.85 in costs to BBH Legal Services Limited. All payments have been made in respect of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss claims.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the publication of guidance on the COVID-19 Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund on 1 April, whether its reference to qualifying properties 'wholly or mainly being used as a hospitality, retail, or leisure venue’ refers to the rateable area of the business being used for such purposes or to its turnover.

Under the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF) businesses in England that would have been in receipt of the Expanded Retail Discount (which covers retail, hospitality and leisure) on 11 March 2020, with a rateable value of less than £51,000, will be eligible for cash grants of up to £25,000 per property.

It is for local authorities to decide, having regard to the Government’s guidance, whether individual properties are eligible for the RHLGF based on the circumstances of each case.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
30th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is taking to support employees who are still attending work and not shielding but have conditions that increase their vulnerability; and in particular in cases where employers are not willing, or able to support, such employees.

The Government has introduced important social distancing measures for all types of businesses to consider in order to minimise the risk of transmission in the workplace. The Government has been clear that it is vital that all employers follow this guidance, which is clinically led and based on expert advice.

The Government has stated that vulnerable people who are at increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19) need to be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures. Additionally, the government guidance sets out that members of staff who are vulnerable or extremely vulnerable, as well as individuals whom they live with, should be supported by their employers as they follow the required social distancing and shielding measures.

If a business is not operating in line with the government guidance, there is a role for the relevant health and safety enforcing authority – the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) or a Local Authority. Where the enforcing authority identifies employers who are not taking action to comply with the relevant public health legislation and guidance to control public health risks – for example, employers not taking appropriate action to socially distance or ensure workers in the shielded category can follow the NHS advice to self-isolate for the period specified – the enforcing authority will consider taking a range of actions to improve control of workplace risks. These actions include the provision of specific advice to employers through to issuing enforcement notices to help secure improvements with the guidance.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
24th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether new challenger banks have been accepted as an official lender by the British Business Bank; if not, why not; what estimate they have made of the time that it will take for small and medium sized companies to be able to speak to potential lenders to access the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme; and what plans they have to ensure that access is given promptly.

The priority for the British Business Bank (BBB) has been to get the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan scheme up and running, delivering urgently needed finance to UK SMEs. In order to achieve that, the Bank has worked with the already existing infrastructure and the 40 accredited lenders to make this operational as soon as possible. Existing lenders range from high-street banks to challenger banks, asset-based lenders and smaller specialist local lenders.

Now that the scheme has successfully launched, accrediting new partners is a top priority. The Bank has put in place substantial additional resource to assist with processing applications from new lenders as quickly as possible.

The scheme went live on Monday 23 March, so businesses are able to speak to lenders now and apply for facilities. Businesses should check on the British Business Bank’s webpage to find out which lenders are able to provide the type of finance they are looking for.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to return to Nigeria historic artefacts from the Kingdom of Benin which are housed in public institutions and museums in the UK.

Museums and galleries in the UK operate independently of Her Majesty’s Government. Decisions relating to their collections are a matter for the trustees of each museum.

Some national museums are prevented by law from disposing of objects in their collections unless, broadly, they are duplicates or unfit for retention. The two exceptions to this are when the objects are human remains that are less than 1,000 years old, and objects that were spoliated during the Nazi era. Her Majesty’s Government has no plans to change this law.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority regarding the requirement for a form of rail seating on spectator behaviour in the next football season; and when they will report on the requirement to move to the full rail seating required for safe standing.

The Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) has already set out the technical requirements needed for seats with barriers or independent barriers in the current (6th) edition of its Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Additionally, the SGSA’s current all-seater policy enforcement approach details, amongst other things, how to identify risks to spectator safety arising from persistent standing in seated areas, and potential mitigation for such risks.

It is for a football club to decide, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, which parts of its ground would benefit from seats with barriers or seats with independent barriers to address the identified risks to spectator safety.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the basis for requiring parts of sports stands to have a form of rail seating to improve safe standing and other adjoining seats, in the same seating area, not to be included.

The Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) has already set out the technical requirements needed for seats with barriers or independent barriers in the current (6th) edition of its Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Additionally, the SGSA’s current all-seater policy enforcement approach details, amongst other things, how to identify risks to spectator safety arising from persistent standing in seated areas, and potential mitigation for such risks.

It is for a football club to decide, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, which parts of its ground would benefit from seats with barriers or seats with independent barriers to address the identified risks to spectator safety.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Sports Ground Safety Authority regarding technical safety differences between requirements for a form of rail seating and the requirement for formal approval of safe standing areas.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Sports Ground Safety Authority about the form of rail seating; whether such seating is regarded as a temporary measure; and if so, when further changes by football clubs to adapt seating for the new season will be required.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which Premier League clubs are being permitted to introduce rail seating for the new football season; what form this permitted rail seating will take; whether it will be described as "safe standing"; and how many of such seats each club will have.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether it is their policy to permit safe standing in football stadiums through rail seating when requested by clubs; and what is the timetable for doing so.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish their Standing at Football review.

In 2019, the Government made a commitment to work with fans and clubs to introduce safe standing at football stadia. The Government is working closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) on planning the next steps for implementing this manifesto commitment. In June 2021, the SGSA published its research into the Safe Management of Persistent Standing in Seated Areas at Football Stadia, which found that the installation of barriers or rails can have a positive impact on spectator safety, particularly in mitigating the risk of a progressive crowd collapse.

The technical requirements for seats with barriers or independent barriers are detailed in the current (6th) edition of SGSA’s Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds (Green Guide). Football clubs may, in consultation with the relevant local authority and other partners, install such types of spectator accommodation in any part or all of their grounds as part of their management strategies for persistent standing.

As the all-seater policy remains in place, these areas are licensed as seating areas only at present.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what data exploitative technologies they are aware are in use in the UK; and what steps they are taking to ensure that such technologies cannot be exploited by anti-abortion activists.

The Government takes both the protection of personal data and the right to privacy extremely seriously. Organisations that are processing people's data for the purposes of providing online services should comply with data protection laws, including the Data Protection Act 2018 and the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations.


In February 2019, DCMS announced a programme of work to consider how online advertising is regulated in the UK and in January 2020, a call for evidence was launched to gather views on online advertising standards. The UK Government also established the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation, an independent advisory body, which provides advice on how we maximise the benefits of data-driven technologies.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the England and Wales Cricket Board about preparations for any future socially distanced spectators at cricket matches.

We are working closely with the sector to facilitate the return of spectators to elite sport, and we have noted the return of spectators in Hungarian football. A multidisciplinary working group, including a number of sports’ medical directors, has begun to consider the breadth of guidance needed in Stage 5 of the return of competitive sport. Guidance will include medical, sports, and venue expertise as well as the experience of other sectors that will reopen to audiences.

We will continue to be led by wider public health guidance, and we will reflect on all emerging best practice, both domestically and internationally, in future guidance on spectators at sports events.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the government of Hungary about the health impact and outcomes of Hungarian football allowing spectators to attend Hungarian football matches.

We are working closely with the sector to facilitate the return of spectators to elite sport, and we have noted the return of spectators in Hungarian football. A multidisciplinary working group, including a number of sports’ medical directors, has begun to consider the breadth of guidance needed in Stage 5 of the return of competitive sport. Guidance will include medical, sports, and venue expertise as well as the experience of other sectors that will reopen to audiences.

We will continue to be led by wider public health guidance, and we will reflect on all emerging best practice, both domestically and internationally, in future guidance on spectators at sports events.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had about the changes required to allow a limited number of socially distanced spectators to attend outdoor sporting events.

We are working closely with the sector to facilitate the return of spectators to elite sport, and we have noted the return of spectators in Hungarian football. A multidisciplinary working group, including a number of sports’ medical directors, has begun to consider the breadth of guidance needed in Stage 5 of the return of competitive sport. Guidance will include medical, sports, and venue expertise as well as the experience of other sectors that will reopen to audiences.

We will continue to be led by wider public health guidance, and we will reflect on all emerging best practice, both domestically and internationally, in future guidance on spectators at sports events.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many children in England are currently not attending school regularly due to unauthorised absences.

Schools are required to record in the register once in the morning session and once in the afternoon session whether or not a pupil is absent.

The attached table below shows the number of pupil enrolments in England with one or more sessions of unauthorised absence by academic year.

In the 2021/22 academic year, 366,042 pupil enrolments missed 10% or more of possible sessions due to unauthorised absence. This figure covers state-funded primary, state-funded secondary and special schools in England.

Unauthorised absence includes pupils who arrived late (after registration has closed), unauthorised holidays, reason for absence not yet provided, and other unauthorised absence.

The data used in this answer are published in the National Statistics release on pupil absence in schools in England, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/pupil-absence-in-schools-in-england.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many school children in England have had an unauthorised school absence in each of the past five years.

Schools are required to record in the register once in the morning session and once in the afternoon session whether or not a pupil is absent.

The attached table below shows the number of pupil enrolments in England with one or more sessions of unauthorised absence by academic year.

In the 2021/22 academic year, 366,042 pupil enrolments missed 10% or more of possible sessions due to unauthorised absence. This figure covers state-funded primary, state-funded secondary and special schools in England.

Unauthorised absence includes pupils who arrived late (after registration has closed), unauthorised holidays, reason for absence not yet provided, and other unauthorised absence.

The data used in this answer are published in the National Statistics release on pupil absence in schools in England, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/pupil-absence-in-schools-in-england.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many newly settled children from overseas have not been able to immediately take up allocated school places due to pressures on school numbers in the past year.

Individual local authorities are under a duty to ensure that children in their areas are receiving a suitable education. We do not routinely collect data on the nationality of children whose parents are seeking school places. However, because of the high levels of migration from the beginning of 2022, the department did conduct a monthly survey of school placements for children from outside the UK between May and September 2022 to obtain better data on school place pressures. The data is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-placements-for-children-from-outside-of-the-uk.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Jan 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many members of the House of Lords did not attend any proceedings between 12 December 2019 and 20 December 2020.

29. The answer is based on the total number of members who were members on 6 January 2021 (817). The figure of 29 includes 10 members on leave of absence, 2 disqualified as members of the judiciary and 6 members who were yet to be introduced including two who joined the House after 20 December 2020.

10th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what funds are available for environment agency flood alleviation projects in each county in the East Midlands.

The Environment Agency is committed to better protecting the East Midlands and the area remains a high priority.

In the previous financial year 2022/23, the Environment Agency’s East Midlands Area, which encompasses Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire as well as parts of Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, spent a total of £35.5 million of Grant in Aid funding on flood alleviation projects.

The Environment Agency’s investment plan currently projects spending £155.6 million across the area between 2023/24 and 2026/27.

The table below shows the funding split for each of the counties. Investment that benefits more than one county is captured in the row titled ‘cross county boundaries’.

Grant-in-Aid (GiA)

Counties

Previous Financial Year 2022/23 (£m)

Programme 2023/24 – 2026/27 (£m)

Cross county boundaries

3.7

23.4

Derbyshire

15.5

59.7

Leicestershire

1.3

7.8

Nottinghamshire

11.1

53.1

Yorkshire

0.2

2.0

Lincolnshire

3.7

9.6

Totals

35.5

155.6

Lord Douglas-Miller
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many 'orphan' waste sites deal with hazardous waste; and what recent discussions they have had with businesses about minimising taxation barriers for such sites.

The Environment Agency has no records of orphaned waste sites containing hazardous waste. Local Authorities will hold records of orphan sites on their contaminated land registers.

A Call for Evidence was held from 21 July to 18 August 2022 on a Proposed Landfill Tax Grant Scheme. The Grant Scheme, announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer at the last Spring Budget, will help Local Authorities cover the cost of landfill tax in land remediation projects. The Government Response to the Call for Evidence was published on 15 March 2023 and the Grant Scheme is currently under development.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what restrictions are being placed on international air passengers transiting through UK airports.

Transit passengers need to complete a passenger locator form with their journey and contact details. If they remain airside (do not pass border control) they do not need to self-isolate. However, if transit passengers pass through border control they must self-isolate for 14-days.

The regulations permit departure from England within 14 days of arrival.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what advice they provide on the steps to take to reclaim the cost of cancelled flights made through a travel agency in instances where the airline has refunded the travel agency and either (1) the travel agency has not refunded customers, or (2) the travel agency seeks to charge customers an additional administrative charge.

The Civil Aviation Authority has published guidance for businesses and consumers with respect to cancelled holidays and flights due to COVID-19.

The Government recognises the challenges businesses and consumers are experiencing with processing large volumes of refunds. In particular, we appreciate the frustration consumers may be experiencing. The Government’s position is clear - if a customer asks for a refund, that refund needs to be paid.

Most businesses are trying to do the right thing in these unprecedented circumstances, but where enforcement bodies have significant evidence that businesses are trying to take advantage of the crisis, we would expect them to take action.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what is the monthly average for reported child hospital admissions for asthma in England.

A table is attached due to the size of the data involved. The information available on children admitted to hospital for asthma is shown in this table, with data for 2022 being provisional.

Data is not held by locality, but the number of admissions for children with asthma by hospital trust and by site, is provided in tab (i) within the table. The average number of monthly child admissions for asthma into English hospitals in 2022 is shown in tab (ii) within the table. Tab (iii) in the table shows the number of annual child hospital admissions for asthma in each of the past 20 years.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what were the annual child hospital admission rates for asthma in each of the past 20 years.

A table is attached due to the size of the data involved. The information available on children admitted to hospital for asthma is shown in this table, with data for 2022 being provisional.

Data is not held by locality, but the number of admissions for children with asthma by hospital trust and by site, is provided in tab (i) within the table. The average number of monthly child admissions for asthma into English hospitals in 2022 is shown in tab (ii) within the table. Tab (iii) in the table shows the number of annual child hospital admissions for asthma in each of the past 20 years.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government which localities in England reported the highest pro rata child hospitalisations for asthma in 2022.

A table is attached due to the size of the data involved. The information available on children admitted to hospital for asthma is shown in this table, with data for 2022 being provisional.

Data is not held by locality, but the number of admissions for children with asthma by hospital trust and by site, is provided in tab (i) within the table. The average number of monthly child admissions for asthma into English hospitals in 2022 is shown in tab (ii) within the table. Tab (iii) in the table shows the number of annual child hospital admissions for asthma in each of the past 20 years.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government which hospitals had the highest patient admissions for child asthma in 2022.

A table is attached due to the size of the data involved. The information available on children admitted to hospital for asthma is shown in this table, with data for 2022 being provisional.

Data is not held by locality, but the number of admissions for children with asthma by hospital trust and by site, is provided in tab (i) within the table. The average number of monthly child admissions for asthma into English hospitals in 2022 is shown in tab (ii) within the table. Tab (iii) in the table shows the number of annual child hospital admissions for asthma in each of the past 20 years.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what was the monthly rate for child admissions for asthma into English hospitals in 2022.

A table is attached due to the size of the data involved. The information available on children admitted to hospital for asthma is shown in this table, with data for 2022 being provisional.

Data is not held by locality, but the number of admissions for children with asthma by hospital trust and by site, is provided in tab (i) within the table. The average number of monthly child admissions for asthma into English hospitals in 2022 is shown in tab (ii) within the table. Tab (iii) in the table shows the number of annual child hospital admissions for asthma in each of the past 20 years.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which 10 UK hospitals have the highest financial deficit, including debts carried over from previous years.

During the last year, the government agreed a number of measures to improve the finances in the NHS provider sector in England. These included writing off £13.4 billion of NHS debt, as part of a major financial reset for NHS providers; temporary arrangements that saw trusts receive block payments to fund their spending through the pandemic, supported by c£18bn of additional funding to support the NHS response to COVID. As a result, the amount and levels of deficits across in the NHS provider sector fell significantly.

Work is ongoing to support the minority of trusts who ended 2020/21 in a deficit position and to develop solutions to secure future financial sustainability.

Final deficit figures for 2020-21 will be published as part of the NHS’s final accounts in due course.

24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which documents set out the triage policy in relation to a pandemic for (1) hospitals, and (2) care homes, as of January 2020.

Re-configuring service delivery to ensure sufficient National Health Service capacity was central to our preparedness for a pandemic and the COVID-19 response. However, the Department does not have - and did not have in January 2020 - a pandemic triage policy for hospitals and care homes, as this is a clinical matter. In the event that patient triage becomes necessary, clinical guidance would be produced to support decision-making.

26th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been vaccinated against COVID-19 in (1) the Bassetlaw Clinical Commissioning Group area, (2) the Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Clinical Commissioning Group area, and (3) England, for the latest available date.

The information is not held in the format requested.

5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been tested for COVID-19 in Nottinghamshire since the announcement of mass testing in November 2020.

The total number of people tested for COVID-19 in Nottinghamshire between 29 October 2020 and 27 January 2021 is 329,057.

5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many GP practices have refused to participate in COVID-19 vaccinations.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have commissioned the general practice COVID-19 vaccination service in line with agreed national terms and conditions, as an enhanced service. Individual general practices opted in to delivering COVID-19 vaccinations, coming together in primary care network groupings to administer the vaccine as ‘local vaccination services’.

As of 10 January 2021, 785 local vaccination services had been stood up to deliver the vaccine. The number of individual practices that have and have not opted into the enhanced service is not collected or held centrally.

Where there are gaps in provision, NHS England will commission additional providers such as community pharmacy, hospital hubs, and mass vaccination centres to provide COVID-19 vaccinations. The first community pharmacy sites opened in the week commencing 11 January 2021. As more vaccines become available, there will be increased flexibility in local delivery.

5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the requirement or otherwise for DBS checks to be made on volunteers to assist with car parking and people movement in any forthcoming programme of mass vaccinations for COVID-19.

Non-clinical stewarding roles at vaccination centres will be filled by volunteers allocated through the Royal Voluntary Service, working with the National Health Service. The only role which requires a Disclosure and Barring Service check is a patient transport role.

5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have determined that retired (1) nurses, (2) GPs and (3) anaesthetists, are incapable of safely administering COVID-19 vaccinations; and if so, what criteria were used to make any such determination.

Retired clinicians can support the National Health Service COVID-19 vaccination team via the Bringing Back Staff programme. A comprehensive training package has been put together by NHS England and NHS Improvement with professional groups and Public Health England. New vaccinators will have undergone both a comprehensive training programme and competency assessment to ensure they can safely administer vaccines to patients under the clinical supervision of an experienced health care professional.