Lord Boateng Portrait

Lord Boateng

Labour - Life peer

Became Member: 27th June 2010


International Relations and Defence Committee
28th Jan 2021 - 31st Jan 2024
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
3rd Dec 2015 - 27th Apr 2017
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
12th Jun 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Privacy and Injunctions (Joint Committee)
5th Sep 2011 - 12th Mar 2012
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
29th May 2002 - 6th May 2005
Public Accounts Committee
16th Jul 2001 - 24th Jun 2002
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Jun 2001 - 29th May 2002
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Oct 1998 - 7th Jun 2001
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health)
6th May 1997 - 28th Oct 1998
Shadow Minister (Lord Chancellor's Department)
1st Jan 1992 - 1st Jan 1997
Shadow Spokesperson (Treasury)
1st Jan 1989 - 1st Jan 1992


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Boateng has voted in 358 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

5 Jul 2022 - Sitting Times - View Vote Context
Lord Boateng voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 22 Labour Aye votes vs 44 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 158 Noes - 124
View All Lord Boateng Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
(16 debate interactions)
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(10 debate interactions)
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(11 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(9 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Boateng's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Boateng, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Lord Boateng has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Boateng has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
8 Other Department Questions
2nd Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what representations they have received about the repatriation of artefacts in UK museums and galleries and the legality of the acquisition of such artefacts; and, where acquisition is contested, whether they have any plans to legislate to facilitate the return of any such artefacts.

Museums and galleries in the UK operate independently of the Government. Decisions relating to the care and management of their collections are a matter for the trustees of each museum, including research into items’ provenance and claims for restitution. Last year, Arts Council England published guidance on the handling of restitution claims and practical advice for museums on this matter.

Some national museums are prevented by legislation from deaccessioning objects in their collections unless, broadly, they are duplicates or unfit for retention. The two exceptions to this are when the objects are human remains less than 1,000 years old, and objects spoliated during the Nazi era. The Government has no plans to change these laws.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the trustees of the British Museum about the return of artefacts of historic, cultural or religious significance in the Museum’s collection to their countries of origin where the legality of their acquisition has been contested; and whether this includes the Ethiopian tabots.

Objects in the collection of the British Museum are legally owned by the Trustees of the British Museum, which is operationally independent of Government. Discussions and decisions relating to the care and management of the museum's collections are therefore a matter for the Trustees of the British Museum.

Some national museums, including the British Museum, are prevented by legislation from deaccessioning objects in their collections unless, broadly, they are duplicates or unfit for retention. The two exceptions to this are when the objects are human remains less than 1,000 years old, and objects spoliated during the Nazi-era. The Government has no plans to change these laws.

The British Museum has said that it recognises the significance of the tabots and has held meaningful talks with the Ethiopian Church on this sensitive issue. The Museum’s stated ambition is to seek to lend these objects to an Ethiopian Orthodox Church in the UK. The Government fully supports the Museum’s Trustees in their approach.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Leader of the House on how many occasions she has been asked to respond to Lords written questions about human rights in each of the last three years in respect of (1) Belarus, (2) Mali, (3) Nicaragua, and (4) Cameroon.

I have not been asked any written questions about human rights in Belarus, Mali, Nicaragua or Cameroon.

Over the past three years other Ministers have regularly answered questions about these four countries, including most recently: HL2108 (Belarus), HL2053 (Mali), HL952 (Nicaragua) and HL2735 (Cameroon).

23rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their role in the process for appointments to the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

Appointments to the board of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) are ministerial appointments, and the role of ministers in appointing EHRC commissioners is set out in the Equality Act 2006.

The appointments follow a recruitment process set out in the Governance Code for Public Appointments and are regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the diversity of the members of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in terms of (1) ethnicity, and (2) religion; and what assessment they have made of the value that would be added to the credibility and effectiveness of the EHRC by addressing any deficit in the diversity of the organisation in that regard.

The Minister for Women and Equalities has recently announced five appointments to the board of the EHRC, to take effect from 1 December 2020. With these appointments, the EHRC board will have four permanent members, out of 14, from minority ethnic backgrounds. This exceeds the government’s aim for 14% of all public appointments to come from ethnic minority backgrounds by 2022.

One member of the EHRC board identifies as Muslim, seven as Christian, two as having no religion and four prefer not to say.

The government is committed to maintaining diversity of appointments to the EHRC board.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when Ministers last met with members of the Equality and Human Rights Commission to discuss the Black Lives Matter movement; whether any Black people were present at that meeting; and if so, in what capacity.

The Minister for Equalities, who is the sponsor Minister for the EHRC and is herself black, met the then Chair of the EHRC and its CEO on two occasions during the summer and more recently met the prospective new Chair of the Commission in mid-November. All these discussions covered, among other issues, the EHRC’s work on Covid-19 and ethnic minorities, including black people.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many employees at senior civil service grade or equivalent in the Equality and Human Rights Commission are (1) Black, (2) Asian, (3) members of another ethnic minority, or (4) Muslim.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC)’s recruitment practices and human resources strategy is the responsibility of the EHRC itself, as an independent organisation who makes its own operational decisions. I have therefore asked the chief executive of the EHRC to respond directly to the noble Lord and to send me a copy of her response. Copies of the chief executive’s response will also be placed in the Libraries of the House.

14th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to commemorate Black History Month in October; which Departments, if any, are supporting specific initiatives to promote a better understanding of the contribution of Black people (1) to the UK, and (2) to the history of the British Isles; and what is the nature of any such initiatives.

Black History Month is an important time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of Black Britons throughout history. Departments across Government will be recognising contemporary and past contributions in a range of ways throughout the month of October.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
3rd Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have of the decision by the government of Switzerland to pass their contracted doses of the Moderna vaccine to the COVAX scheme; and what plans they have, if any, to do the same.

Continued collective global efforts will be crucial to address vaccine inequities. The UK has worked from the start of the pandemic to support equitable access, helping to establish a COVAX to support both higher- and lower-income countries secure the vaccines they need. We invested approximately £71 million to help COVAX secure early supply deals with manufacturers and donated £548 million to the COVAX Advanced Market Commitment to support the procurement of vaccines for lower and middle-income economies, making the UK one of the earliest and largest COVAX donors.

The UK Government through Vaccines Taskforce proactively manages its vaccine supply so that all procured doses are either used rapidly by our domestic programme or shared internationally. This is as per our commitment at the G7 to donate 100 million doses by the end of June 2022, with 30m by the end of 2021.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
3rd Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to withdraw vaccines promised to the COVAX scheme to supply the UK’s vaccine booster programme; and what assessment they have made of the effect of such a step on the COVAX scheme.

We have already secured the doses we need for everyone in the UK who requires a booster this Autumn/Winter. The UK has an excellent track record in securing steady supply and delivery of Covid-19 vaccines. We are in regular contact with the vaccine manufacturers and are confident in our vaccine supplies for our domestic vaccination programmes.

Our G7 commitment to share 100m doses to those countries that most need them and to split this 80/20 between COVAX and bilateral donations still stands. We have set out how we will meet 70% of this target and are confident in meeting 30m by the end of 2021 as per our announcement at the G20 on 30 October.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
30th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when they last discussed the return of artefacts of disputed ownership held in the British Museum with (1) a visiting head of state, or (2) another government.

His Majesty’s Government has regular discussions with visiting heads of state and other governments about a range of issues. If items owned by the British Museum are raised in such discussions, HM Government makes clear that decisions about such items are a matter for the Trustees of the British Museum, that the Museum is prohibited by law from deaccessioning items from its collection, and that we have no plans to change the law. The Government also highlights the extensive work the British Museum does with scholars and cultural institutions around the world to deepen understanding about all the items in its collection, and to ensure that the widest possible audience can learn from and admire them.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay on 20 September (HL9874), what plans they have to support the International Training Programme; how many African museum curators have benefited from it in each of the past three years; and from which countries they have come.

Over the past three years, 16 museum curators from across Africa have participated in the British Museum’s International Training Programme; this includes participants from the following countries and institutions:

2023

Archeological Enfidha Museum, Tunisia

National Museum, Nigeria

Unity Museum, Nigeria

National Museums of Kenya, Kenya

Imhotep Museum, Egypt

Alexandria National Museum, Egypt

2022

Luxor Museum, Egypt

Akhenaton Museum, Egypt

Sudan National Museum, Sudan

Unity Museum, Nigeria

The National Institute of Heritage, Tunisia

2021

Ghana Museums and Monuments Board, Ghana

Edo Global Art Foundation, Nigeria

Sudan National Museum, Sudan

Gebal Barkal Museum, Sudan

More details on the International Training Programme, including its funders, can be found in the annual reports that the British Museum publishes: https://www.bmitpglobalnetwork.org/publications/annual-reports/.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the implications of the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property of 1970 in relation to (1) their responsibilities for the governance of the British Museum, and (2) the role and responsibilities of its Trustees.

His Majesty’s Government expects UK museums to have and to follow appropriate policies and procedures to prevent the acquisition of cultural property contrary to the provisions of the UNESCO 1970 Convention.

The British Museum requires compliance with the Convention and with all other national and international standards, as stated in its ‘Acquisitions of Objects for the Collection’ policy and its ‘Due diligence procedures for works of art and cultural objects on loan from abroad for temporary exhibitions’.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay on 20 September (HL9874), how many of the 3.5 million items not in the British Museum's public database were looted from Africa in the course of British military actions launched against African nations.

It is not possible to answer the Noble Lord’s question without unpacking the loaded terms contained within it. The British Museum, like so many other institutions, seeks to provide detailed contextual information about all the items in its collection, so that scholars, visitors, and members of the public from around the world can engage with them and form their own views about them. Examples of ways in which the Museum does that can be found on the sections of its website which deal with:

The British Museum’s African collections as a whole are well-catalogued, and the Museum has undertaken extensive documentation and history work, including on the collections highlighted above. The British Museum continues actively to research its collections, and its records are updated regularly with references to military looting where evidence is found.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have received representations from foreign governments or other interested parties regarding items in the British Museum’s collections looted from former British colonial possessions in West Africa or Ethiopia in the light of recent concerns over the security of the museum’s collections.

His Majesty’s Government has not received any such representations.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when they were first informed of concerns about security at the British Museum; and what action the museum’s trustees were asked to undertake to address those concerns.

My department is closely monitoring the situation at the British Museum, and engaging directly with the Museum on this concerning issue.

The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport has spoken with the Chairman of the British Museum about this issue on a number of occasions and has sought assurances on the immediate measures that have been put in place to increase security at the Museum. She has also sought assurances on the details of the scope and timetable for the independent review of security which the Museum has instigated, led by a former trustee, Nigel Boardman, and the Chief Constable of British Transport Police, Lucy D’Orsi.

The matter is also currently under investigation by the Economic Crime Command of the Metropolitan Police. The British Museum is working with the police to support their investigations.

My department and I will continue to work closely with the British Museum – and the wider museums sector – to ensure that lessons are learned from this incident once the independent review is complete.

Further details on this matter have been set out in the Written Statements which the Secretary of State and I made to Parliament on 4 September 2023 (HCWS994 and HLWS979).

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they are confident that the full extent of losses sustained through the recent spate of thefts from the British Museum is known.

My department is closely monitoring the situation at the British Museum, and engaging directly with the Museum on this concerning issue.

The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport has spoken with the Chairman of the British Museum about this issue on a number of occasions and has sought assurances on the immediate measures that have been put in place to increase security at the Museum. She has also sought assurances on the details of the scope and timetable for the independent review of security which the Museum has instigated, led by a former trustee, Nigel Boardman, and the Chief Constable of British Transport Police, Lucy D’Orsi.

The matter is also currently under investigation by the Economic Crime Command of the Metropolitan Police. The British Museum is working with the police to support their investigations.

My department and I will continue to work closely with the British Museum – and the wider museums sector – to ensure that lessons are learned from this incident once the independent review is complete.

Further details on this matter have been set out in the Written Statements which the Secretary of State and I made to Parliament on 4 September 2023 (HCWS994 and HLWS979).

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact upon the reputation of the British Museum caused by recent concerns over the security of its collections; and whether they have any plans to review the museum’s governance.

My department is closely monitoring the situation at the British Museum, and engaging directly with the Museum on this concerning issue.

The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport has spoken with the Chairman of the British Museum about this issue on a number of occasions and has sought assurances on the immediate measures that have been put in place to increase security at the Museum. She has also sought assurances on the details of the scope and timetable for the independent review of security which the Museum has instigated, led by a former trustee, Nigel Boardman, and the Chief Constable of British Transport Police, Lucy D’Orsi.

The matter is also currently under investigation by the Economic Crime Command of the Metropolitan Police. The British Museum is working with the police to support their investigations.

My department and I will continue to work closely with the British Museum – and the wider museums sector – to ensure that lessons are learned from this incident once the independent review is complete.

Further details on this matter have been set out in the Written Statements which the Secretary of State and I made to Parliament on 4 September 2023 (HCWS994 and HLWS979).

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) whether the items held by the British Museum looted from Britain’s former colonial possessions in West Africa, or during Britain’s historic military expeditions on that continent, have been catalogued; and (2) the extent of knowledge of the contents of such collections.

The British Museum has 8 million objects in its collection, with 4.5 million currently on the Museum’s public database. The Museum is undertaking an ongoing digitisation project which will ensure that all the objects in its care will be catalogued and available to its global audience on its public database.

The Museum’s collections from Africa are well-catalogued, to the benefit of the public and researchers from across the world. The Museum undertakes extensive research into its collections, including in partnership with African institutions. This is available online at: https://www.britishmuseum.org/research/projects.

The British Museum also has strong links with a variety of African partners. Since 2005, through the Africa Programme, the Museum has worked collaboratively with partner institutions to deliver training and workshops in museum practice in a number of African countries. Colleagues from across Africa also travel to the UK for project-based work placements at the Museum and in its partner museums across the UK. The world-leading annual International Training Programme run by the Museum also offers opportunities for African colleagues to meet peers from global heritage institutions.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the British motor sports industry regarding access to training and employment opportunities for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic young people.

The Government is committed to promoting diversity and inclusion in all sport and physical activity, including motor sport. Our strategy ‘Sporting Future’ sets out a clear ambition to increase diversity among sporting organisations and to help the sport sector be more inclusive and welcoming to its spectators, participants and people in its workforce. However it is ultimately for all individual sports’ national governing bodies, to decide on the specific aims and appropriate initiatives in their organisations, and to evaluate progress with these.

We welcome the work of the Royal Academy of Engineering and Sir Lewis Hamilton which is aimed at improving the representation of Black people in UK motor sport. We will continue to work across government and with sector partners to ensure that inequalities people from ethnically diverse backgrounds face in sport, including motorsports, are being tackled effectively.

Sport England, UK Sport and the other home nations’ sports councils have also recently published the results of a detailed, independent review into tackling racism and racial inequality in sport. Following the findings each Council is working to develop their own specific action plans to deliver on their initial commitments relating to people; representation; investment; systems and insight. This will involve working closely with relevant groups or communities to tackle racial inequality in sport, and bring about lasting change.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) findings, and (2) recommendations, of the Royal Academy of Engineering’s Hamilton Commission report Accelerating Change: Improving Representation of Black People in UK Motorsport, published on 13 July.

The Government is committed to promoting diversity and inclusion in all sport and physical activity, including motor sport. Our strategy ‘Sporting Future’ sets out a clear ambition to increase diversity among sporting organisations and to help the sport sector be more inclusive and welcoming to its spectators, participants and people in its workforce. However it is ultimately for all individual sports’ national governing bodies, to decide on the specific aims and appropriate initiatives in their organisations, and to evaluate progress with these.

We welcome the work of the Royal Academy of Engineering and Sir Lewis Hamilton which is aimed at improving the representation of Black people in UK motor sport. We will continue to work across government and with sector partners to ensure that inequalities people from ethnically diverse backgrounds face in sport, including motorsports, are being tackled effectively.

Sport England, UK Sport and the other home nations’ sports councils have also recently published the results of a detailed, independent review into tackling racism and racial inequality in sport. Following the findings each Council is working to develop their own specific action plans to deliver on their initial commitments relating to people; representation; investment; systems and insight. This will involve working closely with relevant groups or communities to tackle racial inequality in sport, and bring about lasting change.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to give access to documents held on Commonwealth nations and their independence movements to Commonwealth scholars unable to visit the National Archives without access to funding to meet current charges for copying and postage.

As a government department, The National Archives is obliged to charge for some of its public services, including research and record copying. These charges, agreed with HM Treasury, are set out in the Fees Regulations issued under the Public Records Act (1958) and are based on recovering the costs of providing these services. Digitised records on The National Archives’ website are always free to search but a charge of £3.50 per download generally applies to view the full transcription or download digital copies.


In line with its strategic vision of ‘Archives for Everyone’, The National Archives is engaged in a range of activities that aim to expand its audience and enhance access to its collections, both on site at its buildings at Kew and online. Recognising the particular interest in Commonwealth nations in a range of the public records in its collection, The National Archives is in ongoing and active dialogue with its peer institutions in Commonwealth nations, particularly through its membership of the International Council on Archives (ICA) and its leadership of the ICA’s Forum of National Archivists.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
20th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many accredited providers for the Initial Teacher Training (ITT) process received (1) requires improvement, or (2) inadequate, Ofsted ratings in the period since January 2022; and what assessment they have made of the credibility of the ITT accreditation process given those figures.

The current cycle of Ofsted inspections tests the effectiveness of existing Initial Teacher Training (ITT) provision in line with the principles set out in its Initial Teacher Education inspection framework. The accreditation process, undertaken jointly with Ofsted, assessed provider potential to deliver high-quality ITT in line with the new Quality Requirements from the 2024/25 academic year as recommended by the ITT market review, particularly the enhanced requirements around mentoring. These two processes are distinct and, therefore, Ofsted’s current inspection judgements and the accreditation against the new requirements from 2024 do not align in all instances.

In respect of the providers accredited to deliver ITT from September 2024, 69 inspections have been carried out since January 2022. Of these, four received a ‘Requires Improvement’ judgement and one received an ‘Inadequate’ judgement in 2022. These five providers have since been reinspected by Ofsted in 2023 and judged as ‘Good’.

Twelve universities were not successful in gaining accreditation to deliver ITT from September 2024, of which six were judged as ‘Good’, one was judged as ‘Requires Improvement’ and since improved to ‘Good’ on reinspection. Additionally, two were judged ‘Inadequate’, of which one has since improved to ‘Good’ with the other yet to be reinspected.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
20th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many universities who lost accreditation in the Initial Teacher Training accreditation process received (1) good, or (2) outstanding, Ofsted ratings in the period since January 2022.

The current cycle of Ofsted inspections tests the effectiveness of existing Initial Teacher Training (ITT) provision in line with the principles set out in its Initial Teacher Education inspection framework. The accreditation process, undertaken jointly with Ofsted, assessed provider potential to deliver high-quality ITT in line with the new Quality Requirements from the 2024/25 academic year as recommended by the ITT market review, particularly the enhanced requirements around mentoring. These two processes are distinct and, therefore, Ofsted’s current inspection judgements and the accreditation against the new requirements from 2024 do not align in all instances.

In respect of the providers accredited to deliver ITT from September 2024, 69 inspections have been carried out since January 2022. Of these, four received a ‘Requires Improvement’ judgement and one received an ‘Inadequate’ judgement in 2022. These five providers have since been reinspected by Ofsted in 2023 and judged as ‘Good’.

Twelve universities were not successful in gaining accreditation to deliver ITT from September 2024, of which six were judged as ‘Good’, one was judged as ‘Requires Improvement’ and since improved to ‘Good’ on reinspection. Additionally, two were judged ‘Inadequate’, of which one has since improved to ‘Good’ with the other yet to be reinspected.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the adequacy of ethnic monitoring of pupils in the compilation of data in relation to (1) school exclusions, and (2) the provision of alternatives to classroom schooling.

The Government publishes school exclusions data by pupil characteristic in the ‘Permanent exclusions and suspensions in England’ publication. The data is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england. Since November 2022, this data has been published two terms in arrears rather than as an annual release. This fulfils the Department’s commitment to the 2021 report ‘Strengthening Home Education’, where the Education Select Committee suggested that only having an annual statistical release on exclusions may prevent the Department from identifying illegal exclusion practices.

The Department also publishes the ‘Schools, pupils and their characteristics’ publication for placements in non-school based alternative provision arranged by local authorities (Alternative Provision census), and placements in non-school based alternative provision arranged by schools (from 2023 only, School census). These tables are available in the attached files.

The Department also publishes the ‘Schools, pupils and their characteristics’ publication, which is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-pupils-and-their-characteristics. The 2 attached tables provide information on:

  • Placements in non-school based alternative provision arranged by local authorities (Alternative Provision Census).
  • Placements in non-school based alternative provision arranged by schools (from 2023 only, School Census).
Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what guidance they provide to schools about the use of ‘alternative provision’ in place of exclusion for pupils presenting challenging behaviours; and how the use of ‘alternative provision’ is monitored by Ofsted.

The use of alternative provision for pupils presenting challenging behaviours is covered in the government’s statutory guidance on alternative provision, which can be found attached. It is also included in guidance on behaviour in schools, as well as in guidance on suspension and permanent exclusion, which can also be found attached.

The government’s recently published ‘Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan’ sets out the department’s ambitious reforms to improve capacity and capability within the AP sector. The plan includes a three tier model for AP which focusses on providing targeted support and interventions within mainstream schools to reduce the number of preventable exclusions and to improve behaviour and attendance. School commissioning of well planned, high quality AP can play an important part in delivering this service.

Ofsted evaluate local authority and school use of AP separately. Ofsted look at a school’s use of AP as part of graded school inspections. In doing so, inspectors will evaluate how well a school continues to take responsibility for its pupils who attend AP. Further details can be found in paragraphs 361 to 367 of the School Inspection Handbook, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-inspection-handbook-eif/school-inspection-handbook.

From this year, Ofsted have included the inspection of the commissioning of AP by local authorities as part of Area SEND inspections. This includes inspecting whether a local authority’s approach to commissioning and overseeing AP arrangements for children and young people in the local authority area meets their duties as set out in AP statutory guidance. Full details can be found in the Area SEND inspection framework and handbook, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/area-send-framework-and-handbook/area-send-inspections-framework-and-handbook.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many pupils have been placed in Pupil Referral Units in England in each of the last three years for which figures are available; and what proportion of those pupils are (1) boys, (2) of Black Caribbean origin, and (3) of another ethnic minority.

The department publishes annual data on the gender and ethnicity of pupils at schools in England. The most recently published data is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-pupils-and-their-characteristics/2022-23. The publication includes figures for ‘State-funded alternate provision (AP) schools’, which include pupil referral units and alternative provider free schools and academies. The attached tables, taken from the published data, show breakdowns of pupils in these schools by gender and ethnicity from January 2021 to January 2023.

The SEND and AP Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, set out a new national vision and delivery model for the AP system.  Departmental reforms will see AP schools working with mainstream settings to provide targeted support and interventions to improve behaviour, attendance and reduce the numbers of preventable exclusions, including for those groups with a greater likelihood of being referred to alternative provision.

Schools also have a clear duty not to discriminate against pupils based on protected characteristics under the Equality Act 2010. Ofsted’s assessment of behaviour in schools includes specific consideration of rates, patterns and reasons for exclusions, as well as any differences between groups of pupils.

The department’s ‘Understanding your data: a guide for school governors and academy trustees available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/understanding-your-data-a-guide-for-school-governors-and-academy-trustees/understanding-your-data-a-guide-for-school-governors-and-academy-trustees, makes clear that governing boards should carefully consider the level and characteristics of pupils who are leaving the school. They should challenge the school and academy trust management teams on any permanent exclusions to ensure it is only used as a last resort, as well as on directions for pupils to be to be educated off site in AP schools. They should also consider whether there are any patterns to the reasons or timing of such moves.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the level of educational attainment in Pupil Referral Units; and what proportion of pupils in those units gain at least five GCSEs at grades 9 to 4.

Data is published on the educational attainment of pupils at the end Key Stage 4 in pupil referral units and alternative provision (AP) in the annual Key Stage 4 performance National Statistics release, which can be accessed here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/key-stage-4-performance-revised.

The proportion of pupils who gained at least five GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 in academic year 2021/22 in pupil referral units can be found in the attached spreadsheet.

There are many reasons why children who attend AP at Key Stage 4 may face challenges gaining GCSE grades, so it is vital that they receive a high quality education alongside appropriate support. We need to be just as ambitious for pupils in AP as we are for those in mainstream schools. The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities and AP Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, set out a new national vision and delivery model for the AP system to improve the outcomes of the vulnerable and disadvantaged children and young people it supports.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the numbers of food banks in schools; and what guidance they have issued to school governors regarding children having access to at least one nutritious meal a day.

The government supports the provision of nutritious food in schools to enable pupils to be well nourished, develop healthy eating habits and to concentrate in school. The Requirements for School Food Regulations 2014 require schools to provide all children with healthy food and drink options, and to make sure children get the energy and nutrition they need across the school day. The regulations restrict foods high in fat, salt and sugar, as well as low quality reformed or reconstituted foods.

Governors have a responsibility to ensure compliance with the standards and should appropriately challenge the head teacher and school leaders to ensure the school is meeting its obligations. Departmental advice and guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/standards-for-school-food-in-england, and: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-food-standards-resources-for-schools/allergy-guidance-for-schools.

The provision of free school meals (FSM) to children who are eligible for them is of the utmost importance to this government. The greatest ever proportion of school children, over one third, are now provided with free school meals. Around 2 million pupils are claiming benefits-related FSM. In addition, almost 1.3 million infants are supported through the universal infant free school meal policy. Free meals are also available to disadvantaged young people in further education. ​

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of children in schools who are not in receipt of nutritious meals.

The government supports the provision of nutritious food in schools to enable pupils to be well nourished, develop healthy eating habits and to concentrate in school. The Requirements for School Food Regulations 2014 require schools to provide all children with healthy food and drink options, and to make sure children get the energy and nutrition they need across the school day. The regulations restrict foods high in fat, salt and sugar, as well as low quality reformed or reconstituted foods.

Governors have a responsibility to ensure compliance with the standards and should appropriately challenge the head teacher and school leaders to ensure the school is meeting its obligations. Departmental advice and guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/standards-for-school-food-in-england, and: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-food-standards-resources-for-schools/allergy-guidance-for-schools.

The provision of free school meals (FSM) to children who are eligible for them is of the utmost importance to this government. The greatest ever proportion of school children, over one third, are now provided with free school meals. Around 2 million pupils are claiming benefits-related FSM. In addition, almost 1.3 million infants are supported through the universal infant free school meal policy. Free meals are also available to disadvantaged young people in further education. ​

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the contribution of nutrition to children's educational attainment.

The government supports the provision of nutritious food in schools to enable pupils to be well nourished, develop healthy eating habits and to concentrate in school. The Requirements for School Food Regulations 2014 require schools to provide all children with healthy food and drink options, and to make sure children get the energy and nutrition they need across the school day. The regulations restrict foods high in fat, salt and sugar, as well as low quality reformed or reconstituted foods.

Governors have a responsibility to ensure compliance with the standards and should appropriately challenge the head teacher and school leaders to ensure the school is meeting its obligations. Departmental advice and guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/standards-for-school-food-in-england, and: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-food-standards-resources-for-schools/allergy-guidance-for-schools.

The provision of free school meals (FSM) to children who are eligible for them is of the utmost importance to this government. The greatest ever proportion of school children, over one third, are now provided with free school meals. Around 2 million pupils are claiming benefits-related FSM. In addition, almost 1.3 million infants are supported through the universal infant free school meal policy. Free meals are also available to disadvantaged young people in further education. ​

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
2nd Dec 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of changes to the tax free limits to lifetime pension pots on the retention of head teachers in England and Wales.

The department considers a wide range of policy matters with the Teachers’ Pension Scheme Advisory Board to ensure that the pension continues to be a key benefit in attracting and retaining teachers and head teachers in England and Wales.

The lifetime allowance for pensions is being maintained by HM Treasury at its current level of £1,073,100 until April 2026. This allows head teachers and other savers to continue to make significant amounts of pension savings tax-free, while ensuring incentives to save are targeted across society.

The government keeps all aspects of the tax system under review, as part of the annual Budget process, and in the context of the wider public finances.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what data they collect regarding (1) the participation of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic students in STEM subjects, and (2) their access to engineering qualifications at vocational or degree level.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency collects information from further education providers via the Individualised Learner Record (ILR). The ILR specification for the 2019/20 academic year is published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ilr-specification-validation-rules-and-appendices-2019-to-2020.

The attached table contains the number of STEM enrolments for both adult (19+) education and training, and apprenticeships at all ages by people from ethnic minorities in the 2019/20 full academic year, and the 2020/21 provisional academic year. Please note that these counts are of learning aims [1]. If someone were to enrol on more than one learning aim in a given academic year they would be counted twice.

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) collects and publishes data on students enrolled in higher education in the UK. Latest statistics refer to the academic year 2019/20.

Data on student enrolments at UK higher education providers are available by subject of study and ethnicity in the academic year 2019/20 in Table 45 of HESA’s Higher Education Student Data pages: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/students/table-45.

Further details about data collected by HESA is available at the ‘Student record 2019/20’ and ‘Alternative Student record 2019/20’ data collection pages, available here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c19051/a/locsdy and https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c19054.

More data on access to higher education are published by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS). These include breakdowns by subject of study and ethnicity, available in the End of Cycle Data Resources pages: https://www.ucas.com/data-and-analysis/undergraduate-statistics-and-reports/ucas-undergraduate-sector-level-end-cycle-data-resources-2020.

[1] A learning aim constitutes the package of learning being funded and delivered separately, such as an apprenticeship standard, an individual qualification, a module or a short non-qualification bearing course.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
26th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to refer the University of London’s proposed closure of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies to the Office of Students to ascertain the potential implications of such a closure for students engaged in, or seeking opportunities to engage in, further post-doctoral studies in black British history, decolonisation and the documentation of the transition from Empire to Commonwealth.

The Office for Students (OfS), as the regulator of higher education in England, works within its regulatory framework with individual higher education providers to consider the implication for students of any decision to cease the provision of higher education. It does so independently, without reliance on referrals from the Department for Education. We understand, however, that the OfS is aware of these reported proposals and will engage with the University of London to understand them in greater depth as part of its normal engagement process.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with Ofqual about examination boards developing modules on the study of migration and the UK's colonial history; how many such modules are awaiting appraisal; which examination boards have submitted modules for that appraisal; and when such appraisals will be completed.

As set out in my reply to HL8049 from the noble Lord, the department sets the high-level content requirements for GCSEs and A levels for history and within this subject content, there is significant scope for modules that cover the study of migration and the UK's colonial history. It is for awarding organisations themselves to develop specifications for GCSE and A level history that meet those requirements and for Ofqual, the independent qualifications regulator, to ensure those requirements are correctly met. As such, the department has not held discussions with Ofqual concerning the development of modules on these topics by awarding bodies.

21st Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many members of (1) the board of Ofqual, and (2) non-Board members of Ofqual's Standards Advisory Group, are BAME; and when the issue of the promotion of the study or assessment of modules about migration and the UK's colonial history was last discussed by either of those bodies.

These are matters for Ofqual, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation. I have asked its acting Chief Regulator, Dame Glenys Stacey, to write to the noble Lord. A copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

14th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the role of examination boards in  promoting a better understanding of British history; and which such boards examine modules that cover (1) the history of migration, (2) the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, (3) the contribution of Black people to British history from the Roman invasion to the end of the 20th century, and (4) race relations in the UK.

The department sets the content requirements for GCSE and A level history. Within this subject content, there is significant scope for modules that cover the history of migration, the transatlantic slave trade, and the contribution of black people to British history and race relations in the UK.

It is for awarding organisations themselves to develop specifications for GCSE and A level history that meet those requirements and for Ofqual, the independent qualifications regulator, to ensure those requirements are correctly met. As such, the department does not make assessments of the modules or module content offered by awarding organisations.

Two of the three main awarding bodies in England, OCR and AQA, provide an option to undertake a thematic study on migration in Britain, and how this country’s history has been shaped by the black and minority ethnic communities in the past. The 3rd main awarding body, Pearson, is currently developing a thematic study option on migration in Britain. Subject to Ofqual approval, this will provide more choice for schools.

11th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many publicly appointed members of public bodies regulating (1) social work, and (2) education, identify as BAME; and what is the recorded ethnicity of each of those members, disagregated by public body.

The Department for Education has 136 publicly appointed members of public bodies, 17 of whom identify as Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic (BAME). Social Work England has seven public appointees. Due to the low number of appointees, and the risk of potential identification of individuals within this group, we are not able to confirm the number of declared BAME appointees within Social Work England. Ethnicity is based on voluntary declaration. In order to protect personal information, the Department is unable to provide this data disaggregated by public body as, within each body, the number relates to fewer than 10 individuals.

22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what additional assistance they intend to provide to those countries in East Africa affected by COVID-19 to mitigate the impact of the pandemic and the increase in locusts currently swarming in that region.

We are deeply concerned about the combined impacts of COVID-19 and the locust outbreak in East Africa. Millions of people already face food insecurity in the region caused by humanitarian disasters and conflict. These outbreaks will exacerbate these challenges.

We are using UK aid to mitigate new health, humanitarian and economic risks across Africa and have pledged £744 million of UK aid globally to end the COVID-19 pandemic.

The UK is also supporting the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation’s (FAO) Regional Emergency Appeal for the locust outbreak and has contributed £7 million for the spraying of pesticides on the ground and by air. We will continue taking proactive action, including adapting our existing programmes to meet urgent needs.

26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to assist the Food and Agricultural Organisation's support to the areas in East Africa affected by locust swarms and breeding, in particular, assistance with early warning forecasts and alerts on the timings, scale and location of such swarm invasions and breeding.

We are deeply concerned about the devastating locust outbreak in East Africa. It is destroying crops, livelihoods and essential food supplies. Millions of people already face food insecurity in the region and this outbreak will exacerbate this challenge. A supercomputer funded by UK aid is helping countries in East Africa to tackle devastating locust outbreaks by tracking the insects’ movements around the continent. The computer based in Kenya uses data to predict where the locusts will move to and develop early warning systems so communities can prepare.

The UK has provided £5 million to support the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Regional Emergency Appeal for the locust outbreak. UK aid is also helping to tackle this outbreak though the UN Central Emergency Response Fund, which has released £7.5 million. Our support is having an immediate impact. With UK aid backed funding, the FAO is spraying pesticides on the ground and by air to prevent further damage to crops and protect livelihoods. The Desert Locust Information System continues surveillance and provision of early warning information for affected countries. We believe that quick action now provides the best chance of halting the spread of locusts before the next breeding cycle when staple crops are in the field between March and July.

We continue to monitor the situation closely and stand ready to help further. DFID’s existing humanitarian and development programming in the region is working to address current food insecurity and poverty challenges and is ready to flex to respond to this crisis. As rising temperatures due to climate change make such events across Africa more likely, we are also helping communities adapt longer term to climate shocks.

26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have received any requests for assistance to support aerial spraying and other control activities to counter the locust swarms affecting East Africa from the affected nations; and how they have responded to any such requests.

We are deeply concerned about the devastating locust outbreak in East Africa. It is destroying crops, livelihoods and essential food supplies. Millions of people already face food insecurity in the region and this outbreak will exacerbate this challenge. A supercomputer funded by UK aid is helping countries in East Africa to tackle devastating locust outbreaks by tracking the insects’ movements around the continent. The computer based in Kenya uses data to predict where the locusts will move to and develop early warning systems so communities can prepare.

The UK has provided £5 million to support the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Regional Emergency Appeal for the locust outbreak. UK aid is also helping to tackle this outbreak though the UN Central Emergency Response Fund, which has released £7.5 million. Our support is having an immediate impact. With UK aid backed funding, the FAO is spraying pesticides on the ground and by air to prevent further damage to crops and protect livelihoods. The Desert Locust Information System continues surveillance and provision of early warning information for affected countries. We believe that quick action now provides the best chance of halting the spread of locusts before the next breeding cycle when staple crops are in the field between March and July.

We continue to monitor the situation closely and stand ready to help further. DFID’s existing humanitarian and development programming in the region is working to address current food insecurity and poverty challenges and is ready to flex to respond to this crisis. As rising temperatures due to climate change make such events across Africa more likely, we are also helping communities adapt longer term to climate shocks.

26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the locust swarms in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia on (1) food security and agricultural livelihoods in the affected areas, and (2) their own programmes in (a) those countries, and (b) the region generally.

We are deeply concerned about the devastating locust outbreak in East Africa. It is destroying crops, livelihoods and essential food supplies. Millions of people already face food insecurity in the region and this outbreak will exacerbate this challenge. A supercomputer funded by UK aid is helping countries in East Africa to tackle devastating locust outbreaks by tracking the insects’ movements around the continent. The computer based in Kenya uses data to predict where the locusts will move to and develop early warning systems so communities can prepare.

The UK has provided £5 million to support the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Regional Emergency Appeal for the locust outbreak. UK aid is also helping to tackle this outbreak though the UN Central Emergency Response Fund, which has released £7.5 million. Our support is having an immediate impact. With UK aid backed funding, the FAO is spraying pesticides on the ground and by air to prevent further damage to crops and protect livelihoods. The Desert Locust Information System continues surveillance and provision of early warning information for affected countries. We believe that quick action now provides the best chance of halting the spread of locusts before the next breeding cycle when staple crops are in the field between March and July.

We continue to monitor the situation closely and stand ready to help further. DFID’s existing humanitarian and development programming in the region is working to address current food insecurity and poverty challenges and is ready to flex to respond to this crisis. As rising temperatures due to climate change make such events across Africa more likely, we are also helping communities adapt longer term to climate shocks.

6th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have received any representations from (1) Ryanair, or (2) any other interested parties, concerning the compatibility of that airline's requirement for South African passport holders to take an Afrikaans language test, with (a) entry requirements, and (b) anti-discrimination legislation.

The recent language test requirement for passengers travelling with Ryanair is not a UK Government requirement. The FCDO’s Post in South Africa has confirmed this via its social media channels and has been in touch with South Africa’s Department for International Relations and Cooperation. My officials have engaged with Ryanair on this matter and they have since confirmed that the language test is no longer in use.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Institute for Public Policy Research’s findings, published on 24 September, that people from BAME backgrounds are (1) twice as likely as the wider population to expect to face financial difficulty in the next quarter, and (2) more than twice as likely to have lost their jobs or access to paid work during the course of the COVID-19 pandemic; and what steps they are taking to address this discrepancy.

This Government is committed to levelling up opportunities for everyone, we have already taken action to set up the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities which will review inequality across the UK. The Commission will set out a new, positive agenda for change, balancing the needs of individuals, communities and society, maximising opportunities and ensuring fairness for all. This is in addition to the work we are taking forward on the findings of the Public Health England review into disparities in the risks and outcomes of COVID-19, published on 2 June.

Throughout these unprecedented times the Government has provided a crucial safety net to record levels of claimants, ensuring all our customers receive the support they need, when they need it. We know some people might require additional help to get back into work so we have launched our Plan for Jobs, including the Kickstart scheme, the expanded youth offer, the Job Entry Targeted Support and the Sector-based Work Academy Programmes to offer new support to those who lose their job as a result of COVID-19, investing £90 million towards activities that address disparities in youth unemployment – with a focus on the data from the Government’s Race Disparity Audit - and more. The Government is working to ensure that ethnic minority customers have the opportunity to benefit from this extensive package.

1st Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what Official Development Assistance has been given to (1) Nigeria, and (2) Ghana, to support the training and employment of clinical staff in the healthcare systems of each of these countries; and what plans they have to provide further assistance to these countries.

In 2021/22, the Government has allocated £3.6 million to health workforce development programmes in Ghana. This includes programmes focussed on improving workforce planning and governance, training new healthcare workers in refugee camps and developing training curricula. Through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office, we have previously invested in health programmes in Nigeria and Ghana, such as the WomenForHealth Programme in Nigeria and mental health nurse training in Ghana. No decisions on specific programmes and geographical areas in the future have yet been made.

1st Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to agree memoranda of understanding with countries affected by the recruitment of clinical staff by the NHS to regulate that practice and avoid unforeseen consequences for the healthcare systems of those countries.

We have made no specific assessment of the impact of recruitment by the NHS of clinical staff trained and employed in low- and middle-income countries on the healthcare systems of those countries. The Government routinely monitors international recruitment activity and where there are significant workforce flows into the National Health Service, particularly from low and middle-income countries, we are engaging with those nations on how this recruitment could be managed through Government to Government agreements.

International recruitment is regulated through the Code of Practice for the International Recruitment of Health and Social Care Personnel, which is available in an online only format. The Code prevents active international recruitment from a list of 47 countries, unless there is a Government to Government agreement in place to manage international recruitment. These countries have been identified by the World Health Organization as having health economies with significant and unsustainable workforce challenges.

We have signed agreements with the Governments of the Philippines, Kenya and Malaysia to manage healthcare worker recruitment. As these are new agreements within the last six months, no assessment has yet been made of the impact. Any further agreements will be published online once they have been signed.

1st Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many memoranda of understanding they have agreed with other countries to regulate the recruitment of clinical staff by the NHS; and what assessment they have made of the related impact of each.

We have made no specific assessment of the impact of recruitment by the NHS of clinical staff trained and employed in low- and middle-income countries on the healthcare systems of those countries. The Government routinely monitors international recruitment activity and where there are significant workforce flows into the National Health Service, particularly from low and middle-income countries, we are engaging with those nations on how this recruitment could be managed through Government to Government agreements.

International recruitment is regulated through the Code of Practice for the International Recruitment of Health and Social Care Personnel, which is available in an online only format. The Code prevents active international recruitment from a list of 47 countries, unless there is a Government to Government agreement in place to manage international recruitment. These countries have been identified by the World Health Organization as having health economies with significant and unsustainable workforce challenges.

We have signed agreements with the Governments of the Philippines, Kenya and Malaysia to manage healthcare worker recruitment. As these are new agreements within the last six months, no assessment has yet been made of the impact. Any further agreements will be published online once they have been signed.