Maria Eagle Portrait

Maria Eagle

Labour - Garston and Halewood

First elected: 1st May 1997

Shadow Minister (Defence)

(since September 2023)

Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament
9th Feb 2022 - 15th Jan 2024
Victims and Prisoners Bill
14th Jun 2023 - 11th Jul 2023
National Security Bill
29th Jun 2022 - 18th Oct 2022
British Sign Language Bill
9th Feb 2022 - 23rd Feb 2022
Approved Premises (Substance Testing) Bill
8th Dec 2021 - 15th Dec 2021
Leasehold Reform (Ground Rent) Bill [HL]
1st Dec 2021 - 9th Dec 2021
Taxi and Private Hire Vehicles (Safeguarding and Road Safety) Bill (England and Wales)
27th Oct 2021 - 3rd Nov 2021
Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
12th May 2021 - 24th Jun 2021
Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
5th Jan 2016 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Secretary of State for Defence
14th Sep 2015 - 5th Jan 2016
Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Oct 2013 - 14th Sep 2015
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2013
Shadow Solicitor General
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Shadow Minister (Justice)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Shadow Minister (Equalities Office)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (also in Government Equalities Office)
9th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Minister of State (Government Equalities Office) (also in the Ministry of Justice)
9th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
2nd Jul 2007 - 9th Jun 2009
Parliamentary Secretary (Government Equalities office) (also in the Ministry of Justice)
5th Oct 2008 - 9th Jun 2009
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office)
5th May 2006 - 28th Jun 2007
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education and Skills) (Children and Families)
10th May 2005 - 5th May 2006
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Jun 2001 - 10th May 2005
Public Accounts Committee
25th Jul 1997 - 29th Nov 1999


Department Event
Monday 25th March 2024
14:30
Ministry of Defence
Oral questions - Main Chamber
25 Mar 2024, 2:30 p.m.
Defence (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Tuesday 26th March 2024
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
26 Mar 2024, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
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View calendar
Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Ceasefire in Gaza
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 173 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 20 Noes - 212
Speeches
Monday 19th February 2024
Oral Answers to Questions
The Government have delayed producing the information required for the invitation to negotiate for the new medium-lift helicopter four times …
Written Answers
Monday 19th February 2024
Ministry of Defence: Procurement
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q113 of the oral evidence by Andy Start to …
Early Day Motions
Wednesday 22nd January 2020
Job losses at Jaguar Land Rover Halewood plant
That this House is alarmed at the shocking news from Jaguar Land Rover that 500 jobs are to go at …
Bills
Monday 11th December 2023
Multi-Storey Car Parks (Safety) Bill 2023-24
A Bill to increase the minimum required height of guarding in multi-storey car parks; to make provision about the height …
MP Financial Interests
Tuesday 30th May 2023
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Address of donor: Broadcasting House, Portland Place, London W1A 1AA
Amount of donation …
EDM signed
Tuesday 13th June 2023
Honouring Olivia Pratt-Korbel’s 10th birthday
That this House notes that this day, Tuesday 13th June 2023, would have been West Derby schoolgirl Olivia Pratt-Korbel’s 10th …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 6th June 2023
Care Supporters Bill 2022-23
A Bill to provide for a right for a user of health and care services to be accompanied by a …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Maria Eagle has voted in 689 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Maria Eagle Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Edward Argar (Conservative)
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
(30 debate interactions)
Eddie Hughes (Conservative)
(29 debate interactions)
Chris Philp (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(27 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(143 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(90 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(16 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Victims and Prisoners Bill 2022-23
(26,889 words contributed)
National Security Act 2023
(10,752 words contributed)
Leasehold Reform (Ground Rent) Act 2022
(4,601 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Maria Eagle's debates

Garston and Halewood Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Garston and Halewood signature proportion
Petition Debates Contributed

Isolation essential to the Government’s strategy for fighting coronavirus, and UK citizens must remain healthy and exercise whilst keeping adequate distance between people. The Government should allow golf courses to open so families or individuals can play golf in order to exercise safely.

In the event of a spike we would like you not to close gyms as a measure to stop any spread of Covid. Also for gyms to not be put in the same group as pubs in terms of risk or importance. Gyms are following strict guidelines and most members are following rules in a sober manner.


Latest EDMs signed by Maria Eagle

13th June 2023
Maria Eagle signed this EDM on Tuesday 13th June 2023

Honouring Olivia Pratt-Korbel’s 10th birthday

Tabled by: Ian Byrne (Labour - Liverpool, West Derby)
That this House notes that this day, Tuesday 13th June 2023, would have been West Derby schoolgirl Olivia Pratt-Korbel’s 10th birthday; notes that Olivia is sorely missed by her family and friends since her young life was tragically taken from her in a shooting last August which shocked the entire …
34 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Jun 2023)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 26
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
8th June 2023
Maria Eagle signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 8th June 2023

Park View Medical Centre

Tabled by: Ian Byrne (Labour - Liverpool, West Derby)
That this House notes with deep concern the proposed closure of the Park View Medical Centre; notes that the medical centre is located in Tuebrook in the constituency of Liverpool West Derby and also provides GP services to many constituents of Liverpool Wavertree; recognises that the medical centre has been …
22 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Jun 2023)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 20
Scottish National Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Maria Eagle's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Maria Eagle, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Maria Eagle

Thursday 10th June 2021

Maria Eagle has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

7 Bills introduced by Maria Eagle


A Bill to increase the minimum required height of guarding in multi-storey car parks; to make provision about the height of guarding in existing multi-storey car parks; to require 24 hour staffing of multi-storey car parks; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 23rd February 2024

A Bill to establish a public advocate to provide advice to, and act as data controller for, representatives of the deceased after major incidents.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 12th May 2023
(Read Debate)

A Bill to establish a public advocate to provide advice to, and act as data controller for, representatives of the deceased after major incidents.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 6th May 2022

A Bill to increase the minimum required height of guarding in multi-storey car parks; to make provision about increasing the height of guarding in existing multi-storey car parks; to require 24 hour staffing of multi-storey car parks; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 28th February 2023
(Read Debate)

A Bill to establish a public advocate to provide advice to, and act as data controller for, representatives of the deceased after major incidents.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 22nd April 2020
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to establish a public advocate to provide advice to, and act as data controller for, representatives of the deceased after major incidents.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 10th July 2019
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to introduce limits on the age of tyres on buses and coaches; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 31st October 2017
(Read Debate)

731 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6th Dec 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much his Department spent on veterans' accommodation in (a) 2019-20, (b) 2020-21, (c) 2021-22 and (d) 2022-23.

Officials from the Office for Veterans’ Affairs continue to engage with Stoll regarding the sale of Sir Oswald Stoll Mansions and the support being provided to residents during the transition period.

This Government has dedicated nearly £30m towards the provision of veteran housing. This includes £8.55m through the Reducing Veteran Homelessness Programme for veteran supported housing; the launch of Op FORTITUDE as the single referral pathway for homeless veterans and the £20m Capital Housing Fund which will increase the stock of veteran housing through the refurbishment of existing properties and the construction of new builds.

We remain committed to upholding the Armed Forces Covenant and ensuring that the UK becomes the best place in the world to be a veteran.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many applications to the Shipbuilding Credit Guarantee Scheme her Department has approved.

As of 15 December 2023, 31 enquiries about the Shipbuilding Credit Guarantee Scheme have been received since its launch in July 2023. No transactions have yet proceeded to approval stage although discussions with lenders, yards and buyers remain ongoing.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many applications to the Shipbuilding Credit Guarantee Scheme her Department has received.

As of 15 December 2023, 31 enquiries about the Shipbuilding Credit Guarantee Scheme have been received since its launch in July 2023. No transactions have yet proceeded to approval stage although discussions with lenders, yards and buyers remain ongoing.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to page 61 of the policy paper entitled Refresh to the National Shipbuilding Strategy, published on 10 March 2022, whether the market assessment of future opportunities in a range of other vessel types has been completed.

The UK green maritime sector is highly innovative with world-leading propulsion and vessel efficiency technology. Green maritime capability has been assessed as part of an export-focused internal assessment of the UK maritime supply chain.

Research has also been conducted on overseas markets to identify demand for UK green maritime capabilities. Alongside the National Shipbuilding Office and the Department for Transport, DBT maintains active dialogue with companies and industry bodies to inform its understanding of developments in this fast-growing sub-sector.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to page 61 of the policy paper entitled Refresh to the National Shipbuilding Strategy, published on 10 March 2022, whether her Department has completed the market assessment of green marine capability.

The UK green maritime sector is highly innovative with world-leading propulsion and vessel efficiency technology. Green maritime capability has been assessed as part of an export-focused internal assessment of the UK maritime supply chain.

Research has also been conducted on overseas markets to identify demand for UK green maritime capabilities. Alongside the National Shipbuilding Office and the Department for Transport, DBT maintains active dialogue with companies and industry bodies to inform its understanding of developments in this fast-growing sub-sector.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
1st Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many maritime prospects UK Defence and Security Exports was managing as of 1 December 2023.

As of 1 December 2023, UK Defence and Security Exports was managing a ten-year pipeline of over 380 maritime prospects.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
1st Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps her Department is taking to help the shipbuilding industry increase its share of the global maritime export market.

Strengthening global maritime exports is a key pillar of the National Shipbuilding Strategy. The Department for Business Trade launched the Maritime Capability Campaign Office (MCCO) within UK Defence and Security Exports in March 2022 to support this aim.

The MCCO works across government, including the National Shipbuilding Office, Ministry of Defence and UK Export Finance, and supports industry to identify and secure export opportunities through longer term market analysis and co-ordinated campaigns in both the defence and civil maritime sectors.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether (a) Ministers and (b) officials from her Department have met representatives from CK Group since 2019.

Details of Ministers' and Permanent Secretaries' meetings with external individuals and organisations are published quarterly in arrears on GOV.UK.

Published declarations include the purpose of the meeting and the names of any additional external organisations or individuals in attendance. Details are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dit-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/beis-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to support the live events industry; and if he will make a statement.

We appreciate the important role that the live events sector plays in the UK’s economy, and that the Covid-19 pandemic presents a significant challenge to the sector.

The Chancellor has announced the Winter Economy Plan to protect jobs and support businesses over the coming months, once the existing Self-Employment Income Support Scheme and Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme come to end. From November, the Jobs Support Scheme will provide further support to returning workers, while the extended Self-Employed Income Support Scheme will aid the self-employed who are currently actively trading but are facing reduced demand.

We are also offering businesses who face a drop in demand for their services and possible cash flow issues generous terms for the repayment of deferred taxes and government-backed loans, and are extending the application window of the government-backed loan schemes and continuing reduced VAT (from 20% to 5%) on concert tickets to March 2021.

We will give all businesses that borrowed under the Bounce Back Loan Scheme the option to repay their loan over a period of up to ten years. This will reduce their average monthly repayments on the loan by almost half. We also intend to allow CBILS lenders to extend the term of a loan up to ten years, providing additional flexibility for UK-based SMEs who may otherwise be unable to repay their loans.

In addition, the Secretary of State provided a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This support package will benefit the live events sector by providing support to venues and many other cultural organisations to stay open and continue operating.

Sport England have announced a £195 million package of support to help community clubs through this crisis. It recently boosted its Community Emergency Fund by a further £15 million to meet the demand, taking the total package up to £210 million.

We recognise that the live events industry and its supply chain has been severely impacted by Covid-19. We continue to meet with the stakeholders to discuss the specific issues facing the industry.

30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on financial support for the live events industry.

We appreciate the important role that the live events sector plays in the UK’s economy, and that the Covid-19 pandemic presents a significant challenge to the sector.

The Chancellor has announced the Winter Economy Plan to protect jobs and support businesses over the coming months, once the existing Self-Employment Income Support Scheme and Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme come to end. From November, the Jobs Support Scheme will provide further support to returning workers, while the extended Self-Employed Income Support Scheme will aid the self-employed who are currently actively trading but are facing reduced demand.

We are also offering businesses who face a drop in demand for their services and possible cash flow issues generous terms for the repayment of deferred taxes and government-backed loans, and are extending the application window of the government-backed loan schemes and continuing reduced VAT (from 20% to 5%) on concert tickets to March 2021.

We will give all businesses that borrowed under the Bounce Back Loan Scheme the option to repay their loan over a period of up to ten years. This will reduce their average monthly repayments on the loan by almost half. We also intend to allow CBILS lenders to extend the term of a loan up to ten years, providing additional flexibility for UK-based SMEs who may otherwise be unable to repay their loans.

In addition, the Secretary of State provided a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This support package will benefit the live events sector by providing support to venues and many other cultural organisations to stay open and continue operating.

Sport England have announced a £195 million package of support to help community clubs through this crisis. It recently boosted its Community Emergency Fund by a further £15 million to meet the demand, taking the total package up to £210 million.

We recognise that the live events industry and its supply chain has been severely impacted by Covid-19. We continue to meet with the stakeholders to discuss the specific issues facing the industry.

30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the contribution of the live events industry to the UK economy.

In 2018, the leisure events industry contributed £39 billion to the UK economy and the GVA contribution was £30.4 billion. This includes arts and cultural events, music events and festivals, and sporting and recreational events.

We appreciate the important role that the live events sector plays in the UK’s economy.

2nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to help ensure that (a) theatres, (b) arenas, (c) other live entertainment venues and (d) the events industry can safely reopen as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

We are committed to reopening creative businesses, including theatres, arenas, other live entertainment venues and the outdoor events industry, as soon as it is safe to do so.

The Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport recently set out a five stage roadmap that the government will work through to get the performing arts and live entertainment sectors back up and running as soon as possible.

The ministerially-chaired Events and Entertainment Working Group was established to support the Secretary of State’s Cultural Renewal Taskforce. It focuses on developing covid-19 secure guidance to enable the safe reopening of the performing arts, music, entertainment and outdoor events sectors.

2nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what additional support he plans to provide to organisations that provide services to the live entertainment industry and unable to resume economic activity when the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme close; and if he will make a statement.

On Sunday 5 July 2020, the Secretary of State announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of cultural and creative sectors.

We are working closely with DCMS’ Arm’s Length Bodies to develop detailed guidance indicating who can apply for the different elements of this funding. We will publish this guidance as soon as possible in July.

We are committed to reopening creative businesses, including live entertainment and outdoor events, as soon as it is safe to do so. The Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport recently set out a five stage roadmap that the government will work through to get the live entertainment and outdoor events sectors back up and running as soon as possible. The ministerially-chaired Events and Entertainment Working Group was established to support the Secretary of State’s Cultural Renewal Taskforce, and it focuses on developing covid-19 secure guidance to enable the safe reopening of the live entertainment and outdoor events sectors.

2nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has plans to provide a package of financial support for the live events and entertainment industry until that industry can trade normally again; and if he will make a statement.

DCMS is engaging with a range of departments to support the economic response to Covid-19, and ensuring that the needs of its sectors including live entertainment and outdoor events and those who work in them, are fully understood. DCMS will continue to work with these valuable sectors to understand the difficulties they face and help them access support through these challenging times and through recovery.

On Sunday 5 July 2020, the Secretary of State announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of cultural and creative sectors including some businesses operating in the night time economy.

We are working closely with DCMS’ Arm’s Length Bodies to develop guidance indicating who can apply for the different elements of this funding, and we will publish detailed guidance as soon as possible in July.

7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential impact of flu on pupils’ attendance over winter 2022-23.

Regular school attendance is important for pupils’ educational progress, their wellbeing, and their wider development.

As this is the first winter without pandemic restrictions in two years, pupils and adults may be more susceptible to the usual winter bugs and viruses this year. December saw high levels of illness in pupils and young people including flu, scarlet fever, group A streptococcus and COVID-19 that will have contributed to high levels of absence. In previous years, there has been more seasonal spread of these infections. For example, group A streptococcus usually peaks in March. More recently there have been reductions in the incidence of these infections, but it cannot yet be predicted if there will be further resurgences.

During the week commencing 12 December, the weekly illness absence rate was at its highest level since the start of 2022 autumn term. The illness absence rate was 9.1%, which was up from 7.5% in the previous week and 2.6% at the start of term. In the latest data between 6 to 10 February 2023, the total weekly illness absence rate was 3.9%.

In the 2022 autumn term, all primary school aged pupils in England were offered a flu vaccination by the NHS school-aged immunisation service to manage the spread of some winter illnesses, such as flu. The Department has also provided over 8,000 air cleaning units to schools that identified poorly ventilated spaces. These devices filter airborne respiratory aerosols from the air. The Department hopes this will have a positive impact on sickness absence going forward.

14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether schools in Garston and Halewood constituency can order additional digital devices during the January 2021 covid-19 lockdown period.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people. This includes over 750,000 laptops and tablets that have already been delivered to schools, trusts and local authorities by the end of last week.

Figures on the number of devices delivered is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/laptops-tablets-and-4g-wireless-routers-progress-data. These figures are broken down by local authority and academy trust, depending on which organisation ordered devices. Information on delivery by constituency is not available.

We announced on 12 January 2021 that we are purchasing 300,000 more laptops and tablets, bringing the total to 1.3 million. The Get Help with Technology scheme will email all schools with information on the number of additional devices allocated to them, and when they will be able to order. Devices will be available from early February 2021.

We have also partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home.

13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he will set a budget for the next phase of the Uni Connect scheme; and if he will make a statement.

The Uni Connect outreach programme operated by the Office for Student (OfS) has, since its inception in 2017, established 29 regional partnerships of universities, colleges, employers and other local partners, to provide sustained outreach to young people in schools and colleges in areas with low or unexplained gaps in higher education (HE) participation. The programme has been successful in addressing cold spots in outreach and enabling engagement from schools and colleges. Funding this programme has embedded a collaborative approach to widening access and enabled local partners to galvanise action around HE outreach to complement the funding already spent by Higher Education Providers on outreach as part of their Access and Participation Plans.

The initial investment in the Uni Connect programme to establish a collaborative model and set up a regional infrastructure comes to an end in July 2021, and so this is an appropriate time to consider the scope and objectives of the programme, including funding other areas of increasing importance for students and prospective students.

The OfS is currently consulting on the future of the programme. Whilst it has not undertaken individual discussions with Shaping Futures regarding the next phase of funding for Uni Connect, programme-wide updates have been provided to partnerships at regular meetings with the Programme Leads and Chairs.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, writes annually to the OfS, setting out the available teaching grant funding, and will issue the letter for 2021/2022 in due course.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish a Letter of Strategic Direction to the Office for Students in respect of the next phase of the Uni Connect programme; and if he will make a statement.

The Uni Connect outreach programme operated by the Office for Student (OfS) has, since its inception in 2017, established 29 regional partnerships of universities, colleges, employers and other local partners, to provide sustained outreach to young people in schools and colleges in areas with low or unexplained gaps in higher education (HE) participation. The programme has been successful in addressing cold spots in outreach and enabling engagement from schools and colleges. Funding this programme has embedded a collaborative approach to widening access and enabled local partners to galvanise action around HE outreach to complement the funding already spent by Higher Education Providers on outreach as part of their Access and Participation Plans.

The initial investment in the Uni Connect programme to establish a collaborative model and set up a regional infrastructure comes to an end in July 2021, and so this is an appropriate time to consider the scope and objectives of the programme, including funding other areas of increasing importance for students and prospective students.

The OfS is currently consulting on the future of the programme. Whilst it has not undertaken individual discussions with Shaping Futures regarding the next phase of funding for Uni Connect, programme-wide updates have been provided to partnerships at regular meetings with the Programme Leads and Chairs.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, writes annually to the OfS, setting out the available teaching grant funding, and will issue the letter for 2021/2022 in due course.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions the Office for Students has had with Shaping Futures, the Liverpool City Region arm of the Uni-Connect programme, on what budget it can expect to have for the next phase of the programme from August 2021.

The Uni Connect outreach programme operated by the Office for Student (OfS) has, since its inception in 2017, established 29 regional partnerships of universities, colleges, employers and other local partners, to provide sustained outreach to young people in schools and colleges in areas with low or unexplained gaps in higher education (HE) participation. The programme has been successful in addressing cold spots in outreach and enabling engagement from schools and colleges. Funding this programme has embedded a collaborative approach to widening access and enabled local partners to galvanise action around HE outreach to complement the funding already spent by Higher Education Providers on outreach as part of their Access and Participation Plans.

The initial investment in the Uni Connect programme to establish a collaborative model and set up a regional infrastructure comes to an end in July 2021, and so this is an appropriate time to consider the scope and objectives of the programme, including funding other areas of increasing importance for students and prospective students.

The OfS is currently consulting on the future of the programme. Whilst it has not undertaken individual discussions with Shaping Futures regarding the next phase of funding for Uni Connect, programme-wide updates have been provided to partnerships at regular meetings with the Programme Leads and Chairs.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, writes annually to the OfS, setting out the available teaching grant funding, and will issue the letter for 2021/2022 in due course.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the ability of school pupils to prepare for examinations in 2021.

Our priority is that there is a consistent approach to what is taught and will be assessed across schools. We know schools will be making every effort, including in areas where there is a high prevalence of COVID-19, to deliver high quality teaching, including through remote education. All schools are expected to plan to ensure any pupils educated at home for some of the time are given the support they need to master the curriculum and make good progress.

The changes to assessments in certain subjects that were announced by Ofqual in the summer, alongside the later starting date for exams in summer 2021, will give schools and colleges extra time to plan teaching and pupils extra time to study. Combined with our £1 billion catch-up package, including a 'Catch-Up Premium' worth a total of £650 million, these changes give young people the best chance of being ready for their exams without undermining the value of the qualifications they receive.

The Department is working with Ofqual and engaging widely with the education sector to identify any risks to examinations at a national, local, and individual student level, and to consider measures needed to address any potential disruption. This could be a student unable to sit examinations due to illness or self-isolation, or schools affected by a local COVID-19 outbreak during the examination season resulting in examination centres not being able to open. More details will be published later in the autumn.

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the ability of schools to prepare for Ofsted inspections in 2021; and if he will make a statement.

The COVID-19 outbreak has had a profound impact on schools across the country. The Department acknowledges the continued hard work of all school staff in ensuring that pupils receive a high quality education that enables them to thrive and progress whilst putting in place proportionate protective measures for children and staff.

It is important for school inspections to start up again in the new year, but at the right time and in the right way. The Department is working with schools and Ofsted to decide the best way to achieve this in a sensitive and gradual way.

The Department and Ofsted are clear that schools are not expected to prepare for Ofsted inspections.

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he has taken to amend the Education Inspection Framework for 2021 in response to the potential effect of the covid-19 outbreak on school performance.

The COVID-19 outbreak has had a profound impact on schools across the country. The Department acknowledges the continued hard work of all school staff in ensuring that pupils receive a high quality education that enables them to thrive and progress whilst putting in place proportionate protective measures for children and staff.

It is important for school inspections to start up again in the new year, but at the right time and in the right way. The Department is working with schools and Ofsted to decide the best way to achieve this in a sensitive and gradual way.

The Department and Ofsted are clear that schools are not expected to prepare for Ofsted inspections.

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the ability of pupils who are told to self-isolate to access online learning at home in circumstances where those pupils do not have access to the internet.

The Department has invested over £195 million to support access to remote education and online social care. As part of this, we have already provided over 50,000 4G wireless routers, with free data for the rest of the 2020/21 academic year; 220,000 laptops and tablets in the summer term; and over 100,000 more this term to support disadvantaged children. Departmental guidance about remote education is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/remote-education-good-practice/remote-education-good-practice.

The Department estimated the number of disadvantaged pupils without access to an internet connection using data on pupils eligible for free school meals in each school, taking into consideration estimations by Ofcom and reflecting that some pupils would already have access to a private internet connection. We know that schools and local authorities will have the best judgement of the children that need access to a device or internet connection.

We continue to provide 4G wireless routers, with free data, where schools face disruption and children need to access remote education.

In partnership with mobile network operators, the Department is providing temporary access to free additional mobile data, offering families flexibility to access the resources that they need the most.

Schools can request free mobile data uplifts for families who lack sufficient internet access until the end of the academic year via the Get Help with Technology service, when they experience disruption to face-to-face education or for clinically extremely vulnerable children. Further guidance about the Get Help with Technology service is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/get-help-with-technology-for-remote-education-during-coronavirus-covid-19.

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of fixed penalty notices for non-attendance at school on the wellbeing of households containing a clinically vulnerable adult who is shielding and a child of school age.

It is vital that pupils continue to attend school for their education, wellbeing and long term development. Time spent out of school is detrimental for children’s cognitive and academic development, particularly for disadvantaged children. The Government guidance for the opening of schools during the COVID-19 outbreak is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

Children who live with someone who is clinically extremely vulnerable, but who are not clinically extremely vulnerable themselves, should still attend school. Guidance on shielding and protecting extremely vulnerable persons from COVID-19 is available through the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19.

The usual powers to secure high levels of attendance continue to be available to schools and local authorities during the COVID-19 outbreak. It would be for either the school or the local authority to decide if they wish to use a penalty notice as a sanction. When considering the appropriate action to tackle absence, schools and local authorities should consider the individual circumstances of each pupil and family and take the best course of action to support the child’s return to school.

Schools should consider concerns from pupils, parents and households who may be reluctant or anxious about school attendance and put the right support in place to address this. Schools will be able to provide reassurance of the measures they are putting in place to reduce the risk in school.

1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to assist those who wish to deliver food aid via the EU to support Ukrainian refugees now in Eastern Europe.

Defra has been contacted by many individuals and organisations willing to generously donate their time, money and resources to helping the Ukrainian people. The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office is leading on the distribution of humanitarian aid to Ukraine.

Individuals who wish to help Ukraine are urged to donate to the Red Cross or DEC Ukraine appeals (www.dec.org.uk/). Cash donations will be more effective at enabling experienced aid workers to reach the people who need help the most, rather than donations of goods. Reputable NGOs such as these will be able to efficiently utilise existing supply chains.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average length of time is an applicant for a new HGV or PSV licence must wait to receive the licence; and if he will make a statement.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency is currently prioritising applications for vocational driving licences and has moved additional staff into this area. Applications for provisional vocational licences are being processed within the normal turnaround time of five working days.

3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the need to mitigate the effect of covid-19 quarantine measures on the aviation industry; and if he will make a statement.

The Government recognises that the aviation sector has been significantly impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic. Firms can continue to draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor, including a Bank of England scheme for firms to raise capital, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, Time to Pay flexibilities with tax bills, financial support for employees and VAT deferrals.

If businesses find themselves in severe and urgent financial difficulties, even following these unprecedented support measures, then we remain open to discussion about bespoke financial support, but only as a last resort. Any intervention would need to be on terms to protect the interests of taxpayers.

The Department for Transport works closely with HM Treasury on matters related to aviation.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he last met with representatives of (a) Liverpool John Lennon Airport and (b) other regional airports.

Ministers and officials have engaged extensively with the Aviation industry, including regional airports, throughout this crisis. We remain committed to an open engagement with the sector and continue to work with industry to establish relationships that will reflect Government’s priorities, both in terms of sharing information and giving industry the opportunity to feedback as policy develops, with the aim of helping retain jobs and return the sector to growth as soon as possible.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what meetings he has had with representatives of regional airports on the implementation of the Government's covid-19 quarantine policy; and if he will make a statement.

Ministers and officials have engaged extensively with the Aviation industry, including regional airports, throughout this crisis. We remain committed to an open engagement with the sector and continue to work with industry to establish relationships that will reflect Government’s priorities, both in terms of sharing information and giving industry the opportunity to feedback as policy develops, with the aim of helping retain jobs and return the sector to growth as soon as possible.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the number of flights that will be operated (a) into and (b) out of regional airports after the introduction of compulsory hotel based covid-19 quarantine measures on arrival into the UK.

Airlines’ schedules are subject to change at short notice and it is for that reason that we have not made a formal assessment of the number of flights that will be operated after the introduction of the new managed quarantine measures.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the need to mitigate the effect of covid-19 quarantine measures on the (a) aviation industry and (b) regional airports.

The Department for Transport works closely with HM Treasury on matters related to aviation. The Secretary of State meets regularly with his Cabinet colleagues including the Chancellor of the Exchequer, in addition to the many more meetings attended by Junior Ministers or DfT Officials to discuss and achieve the goals to mitigate the effect of COVID-19.

The Government recognises the impact COVID has had on the aviation sector, particularly in light of the continuing restrictions. Firms can continue to draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor, including a Bank of England scheme for firms to raise capital, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, Time to Pay flexibilities with tax bills, financial support for employees and VAT deferrals or the new Airport and Ground Operator Support Scheme (AGOSS).

In total, we estimate the support we have committed to provide to the air transport sector (airlines, airports and related services) through the coronavirus support package, the new AGOSS scheme and through export development guarantees, will benefit the sector by around £6.5bn.

If businesses find themselves in severe and urgent financial difficulties, even following these unprecedented support measures, then we remain open to discussion about bespoke financial support, but only as a last resort. Any intervention would need to be on terms to protect the interests of taxpayers.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to publish a recovery plan on how his Department will support regional airports to help ensure their continuing viability as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are lifted.

The government is focused on reducing the public health risks posed by community transition of COVID-19 and imported variant cases of the virus from overseas.

We are also developing a forward looking strategic framework on the recovery of the sector, which will include the government’s ongoing priority to support and strengthen regional connectivity.

The Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme (AGOSS) opened for applications on 29 January to provide support for eligible commercial airports and ground handlers in England. It will provide support up to the equivalent of their business rates liabilities in the 2020/21 financial year, subject to certain conditions and a cap per claimant of £8m.

In total, we estimate the support we have committed to provide to the overall air transport sector (airlines, airports and related services) through the coronavirus support package, the new AGOSS scheme and through export development guarantees, will benefit the sector by around £6.5bn.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to support regional airports; and if he will make a statement.

The Department recognises the severe impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on travel, and work continues to understand how best the industry can be supported at this time.

The Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme (AGOSS) opened for applications on 29 January to provide support for eligible commercial airports and ground handlers in England. It will provide support up to the equivalent of their business rates liabilities in the 2020/21 financial year, subject to certain conditions and a cap per claimant of £8m.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many meetings he has had with Ministers of the HM Treasury to discuss the aviation industry in the last three months .

The Department has been working closely with the aviation sector and HM Treasury to produce and support measures which will ensure there is sufficient capacity to protect global travel routes, continue repatriation, freight and maintain vital connectivity. The Secretary of State has met with other Ministerial colleagues including HMT Ministers sixteen times over the last three months, in addition to the many more meetings attended by Junior Ministers and DfT Officials to help achieve these goals.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the economic effect on (a) airlines and (b) airports of the 14-day quarantine restrictions for people entering the UK during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department for Transport has ensured the economic impact assessment, led by the Treasury, reflects the impacts the measures will have on the transport sector and the wider economy, and ensured specific and targeted exemptions to mitigate the impact.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Home Secretary on the financial effect on (a) the aviation sector and (b) the UK economy of the 14-day quarantine restrictions for people entering the UK during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department for Transport has ensured the economic impact assessment, led by the Treasury, reflects the impacts the measures will have on the transport sector and the wider economy, and ensured specific and targeted exemptions to mitigate the impact.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what consultations his Department has undertaken with representatives of (a) Eurostar and the (b) airlines, (c) ferries, (d) ports and (e) airports industries on the implementation of the 14-day quarantine restrictions for people entering the UK during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has worked closely and extensively with representatives of Eurostar, airlines, airports, ferries, and ports throughout this process. This has included identifying applicable exemptions from the self-isolation requirements.

25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to respond to the correspondence of 13 January 2020 from the hon. Member for Garston and Halewood on the Tyred campaign to ban dangerous old tyres from UK roads.

The Roads Minister has recently responded on this issue.

13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to ban tyres aged 10 years and over on (a) public service vehicles, (b) HGVs and (c) other vehicles; and if he will make a statement.

The previous Government announced its intention to bring forward legislation to ban the use of tyres aged 10 years and over on HGVs, heavy trailers, buses, coaches and minibuses in February 2019. A statutory consultation on legislative proposals, which concluded on 1 September 2019, received more than 1100 responses reflecting a wide variety of views.

The Government is committed to improving road safety. The Department for Transport is analysing the consultation responses and finalising the regulatory impact assessment. We expect to publish the conclusions of the consultation this Spring.

13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to publish the response to his Department's consultation, entitled Banning tyres 10 years and older, published in June 2019.

The previous Government announced its intention to bring forward legislation to ban the use of tyres aged 10 years and over on HGVs, heavy trailers, buses, coaches and minibuses in February 2019. A statutory consultation on legislative proposals, which concluded on 1 September 2019, received more than 1100 responses reflecting a wide variety of views.

The Government is committed to improving road safety. The Department for Transport is analysing the consultation responses and finalising the regulatory impact assessment. We expect to publish the conclusions of the consultation this Spring.

13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the outcome is of his Department's consultation, entitled Banning tyres aged 10 years or older, published in June 2019 on public service vehicles and other vehicles; and if he will make a statement.

The previous Government announced its intention to bring forward legislation to ban the use of tyres aged 10 years and over on HGVs, heavy trailers, buses, coaches and minibuses in February 2019. A statutory consultation on legislative proposals, which concluded on 1 September 2019, received more than 1100 responses reflecting a wide variety of views.

The Government is committed to improving road safety. The Department for Transport is analysing the consultation responses and finalising the regulatory impact assessment. We expect to publish the conclusions of the consultation this Spring.

14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether it is her policy to use digital by default when contacting universal credit recipients; and if she will make a statement.

It is not the Department’s policy to use digital methods by default when contacting all Universal Credit recipients.

We have a number of methods to support us in communicating with claimants. When making an initial application for Universal Credit, individuals are able to opt for their preferred contact method.

Work coaches and claimants can also use Universal Credit online journals to communicate, unless it has been previously identified that this is not an option for the claimant. In these cases, the journal will be updated, however the claimant will also be contacted in a way that suits their individual needs, for example by a phone call.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how often a jobseeker on universal credit in Liverpool is required to attend a face to face interview in the job centre; and if she will make a statement.

Throughout the pandemic, Jobcentres remained open for claimants who required face-to-face support. From April, Jobcentres in England, Scotland, and Wales returned to their pre-lockdown opening hours and restarted face-to-face appointments, in accordance with government guidelines.

In line with current public health guidance, and with safety measures in place, Jobcentre Work Coaches are continuing to book face-to-face appointments for those claimants who are required to attend mandatory appointments as part of their conditions for receiving Universal Credit.

The frequency of interventions Work Coaches undertake with claimants is determined by the individual circumstances of the claimant, the duration of their claim, and the level of support required at that particular time. There is no target of face-to-face appointments a full-time Work Coach is expected to deliver in one day. Appointments are determined by the circumstances of each claimant and the type of meeting being conducted. Maintaining an effective Work Coach diary is a joint responsibility between a team leader and the Work Coach, and is managed collaboratively through regular discussion and agreement.

Our Jobcentre teams are committed to ensuring all claimants receive the best possible support to meet their individual circumstance. Jobcentre team leaders are responsible for assuring the quality services provided to individual claimants through a combination of observation of Work Coach interviews, feedback, coaching and appraisal.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has plans to issue guidance to job centres on conducting interviews online or by telephone as part of the introduction of Plan B covid-19 restrictions.

Throughout the pandemic, Jobcentres remained open for claimants who required face-to-face support. From April, Jobcentres in England, Scotland, and Wales returned to their pre-lockdown opening hours and restarted face-to-face appointments, in accordance with government guidelines.

In line with current public health guidance, and with safety measures in place, Jobcentre Work Coaches are continuing to book face-to-face appointments for those claimants who are required to attend mandatory appointments as part of their conditions for receiving Universal Credit.

The frequency of interventions Work Coaches undertake with claimants is determined by the individual circumstances of the claimant, the duration of their claim, and the level of support required at that particular time. There is no target of face-to-face appointments a full-time Work Coach is expected to deliver in one day. Appointments are determined by the circumstances of each claimant and the type of meeting being conducted. Maintaining an effective Work Coach diary is a joint responsibility between a team leader and the Work Coach, and is managed collaboratively through regular discussion and agreement.

Our Jobcentre teams are committed to ensuring all claimants receive the best possible support to meet their individual circumstance. Jobcentre team leaders are responsible for assuring the quality services provided to individual claimants through a combination of observation of Work Coach interviews, feedback, coaching and appraisal.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what key performance indicators operate in job centres in respect of interviewing recipients of universal credit and other working age benefits; and if she will publish those key performance indicators.

Throughout the pandemic, Jobcentres remained open for claimants who required face-to-face support. From April, Jobcentres in England, Scotland, and Wales returned to their pre-lockdown opening hours and restarted face-to-face appointments, in accordance with government guidelines.

In line with current public health guidance, and with safety measures in place, Jobcentre Work Coaches are continuing to book face-to-face appointments for those claimants who are required to attend mandatory appointments as part of their conditions for receiving Universal Credit.

The frequency of interventions Work Coaches undertake with claimants is determined by the individual circumstances of the claimant, the duration of their claim, and the level of support required at that particular time. There is no target of face-to-face appointments a full-time Work Coach is expected to deliver in one day. Appointments are determined by the circumstances of each claimant and the type of meeting being conducted. Maintaining an effective Work Coach diary is a joint responsibility between a team leader and the Work Coach, and is managed collaboratively through regular discussion and agreement.

Our Jobcentre teams are committed to ensuring all claimants receive the best possible support to meet their individual circumstance. Jobcentre team leaders are responsible for assuring the quality services provided to individual claimants through a combination of observation of Work Coach interviews, feedback, coaching and appraisal.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether job centres (a) have targets for conducting face-to-face interviews or (b) plan to implement targets for conducting those interviews for recipients of universal credit and other working age benefits; and if she will make a statement.

Throughout the pandemic, Jobcentres remained open for claimants who required face-to-face support. From April, Jobcentres in England, Scotland, and Wales returned to their pre-lockdown opening hours and restarted face-to-face appointments, in accordance with government guidelines.

In line with current public health guidance, and with safety measures in place, Jobcentre Work Coaches are continuing to book face-to-face appointments for those claimants who are required to attend mandatory appointments as part of their conditions for receiving Universal Credit.

The frequency of interventions Work Coaches undertake with claimants is determined by the individual circumstances of the claimant, the duration of their claim, and the level of support required at that particular time. There is no target of face-to-face appointments a full-time Work Coach is expected to deliver in one day. Appointments are determined by the circumstances of each claimant and the type of meeting being conducted. Maintaining an effective Work Coach diary is a joint responsibility between a team leader and the Work Coach, and is managed collaboratively through regular discussion and agreement.

Our Jobcentre teams are committed to ensuring all claimants receive the best possible support to meet their individual circumstance. Jobcentre team leaders are responsible for assuring the quality services provided to individual claimants through a combination of observation of Work Coach interviews, feedback, coaching and appraisal.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have experienced a delay in receipt of their first payment of State Pension in each of the last three years.

This information is not collated as a matter of normal business and is only available at disproportionate cost to the Department.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what was the average length of time after retirement and entitlement to state pension by which the first payment was made to recipients in (a) 2018-19, (b) 2019-20 and (c) 2020-21.

This information is not collated as a matter of normal business and is only available at disproportionate cost to the Department.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the delays in receipt of the first payment of state pension experienced by some people retiring this year have now been ended, and if she will make a statement.

Yes. This matter was addressed during a Work and Pension Select Committee evidence session on 8 November.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of universal credit claimants did not receive their first payment within five weeks in the latest period for which data is available.

The latest available information on Universal Credit payment timeliness is published and can be found at: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit advance payments were made in (a) March and (b) April 2020.

The department published a set of supplementary management information on the number of Universal Credit Advances paid by the four advance types. It is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-credit-declarations-claims-and-advances-management-information

This management information will be updated on each Tuesday up to the end of June. Each week the release will include daily data for the time up to a week before the release date.

15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans her Department has to inform universal credit claimants that they can apply to have their historic benefit over-payment debts waived on (a) health and (b) and financial grounds.

The Department is open and transparent about our approach to benefit recovery, publishing our full Benefit Overpayment Recovery staff guide on gov.uk. Information regarding the waiver process can be found in chapter 8 of this guide. I have included a link below for your information.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/878823/benefit-overpayment-recovery-guide.pdf

In addition, when the Department informs claimants of a benefit overpayment (either by letter, or via the journal in Universal Credit), they are advised to contact the Department’s Debt Management Team to discuss repayment. During this discussion, if a claimant expresses concern about repayment, Debt Management staff will inform them that they can request a waiver be considered.

It should be noted that a waiver can only be granted where the recovery of the overpayment is causing substantial medical and/or financial hardship, and where clear evidence of this can be provided.

15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many alternative payment arrangements for payment of universal credit were made with claimants in (a) March and (b) April 2020.

This information is intended for future publication

Statistics on Alternative Payment Arrangements for March and April will be published on 11 August 2020 and can be found at https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit deductions for the over-payment of universal credit were made in (a) March and (b) and April 2020.

The data for deductions in March and April 2020 is not yet available.

From 3rd April 2020, deductions from Universal Credit for some government debt, such as Tax Credits, benefit overpayments and Social Fund Loans were suspended initially for 3 months with a review. This was done to ease the financial pressure of debt recovery on benefit claimants and to also allow Debt Management staff to be re-deployed to focus on the unprecedented volume of new claims received during the covid-19 outbreak.

5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many applications for personal independence payment were made in (a) March and (b) April 2020.

The information requested for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) new claims registrations made in March and April 2020 is not yet readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost. It is due for future publication in the PIP Quarterly Official Statistics which will be released on 11 June 2020.

5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of her Department's ability to undertake (a) work capability and (b) disability assessments remotely.

We are closely monitoring all new assessment processes to ensure they are working well for those claiming health and disability benefits, as well as providing the right level of information to allow claims to be assessed.

The department’s priority is ensuring people get their benefit payments and that we can continue to support those who need us most. We are working with all our Assessment Providers to ensure we do not place people claiming health and disability benefits at unnecessary risk. As a temporary measure, this has included suspending face-to-face assessments and introducing telephone assessments. Health Professionals continue to make recommendations based on paper-based evidence, where possible, to avoid unnecessary assessments.

5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what her timetable is for the resumption of her Department's (a) work capability and (b) disability assessments.

Assessments haven’t stopped. From 17 March we suspended face to face assessments for sickness and disability benefits for 3 months to protect vulnerable people (and assessment centre staff) from unnecessary risk of exposure to COVID-19. As always, wherever possible we will do a paper-based assessment. If further information is needed, the assessment provider may arrange a telephone assessment.

5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to implement social distancing in Jobcentre Plus branches.

DWP is committed to paying people benefits and supporting our citizens at this time.

All face to face appointments have been suspended so that jobcentres are closed to the public except for in exceptional circumstances to minimise risk to the public and staff.

Where colleagues can effectively contribute to the department’s response working from home then they are doing so. Not all colleagues can work from home because they need to access equipment, programmes and support to enable them to do their telephony and processing work.

Measures are in place to ensure compliance with social distancing, including extensive communications, both through posters displayed in the office and on the department’s Intranet advising colleagues about how to work differently to ensure social distancing can be achieved.

We have also put in place a route for staff to escalate concerns to our regional Health & Safety teams. Cleaning regimes have been enhanced to include additional targeted touchpoint cleaning.

We will continue to follow Government guidance on social distancing and reflect best practice as the current situation evolves

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether she has made an assessment of the impact of the closure of the Veterans Hearing Fund on NHS auditory services.

The Veterans' Hearing Fund was a time-limited fund set up in 2015 to provide support for veterans with noise induced hearing loss and to provide equipment not available on the National Health Service to support veterans’ wellbeing needs, such as peripheral devices to connect to televisions and telephones. This fund has now closed and there are currently no plans to re-establish it. Commissioning of general hearing services and audiology takes place at a local level, based on the needs of the local population.

The Department has not made any assessment of the effectiveness of the Veterans’ Hearing Fund, however following its closure, we have worked with NHS England to ensure that there is no gap in provision and support for those who relied on this Fund to support their clinical needs.

No discussions have been held between my Rt hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care and the Secretary of State for Defence on integrating commissioning for veteran-specific hearing treatments and equipment in the NHS. The Government has not made any assessment of the impact of the closure of the Veterans Hearing Fund on NHS auditory services.

Commissioning Services for People with Hearing Loss: A Framework for Clinical Commissioning Groups was published in July 2016. This framework supported the former clinical commissioning groups and the newly established integrated care boards in England to make informed decisions on maximising value for local populations and provide consistent, high quality, integrated care. It also addresses inequalities in access and outcomes between hearing services.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Veterans Hearing Fund.

The Veterans' Hearing Fund was a time-limited fund set up in 2015 to provide support for veterans with noise induced hearing loss and to provide equipment not available on the National Health Service to support veterans’ wellbeing needs, such as peripheral devices to connect to televisions and telephones. This fund has now closed and there are currently no plans to re-establish it. Commissioning of general hearing services and audiology takes place at a local level, based on the needs of the local population.

The Department has not made any assessment of the effectiveness of the Veterans’ Hearing Fund, however following its closure, we have worked with NHS England to ensure that there is no gap in provision and support for those who relied on this Fund to support their clinical needs.

No discussions have been held between my Rt hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care and the Secretary of State for Defence on integrating commissioning for veteran-specific hearing treatments and equipment in the NHS. The Government has not made any assessment of the impact of the closure of the Veterans Hearing Fund on NHS auditory services.

Commissioning Services for People with Hearing Loss: A Framework for Clinical Commissioning Groups was published in July 2016. This framework supported the former clinical commissioning groups and the newly established integrated care boards in England to make informed decisions on maximising value for local populations and provide consistent, high quality, integrated care. It also addresses inequalities in access and outcomes between hearing services.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has had discussions with the Secretary of State for Defence on integrating commissioning for veteran-specific hearing (a) treatments and (b) equipment in the NHS.

The Veterans' Hearing Fund was a time-limited fund set up in 2015 to provide support for veterans with noise induced hearing loss and to provide equipment not available on the National Health Service to support veterans’ wellbeing needs, such as peripheral devices to connect to televisions and telephones. This fund has now closed and there are currently no plans to re-establish it. Commissioning of general hearing services and audiology takes place at a local level, based on the needs of the local population.

The Department has not made any assessment of the effectiveness of the Veterans’ Hearing Fund, however following its closure, we have worked with NHS England to ensure that there is no gap in provision and support for those who relied on this Fund to support their clinical needs.

No discussions have been held between my Rt hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care and the Secretary of State for Defence on integrating commissioning for veteran-specific hearing treatments and equipment in the NHS. The Government has not made any assessment of the impact of the closure of the Veterans Hearing Fund on NHS auditory services.

Commissioning Services for People with Hearing Loss: A Framework for Clinical Commissioning Groups was published in July 2016. This framework supported the former clinical commissioning groups and the newly established integrated care boards in England to make informed decisions on maximising value for local populations and provide consistent, high quality, integrated care. It also addresses inequalities in access and outcomes between hearing services.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to re-establish the Veterans Hearing Fund.

The Veterans' Hearing Fund was a time-limited fund set up in 2015 to provide support for veterans with noise induced hearing loss and to provide equipment not available on the National Health Service to support veterans’ wellbeing needs, such as peripheral devices to connect to televisions and telephones. This fund has now closed and there are currently no plans to re-establish it. Commissioning of general hearing services and audiology takes place at a local level, based on the needs of the local population.

The Department has not made any assessment of the effectiveness of the Veterans’ Hearing Fund, however following its closure, we have worked with NHS England to ensure that there is no gap in provision and support for those who relied on this Fund to support their clinical needs.

No discussions have been held between my Rt hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care and the Secretary of State for Defence on integrating commissioning for veteran-specific hearing treatments and equipment in the NHS. The Government has not made any assessment of the impact of the closure of the Veterans Hearing Fund on NHS auditory services.

Commissioning Services for People with Hearing Loss: A Framework for Clinical Commissioning Groups was published in July 2016. This framework supported the former clinical commissioning groups and the newly established integrated care boards in England to make informed decisions on maximising value for local populations and provide consistent, high quality, integrated care. It also addresses inequalities in access and outcomes between hearing services.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
6th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he made an assessment of the potential merits of funding influenza vaccinations for 50 to 64 years olds; and if he will make a statement.

The Department is guided by the independent Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) on the approach to the seasonal flu vaccination programme in England. Details about the flu vaccination programme for 2023/24, including which groups will be eligible for a free vaccine and the vaccines that will be reimbursable to National Health Service providers, were published on 25 May 2023. The groups eligible for a free flu vaccine for the 2023 to 2024 season include those aged 65 years and over and those aged 6 months to under 65 years in clinical risk groups.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, eligibility for the influenza programme was temporarily extended to include all adults aged between 50 and 64 years of age to protect the population from the potential threat of cocirculation of COVID-19 and influenza and alleviate pressure on the NHS. In the JCVI’s advice for the 2023/24 programme published in November 2022, it stated that whilst there would be a health benefit in vaccinating low risk 50- to 64-year-olds, it is uncertain whether this would be cost effective, and that the overall priority should be to extend the childhood programme in secondary schools as this would be more cost effective and likely to have a greater impact on morbidity and mortality compared with vaccinating 50- to 64-year-olds. We will continue to be guided by the JCVI on eligibility for seasonal flu vaccination

Whilst there was no quantitative assessment made of additional indirect benefits to the economy of not offering flu vaccinations to 50- to 64-year-olds this year, we did take into consideration qualitative evidence including the benefits of seasonal flu vaccination on reducing winter pressures when making our overall assessment. The department will continue to be guided by JCVI advice on cost-effectiveness.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
6th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will hold discussions with the Scottish government on the reasons for which they have decided to provide influenza vaccinations to people aged between 50 and 64.

The Scottish Government is guided by the advice of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI). As a devolved power, all final policy decisions are made by the Scottish Government. Scottish Ministers wish to continue to offer an extended Seasonal Flu Immunisation Programme in 2023/24, to provide greater protection and in response to the earlier and more severe flu season experienced last winter. The United Kingdom Government remains in regular dialogue with Devolved Governments regarding public health, and works collaboratively across the UK in the provision of vaccination programmes, as evidenced during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of children aged between two and 18 years old have received the flu vaccination in each region during the 2022-23 winter period.

We do not hold the information in the format requested. Data for two and three year old children is not available in the format requested. However, it is available by local authority, grouped by National Health Service region here available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/seasonal-influenza-vaccine-uptake-in-gp-patients-monthly-data-2022-to-2023

Data for eligible at risk 17 and 18 year olds is not available in the format requested.

The following table shows the percentage vaccine uptake, number registered and number vaccinated in NHS region of all eligible school age children aged four to 16 years old.

NHS Region

Percentage vaccine uptake

Number registered

Number vaccinated

East of England

48.3

942,745

455,731

London

33.2

1,164,446

387,090

Midlands

43.4

1,511,057

655,318

North East and Yorkshire

47.1

1,147,216

540,117

North West

43.6

964,475

420,346

South East

49.3

1,304,640

643,553

South West

47.8

737,216

352,082

Source: UK Health Security Agency

Note:

Monthly data was published in February 2023 and includes all vaccinations from 1 September 2022 to 31 January 2023.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department allows private businesses to change a patient's nominated pharmacy without seeking the patients permission; if he will make statement.

The purpose of the Electronic Prescription Service (EPS) is to allow prescribers to send prescriptions electronically to a pharmacy of the patient's choice. A patient can choose to nominate a pharmacy and all prescriptions will be sent to the nominated pharmacy until the patient chooses to change or remove this nomination.

Changes to a patient nomination should only be made with the patient’s consent. Although consent does not have to be provided in writing, there must be an auditable process in place.

Patients can change their current nomination using the National Health Service app or on the NHS website. General practitioners and pharmacies can also change a patient’s nomination but only with the patient’s consent. There are instances where prescriptions can be sent to another pharmacy as a one-off nomination instead of the patient’s nominated pharmacy, but this must be done at the request of the patient.

In the event a pharmacy business changes hands as an on-going concern, NHS England asks the outgoing owners to inform their nominated patients that the pharmacy is being taken over and by whom, and to offer those patients the opportunity, during a time-limited window, to opt out of their nomination being transferred to the new owner.

Additionally, patients can choose not to nominate a pharmacy, in which case patients will receive an EPS token that includes a barcode, allowing any pharmacy with access to the EPS to retrieve the electronic prescription.

7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his officials have had discussions with NHS Digital on the switching of patients nominated pharmacies.

The purpose of the Electronic Prescription Service (EPS) is to allow prescribers to send prescriptions electronically to a pharmacy of the patient's choice. A patient can choose to nominate a pharmacy and all prescriptions will be sent to the nominated pharmacy until the patient chooses to change or remove this nomination.

Changes to a patient nomination should only be made with the patient’s consent. Although consent does not have to be provided in writing, there must be an auditable process in place.

Patients can change their current nomination using the National Health Service app or on the NHS website. General practitioners and pharmacies can also change a patient’s nomination but only with the patient’s consent. There are instances where prescriptions can be sent to another pharmacy as a one-off nomination instead of the patient’s nominated pharmacy, but this must be done at the request of the patient.

In the event a pharmacy business changes hands as an on-going concern, NHS England asks the outgoing owners to inform their nominated patients that the pharmacy is being taken over and by whom, and to offer those patients the opportunity, during a time-limited window, to opt out of their nomination being transferred to the new owner.

Additionally, patients can choose not to nominate a pharmacy, in which case patients will receive an EPS token that includes a barcode, allowing any pharmacy with access to the EPS to retrieve the electronic prescription.

7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department is taking steps to help ensure patients nominated pharmacies are not altered without the patient’s permission.

The purpose of the Electronic Prescription Service (EPS) is to allow prescribers to send prescriptions electronically to a pharmacy of the patient's choice. A patient can choose to nominate a pharmacy and all prescriptions will be sent to the nominated pharmacy until the patient chooses to change or remove this nomination.

Changes to a patient nomination should only be made with the patient’s consent. Although consent does not have to be provided in writing, there must be an auditable process in place.

Patients can change their current nomination using the National Health Service app or on the NHS website. General practitioners and pharmacies can also change a patient’s nomination but only with the patient’s consent. There are instances where prescriptions can be sent to another pharmacy as a one-off nomination instead of the patient’s nominated pharmacy, but this must be done at the request of the patient.

In the event a pharmacy business changes hands as an on-going concern, NHS England asks the outgoing owners to inform their nominated patients that the pharmacy is being taken over and by whom, and to offer those patients the opportunity, during a time-limited window, to opt out of their nomination being transferred to the new owner.

Additionally, patients can choose not to nominate a pharmacy, in which case patients will receive an EPS token that includes a barcode, allowing any pharmacy with access to the EPS to retrieve the electronic prescription.

7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department prepared an impact assessment before deciding to delay the delivery of the flu vaccine for children and adolescents until the end of January 2023.

The Department did not take a decision to delay the delivery of the flu vaccine for children and adolescents until the end of January 2023. The National Health Service commissioned School Aged Immunisation Service providers to vaccinate as many children as possible before the onset of the flu season, which typically peaks between January and March, with a priority focus on vaccinating the youngest children first from primary school age and then move to secondary school children in years seven, eight and nine.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure (a) NHS Digital and (b) NHS England are compliant with their data protection obligations; and if he will make a statement.

NHS Digital functions legally transferred to NHS England on 1 February 2023. NHS England is consequently responsible for ensuring it meets its obligations to protect people’s data. Data protection law will continue to apply. This means there must always be a valid, lawful basis for the collection and processing of personal information including special category information within federated data platforms and any other NHS England IT system, as defined under data protection legislation. Data protection impact assessments must be carried out and privacy notices published which explain what data is collected, analysed and shared and for what purposes.

NHS England must have regard to statutory guidance issued by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care under the power in section 274A of the Health and Social Care Act 2012, which sets out measures that the Secretary of State expects NHS England to take to protect confidential information. The draft guidance has been published on GOV.UK, and the finalised guidance will be published shortly, and kept under review.

NHS England is legally required to report annually to Parliament on how well it has discharged its data functions. NHS England also makes an annual Data Security and Protection submission which demonstrates how they meet data protection obligations.

1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate her Department has made of the number of cancelled operations in Garston and Halewood constituency in the past 12 months.

This information is not collected in the format requested.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate her Department has made of the number of GP practices open in Garston and Halewood constituency as of 25 October 2022; and what that number was in 2013.

In September 2013, there were 21 practices registered in Garston and Halewood. In October 2022, 19 practices were registered in this region.

Practices close for a variety of reasons, including practice mergers or retirement. A reduction in practice numbers does not indicate a reduction in the quality of care. When a practice closes, patients are informed and advised to register at another local practice of their choice. Practices and commissioners must put in place appropriate measures to ensure that affected patients have access to general practitioner services.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of trends in the level of healthy life expectancy in Garston and Halewood constituency.

No specific assessment has been made.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate her Department has made of the proportion of GP appointments in Garston and Halewood conducted face-to-face in the last 12 months; and what that number was in 2013.

This information is not collected in the format requested.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate her Department has made of the number of GP appointments in Garston and Halewood in the past 12 months; and what that number was in 2013.

This information is not collected in the format requested.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate her Department has made of the number of FTE Fully qualified GPs excluding GPs in Training Grade practicing in Garston and Halewood on 25 October 2022; and what that number was in 2013.

This information is not collected in the format requested.

24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people were diagnosed with diabetes in Garston and Halewood constituency in each of the last five years.

The following table shows the number of people that were diagnosed with diabetes in Garston and Halewood constituency in each of the calendar years from 2016 to 2020, broken down by diabetes type.

Year of diagnosis

Number of people diagnosed with diabetes

Type 1

Type 2 and Other

2016

15

420

2017

15

340

2018

15

450

2019

25

510

2020

10

295

Source: National Diabetes Audit

Notes:

  1. A person may have more than 1 diabetes diagnosis within the National Diabetes Audit. In this case, an algorithm is used to derive the best diagnosis date and diabetes type for each person. This is used in the analysis above.
  2. Disclosure control has been applied to all figures, as per the National Diabetes Audit publication – all numbers are rounded to the nearest 5, unless the number is 1 to 7, in which case it is rounded to ‘5’.
  3. Diabetes type is reported as ‘Type 1’ and ‘Type 2 and other’ within the National Diabetes Audit.
    1. ‘Type 1’ includes where a person is recorded as having Type 1 diabetes in the National Diabetes Audit.
    2. ‘Type 2 and other’ includes where a person is recorded as having Type 2 diabetes, Maturity-onset Diabetes of the Young, other or non-specified diabetes in the National Diabetes Audit.
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people were diagnosed with HIV in Garston and Halewood constituency in each of the last five years.

The information is not collected in the format requested.

24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment her Department has made of trends in the level of malnutrition in Garston and Halewood constituency.

No specific assessment has been made.

24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps her Department has taken to help tackle health inequality in Garston and Halewood constituency.

‘Our plan for patients’, published on 22 September, sets out the immediate priorities to support individuals to live healthier lives, including improving access to health and care services in all areas and preventing ill-health. Further information on measures to address health disparities will be available in due course.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities works with local system partners in Garston and Halewood to support programmes to reduce health inequalities, including providing evidence and intelligence.

24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children under the age of (a) four and (b) 11 were admitted to hospital for a tooth extraction as a result of decay in Garston and Halewood constituency in each of the last five years.

This information is not held in the format requested.

21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help support the (a) recruitment and (b) retention of GPs in Garston and Halewood constituency.

We are working with NHS England, Health Education England and the profession to increase the general practice workforce in England, including in Garston and Halewood. This includes measures to improve recruitment, address the reasons why doctors leave the profession and encourage them to return to practice.

The updated GP Contract Framework announced a number of new schemes, alongside continued support for existing recruitment and retention schemes for the general practice workforce. This includes the GP Retention Scheme, the GP Retention Fund, the National GP Induction and Refresher, the Locum Support Scheme, the New to Partnership Payment and the Supporting Mentors Scheme.

21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help support the (a) recruitment and (b) retention of midwives in Garston and Halewood constituency.

NHS England retains oversight of local workforce plans and is updated on vacancy rates. However, recruitment and retention is undertaken at trust level.

In 2022, an additional £127 million has been invested in the National Health Service maternity workforce and improving neonatal care, including in Garston and Halewood. This is in addition to the £95 million invested in 2021 to fund a further 1,200 midwives and 100 consultant obstetricians. The NHS People Plan focuses on improving the retention of NHS staff by prioritising staff health and wellbeing. In 2022/23, £45 million has been allocated to support the continuation of 40 mental health hubs, the Professional Nurse Advocates programme and expanding the NHS Practitioner Health service.

21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help support the (a) recruitment and (b) retention of mental health specialists in Garston and Halewood constituency.

The NHS Long Term Plan stated the aim of increasing the mental health workforce in England by an additional 27,000 professionals by 2023/24. NHS England and Health Education England are working with local integrated care systems, including NHS Cheshire and Merseyside Integrated Care Board, to confirm plans for service models, supply, retention and recruitment until 2024.

NHS England continues to support local systems, including NHS Cheshire and Merseyside Integrated Care Board, to develop tailored health and wellbeing offers to meet the needs of the local mental health workforce. This includes mental health hubs in each integrated care system and occupational health services which are being supported through the Growing Occupational Health and Wellbeing national programme.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of trends in the level of life expectancy in Garston and Halewood constituency.

No specific assessment has been made.

21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of trends in rates of perinatal mortality in Garston and Halewood constituency.

No specific assessment has been made. The Government’s national maternity safety ambition aims to halve the 2010 rates of stillbirths, neonatal and maternal deaths and brain injuries in babies occurring during or soon after birth, by 2025. Since 2010, the rate of stillbirths has reduced by 19.3%, the rate of neonatal mortality for babies born over 24 weeks gestational age of viability has reduced by 36% and maternal mortality has reduced by 17%.

We have introduced targeted interventions to accelerate progress, such as the Saving Babies Lives Care Bundle and the Brain Injury Reduction Programme. NHS England has also invested £127 million in National Health Service maternity workforce and improving neonatal care. This is in addition to the £95 million investment made in 2021 to fund the establishment of a further 1,200 midwifery and 100 consultant obstetrician posts. NHS England is offering funding and support to trusts to recruit an additional 300 to 500 overseas midwives in the next 12 months.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
19th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of social care capacity in Garston and Halewood constituency.

No specific assessment has been made. Local authorities have a responsibility under the Care Act 2014 to ensure that the care needs of the local population are met.

19th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) financial and (b) other steps her Department is taking to help tackle NHS workforce shortages in Garston and Halewood constituency.

The Department has commissioned NHS England to develop a long-term workforce plan. The plan will consider the number of staff and the roles required and will set out the actions and reforms needed to improve workforce supply and retention, including in Garston and Halewood.

19th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if her Department will take steps to increase the availability of face-to-face GP appointments in Garston and Halewood constituency.

On 22 September 2022, we announced ‘Our plan for patients’, which contains measures to assist people make an informed choice on their general practitioner (GP) practice, book an appointment more easily, benefit from more care options and increase the diversity of general practice teams. This aims to increase the availability of appointment types, such as face-to-face, in England, including in Garston Halewood.

NHS England’s guidance states that GP practices must provide face to face appointments and remote consultations and should respect preferences for face-to-face care unless there are good clinical reasons to the contrary.  While remote consultations can provide additional choice, flexibility and convenience for patients, this is not suitable for all patients or in all circumstances.

19th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether her Department has provided additional (a) financial and (b) other support to help tackle (i) patient backlogs and (ii) increased workloads in GP surgeries in Garston and Halewood.

The ‘Delivery plan for tackling the COVID-19 backlog of elective care’, published in February 2022, stated the ambition to reduce patient backlogs for planned National Health Service treatments and the government plans to spend more than £8bn from 2022/23 to 2024/25. We made £520 million available to expand general practice capacity during the pandemic. This was in addition to at least £1.5 billion announced in 2020 by 2024 which includes supporting increased workloads in GP surgeries, including in Garston and Halewood. In September 2022, ‘Our plan for patients’ announced measures to support GP practices increase access and manage workload such as the provision of 31,000 phone lines and freeing up funding rules to widen the types of staff that work in general practice, including in Garston and Halewood.

19th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help reduce waiting times for elective surgeries in Garston and Halewood.

The ‘Delivery plan for tackling the COVID-19 backlog of elective care’ sets out how the National Health Service will recover and expand elective services over the next three years, including in Garston and Halewood. We have allocated more than £8 billion from 2022/23 to 2024/25, in addition to the £2 billion Elective Recovery Fund and £700 million Targeted Investment Fund already made available in 2021/2022 to increase elective activity. This funding aims to deliver the equivalent of approximately nine million additional checks and procedures and 30% further elective activity by 2024/25 than pre-pandemic levels. A proportion of this funding will be invested in workforce capacity and training and we have committed to invest £5.9 billion for new beds, equipment and technology.

The target to eliminate waiting times of two years or more for elective procedures was met in July 2022 and we aim to eliminate waiting time of eighteen months or more by April 2023. This will be achieved through increasing capacity, seeking alternate capacity in other trusts or the independent sector and engaging with patients to understand choices made regarding their care.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help support young people with eating disorders in Garston and Halewood constituency.

In September we announced ‘Our Plan for Patients’, which outlines how we will increase access to National Health Service mental health and eating disorder services, including in Garston and Halewood. Making it easier to access general practice through our ABCD priorities will expand this route as a gateway to mental health care.

Through the NHS Long Term Plan, we are investing an additional £2.3 billion a year by 2023/24 to expand these services for adults, children and young people in England, including in Garston and Halewood.

We will invest approximately £1 billion in community mental health care for adults with severe mental illness, including eating disorders, by 2023/24 and an additional £53 million per year in children and young people's community eating disorder services to increase capacity in the 70 community eating disorder teams.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of NHS dentist provision in Garston and Halewood constituency.

No specific assessment has been made. In September, we announced ‘Our plan for patients’, which outlines how we will meet oral health needs and increase access to dental care, including in Garston and Halewood.

The plan includes improvements to ensure dentists are renumerated fairly for more complex work, allowing greater flexibility to reallocate resources and to utilise dentists with greater capacity to deliver National Health Service treatment, whilst enabling full use of the dental team. The plan also includes streamlining processes for overseas dentists and holding the local NHS to account for dentistry provision. In addition, Health Education England is also reforming dental education to improve the recruitment and retention of dental professionals.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help improve access to NHS dental services in Garston and Halewood constituency.

No specific assessment has been made. In September, we announced ‘Our plan for patients’, which outlines how we will meet oral health needs and increase access to dental care, including in Garston and Halewood.

The plan includes improvements to ensure dentists are renumerated fairly for more complex work, allowing greater flexibility to reallocate resources and to utilise dentists with greater capacity to deliver National Health Service treatment, whilst enabling full use of the dental team. The plan also includes streamlining processes for overseas dentists and holding the local NHS to account for dentistry provision. In addition, Health Education England is also reforming dental education to improve the recruitment and retention of dental professionals.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help improve access to mental health services in Garston and Halewood constituency.

In September we announced ‘Our Plan for Patients’, which outlines how we will increase access to National Health Service mental health and eating disorder services, including in Garston and Halewood. Making it easier to access general practice through our ABCD priorities will expand this route as a gateway to mental health care.

Through the NHS Long Term Plan, we are investing an additional £2.3 billion a year by 2023/24 to expand these services for adults, children and young people in England, including in Garston and Halewood.

We will invest approximately £1 billion in community mental health care for adults with severe mental illness, including eating disorders, by 2023/24 and an additional £53 million per year in children and young people's community eating disorder services to increase capacity in the 70 community eating disorder teams.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help increase the uptake of breast cancer screening in Garston and Halewood constituency.

The Department is working with NHS England to finalise the delivery of £10 million for breast screening units, including determining which areas will benefit from this investment.

National Health Service breast screening providers are also encouraged to work with Cancer Alliances, Primary Care Networks, NHS regional teams and the voluntary sector to promote the uptake of breast screening and ensure access to services.

22nd Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letter on behalf of a constituent from the hon. Member for Garston and Halewood of August 10 2021 on student nurse debt and the abolition of nurses and allied trades bursaries.

We responded to the hon. Member’s letter on 1 November 2021.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, on what date the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority issued an exceptional use authorisation for the use of lateral flow covid-19 testing on a daily basis at (a) Jaguar Land Rover and (b) other Government workplace pilots.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority issued an exceptional use authorisation on 23 December 2020.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he had with airline and airport representatives prior to the announcement of a policy of hotel based covid-19 quarantine from certain destinations in order to mitigate the effect of that policy on the viability of regional airports.

Over the few past weeks, Government Ministers and officials have engaged with stakeholders from across the aviation, maritime, hotel and hospitality industries and are finalising plans to implement the new scheme.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what impact assessment he has undertaken on the potential economic effect of the introduction of hotel based covid-19 quarantine measures on (a) airlines, (b) airports, (c) tourism and (d) hospitality businesses.

While the Government has not undertaken a formal impact assessment, we continue to consult widely with the travel and hospitality sector, including through the Global Travel Taskforce.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Garston and Halewood dated 8 September 2020.

We replied to the hon. Member’s letter on 20 January 2021.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implications for the Government pilot of lateral flow testing at Jaguar Land Rover and other workplaces of the MHRA's refusal to authorise the daily use of that testing in schools.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has not refused to authorise daily lateral flow testing in schools. The MHRA excluded daily testing of one type of lateral flow device which was not deployed in schools.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the MHRA authorised the use of lateral flow testing on a daily basis in workplaces such as Jaguar Land Rover which are piloting the operation of the Government's protocol in workplaces.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has issued an exceptional use authorisation to the Department, who have taken on the role of legal manufacturer. The devices deployed for daily contact testing at workplaces such as Jaguar Land Rover have received a CE mark for supervised use. As long as use of the devices is supervised, as is the case at Jaguar Land Rover, the MHRA considers their use within the CE mark and no further authorisation is required.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether it is his policy to encourage employers to require employees to disable the use of the NHS Test and Trace app at work in non-healthcare settings; and if he will make a statement.

Although there should be no requirement for employees to use the app, employers should not be preventing staff from using it if they wish to.
There are some specific scenarios when users should pause the app’s contact tracing function. For non-health and social care workers these are if the phone is stored in a locker or communal area or if the user is working behind a fixed perspex or equivalent screen.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether daily lateral flow testing following exposure to a colleague that has tested positive for covid-19 obviates the need for self-isolation for ten days.

Anyone identified as the close contact of someone who has tested positive must complete their full self-isolation period, regardless of any negative test result during this period. The incubation period for COVID-19 varies from person to person and a test taken during the self-isolation period may not therefore necessarily detect the virus.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the rapid covid-19 testing procedure agreed between (a) his Department, (b) Public Health England and (c) Jaguar Land Rover.

The standard operating procedure ‘Clinical Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for Mass Testing with Lateral Flow Antigen Testing Devices – Workplace Asymptomatic Test Site’ and terms and conditions ‘DHSC Terms and Conditions for Covid-19 Testing of Employees 1.3’ with Jaguar Land Rover are attached.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether students residing in England will be eligible for an award from the NHS Learning Support Fund if they choose to undertake a qualifying degree level course at a university in Scotland, Wales, or Northern Ireland.

The Government introduced the new, non-repayable, training grant, an extension of the Learning and Support Fund (LSF), of at least £5,000 per academic year in September 2020, for all eligible new and continuing pre-registration nursing students, studying at English universities. Continuing students on the NHS bursary are not eligible for the LSF package.

Students ordinarily resident in England choosing to study at a higher education provider in one of the devolved administrations are not eligible for the LSF. Student support arrangements for healthcare students residing in England but studying in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales are set out in detail at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/student-finance/who-qualifies#content

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the NHS Learning Support Fund is available to all (a) new and (b) continuing degree-level nursing students.

The Government introduced the new, non-repayable, training grant, an extension of the Learning and Support Fund (LSF), of at least £5,000 per academic year in September 2020, for all eligible new and continuing pre-registration nursing students, studying at English universities. Continuing students on the NHS bursary are not eligible for the LSF package.

Students ordinarily resident in England choosing to study at a higher education provider in one of the devolved administrations are not eligible for the LSF. Student support arrangements for healthcare students residing in England but studying in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales are set out in detail at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/student-finance/who-qualifies#content

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether people are eligible to receive the Test and Trace Support Payment if part of their period of self-isolation commenced before the scheme was introduced.

The National Health Service Test and Trace Support Payment was a new scheme introduced on 28 September 2020, it is only for people who are told to self-isolate on or after this date and who meet the relevant eligibility criteria.

However, an individual may wish to make enquiries with their local authority about the discretionary fund available to individuals who do not qualify for the Test and Trace Support Payment but require corresponding financial support to self-isolate.

For both the Test and Trace Support Payment and discretionary payments, eligible individuals will receive their £500 payment on top of any benefits and Statutory Sick Pay that they currently receive.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will review the eligibility criteria for Test and Trace Support Payments to include people whose Test and Trace ID Reference isolation date predates the introduction of the scheme.

The NHS Test and Trace Support Payment scheme was introduced on 28 September 2020, alongside the legal duty to self-isolate. People can apply for the Test and Trace Support Payment if they have been told to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace on or after this date and they meet the eligibility criteria. The eligibility criteria will not be changed to include people whose isolation period predates the scheme.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether people notified to self-isolate by the NHS Test and Trace app are now eligible to receive the Test and Trace Support payment.

As of 10 December, an individual notified to self-isolate by the NHS COVID-19 App because they have recently been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 is able to claim the £500 Test and Trace Support Payment, provided they meet the eligibility criteria.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to inform people who have been instructed to shield until 30 June 2020 what they are to do after that date; and if he will make a statement.

On 22 June 2020, the Department set out a series of steps to relax the shielding guidance until shielding is paused on 31 July 2020. Full details are set out in the advice to clinically extremely vulnerable people at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure NHS workers have access to covid-19 testing.

The Prime Minister has called on industry to work with the Government to urgently develop a new test to determine whether people have developed immunity. Rapid upscaling will help National Health Service and other critical public sector staff back to work as fast as possible.

With a focus on ensuring the highest priority cases are tested first, officials are working to rapidly increase the number of tests that can be conducted by Public Health England and the NHS in laboratories, with the expected surge in capacity ready within weeks.

19th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he is participating in daily EU Health Ministers conference calls; and if he will make a statement.

The United Kingdom left the European Union on 31 January 2020. As the UK is no longer a Member State, we no longer attend EU Health Ministers’ meetings. However, the UK continues to collaborate with the EU to tackle this outbreak by attending Health Security Committee meetings, sharing information through the Early Warning and Response System (EWRS) and through engaging bilaterally with the European Commission and other European and international partners.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether (a) Ministers and (b) officials from his Department have met representatives from CK Group since 2019.

The FCDO does not centrally hold any record of Ministers or officials meeting representatives from CK Group since 2019.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to facilitate the delivery of aid from those in Britain who wish to take (a) food, (b) medicine and (c) other supplies to people who have fled from Ukraine.

The UK Government advises people to donate cash through trusted charities and humanitarian partners, rather than donating goods. Unsolicited donations, although well-meaning, can obstruct supply chains and delay more urgent support from getting through. Trusted humanitarian partners are working with the Government of Ukraine and countries in the region to assess needs and delivering the assistance most required to meet those needs. It is usually more efficient for aid organisations to procure items that are required themselves, and locally, than to process, store, and distribute donated goods.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions she has had with her EU counterparts on the reduction of customs and export paperwork requirements between the UK and the EU to enable aid collected by the public to be quickly sent to Eastern countries to assist Ukrainian refugees.

The Foreign Secretary is in regular contact with EU, NATO and other international counterparts.

The UK Government advises people to donate cash through trusted charities and humanitarian partners, rather than donating goods. Unsolicited donations, although well-meaning, can obstruct supply chains and delay more urgent support from getting through. Trusted humanitarian partners are working with the Government of Ukraine and countries in the region to assess needs and deliver the assistance most required. It is usually more efficient for aid organisations to procure required items themselves, and locally, than to process, store, and distribute donated goods.

HMG will also match-fund the public's first £25 million of donations to the DEC Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal, our largest ever aid-match contribution.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when he plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Garston and Halewood of 1 April 2020 and subsequent requests for a reply in respect of her constituent.

A response was sent on 16 April 2020, and has now been resent as a courtesy.

19th Sep 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether (a) Ministers and (b) officials from his Department have met representatives from CK Group since 2019.

Details of Ministers’ and Permanent Secretaries’ meetings with external individuals and organisations are published quarterly in arrears on GOV.UK. Published declarations include the purpose of the meeting and the names of any additional external organisations or individuals in attendance.

Gareth Davies
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has introduced any exemptions to the current documentary requirements to allow the process of delivering aid to EU countries to assist Ukrainian refugees to be expedited in particular in relation to MRN numbers.

Businesses and individuals sending goods as in kind donations to assist Ukrainian refugees have to follow UK export guidance and comply with any import rules in the EU or other country that the goods are going to. UK businesses can contact the Export Support Service by phone or online for advice.

The Government understands that people in the UK want to help. The Government advises that businesses and individuals should give money through trusted charities and humanitarian aid organisations, rather than donating in kind assistance, such as blankets and clothing. Trusted humanitarian partners will be regularly assessing the need and delivering the assistance required to meet those needs. The Disasters Emergency Committee appeal can be found here: https://www.dec.org.uk/appeal/ukraine-humanitarian-appeal.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Test and Trace Support Payment is liable to income tax; and if he will make a statement.

The Test and Trace Support Payment scheme in England and equivalent support schemes in the Devolved Administrations are linked to employment, and the legislative default is that these payments are liable to income tax. This is in line with the tax treatment of other COVID-19 support payments.

HM Revenue and Customs will use existing powers to gather data from local authorities on the payments made through this scheme. This information will be used to adjust the tax codes through the employer’s PAYE scheme for employees receiving Test and Trace Support Payments.

Such payments are normally liable to National Insurance Contributions (NICs), but the UK Government has granted a NICs exemption in England to reduce the administrative burden on the local authorities making the Test and Trace Support Payments and employers.

The UK Government is working with the Devolved Administrations to extend this NICs exemption to their equivalent schemes.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether people in receipt of the Test and Trace Support Payment will have a change applied to their PAYE code as a result of that payment having been made.

The Test and Trace Support Payment scheme in England and equivalent support schemes in the Devolved Administrations are linked to employment, and the legislative default is that these payments are liable to income tax. This is in line with the tax treatment of other COVID-19 support payments.

HM Revenue and Customs will use existing powers to gather data from local authorities on the payments made through this scheme. This information will be used to adjust the tax codes through the employer’s PAYE scheme for employees receiving Test and Trace Support Payments.

Such payments are normally liable to National Insurance Contributions (NICs), but the UK Government has granted a NICs exemption in England to reduce the administrative burden on the local authorities making the Test and Trace Support Payments and employers.

The UK Government is working with the Devolved Administrations to extend this NICs exemption to their equivalent schemes.

2nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to extend the timeframe for the (a) Job Retention Scheme and (b) Self-Employment Support Scheme for industries that are unable to resume economic activities as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

After eight months of the CJRS, the scheme will close at the end of October. The SEISS will remain open for applications for the second and final grant until 19 October.

It is the case that some sectors will be affected by coronavirus for longer than others, and the Government will seek to support those sectors appropriately.

The Government will continue to engage with businesses and representative groups with the aim of ensuring that support provided is right for those sectors and for the economy as a whole.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many meetings Ministers of his Department have had with representatives of UK airports since the start covid-19 outbreak; and what the frequency of those meetings were.

Treasury Ministers and officials meet with a wide range of stakeholders across sectors as part of ongoing policy development and implementation.

Ministers and officials from the Department for Transport are in regular contact with airlines, airports and unions to understand the impact that COVID-19 is having on the sector and its workers.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, Whether she is taking steps to implement the recommendations of the report of the Right Reverend James Jones The Patronising Disposition of Unaccountable Power, HC 511, published in January 2017, on equality of arms at inquests and the statutory duty of candour; and if she will make a statement.

The points of learning made by Bishop James Jones in his report span a number of departments and organisations and the Home Office is coordinating the Government’s overarching response to it.

Whilst the timing of the Government’s response has been impacted by the need to avoid risk of prejudice during the Hillsborough criminal proceedings, work has been underway within the relevant departments and organisations to carefully consider and address those points of learning directed at the Government.

As with all of the points of learning in the Bishop’s report, the Government will address the points of learning related to equality of arms at inquests and the duty of candour, as part of the full response.

The Home Secretary is committed to engaging with the Hillsborough families prior to publication of the Government’s full response in due course.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to respond to the report by the Right Reverend James Jones The Patronising Disposition of Unaccountable Power, HC 511, published in January 2017; and if she will make a statement.

The points of learning made by Bishop James Jones in his report span a number of departments and organisations and the Home Office is coordinating the Government’s overarching response to it.

Whilst the timing of the Government’s response has been impacted by the need to avoid risk of prejudice during the Hillsborough criminal proceedings, work has been underway within the relevant departments and organisations to carefully consider and address those points of learning directed at the Government.

As with all of the points of learning in the Bishop’s report, the Government will address the points of learning related to equality of arms at inquests and the duty of candour, as part of the full response.

The Home Secretary is committed to engaging with the Hillsborough families prior to publication of the Government’s full response in due course.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she will respond to the correspondence of 7 November and 22 November 2022 from the hon. Member for Garston and Halewood.

A response was sent by the Minister of State for Crime, Policing and Fire on 30 November 2022.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to reinstate online accessibility to the Hillsborough archive following the ending of criminal trials; and if she will make a statement.

The Government has ensured public access to the online archive material concerning the Hillsborough Independent Panel and the Hillsborough Inquests which has been available via The National Archives website since January 2022. The archived websites are available on the following links:

https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ukgwa/+/panel.hillsborough.independent.gov.uk/ ;

https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ukgwa/20211203190624/http:/hillsborough.independent.gov.uk/ ; and

https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ukgwa/20180405140956/http://hillsboroughinquests.independent.gov.uk/

The Operation Resolve archive website has been accessible to the public since March 2022 and is available at the following link,

https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ukgwa/20220308161046/http://operationresolve.co.uk/

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to publish a Government response to the report by Bishop James Jones entitled The Patronising Disposition of Unaccountable Power.

The Home Office is coordinating the Government’s overarching response to the Bishop’s report on the experiences of the Hillsborough families, and has been working closely with its partners in the relevant government departments and organisations to carefully consider all of the points of learning in it.

We are committed to responding to the Bishop's report as soon as practicable, and will engage with the families during the process.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q112 of the oral evidence given by David Williams to the Public Accounts Committee on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what steps he is taking to increase access to semiconductors.

His Majesty's Government is actively and continuously assessing the national security implications around semiconductor supply chains and this forms a part of our strategy both domestically and internationally, working with Allies. Additionally, the MOD is working with industry through the Defence Suppliers Forum to determine potential actions to mitigate defence supply chain risks, particularly relating to semiconductors.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q110 of the oral evidence given by David Williams to the Public Accounts Committee on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what the total value is for each of the contracts with Fujitsu.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 15 January 2024 to Question 8351, on the duration and value of the Ministry of Defence’s contracts with Fujitsu.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q110 of the oral evidence given by David Williams to the Public Accounts Committee on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what the duration is for each of the contracts with Fujitsu.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 15 January 2024 to Question 8351, on the duration and value of the Ministry of Defence’s contracts with Fujitsu.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on when the 2.5% of GDP target for defence spending will be achieved.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 23 November to Question 2090 and to the reply given on the 27 November 2023 to the right hon. Member for Wentworth and Deane (Mr John Healey) in response to Question 3090.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q128 of the oral evidence given by the Chief Executive, Defence Equipment and Support, to the Public Accounts Committee on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what steps he is taking to increase the number of master welders in defence manufacturing.

It is generally the responsibility of industry to develop and employ the skilled workforce they need to win and deliver Defence contracts. However, as identified in the Defence and Security Industrial Strategy (DSIS) and more recently the Defence Command Paper Refresh (DCPR), the Ministry of Defence (MOD) recognises that it can help industry by being as transparent as possible about future requirements, thereby providing confidence for workforce planning and investment. To this end, the Department publishes its future pipeline of work via the Equipment Plan, Defence Capability Framework, Acquisition Pipelines, and sector strategies such as the National Shipbuilding Strategy and the Land Industrial Strategy.

The MOD is engaged with the Engineering Council and with the Professional Engineering Institutes, including The Welding Institute, to enhance Defence's reputation as a lead employer for Professional Registration. The Head of Profession for Defence Engineering is engaged with the Defence Suppliers Forum and Defence Equipment and Support to consider the career proposition for young technicians and engineers within the defence sector. The Defence Engineering Profession is also working alongside the Professional Engineering Institutes to further standardise the recognition of training and engineering skills.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q122 of the oral evidence by David Williams to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what support senior responsible owners are receiving from (a) programme directors and (b) Defence Equipment and Support.

The Senior Responsible Owner (SRO) is supported by a Programme Director who is accountable to the SRO. The Programme Director has delegated responsibility for the day-to-day management of the programme to deliver the desired outcomes and outputs and realise the required benefits, within agreed time, cost and quality constraints. This includes establishing the programme governance framework and ensuring the team is resourced with suitably qualified and experienced people throughout the programme lifecycle.

As one of MOD's Enabling Organisations, Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) provides delivery services to SROs for equipment procurement and through life support related matters. DE&S Delivery Teams act as the Contracting Authority with Industry to deliver the SRO's programme, providing expertise in many fields including Engineering, Safety, Project Management, Commercial, Finance and In-Service Support.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q116 of the oral evidence by Andy Start to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what recent discussions he has had with industry stakeholders on investments in munitions.

The Secretary of State for Defence has regular meetings with defence industry representatives to discuss investments in munitions, amongst other topics. Of particular note in this respect is his role as co-Chair of the Defence Suppliers Forum (DSF), the primary MOD-industry engagement mechanism for discussion on strategic topics.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q116 of the oral evidence by Andy Start to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what the budget for Project Hirst has been in each financial year since its establishment.

Task Force HIRST was set up in December 2023 to develop a new strategy that will build a sustained defence industrial partnership between the UK and Ukraine. The funding allocation is yet to be determined. Task Force HIRST activity to date has been funded from existing budgets for support to Ukraine, as the activity is complimentary to the objectives of those initiatives.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q111 of the oral evidence given by David Williams to the Public Accounts Committee on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what the programme of project review meetings led by non-executive directors at Defence Equipment and Support covers.

The Programme Review Committee (PRC) reviews the status, progress and management of critical programmes relating to the effective delivery of the Equipment Programme (EP) by DE&S. It focuses on areas that contribute to project performance and monitors initiatives designed to improve delivery. It monitors and reviews Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP) programmes and provides direction and guidance on how to conduct further assurance reviews where particular concerns arise. The PRC also provides early strategic advice to new programmes and advises on programme delivery improvement activities.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 8.5 on page 6 of the Defence Suppliers' Forum publication entitled Collaboration Charter, published on 22 November 2023, when he next plans to review collaborative working.

There will be an annual review of how well we are delivering on the Collaboration Charter aims. The first of which will be at the Autumn 2024 Joint Industry Study Day.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 8.3 on page 6 of the Defence Suppliers' Forum publication entitled Collaboration Charter, published on 22 November 2023, how many people from each of the companies listed as a signatory of the charter have received security clearance from his Department as of 1 February 2024.

The Ministry of Defence does not hold the information centrally. All industry participants at collaborative events and who will have access to the future collaborative system will have the required security clearances to access that information.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 7.5 of the Defence Suppliers' Forum publication entitled Collaboration Charter, published on 22 November 2023, whether data retention settings are in place to save messages from the instant messaging platform on the new system.

We are currently working on a collaboration system that meets the requirements set down in the Charter including instant messaging. We aim to deliver this via an iterative approach later this calendar year and evolve it thereafter to meet user needs.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 7.4 of the Defence Suppliers' Forum publication entitled Collaboration Charter, published on 22 November 2023, what recent estimate he has made of when the new system to standardise the ability to exchange information will be completed.

We are currently working on a collaboration system that meets the requirements set down in the Charter, we aim to deliver this via an iterative approach later this calendar year.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 7.3 of the Defence Suppliers' Forum publication entitled Collaboration Charter, published on 22 November 2023, what bespoke engagements have taken place since the establishment of the charter.

Since it was signed in November 2023 there have been numerous engagements between MOD and Industry that will be delivering the intent of the Collaboration Charter. The specific joint industry study days sighted in the Charter are planned for 22 February 2024 and 12 June 2024 and approximately every quarter from then on.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 29 January 2024 to Question 10992 on Haythornthwaite Review of Armed Forces Incentivisation, if he will detail how the £9.2 million was spent.

The specific information requested is commercial in confidence so cannot be provided at this time.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q111 of the oral evidence given by David Williams to the Public Accounts Committee on 22 January 2024, HC 451, how many Government Major Projects Portfolio review meetings took place in 2023.

A Portfolio Review of all Defence programmes contained within the Government Major Projects Portfolio is held at the end of each financial quarter. As such there were four whole of portfolio reviews in 2023. I chaired the Portfolio Review for the first time in November 2023 (quarter 2 of financial year 2023-24) and I expect to chair the quarter 3 review later this month. Such reviews are in addition to routine individual programme reviews, and assurance reviews undertaken by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority and the Department's Defence Major Programmes Portfolio Sponsor Group.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page six of the Defence Suppliers' Forum publication entitled Collaboration Charter, published on 22 November 2023, following which operations has in-service feedback been shared with industry partners since the publication of that charter.

The Collaboration Charter was only signed in November 2023 and with Industry we are working through the implementation plan. We have made progress already by establishing classified study days over the last 18 months, including one on Ukraine lessons, and by inviting industry to participate this year in our Planned Force Testing event for the first time. We have further study days planned on 22 February 2024 and 12 June 2024 and roughly every quarter thereafter where we will jointly share operational lessons and future challenges.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q113 of the oral evidence by Andy Start to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, how much and what proportion of the £560 million has been spent on enhancing the supply chain of chemicals.

£125.5 million of the £560 million has been allocated for enhancing the supply chain for energetic materials and energetic components. Of this, £21.2 million has been committed to contract (as at 5 February 2024).

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Defence Suppliers' Forum publication entitled Collaboration Charter, published on 22 November 2023, whether he plans to engage with businesses signed up to that Charter before other businesses.

The most important aspect of the MOD-Industry collaboration charter is that it provides the top- down direction to frame our relationship across all levels of the Department and with all our interactions with Industry regardless of whether they have signed the charter or not. Whilst signatories to the collaboration charter are invited to exchange information at an appropriate classification, the MOD treats all its suppliers equally and fairly in line with Government procurement rules. At the bespoke workshops there are trade body representatives to bring a wider perspective into the debates and who can then feedback appropriately to their members.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q91 of the oral evidence given by Lt General Sir Robert Magowan to the Public Accounts Committee on 22 January 2024, HC 451, when he expects the rewriting of the routine operating model to be completed.

The rewriting of the Queen Elizabeth Class Routine Operating Model is complete, subject to approval by senior military officers and Ministers.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q83 of the oral evidence given by David Williams to the Public Accounts Committee on 22 January 2024, HC 451, when he expects to (a) receive and (b) publish the report from the nuclear skills taskforce.

The Nuclear Skills Taskforce is addressing how the UK continues to build nuclear skills and address challenges across its defence and civil workforce to help the UK meet its nuclear ambition.

The Taskforce is chaired by Sir Simon Bollom KBE and includes representatives from the Ministry of Defence, Department for Energy Security and Net Zero, Department for Education, academia, professional bodies and industry partners. Since September 2023, meetings have taken place almost weekly.

As set out by the Permanent Secretary, a report setting out the Taskforce’s findings and recommendations will be presented to Ministers shortly with publication to follow in due course. It would not be appropriate for me to comment on future recruitment plans before the Government has given that report due consideration.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q83 of the oral evidence given by the Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Defence to the Public Accounts Committee on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what plans he has to recruit an extra ten thousand (a) apprentices, (b) graduate engineers and (c) people in other professions.

The Nuclear Skills Taskforce is addressing how the UK continues to build nuclear skills and address challenges across its defence and civil workforce to help the UK meet its nuclear ambition.

The Taskforce is chaired by Sir Simon Bollom KBE and includes representatives from the Ministry of Defence, Department for Energy Security and Net Zero, Department for Education, academia, professional bodies and industry partners. Since September 2023, meetings have taken place almost weekly.

As set out by the Permanent Secretary, a report setting out the Taskforce’s findings and recommendations will be presented to Ministers shortly with publication to follow in due course. It would not be appropriate for me to comment on future recruitment plans before the Government has given that report due consideration.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Nuclear Skills Taskforce.

The Nuclear Skills Taskforce is addressing how the UK continues to build nuclear skills and address challenges across its defence and civil workforce to help the UK meet its nuclear ambition.

The Taskforce is chaired by Sir Simon Bollom KBE and includes representatives from the Ministry of Defence, Department for Energy Security and Net Zero, Department for Education, academia, professional bodies and industry partners. Since September 2023, meetings have taken place almost weekly.

As set out by the Permanent Secretary, a report setting out the Taskforce’s findings and recommendations will be presented to Ministers shortly with publication to follow in due course. It would not be appropriate for me to comment on future recruitment plans before the Government has given that report due consideration.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, on what dates the Nuclear Skills Taskforce has met since its establishment.

The Nuclear Skills Taskforce is addressing how the UK continues to build nuclear skills and address challenges across its defence and civil workforce to help the UK meet its nuclear ambition.

The Taskforce is chaired by Sir Simon Bollom KBE and includes representatives from the Ministry of Defence, Department for Energy Security and Net Zero, Department for Education, academia, professional bodies and industry partners. Since September 2023, meetings have taken place almost weekly.

As set out by the Permanent Secretary, a report setting out the Taskforce’s findings and recommendations will be presented to Ministers shortly with publication to follow in due course. It would not be appropriate for me to comment on future recruitment plans before the Government has given that report due consideration.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, who sits on the Nuclear Skills Taskforce.

The Nuclear Skills Taskforce is addressing how the UK continues to build nuclear skills and address challenges across its defence and civil workforce to help the UK meet its nuclear ambition.

The Taskforce is chaired by Sir Simon Bollom KBE and includes representatives from the Ministry of Defence, Department for Energy Security and Net Zero, Department for Education, academia, professional bodies and industry partners. Since September 2023, meetings have taken place almost weekly.

As set out by the Permanent Secretary, a report setting out the Taskforce’s findings and recommendations will be presented to Ministers shortly with publication to follow in due course. It would not be appropriate for me to comment on future recruitment plans before the Government has given that report due consideration.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will ensure that top level budget holders in the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) Royal Air Force assess their budgets on the same basis for future Equipment Plan reports.

All Top Level Budget Holders (TLBs) already operate within the same standardised financial planning processes. The Department's operating model, where responsibility for managing the equipment plan is delegated to TLBs, acknowledges that they have different financial positions and carry a balance between capability and financial risk.

The Department is committed to reviewing the format of future equipment plan reports to ensure they remain fit for purpose.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 37 of the National Audit Office's report entitled The Equipment Plan 2023-2033, HC 315, published on 4 December 2023, what steps he is taking to improve the red rating from the Infrastructure and Projects Authority of the Future Combat Air System.

The current Future Combat Air System (FCAS) IPA rating reflects the early stage of this programme and the scale and complexity involved in the successful long-term delivery of a 6th generation fighter jet with ground-breaking technologies. The IPA recommendations have been accepted in full, and we have set out a clear roadmap with stakeholders to tackle the challenges identified within the report. FCAS is a ‘Tier A Active Programme’ for the IPA, meaning we are receiving direct support and have regular scrutiny and reporting requirements.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q62 of the oral evidence by Lt General Sir Robert Magowan to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, when he plans to make a decision on the potential cancellation of procurement contracts.

The assumptions for the Department's costs and budget over the next 10 years are uncertain, so we are developing plans for different scenarios. It would be precipitous to cancel programmes now.

To reduce the risk to value for money, the Department is monitoring levels of contractually committed spend carefully and continues to operate a robust approvals framework to ensure new commitments do not constrain our ability to reduce costs in the future or to choose to fund different capabilities.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q84 of the oral evidence given by David Williams to the Public Accounts Committee on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what the other key features of the new procurement model are.

We set out our approach to acquisition reform in the Defence Command Paper. We are putting an increased emphasis on time to delivery so that we can get capability into the hands of our Armed Forces when it is needed.

Key features of a reformed model for acquisition are expected to include: a cultural shift that puts an increased emphasis on pace; driving pace through spiral development; a closer relationship with industry; and earlier expert advice to set programmes up for success.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 37 of the National Audit Office's report entitled The Equipment Plan 2023-2033, HC 315, published on 4 December 2023, what steps he is taking to improve the red rating from the Infrastructure and Projects Authority of MODNet Evolve.

Since the last Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) review, the MODNET Evolve programme has appointed a new Senior Responsible Owner and Programme Director. The governance regime has been strengthened and is more robust, and the performance of the programme continues to improve. In accordance with the IPA’s recommendation, the programme has been brigaded into two technically independent capability streams, covering the Official and Secret security tiers.

The primary MODNET Official contract was signed in December and there is a clear, credible plan to migrate to the new supplier, and realise a 60% reduction in running costs.

The future Secret requirement is in the process of being revalidated to ensure the project meets Defence needs and has the flexibility to adapt to rapidly changing threats, technology, and evolving user need.

An IPA review is planned for April, where it is expected that the programme’s rating will improve.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q65 of the oral evidence by Lt General Sir Robert Magowan to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, when he plans to make a decision on whether to complete a midlife upgrade of the Meteor long-range air-to-air missile.

The UK, together with the five other Meteor Partner Nations, continues to assess Mid Life options for Meteor and expects to reach a formal decision on the way forward by the end of 2024.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 5 of the Defence Suppliers' Forum publication entitled Collaboration Charter, published on 22 November 2023, how many joint study days (a) have taken place and (b) are planned to take place.

To date, the Deputy Chief of Defence Staff for Military Capability has organised joint industry study days and workshops on 7 November 2022, 23 February 2023, 31 June 2023 and 14 November 23. Future dates planned are 22 February 2024 and 12 Jun 2024 and roughly every quarter from then on. There will be further engagements and workshops by the Front Line Commands as part of routine business that will also deliver the intent of the Collaboration Charter.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 37 of the National Audit Office's report entitled The Equipment Plan 2023-2033, HC 315, published on 4 December 2023, what steps he is taking to improve the red rating from the Infrastructure and Projects Authority of the Core Production Capability.

Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) delivery confidence assessments reflect a judgement at a particular point in time. They do not represent the likelihood or not of successful delivery but are a representation of the level of risk and what further mitigation may be required in order to reduce such risk.

The red rating for the Core Production Capability programme reflects its ambitious timelines. The Department is working closely with Rolls-Royce Submarines to improve delivery confidence, including by increasing production rates and improving manufacturing resilience. The IPA has confirmed the ongoing actions are appropriate.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 6 of the Defence Suppliers' Forum publication entitled Collaboration Charter, published on 22 November 2023, which training exercises has in-service feedback been shared with industry partners for since the publication of that charter.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD)-Industry charter is our first step in delivering the Defence Command Paper Refresh’s intent of building a new partnership with industry and builds on ongoing work to bring industry earlier into the capabiltiy development cycle. The charter was only signed in November 2024 and with Industry we are working through the implementation plan. We have made progress already by establishing classified workshops over the last 18 months, including one on Ukraine lessons, and by inviting industry to particate this year in our Planned Force Testing event for the first time. Going forward there will be further Head Office led quarterly classified workshops to share operational challenges and lessons. We will assess the effectiveness through engagement at the Defence Suppliers Forum and by visibly seeing a fundamentally different approach and behaviours between MOD and Industry.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 5 of the Defence Suppliers' Forum publication entitled Collaboration Charter, published on 22 November 2023, what (a) operational and (b) industry lessons (i) have taken place and (ii) are planned to take place.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD)-Industry charter is our first step in delivering the Defence Command Paper Refresh’s intent of building a new partnership with industry and builds on ongoing work to bring industry earlier into the capabiltiy development cycle. The charter was only signed in November 2024 and with Industry we are working through the implementation plan. We have made progress already by establishing classified workshops over the last 18 months, including one on Ukraine lessons, and by inviting industry to particate this year in our Planned Force Testing event for the first time. Going forward there will be further Head Office led quarterly classified workshops to share operational challenges and lessons. We will assess the effectiveness through engagement at the Defence Suppliers Forum and by visibly seeing a fundamentally different approach and behaviours between MOD and Industry.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Defence Suppliers' Forum publication entitled Collaboration Charter, published on 22 November 2023, when he plans to assess the effectiveness of that Charter.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD)-Industry charter is our first step in delivering the Defence Command Paper Refresh’s intent of building a new partnership with industry and builds on ongoing work to bring industry earlier into the capabiltiy development cycle. The charter was only signed in November 2024 and with Industry we are working through the implementation plan. We have made progress already by establishing classified workshops over the last 18 months, including one on Ukraine lessons, and by inviting industry to particate this year in our Planned Force Testing event for the first time. Going forward there will be further Head Office led quarterly classified workshops to share operational challenges and lessons. We will assess the effectiveness through engagement at the Defence Suppliers Forum and by visibly seeing a fundamentally different approach and behaviours between MOD and Industry.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 37 of the National Audit Office's report entitled The Equipment Plan 2023-2033, HC 315, published on 4 December 2023, what steps he is taking to improve the red rating from the Infrastructure and Projects Authority of Spearcap 3.

Delivery confidence assessments reflect a judgement at that particular point in time. They do not represent the likelihood or not of successful delivery but are indicative of the level of risk and what further mitigation may be required to reduce such risk.

SPEAR 3 and BS3 both have senior level engagement, along with a new 50% SRO and 100% dedicated Programme Director in post; industry too, is focused on successful delivery of the programmes. Both programmes will both be undergoing an IPA review later this month.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 37 of the National Audit Office's report entitled The Equipment Plan 2023-2033, HC 315, published on 4 December 2023, what steps he is taking to improve the red rating from the Infrastructure and Projects Authority of Brimstone 3.

Delivery confidence assessments reflect a judgement at that particular point in time. They do not represent the likelihood or not of successful delivery but are indicative of the level of risk and what further mitigation may be required to reduce such risk.

SPEAR 3 and BS3 both have senior level engagement, along with a new 50% SRO and 100% dedicated Programme Director in post; industry too, is focused on successful delivery of the programmes. Both programmes will both be undergoing an IPA review later this month.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will make a comparative assessment of difficulties in recruitment to each of the armed forces.

The current level of Armed Forces recruitment is lower than we would wish, a challenge we face in common with our allies. Each of the single Services within the UK Armed Forces face the same difficulties in what is a particularly challenging and competitive recruitment environment. Defence and the single Services are working together to address these challenges collectively through a range of initiatives.

A number of short-term deliverables are being actioned to increasing the inflow into Armed Forces pipelines, all intended to increase the breadth of potential candidates and to drive efficiencies into recruitment systems. These ongoing and new initiatives are focused upon engaging the broad range of skills, experience and diversity needed to deliver that which our nation demands of our Armed Forces; and in the range of roles that are critical to enable this.

In June 2023 we committed to implementing the recommendations of the Haythornthwaite Review, a generational independent review of how we retain our current people and attract new ones. Its recommendations relate to policies and processes across a complex system of incentivisation and support. A formal Government Response, which will provide more detail on our approach to tackling each recommendation, will be published in early 2024. This will confirm which recommendations have been - or are in the process of being – delivered.

Other initiatives aimed at improving the recruitment and retention of our people include; Flexible Service, which introduces the potential for people to alter their career commitment for set periods of time, allowing more people to remain in the Armed Forces who may otherwise have decided to leave in order to meet competing demands and responsibilities; Wraparound Childcare, which Defence established in recognition of the importance of a robust childcare support system to enable the mobility, recruitment and retention of a Armed Forces personnel; acceptance of the Armed Forces’ Pay Review Body’s and Senior Salaries Review Body’s recommendations in full, ensuring that the overall remuneration package for Service personnel (which includes a good pension, subsidised accommodation, and a range of allowances on top of basic salary) remains competitive.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q33 of the oral evidence given to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what changes he is considering to his Department's procurement process.

We set out our approach to acquisition reform in the Defence Command Paper. We are putting an increased emphasis on time to delivery so that we can get capability into the hands of our Armed Forces when it is needed. We will prioritise timely delivery over perfection, increasing the use of spiral development to drive pace and adapt to the rapidly changing environment.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the Minister for Defence Procurement has met UK Steel since his appointment.

Ministry of Defence Ministers and officials have regular meetings with counterparts in other Government Departments on a range of matters including industry and the defence supply chain.

In regard of meetings with UK Steel, I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 14 November 2023 to Question number 1039.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he has met representatives of UK steel since his appointment.

Ministry of Defence Ministers and officials have regular meetings with counterparts in other Government Departments on a range of matters including industry and the defence supply chain.

In regard of meetings with UK Steel, I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 14 November 2023 to Question number 1039.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether (a) he and (b) other Ministers in his Department have had discussions with the Secretary of State for Business and Trade on the closure of the Port Talbot blast furnaces by Tata steel.

Ministry of Defence Ministers and officials have regular meetings with counterparts in other Government Departments on a range of matters including industry and the defence supply chain.

In regard of meetings with UK Steel, I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 14 November 2023 to Question number 1039.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of the closure of Port Talbot blast furnaces on the timetable of his Department's procurement contracts.

Tata Steel’s plans to cease UK primary steel production at its Port Talbot steelworks are not anticipated to adversely impact defence. Specialist steels that are unavailable from UK sources are already sourced by our prime contractors from overseas suppliers. Other grades of steel are likely to remain available from UK sources or are widely available on world markets.

Ministers across Government, including myself, continue to work closely with our suppliers to ensure that we have the capability to procure the steel required for the UK’s national security and defence programmes.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he has made an assessment of the potential impact of the closure of the Port Talbot blast furnaces on defence capability.

Tata Steel’s plans to cease UK primary steel production at its Port Talbot steelworks are not anticipated to adversely impact defence. Specialist steels that are unavailable from UK sources are already sourced by our prime contractors from overseas suppliers. Other grades of steel are likely to remain available from UK sources or are widely available on world markets.

Ministers across Government, including myself, continue to work closely with our suppliers to ensure that we have the capability to procure the steel required for the UK’s national security and defence programmes.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q14 of the oral evidence given to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, when he plans to complete the force design process.

The iterative force design process is being used to inform decisions today and to provide evidence on our military capability priorities ahead of the next Spending Review.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q16 of the oral evidence given to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, what steps his Department is taking to invest more in munitions stockpiles.

Weapons stockpile levels and requirements are kept under constant review balancing current holdings against threats, availability, industrial capacity and evolving technology. The Defence Command Paper 2023 announced that the Ministry of Defence (MOD) would spend an additional £2.5 billion on munitions in addition to the Government’s provision of £560 million over two years to build our munitions stockpiles and a £1.9 billion over two years for investment in wider readiness and resilience. The MOD is developing a munitions strategy to ensure that we hold sufficient munitions with a suitable industrial base to support our, and our allies requirements.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q21 of the oral evidence given to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, when his Department plans to introduce inflation-linked contracts in defence procurement competitions.

The Ministry of Defence already uses inflation-linked contracts in defence procurement competitions.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he has taken to help resolve industrial action at the Atomics Weapons Establishment.

As an arm's-length body of the Ministry of Defence, AWE plc (the Atomic Weapons Establishment) is responsible for pay negotiations with its employees. The AWE offer remains on the table and they will continue to seek a resolution.

It would not be appropriate to comment on the specific terms of the pay mandate agreed with the AWE while negotiations are ongoing with their recognised trade unions.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what budget was provided to the Atomic Weapons Establishment to enable the negotiated settlement of the 2023 pay disputes.

As an arm's-length body of the Ministry of Defence, AWE plc (the Atomic Weapons Establishment) is responsible for pay negotiations with its employees. The AWE offer remains on the table and they will continue to seek a resolution.

It would not be appropriate to comment on the specific terms of the pay mandate agreed with the AWE while negotiations are ongoing with their recognised trade unions.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q57 of the oral evidence given to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, when he expects the planning round to be completed.

The planning round is scheduled to finish by the end of April 2024.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 4 December 2023 to Question 4065 on Ministry of Defence: Consultants, when he plans to send the letter to the Rt Hon. Member for Garston and Halewood.

I responded to the right hon. Member on 6 February 2024.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q33 of the oral evidence given to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, when he plans to announce changes to the procurement process within his Department.

We plan to make an announcement about a reformed model for acquisition before Easter 2024.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to Q43 of the oral evidence given to the Committee of Public Accounts on 22 January 2024, HC 451, when the maintenance period for RFA Fort Victoria will be completed.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 25 January 2024 to Question 10715 to the right hon. Member for Wentworth and Dearne (Mr Healey).

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he is taking to help reduce the number of Armed Forces personnel who are medically discharged due to hearing related (a) damage and (b) impairments.

Defence’s policy for managing noise and preventing noise induced hearing damage or impairment is set out in Joint Service Publication (JSP) 375 – Management of health and safety in Defence, chapter 25 – Noise at work.

20220909_JSP_375_Chapter_25_Noise_at_Work.pdf (publishing.service.gov.uk)

To ensure it remains compliant with legislation and aligned to best practice, JSP 375 is subject to an on-going rolling review programme. As part of this, chapter 25 was last updated in September 2022 with input from both Defence and external subject matter experts.

Chapter 25 provides clear and succinct policy statements, mapped to relevant legislation, setting out the measures to be taken to eliminate noise exposure risks or reduce them to as low as is reasonably practicable (ALARP) and tolerable. If a noise risk assessment indicates a health risk to personnel, they must be placed under suitable audiometric health surveillance.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 48 of his Department's Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, published on 20 July 2023, what the total budget was for DE&S World Environment and Safety Day.

The cost of Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) World Environment Day events was £5,814 plus VAT.

The cost of DE&S Safety Day events was £7,905 plus VAT.

In addition, Safety Day included the 'Spotlight on Safety Immersive Event' at a cost of £109,752 plus VAT. This event involved the re-enactment of a number of historic Safety incidents, videos of which continue to be used as training material underpinning all DE&S safety courses.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 48 of his Department's Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, published on 20 July 2023, what the cost to the taxpayer was of the mock health and safety prosecution trial event.

The cost of the mock health and safety prosecution trial event was £6,950 plus VAT.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 December 2023 to Question 3438 on Armed Forces Compensation Scheme: Pain, whether the tariff system within the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme allows for a separate award to be made for (a) chronic neuropathic pain, (b) chronic secondary visceral pain, (c) chronic secondary musculoskeletal pain, (d) chronic secondary headache or orofacial pain, (e) chronic postsurgical or posttraumatic pain and (f) chronic cancer-related pain where the initial injury is attributable to service but is recognised as disproportional or no longer attached to that initial injury.

The terms primary and secondary chronic pain are reflected within a new approach to pain nomenclature introduced by the 2022 World Health Organisation disease classification system (International Classification of Diseases 11 (ICD 11)). ICD 11 is not yet in widespread use in routine UK clinical practice, nor referenced in the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme (AFCS) Order, which uses the extant ICD 10.

Dependent on case specific evidence, AFCS awards have been made for pain since the introduction of AFCS in 2005. Awards for all AFCS tariff descriptors include an element for pain and suffering. Where pain is reasonably controlled with treatment of the underlying condition and AFCS entitlement criteria for that condition are met, the award covers all pain and suffering i.e. a separate standalone chronic pain diagnosis is not recognised. If, despite appropriate treatment of the accepted condition, pain remains uncontrolled, and is claimed as a separate /additional claimed condition, an award may be paid dependent on case facts.

Separate awards for the categories of secondary pain listed a-f within the question may be made in line with this approach.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 December 2023 to Question 3438 on Armed Forces Compensation Scheme: Pain, when the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme started to recognise both primary and secondary chronic pain as a condition of itself for which a separate award for injury could be made.

The terms primary and secondary chronic pain are reflected within a new approach to pain nomenclature introduced by the 2022 World Health Organisation disease classification system (International Classification of Diseases 11 (ICD 11)). ICD 11 is not yet in widespread use in routine UK clinical practice, nor referenced in the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme (AFCS) Order, which uses the extant ICD 10.

Dependent on case specific evidence, AFCS awards have been made for pain since the introduction of AFCS in 2005. Awards for all AFCS tariff descriptors include an element for pain and suffering. Where pain is reasonably controlled with treatment of the underlying condition and AFCS entitlement criteria for that condition are met, the award covers all pain and suffering i.e. a separate standalone chronic pain diagnosis is not recognised. If, despite appropriate treatment of the accepted condition, pain remains uncontrolled, and is claimed as a separate /additional claimed condition, an award may be paid dependent on case facts.

Separate awards for the categories of secondary pain listed a-f within the question may be made in line with this approach.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) budget and (b) spending was of the Independent Review of UK Government Welfare Services for Veterans.

The Independent Review of UK Government Welfare Services for veterans was jointly commissioned by the Ministry of Defence and the Office for Veterans’ Affairs in the Cabinet Office in March 2023, and did not have a specific budget allocation. The team that conducted the review over four months was made up of three civil servants on loan from other Government Departments, consisting of an independent Senior Civil Servant at Pay Band 1, and two civil servants at Grade 6.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) budget and (b) spending was of the Independent review of UK Armed Forces incentivisation.

The total budget allocated and approved for the Haythornthwaite Review of Armed Forces Incentivisation was £8.5 million. The final overall cost was £9.2 million, including VAT where applicable. This did not include pay costs which were budgeted for in existing workstreams and Defence/single Service budgets.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) budget and (b) spending was of the Independent Review into the service and experience of LGBT veterans who served prior to 2000.

The original budget for the LGBT Veterans Independent Review (not including staff costs) was £106,000, based on the Review being completed within six months. Following agreement between Lord Etherton and the Government, the Review was extended to twelve months. The actual cost amounted to £503,000.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 50 of the Defence Equipment & Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, how many people work in the Integrated Technical Services team.

The team in question was named incorrectly in the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts (ARAC) 2022-23; its correct name is the Internal Technical Support (ITS) team. This team contains 263 people. Of these, 60 work in the ITS-Security service detailed on page 50 of the ARAC.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 50 of the Defence Equipment & Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, what steps the DE&S Digital team have taken to deliver (a) internal information assurance and (b) the application of defence information assurance mechanisms across the supply chain.

The Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) Digital team follows the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 27001 international standard for information assurance. This measures the maturity of, and informs improvements to, the cyber security controls across business Information Technology systems. Through this process, DE&S is annually audited by an external body and remains certified following the most recent audit in late 2023. Observations from ISO27001 audits are included into mitigation plans which are then delivered through either an internal team of security professionals, or by industry partners on their behalf.

Security Assurance of MOD information across the supply chain is conducted as part of the Defence Cyber Protection Partnership (DCPP), a joint MOD and industry initiative to improve the protection of the defence supply chain from cyber threat. Through this process, DE&S contracts undergo a risk assessment and apply a cyber security control set proportionate to the sensitivity of the information held. DE&S Digital have an ongoing program of work to increase awareness and compliance to DCPP across the business, as well as participating in internal audits to check project compliance status so that improvements can be made where required.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 49 of the Defence Equipment & Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, when he plans that the design phase of solar installation for four of his Department's sites will be completed.

Defenfence Equipment and Support completed the design phase for the four solar installations, plus a further two, in November 2023.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 48 of the Defence Equipment & Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, whether he has established high-level environmental objectives and targets.

High level objectives to enhance the environmental performance of defence Products, Systems and Services have been established since the publication of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23. The proposed targets against those objectives remain under development.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 48 of the Defence Equipment & Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, what the conclusions of the Training Needs Analysis were.

Defence Equipment and Support identified the relatively sudden shift to 'large scale' Working From Home as a result of the C-19 pandemic may have resulted in some employees not receiving the appropriate levels of duty of care from their delivery managers which UK legislation describes and mandates. As a result, a Training Needs Analysis was carried out which established the need for additional training.

A series of measures to address this training need have been implemented, including new Health and Safety training for all employees and managers. All Occupational Health and Safety policy and guidance has been reviewed to ensure it covers both office and remote scenarios.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 48 of the Defence Equipment & Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, what weakness he has identified in delivery management oversight from staff working remotely.

Defence Equipment and Support identified the relatively sudden shift to 'large scale' Working From Home as a result of the C-19 pandemic may have resulted in some employees not receiving the appropriate levels of duty of care from their delivery managers which UK legislation describes and mandates. As a result, a Training Needs Analysis was carried out which established the need for additional training.

A series of measures to address this training need have been implemented, including new Health and Safety training for all employees and managers. All Occupational Health and Safety policy and guidance has been reviewed to ensure it covers both office and remote scenarios.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 51 of the Defence Equipment & Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, how many (a) mobile sensor and (b) communication technologies have been deployed.

There are several different capabilities that are used to ensure the security of the movement of munitions. It would not be appropriate to comment on these capabilities for reasons of safeguarding operational security.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 51 of the Defence Equipment & Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, when he plans that the new IT system PSyA are developing will be completed.

PSyA utilises the ISAbelle system, an in-house programme designed to manage the administration of International Visits, Industry Personnel Security Assurance and Facilities Security Clearance. The system has been developed in three phases;

Phase 1 - International Visits Control Office: is complete and in use.

Phase 2 - Industry Personnel Security Assurance: is on schedule to be delivered in early March 2024.

Phase 3 - Facilities Security Clearance: Full implementation is dependent on a number of factors, including changes to strategic priorities as part of DE&S transformation and is not currently scheduled. Once requirements have been assessed, delivery would take between four and six months, with ongoing system support then in place.

Until the final phase of the new information system is in place, DE&S will continue to operate the current system for managing data around the Facilities Security Clearance process.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 18 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, how much has been spent on the refurbishment of the office accommodation as of 18 January 2024.

The summarised costs of the totals spent by Defence Equipment & Support on refurbishment of office accommodation from Financial Year 2022-23 to date are shown in the table below. Please note that the figures for Financial Year (FY) 2023-24 extend only up to 31 December 2023; the accounting period for January 2024 remains open with the final figure for this month still to be finalised.

Office Accommodation Refurbishment Costs

FY2022-23

FY2023-24 (up to 31/12/23)

Total 22/23 & 23/24 Year To Date

Refurbishment costs within DE&S accounts

724,079

376,327

1,100,406

DE&S Transfers to DIO for refurbishment projects

1,169,963

1,824,105

2,994,068

Total

1,894,042

2,200,432

4,094,474

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 9 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, how many women have completed the four leadership development training programmes designed specifically for women with high potential as of 18 January 2024.

There were four initial cohorts of high potential candidates in 2022-23, totalling 28 individuals. This training was then opened up as a generic leadership offer for women, taken up by an additional 89 individuals in 2023. A breakdown of participant numbers by cohort is shown in the following table:

Cohort number

High potential or leadership programme

Number of participants

Programme dates

1

High potential

14

Feb-Jun 2022

2

High potential

14

Mar-Jun 2022

3

High potential

15

Sep 2022-Feb 2023

4

High potential

15

Oct 2022-Mar 2023

5

Leadership

15

Feb-Jun 2023

6

Leadership

15

Feb-Jun 2023

7

Leadership

15

Sep-Dec 2023

8

Leadership

15

Sep-Dec 2023

9

Leadership

15

Sep-Dec 2023

10

Leadership

14

Sep-Dec 2023

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average length of time was between notification of discharge and actual discharge for the (a) Army, (b) Navy and (c) Royal Air Force in each year since 2019.

The requested information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 18 of the Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, how many staff members have utilised the DE&S Whistleblowing and Raising a Concern Policy in each year since 2019.

The DE&S Whistleblowing and Raising a Concern Policy sets out two principal routes available to employees who wish to raise a whistleblowing concern; the central MOD Confidential Hotline and discussion with line management. Instances of whistleblowing issues raised directly with line management are not recorded centrally. Regarding the MOD Confidential hotline, between 1 January 2019 and 31 December 2023, there were 13 cases raised for DE&S. It is not possible to state how many individuals raised these cases. A breakdown of cases by year is given in the table below:

Year

No of Cases

2019

0

2020

2

2021

0

2022

2

2023

9

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 47 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, how many (a) experience sessions, (b) masterclasses and (c) communication campaigns there were to raise awareness of new policies and guidance.

In 2022-23 there were a range of safety related events to help promote a strong safety culture within Defence Equipment and Support. These included three one-day experience events, all of which were also recorded and form part of awareness training. There were 139 courses/masterclasses.

There were a series of monthly and quarterly communications to raise awareness of policies and guidance. Further to this, there were also13 Communication Safety Bulletins (SEB 034 - SEB 046) released, notifying staff of policy and guidance changes.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 40 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, what the 16 sub-targets were; and of those, which (a) were and (b) were not met.

The status of the 16 sub-targets for DE&S KPI 4.1 (Culture and Inclusion), at the end of reporting year 2022-23, is shown in the table below. Note that since the publication of these sub-targets the nomenclature of the grade Senior Admin Specialist (SAS) has changed to Senior Technical Specialist.

Targets

Status

Commercial

Increase Ethnic Minority (EM) representation at Senior Admin Specialist (SAS) – Professional II (PII) to 6.5%

Not Met

Increase female representation at Professional I (PI) – Senior Professional (SP) to 41.8%

Met

Corporate Services Group

Increase female representation at SP to be 35%

Not Met

Increase EM representation to be 6%

Not Met

Engineering

20% of Engineering new joiners to be female

Not Met

Maintain female attrition 0.5% below male rate

Not Met

Finance & Accounting

Increase disabled representation at PI - SP to 4.2%

Not Met

Increase EM representation at PI - SP to 8.4%

Met

HR

Increase EM representation to 7.5%

Met

Maintain Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Other representation at ≥3.4%

Met

Integrated Logistics

Increase female representation in PII-SP to 26.5%

Met

Increase EM representation in PII - PI to 4.9%

Not Met

Information Management & IT

Increase female representation at PII – SP to 30.5%

Met

Increase in EM representation at PII – SP to 7.1%

Met

Project Delivery

Increase female representation at PI to 30%

Not Met

Increase EM representation at PI to 4%

Not Met

DE&S uses its own grade structure and grading methodology. This utilises a broadly comparable read across to Civil Service grades, but does not confirm exact grade equivalency between DE&S and other Civil Service organisations:

DE&S Grade

Civil Service Grade

Senior Leadership Group 3 (SLG3*)

Director General (Senior Civil Service 3)

Senior Leadership Group 2 (SLG2*)

Director (Senior Civil Service 2)

Senior Leadership Group 1 (SLG1*)

Deputy Director (Senior Civil Service 1)

Senior Professional (SP)

G6

Professional I (PI)

G7

Professional II (PII)

Senior Executive Officer (SEO)

Senior Technical/Senior Specialist I (STSI)

Higher Executive Officer (HEO)

Senior Technical/Senior Specialist II (STSII)

Executive Officer (EO)

Technical/Specialist I (TSI)

Administrative Officer (AO)

Technical/Specialist II (TSII)

Administrative Assistant (AA)

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 25 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Account 2022-23, what recent progress has been made on the creation of the three control centres.

The three control centres achieved Initial Operating Capability in December 2023. These include the Defence Availability Centre, Digital Engineering Centre, Battlespace Integration Centre all hosted in an interim physical facility in MOD Abbey Wood. These are now collectively referred to as Capability Centres rather than control centres following client feedback. Further engagement with key stakeholders is ongoing to develop the future operation of the centres.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 25 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Account 2022-23, what steps he has taken to simplify and accelerate internal initiatives.

Defence Equipment and Support is taking steps to simplify and accelerate internal change initiatives to better meet the demands placed on it. DE&S is reforming its operating model. It is changing the way it resources its activities to make best use of its people and focus on Defence's priorities. It is also introducing agile delivery tools and ways of working to improve task prioritisation and reduce systemic waste.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 18 of the Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, whether the review of the DE&S operating model has been completed.

Work is currently underway on a new operating model for Defence Equipment and Support, which will improve both its internal processes and how it interfaces with Ministry of Defence, industry and allies. The design phase is in progress, which includes direct input from senior leaders from the Front Line Commands to ensure a cross-defence approach to new ways of working. The first teams to take selected projects through to test while refining the new design will be stood up in February 2024. The aim is to have the new DE&S operating model fully operational by March 2025.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 18 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, what recent progress has been made on the automation of key control processes.

Since July 2023, Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) has fully delivered robust, auditable, automated solutions in key control process areas such as declarations of interest and gifts and hospitality. It has extended the control portfolio of processes to also include digitised travel and subsistence checks and a more robust, digitally automated financial letter of delegation process. Collectively, DE&S has increased automation to allow the operation of 114 live automation processes and, to date, has delivered over 3,400,000 automated transactions, saving its workforce over 550,000 hours of automated benefit through transactional or workflow processing. Work to build on this progress is ongoing.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 18 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, how many staff members have undertaken training in forensic accounting as of 18 January 2024.

20 Defence Equipment and Support employees have undertaken training in forensic accounting as of 18 January 2024.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 18 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, whether a decision has been made on the location of the two net zero pilot sites.

The two pilot sites selected for the delivery of Net Zero are Defence Munitions Crombie and Defence Munitions Plymouth.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 15 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Project Delivery function.

The Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) Project Delivery Function is subject to frequent review and audit to ensure its effectiveness. In addition to DE&S' internal governance, MOD Head Office assures DE&S outputs with independent review and audit provided by the Government Internal Audit Agency and National Audit Office.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 11 of the Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, for which three key themes did DE&S not record a positive shift in its latest People Survey.

The three themes that did not record a positive shift in the 2022 survey were 'Leadership & Managing Change', 'Learning & Development' and 'Resources & Workload'. These three themes each kept the same scores as in the 2021 survey.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 9 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, how many sessions entitled Let’s Talk About Behaviours did (a) executives and (b) senior leaders lead in (i) 2022 and (ii) 2023.

A total of eight Executive Let's Talk About Behaviours sessions were held in 2022.

A total of 14 senior leader Let's Talk About Behaviours sessions were held in 2022, and 36 senior leader Let's Talk About Behaviours sessions were held in 2023.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 9 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, what estimate he has made of the date by which the leadership development programmes for those (a) with a declared disability and (b) from an ethnic minority will be operational.

Dates have not been confirmed, but we are anticipating that these programmes will be available in Q1 of the 2024-25 reporting year.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what proportion of Defence Equipment and Support staff were women in each year since 2019.

The below table illustrates the proportion of female civilian Defence Equipment and Support staff from 31 March 31 2019, to 31 March 2023. Historic records are not held on service personnel assigned to Defence Equipment and Support.

End of Financial Year

Female Proportion

Female Headcount

Total Headcount

2018-19

33%

3,491

10,465

2019-20

34%

3,708

10,858

2020-21

34%

3,652

10,701

2021-22

34.6%

3,718

10,743

2022-23

35.5%

3,869

10,905

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 25 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, what steps he has taken to maximise the use of professional expertise to better inform decision-making.

DE&S is one year into delivering its three year strategy, which was updated to reflect key changes in the global context. To deliver its strategy DE&S is reforming its operating model. This includes creating a DE&S Gateway, a single entry point for the military and industry into DE&S. By pooling our professional expertise, promoting engagement early in our processes, and focussing on outcomes, this Gateway will provide access to market intelligence, knowledge and experience. It will enable the Defence community to shape military requirements, develop considered options and offer more assured delivery outcomes together.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 25 of the Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, what steps he has taken to ensure DE&S are an intelligent, market-informed supplier.

DE&S is one year into delivering its three year strategy, which was updated to reflect key changes in the global context. To deliver its strategy DE&S is reforming its operating model. This includes creating a DE&S Gateway, a single entry point for the military and industry into DE&S. By pooling our professional expertise, promoting engagement early in our processes, and focussing on outcomes, this Gateway will provide access to market intelligence, knowledge and experience. It will enable the Defence community to shape military requirements, develop considered options and offer more assured delivery outcomes together.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 11 of the Defence Equipment and Support Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, what steps he has taken to encourage staff to voice concerns.

I have personally expressed the importance of ensuring staff felt able to voice concerns at a DE&S “Town Hall” meeting in November 2023.

As well as speaking to their management chain, staff have a number of formal and informal routes to raise behaviour which falls outside our values, including the MOD Helpline, the Employee Assistance Programme and in-house mediation service.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 15 January 2024 to Question 8912 on Ministry of Defence: Bullying and Harassment, how many complaints are logged on the Defence Business Services case management system as bullying and harassment.

It is taking time to determine the required information to answer the right hon. Member's Question. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 15 January 2024 to Question 8912 on Ministry of Defence: Bullying and Harassment, how many (a) bullying, (b) discrimination and (c) harassment complaints were recorded on MyHR in each year since 2019.

The below table shows the number of civilian complaints recorded as being received and resolved in each of the last five calendar years. Data from 2019-2021 is from the HRMS System. Data for 2022 and 2023 is from the MyHR System.

Complaint Type

Calendar Year

Bullying

Harassment

Discrimination

Resolved

Received

Resolved

Received

Resolved

Received

2019

21

20

26

11

Before 2022, ‘discrimination’ was not an explicitly defined category available for civilian data

2020

28

53

33

15

2021

18

76

67

4

2022

72

78

3

3

19

23

2023, up to 13 December 2023

93

56

6

6

15

6

Before 2022, ‘discrimination’ was not an explicitly defined category available for civilian data, so it is not possible to be able to say which – if any – complaints were due to Discrimination.

In the MyHR Data set, numbers are identified using the ‘Date from’ field.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has any contracts with Fujitsu.

Yes, the Department uses equipment made by Fujitsu. However, the release of details on specific equipment would prejudice national security.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 15 January 2024 to Question 8351.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department uses equipment made by Fujitsu.

Yes, the Department uses equipment made by Fujitsu. However, the release of details on specific equipment would prejudice national security.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 15 January 2024 to Question 8351.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 15 January 2024 to Question 8912 on Ministry of Defence: Bullying and Harassment, in what year each complaint on the Defence Business Services case management system as bullying and harassment was first logged.

It is taking time to determine the required information to answer the right hon. Member's Question. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 20 December 2023 to Question 6435 on Ministry of Defence: Allowances, how much his Department recovered from fraudulent claims in each financial year since 2019-20.

The total value of recoveries received from substantiated closed investigations relating to fraudulent expense claims in each financial year (FY) since 2019-20 is set out below:

FY

Total value

FY 2019-20

£32,674

FY 2020-21

£19,130

FY 2021-22

£1,528

FY 2022-23

£14,417

FY 2023-24

£7,155*

* Q1-Q3 for FY 2023-24 (31/12/2023)

Recovered monies can relate to investigations that pre-date 2019-20 due to the timeframe an investigation and recovery action can take. The recovery totals provided in the table will have been received in the timeframes stipulated.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 21 December 2023 to Question 7169 on Ministry of Defence: Allowances, what the value was of subsistence claims in each year since 2019.

The below table shows the number and value of subsistence claims for all MOD core employees, including DE&S and SDA, in the last five calendar years.

Number of claims

Total Value of claims

2019

221,057

£9,246,180

2020

83,891

£3,244,459

2021

76,805

£3,357,497

2022

133,875

£7,824,689

2023

158,065

£6,144,513

Total

673,783

£29,917,337.97

A single claim may have more than one ledger item (e.g one claim could be submitted for two meals and a gratuity), however the total cost of each individual subsistence item has been counted.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 21 December 2023 to Question 7169 on Ministry of Defence: Allowances, how many claims for subsistence were made in each year since 2019.

The below table shows the number and value of subsistence claims for all MOD core employees, including DE&S and SDA, in the last five calendar years.

Number of claims

Total Value of claims

2019

221,057

£9,246,180

2020

83,891

£3,244,459

2021

76,805

£3,357,497

2022

133,875

£7,824,689

2023

158,065

£6,144,513

Total

673,783

£29,917,337.97

A single claim may have more than one ledger item (e.g one claim could be submitted for two meals and a gratuity), however the total cost of each individual subsistence item has been counted.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 15 January 2024 to Question 5499 on Ministry of Defence: Apprentices, what steps his Department takes to monitor where apprenticeships are delivered.

Armed Forces apprenticeships are delivered across most military locations, units and training establishments. Delivery is directly linked to where Armed Forces training takes place, with on-job and consolidation training being conducted across most units, and additional training locations predicated by Service needs. Apprentices are tracked and managed, with monthly data collated centrally for oversight of the entire Armed Forces programme.

Defence records where Civil Service apprentices are based, not the locations at which their apprenticeships are delivered. Civil Service apprenticeships are delivered by different contract-winning providers, through a blend of face-to-face and remote learning methods.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 12 January 2024 to Question 7289 on Ministry of Defence: Staff, what steps his Department takes to monitor the number of diversity and inclusion (a) advisers and (b) practitioners employed by his Department.

The Diversity and Inclusion Adviser and Practitioner roles are not full-time staffed positions, rather they are people who have completed a Defence training course and are available to provide advice to our staff on an ad-hoc basis. It is not possible to estimate how many hours our staff dedicate to these voluntary roles as some advisers and practitioners are utilised more often than others.

We do not employ diversity and inclusion advisers on a full-time basis. Defence has dedicated diversity and inclusion policy staffs that provide advice and guidance to staff undertaking adviser and practitioner work in addition to their primary role. Training is available to anyone across the organisation who wishes to become an adviser or practitioner, regardless of their profession. We are therefore able to ensure that all parts of the MOD can utilise the valuable resource that these volunteers provide.

We do not centrally record the number of diversity and inclusion advisers and practitioners in the Department. This is because they are not full-time roles, rather they are voluntary duties undertaken by colleagues who want to learn more about diversity and inclusion and bring that knowledge and advice back to their teams once they have completed a skills-based training course.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 12 January 2024 to Question 7482 on Ministry of Defence: Equality, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of employing diversity and inclusion (a) advisers and (b) practitioners on a full time basis.

The Diversity and Inclusion Adviser and Practitioner roles are not full-time staffed positions, rather they are people who have completed a Defence training course and are available to provide advice to our staff on an ad-hoc basis. It is not possible to estimate how many hours our staff dedicate to these voluntary roles as some advisers and practitioners are utilised more often than others.

We do not employ diversity and inclusion advisers on a full-time basis. Defence has dedicated diversity and inclusion policy staffs that provide advice and guidance to staff undertaking adviser and practitioner work in addition to their primary role. Training is available to anyone across the organisation who wishes to become an adviser or practitioner, regardless of their profession. We are therefore able to ensure that all parts of the MOD can utilise the valuable resource that these volunteers provide.

We do not centrally record the number of diversity and inclusion advisers and practitioners in the Department. This is because they are not full-time roles, rather they are voluntary duties undertaken by colleagues who want to learn more about diversity and inclusion and bring that knowledge and advice back to their teams once they have completed a skills-based training course.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 12 January 2024 to Question 7482 on Ministry of Defence: Equality, for how many hours a week his Department expects diversity and inclusion (a) advisers and (b) practitioners to undertake their role.

The Diversity and Inclusion Adviser and Practitioner roles are not full-time staffed positions, rather they are people who have completed a Defence training course and are available to provide advice to our staff on an ad-hoc basis. It is not possible to estimate how many hours our staff dedicate to these voluntary roles as some advisers and practitioners are utilised more often than others.

We do not employ diversity and inclusion advisers on a full-time basis. Defence has dedicated diversity and inclusion policy staffs that provide advice and guidance to staff undertaking adviser and practitioner work in addition to their primary role. Training is available to anyone across the organisation who wishes to become an adviser or practitioner, regardless of their profession. We are therefore able to ensure that all parts of the MOD can utilise the valuable resource that these volunteers provide.

We do not centrally record the number of diversity and inclusion advisers and practitioners in the Department. This is because they are not full-time roles, rather they are voluntary duties undertaken by colleagues who want to learn more about diversity and inclusion and bring that knowledge and advice back to their teams once they have completed a skills-based training course.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 8 of DE&S Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, published on 20 July 2023, HC 1528, when he expects Peregrine to be operational.

Peregrine is an important capability for the Royal Navy. It is planned to enter service this summer, subject to operational availability of the ship into which it is being integrated.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 8 of DE&S Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, published on 20 July 2023, HC 1528, when he expects the remaining new generation bomb disposal and search vehicles to be delivered to the Army.

All 295 new generation bomb disposal and search vehicles are forecast to be delivered to the Army by March 2025.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with which public affairs agencies his Department has had discussions in each financial year since 2019-20.

The information requested is not held centrally and can only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 8 January 2024 to Question 7285 on Ministry of Defence: Internet, what steps his Department takes to monitor the (a) number and (b) outcome of investigations into the online behaviour of people employed in his Department.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Question. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 15 January 2024 to Question 8680 on Ministry of Defence: Bullying and Harassment, whether his Department issues guidance to officials on determining what a high number is.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave to her on 13 March 2021, to Question 8680.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 15 January 2024 to Question 8921 on Ministry of Defence: Bullying and Harassment, what steps his Department takes to monitor instances of unacceptable behaviour that result in matters being referred to the police.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to her on 15 January 2024, to Question 8921.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 15 January 2024 to Question 8908 on Ministry of Defence: Bullying and Harassment, when he plans that the review into service complaints will conclude.

The Secretary of State for Defence requested that the Chief of Defence people undertake a review of the Service Complaints system. That review is underway and the findings are expected to be reported to the Secretary of State by the end of February 2024.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 4 December 2023 entitled Update on the AUKUS Defence Partnership, HCWS89, how much his Department has spent on increasing its cyber capabilities since the announcement of the programme.

The UK Government has made a significant investment in offensive cyber capabilities, providing a £114 million increase in the National Offensive Cyber Programme as part of the £2.6 billion investment in cyber and legacy IT at the 2021 Spending Review. Within AUKUS, the three Governments are collaborating with industry partners to deploy advanced tooling which will uplift the cyber security of our supply chains, while also giving us greater insight into the threats to AUKUS. As the cyber budget is delivered through integrated programmes across multiple defence and intelligence agencies, it is not possible to disclose individual Departmental spending.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent progress he has made on cyber capabilities in the AUKUS partnership.

AUKUS partners are making good progress on advanced cyber, engaging with critical suppliers and industry partners to uplift the security of our supply chains. At the recent AUKUS Defence Ministerial Meeting in December 2023, partners agreed to work closely to further strengthen our cyber capabilities in order to protect critical communication and operations systems.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent progress his Department has made on increasing (a) innovation and (b) information sharing within the AUKUS programme.

AUKUS partners continue to progress innovation and information sharing. The AUKUS Innovation Working Group, led by the UK, leverages innovation in critical key areas, including: AUKUS Innovation Challenges; command-and-control Maritime Uncrewed Systems, the adoption of Autonomous Systems at scale; and the establishment of an industry-led AUKUS Defence Investors Network. AUKUS partners have also made significant progress on information sharing: the US National Defense Authorization Act for 2024 included significant reforms to International Trade in Arms (ITAR) and US export controls, to enable increased license-free trade and information-sharing between AUKUS nations. This was informed by extensive UK and Australian engagement and will be critical to the success of AUKUS.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) full- and (b) part-time officials are working on AUKUS pillar two.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave to Question 191500 to the right hon. Member for Wentworth and Dearne (John Healey).

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent progress he has made on artificial intelligence capabilities in the AUKUS partnership.

AUKUS partners continue to progress AI and autonomy, focusing efforts on Resilient and Autonomous Artificial Intelligence Technologies (RAAIT) to deliver artificial algorithms and machine learning to enhance force protection, precision targeting, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. In April 2023, the UK hosted a successful first demonstration of Australian, UK and US AI-enabled assets in a collaborative swarm to detect and track military targets in a representative environment in real time, with a further demonstration in South Australia in October 2023.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent progress he has made on electronic warfare capabilities in the AUKUS partnership.

AUKUS partners continue to work to develop new tools, techniques, and technology to enable our armed forces to operate in contested and degraded environments. The first trilateral AUKUS Innovation Prize Challenge, a challenge-based competition for innovators in partner nations, will focus on electronic warfare.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent progress he has made on (a) hypersonic and (b) counter-hypersonic capabilities in the AUKUS partnership.

AUKUS partners continue to progress the exchanging of information and technical data, to accelerate the development of advanced hypersonic and counter-hypersonic capabilities. We are making progress fostering deeper integration of security- and defence-related science and technology.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent progress he has made on undersea capabilities in the AUKUS partnership.

We are making good progress on developing undersea capabilities, particularly, on autonomous underwater vehicles, including the integration of our ability to launch and recover undersea vehicles from submarine torpedo tubes. This will enhance our strike and surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities, increasing the range and effectiveness of our undersea forces. Over the next year, AUKUS partners will continue to conduct trials and pursue increased interoperability of undersea systems.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent progress he has made on quantum technologies in the AUKUS partnership.

At the recent AUKUS Defence Ministerial Meeting in December 2023, AUKUS partners agreed to accelerate the development of quantum technologies for positioning, navigation, and timing in military capabilities. These capabilities will enhance our force resilience in GPS-degraded environments and enhance stealth in the undersea domain.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 4 December 2023 entitled Update on the AUKUS Defence Partnership, HCWS89, what opportunities will there be for UK industry to engage with the scaling-up of maritime capabilities.

AUKUS partners engage closely with UK industry to keep them informed on all opportunities within the partnership. Our three governments will bolster our efforts here using the AUKUS Industry Forum announced at the December AUKUS Defence Ministerial meeting, including to inform policy, technical, and commercial frameworks to facilitate further the development and delivery of advanced capabilities.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many incident logs recorded the nature of the complaint as something else not listed in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved the use of inappropriate language in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved unhelpful comments about (a) mental health and (b) being off sick in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved the disclosure of personal or sensitive information to colleagues without consent in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved being denied time off for family or caring responsibilities in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved being denied time off for personal ill health in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved being undermined in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence,with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved being (a) ignored (b) excluded or (c) marginalised in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved being treated less favourable to others in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved (a) the removal of job responsibilities (b) unconstructive criticism and (c) impossible expectations in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved negative micromanagement in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved being humiliated in front of their team or others in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved intimidation or verbal aggression in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 4 December 2023 on AUKUS Defence Partnership Update, HCWS89, what steps his Department is taking to scale up cooperation on maritime capabilities.

To scale up cooperation on maritime capabilities, AUKUS partners will execute a series of integrated trilateral maritime experiments and exercises to allow us to test and refine our ability to jointly operate uncrewed maritime systems, share and process maritime data trilaterally, and provide real-time maritime domain awareness to support decision-making.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 4 December 2023 on AUKUS Defence Partnership Update, HCWS89, how many Australian sailors have completed their training in the UK as of 11 January 2024.

No Australian sailors have completed their training yet; three officers are part of the initial RAN cohort that will graduate the Marine Engineering Submariners course (to become a nuclear supervisor) later this year.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 4 December 2023 on AUKUS Defence Partnership Update, HCWS89, how many more Australian sailors will be trained in the UK.

There are currently two Royal Australian Navy (RAN) personnel who have applied to go through the UK Nuclear General Course. With the Royal Australian Navy transitioning to Virginia class SSNs initially, in the early years more Australian sailors will be trained in the US than the UK, but the numbers in the UK can be expected to increase steadily in preparation for Australia receiving the first SSN-AUKUS in the early 2040s.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the letter sent of 21 December 2023 from the Minister of Defence People and Families on the Haythornthwaite review of armed forces incentivisation, reference 4/4/2/26/ap, what his planned timetable is for completing the design work for the first elements of the trials to explore a new total reward approach.

The design work for the first elements of the Total Reward Trial have begun. In line with the recommendations of the Haythornthwaite report, we have adopted the ‘think big, start small and scale fast’ approach. Elements of the trial will be implemented over the next 12 months using an engineering cohort. The learnings will inform further design iterations and tests which can be scaled.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the letter of 21 December 2023 from the Minister of Defence People and Families regarding the Haythornthwaite review of armed forces incentivisation, reference code 4/4/2/26/ap, when he plans to have the single recruiting service implemented.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 13 December 2023 to Question 5218 to the right hon. Member for Bournemouth East (Mr Tobias Ellwood) where I stated that the Recruiting Service will commence from January 2027.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the letter of 21 December 2023 from the Minister of Defence People and Families on the Haythornthwaite review of armed forces incentivisation, reference 4/4/2/26/ap, what his planned timetable is for fully delivering a new Pan-Defence Skills Framework.

The Pan Defence Skills Framework will be fully delivered by the end of March 2025. The process of civilian skill authoring is almost complete, with military skill authoring well underway. User trials have been conducted within test IT environments and will move onto the live IT system through the next few months. Rollout is planned to start in May 2024 and will be aligned with the training and deployment schedule of units, to cause minimal disruption and to ensure the users have a good experience with support and guidance available.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the letter of 21 December 2023 from the Minister of Defence People and Families on the Haythornthwaite review of armed forces incentivisation, reference 4/4/2/26/ap, how he plans to introduce artificial intelligence to recruiting reform.

Defence’s recruitment activity employs a wide range of processes and technology to support the attraction and selection of the best candidates. Limited use of AI is already in place to support elements of recruitment operations, such as assisting candidates with their understanding of Armed Forces employment opportunities. Further employment of technology and AI is part of the review of recruiting reform, ensuring that it can safely and securely offer support to a range of appropriate functions within Defence’s recruiting pipelines.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 4.8 on page 20 of his Department's directive entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 1: Directive - Understanding Behaviours in Defence, how many people are waiting to undertake their training as of 10 January 2024.

Between now and 31 March 2024 there are 160 places for the D&I(Practitioner) course At the time of writing there are 67 places allocated, 63 awaiting allocation and currently 30 unfilled places.

Between now and 31 March 2024 there are 140 places for the D&I(Advisor) course. At the time of writing there are 76 places allocated, four awaiting allocation and currently 60 unfilled places.

Please note that allocations are not normally made until 25 days away from delivery, so the numbers will increase as we move closer to the course start dates.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 2.13 on page 4 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of requiring informal complaints to be recorded on the (a) Joint Personnel Administration system or (b) civilian HR management system.

All informal complaints are captured anonymously through the Diversity and Inclusion Adviser log, which is a centralised online system. Currently there is no requirement to register them on the Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) human resources management systems. However, the MOD is currently undertaking a review into Service Complaints and part of that work involves looking at whether lower-level complaints can be resolved on units, but still tracked by the new Service Complaints Case Management System which is due to go live in the spring.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 2.13 on page 4 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many staff members made informal complaints to diversity and inclusion advisers in each year since 2019.

The Defence D&I adviser log captures incidents reported to Defence D&I advisers, a system that has been in place since the middle of 2021. Prior to that paper records were kept at unit level and the information would be too expensive/ require too many hours to recover.

The number of informal complaints registered by D&I advisers by year are:

  1. 2021 – 127
  2. 2022 – 401
  3. 2023 – 451
  4. 2024 - 6
Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph to paragraph 7.5 on page 15 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, on how many occasions have matters been referred to the police as a result of unacceptable behaviour in each year since 2019.

This information is not centrally held and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 19 December 2023 to Question 7281 on Defence Business Services: Bullying and Harassment, how the Defence Business Services Casework Services record complaints of (a) bullying, (b) discrimination and (c) harassment.

Formal bullying, harassment, discrimination and victimisation complaints are received via a designated email multiuser. The complaint is then logged on a case management system as 'bullying and harassment' and investigated. When a case has concluded it is then recorded on the Civilian HR System; MyHR, at the end of the process.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved spreading gossip or making false accusations in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to appendix 1 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how many incident logs recorded that the nature of the complaint involved comments about personal appearance in each year since 2019.

This information for each of the right hon. Member's Questions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 3.17 on page 7 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many complaints involved mediation in each year since 2019.

This information is not centrally held and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 4.8 on page 20 of his Department's directive entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 1: Directive - Understanding Behaviours in Defence, what estimate he has made of when the training for diversity and inclusion advisers will be (a) formalised and (b) accredited.

Paragraph 4.8 of Joint Service Publication 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 1: Directive - Understanding Behaviours in Defence is out of date and will be corrected in the next iteration of the publication.

Training for Diversity and Inclusion Advisers (and Practitioners) (D&I A, D&I P) has been formalised and accredited for a number of years. With regard to formalisation, both the Adviser and Practitioner roles in the Ministry of Defence (MOD) are formally recognised (by policy); to execute the duties of either, individuals need to be certified competent, which comes from successful completion of the associated competency-based training courses D&I A and D&I P.

The MOD’s Joint Personnel Administration system is used to accredit an individual as being a suitably qualified and experienced person, and the Chartered Management Institute also accredits both courses to Level 3 in D&I Leadership.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 5.4 on page 10 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many agency staff raised a complaint of unacceptable behaviour in each year since 2019.

This information is not centrally held and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 18 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how does his Department protect complainants from victimisation as a result of raising an issue.

Unacceptable behaviour is not tolerated in Defence, and anyone failing to meet our values and standards will be dealt with robustly. There is no place in either the Civil Service or the Armed Forces for unacceptable behaviour, including the victimisation of complainants.

Diversity and Inclusion Advisers work to ensure all personnel and employees are aware that any form of discrimination, bullying, harassment or victimisation will not be tolerated, and that any allegation of such behaviour will be properly investigated, as outlined in Joint Service Publication (JSP) 763 and JSP 831 (Redress of Individual Grievances: Service Complaints) or the formal civilian Bullying, Harassment and Discrimination complaints policy and process.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph d on page 18 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process published in June 2021, how many complainants chose to turn their informal complaint into a formal complaint in each year since 2019.

Informal complaints are handled at a local level, any records of informal complaints are not centrally held and could only be reviewed at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 7.5 on page 15 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, on how many occasions has (a) disciplinary, (b) administrative and (c) misconduct action been taken as a result of unacceptable behaviour in each year since 2019.

Informal complaints are handled at a local level, any records of informal complaints are not centrally held and could only be reviewed at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 7.4 on page 15 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many informal complaints resulted in the situation being monitored for at least one month in each year since 2019.

Informal complaints are handled at a local level, any records of informal complaints are not centrally held and could only be reviewed at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 7.3 on page 15 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many informal complaints resulted in a resolution in each year since 2019.

Informal complaints are handled at a local level, any records of informal complaints are not centrally held and could only be reviewed at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 7.2 on page 15 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many informal complaints resulted in no resolution in each year since 2019.

Informal complaints are handled at a local level, any records of informal complaints are not centrally held and could only be reviewed at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 5.10 on page 11 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many complaints from members of the Ministry of Defence Police wishing to raise a matter about (a) civil servants and (b) service personnel have been raised in each year since 2019.

There is no central register for the Informal Complaints Resolution Process. The information required to answer the question could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 5.10 on page 11 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, how many complaints from civil servants wishing to raise a matter about a Ministry of Defence Police officer have been raised in each year since 2019.

There is no central register for the Informal Complaints Resolution Process. The information required to answer the question could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph c on page 16 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, if he will publish the formal civilian bullying, harassment and discrimination complaints policy and procedures.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) externally publishes some Service and whole force (covering both Service personnel and civilian employees) policy and procedure documents, but does not routinely publish those that are civilian-only.

Attached is a copy of the Civilian Mediation policy and the bullying, harassment and discrimination complaints policy. MOD officials have also reviewed our response to a previous Question (UIN 7288) that you tabled on 18 December 2023, and we have subsequently attached a copy of the Civilian Formal Bullying, Harassment and Discrimination Complaint process too.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 3.21 on page 8 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 2: Guidance - Informal Complaints Resolution Process, if he will publish the civilian mediation policy and procedures document.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) externally publishes some Service and whole force (covering both Service personnel and civilian employees) policy and procedure documents, but does not routinely publish those that are civilian-only.

Attached is a copy of the Civilian Mediation policy and the bullying, harassment and discrimination complaints policy. MOD officials have also reviewed our response to a previous Question (UIN 7288) that you tabled on 18 December 2023, and we have subsequently attached a copy of the Civilian Formal Bullying, Harassment and Discrimination Complaint process too.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 1: Directive - Understanding Behaviours in Defence, published in June 2021, how many and what proportion of climate assessments conducted have been at (a) level one and (b) level two in each year since 2019.

The single Services have provided the following responses:

Royal Navy

Climate Assessment Level 1:

  • July to December 2021: 11
  • 2022: 27
  • 2023: 31

Climate Assessment Level 2:

  • 2022: 3
  • 2023: 7

Note: Royal Navy Level 1 Climate Assessments were created in July 2021 and Level 2 in January 2022.

Army

Climate Assessment Level 1:

  • 2019: 198
  • 2020: 234
  • 2021: 276
  • 2022: 271
  • 2023: 257

Climate Assessment Level 2:

  • 2019: 6
  • 2020: 2
  • 2021: 11
  • 2022: 20
  • 2023: 29

Notes: The Level 2 process was redesigned in 2019, so delivery stopped during this process and only commenced for the year in October.

Covid interruptions reduced face-to-face Climate assessments in 2020 and 2021.

Royal Air Force

Climate Assessment Level 1:

  • 2022: 11
  • 2023: 25

Climate Assessment Level 2:

  • 2022: 3
  • 2023: 12

Note: The Royal Air Force did not undertake Climate Assessments prior to September 2021.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 1: Directive - Understanding Behaviours in Defence, published in June 2021, if he will publish the question set used in climate assessments.

A copy of the climate assessment question set, including a separate list of personal information gathered at the start of the survey, is provided in the attached documents.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 1: Directive - Understanding Behaviours in Defence, published in June 2021, what is the definition of a high number in each of the additional triggers listed.

The Ministry of Defence has not set such a definition. The triggers act as a guide for Commanding Officers, enabling them to request a Level 2 climate assessment when they have concerns about an aspect of their area of responsibility. A Level 2 assessment is undertaken in two phases; a Level 1 survey is conducted and followed up by more in-depth focus groups and interviews, based on the results of the Level 1 survey and the specific concerns of the Commanding Officer.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 21 of his Department's guidance entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution Part 1: Directive - Understanding Behaviours in Defence, published in June 2021, how many climate assessments have been carried out in civilian top level budgets since April 2022.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Question. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department takes to evaluate whether the social value commitments made by contractors have been delivered.

Social value commitments, as with any other contractual obligation, are managed and monitored throughout the life of the contract as part of the normal contract management process and practice.

To support the introduction of Social Value the Department has a dedicated team providing guidance to ensure sound requirements setting, evaluation of commitments and sampling exercises to review implementation across the procurement life cycle.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28 and the Rehearsal of Concept drill to test winter preparedness, whether (a) DIO, (b) Pinnacle, (c) Amey and (d) VIVO reported that they could not respond appropriately to (i) a surge in repair requests and (ii) callouts due to the impact of weather.

As part of Winter Planning, the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) and its contractors established the following indicators and warnings to ensure agility in respect of resource allocations during winter:

  • Regular reporting of heating and hot water outages;
  • Regular reporting of damp and mould reports and remedial works;
  • Monitoring call centre volumes, types of call, availability of Urgent and Routine appointments, chaser call volumes and complaints;
  • Monitoring social media; and
  • A severe weather watch protocol (initially using Met Office Severe Weather Warnings, but also investigating a system used by the insurance industry to predict how forecast weather might impact on types of building insurance claims etc).

The Rehearsal of Concept (ROC) drill was to stress test the DIO’s and contractors’ winter plans to improve capability and respond to emergent weather events. Contingency plans were established for a tiered BRONZE/SILVER/GOLD command structure to be activated in the event that severe/extreme weather events are forecast or emerge. These included;

  • Preparation of communications to families/chain of command, plus upward reporting;
  • Activation of surge plans;
  • Activation of support from local military units;
  • Planning for recovery after the event.

The DIO and its contractors all responded appropriately to the ROC drill, which gave a high degree of assurance that robust plans were in place. The ROC drill was followed around two weeks later by the onset of Storm Ciaran which tested these contingency plans in real time.

Where appropriate, planned appointments (eg for roof works that could not be safely conducted in high winds) were re-scheduled with families in advance of the storm and the immediate response to flooding and serious storm damage was prompt and effective. National Service Centre call waiting times remained well within acceptable levels throughout. This pattern has been repeated throughout all of the named storms that have followed.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, what the conclusions were from the Rehearsal of Concept drill to test winter preparedness.

As part of Winter Planning, the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) and its contractors established the following indicators and warnings to ensure agility in respect of resource allocations during winter:

  • Regular reporting of heating and hot water outages;
  • Regular reporting of damp and mould reports and remedial works;
  • Monitoring call centre volumes, types of call, availability of Urgent and Routine appointments, chaser call volumes and complaints;
  • Monitoring social media; and
  • A severe weather watch protocol (initially using Met Office Severe Weather Warnings, but also investigating a system used by the insurance industry to predict how forecast weather might impact on types of building insurance claims etc).

The Rehearsal of Concept (ROC) drill was to stress test the DIO’s and contractors’ winter plans to improve capability and respond to emergent weather events. Contingency plans were established for a tiered BRONZE/SILVER/GOLD command structure to be activated in the event that severe/extreme weather events are forecast or emerge. These included;

  • Preparation of communications to families/chain of command, plus upward reporting;
  • Activation of surge plans;
  • Activation of support from local military units;
  • Planning for recovery after the event.

The DIO and its contractors all responded appropriately to the ROC drill, which gave a high degree of assurance that robust plans were in place. The ROC drill was followed around two weeks later by the onset of Storm Ciaran which tested these contingency plans in real time.

Where appropriate, planned appointments (eg for roof works that could not be safely conducted in high winds) were re-scheduled with families in advance of the storm and the immediate response to flooding and serious storm damage was prompt and effective. National Service Centre call waiting times remained well within acceptable levels throughout. This pattern has been repeated throughout all of the named storms that have followed.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, what (a) indicators and (b) warnings have been established to enable the Defence Infrastructure Organisation to remain agile in respect of the allocation of resource over winter 2023-24.

As part of Winter Planning, the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) and its contractors established the following indicators and warnings to ensure agility in respect of resource allocations during winter:

  • Regular reporting of heating and hot water outages;
  • Regular reporting of damp and mould reports and remedial works;
  • Monitoring call centre volumes, types of call, availability of Urgent and Routine appointments, chaser call volumes and complaints;
  • Monitoring social media; and
  • A severe weather watch protocol (initially using Met Office Severe Weather Warnings, but also investigating a system used by the insurance industry to predict how forecast weather might impact on types of building insurance claims etc).

The Rehearsal of Concept (ROC) drill was to stress test the DIO’s and contractors’ winter plans to improve capability and respond to emergent weather events. Contingency plans were established for a tiered BRONZE/SILVER/GOLD command structure to be activated in the event that severe/extreme weather events are forecast or emerge. These included;

  • Preparation of communications to families/chain of command, plus upward reporting;
  • Activation of surge plans;
  • Activation of support from local military units;
  • Planning for recovery after the event.

The DIO and its contractors all responded appropriately to the ROC drill, which gave a high degree of assurance that robust plans were in place. The ROC drill was followed around two weeks later by the onset of Storm Ciaran which tested these contingency plans in real time.

Where appropriate, planned appointments (eg for roof works that could not be safely conducted in high winds) were re-scheduled with families in advance of the storm and the immediate response to flooding and serious storm damage was prompt and effective. National Service Centre call waiting times remained well within acceptable levels throughout. This pattern has been repeated throughout all of the named storms that have followed.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, how many homes his Department plans to purchase for service families in (a) 2023-24, (b) 2024-25 and (c) 2025-26.

The Department is purchasing 176 homes for Service personnel and their families based at Imjin Barracks, Gloucestershire over the next three years.

There is currently no funding committed for the purchase of further additional Service Family Accommodation within the Defence Infrastructure Organisation Accommodation budget. However, further opportunities have been identified should funding be available once future years' budgets are confirmed.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, what his planned timetable is for completing the refurbishments of long-term empty service family accommodation.

The Department allocated £400 million additional funding over this financial year (FY) and next for Service Family Accommodation (SFA); £220 million for FY2023-24 and £180 million for FY 2024-25. The £220 million for this financial year was received at the end of July 2023 and since then the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) has been working at pace to instruct works to improve SFA.

This financial year, £58 million has been allocated to fund a nationwide programme of high-quality refurbishment works to bring circa 1000 homes back online, that are currently unavailable for allocation due to their condition and in areas where need is greatest for Service families.

The majority of this work has been instructed and the refurbishment programme is well underway. It is planned that most of the works will be complete by the end of this financial year.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, how much funding the Defence Infrastructure Organisation has allocated to carry out extensive, high quality refurbishments of long-term empty service family accommodation as of 8 January 2024.

The Department allocated £400 million additional funding over this financial year (FY) and next for Service Family Accommodation (SFA); £220 million for FY2023-24 and £180 million for FY 2024-25. The £220 million for this financial year was received at the end of July 2023 and since then the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) has been working at pace to instruct works to improve SFA.

This financial year, £58 million has been allocated to fund a nationwide programme of high-quality refurbishment works to bring circa 1000 homes back online, that are currently unavailable for allocation due to their condition and in areas where need is greatest for Service families.

The majority of this work has been instructed and the refurbishment programme is well underway. It is planned that most of the works will be complete by the end of this financial year.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, how much funding the Defence Infrastructure Organisation has allocated for further and more substantial damp and mould prevention works as of 8 January 2024.

As part of the £400 million additional funding announced in the July 2023 Defence Command Paper Refresh over this financial year and next, the Department has made tackling damp and mould in Service Family Accommodation (SFA) a key priority. Service families will not be placed in homes suffering from damp and mould and we have developed processes to assess and tackle new cases as they arise.

We are spending £29 million over the next 12 months on a programme of mitigation works to address damp and mould in over 4,000 SFA, including first responder visits and installation of improved ventilation. Additionally, £94 million is being dedicated to more substantial works, including replacement doors and windows, upgraded heating systems including boilers, improvements to groundwater drainage and repairs to damp-proof courses, roof repairs and/or replacement and installation of external wall insulation to make SFA more energy efficient and to prevent damp and mould reoccurring.

We are dealing with decades of under-investment in SFA and, as such, damp and mould will inevitably recur and require a constant and ongoing programme of activity. As such we cannot provide a definitive estimate of the costs; what is clear that long-term investment and the wholesale modernisation of the estate to bring energy efficiency and ventilation up to modern standards will be required.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent estimate he has made of the cost of removing damp and mould from his Department's properties requiring such work.

As part of the £400 million additional funding announced in the July 2023 Defence Command Paper Refresh over this financial year and next, the Department has made tackling damp and mould in Service Family Accommodation (SFA) a key priority. Service families will not be placed in homes suffering from damp and mould and we have developed processes to assess and tackle new cases as they arise.

We are spending £29 million over the next 12 months on a programme of mitigation works to address damp and mould in over 4,000 SFA, including first responder visits and installation of improved ventilation. Additionally, £94 million is being dedicated to more substantial works, including replacement doors and windows, upgraded heating systems including boilers, improvements to groundwater drainage and repairs to damp-proof courses, roof repairs and/or replacement and installation of external wall insulation to make SFA more energy efficient and to prevent damp and mould reoccurring.

We are dealing with decades of under-investment in SFA and, as such, damp and mould will inevitably recur and require a constant and ongoing programme of activity. As such we cannot provide a definitive estimate of the costs; what is clear that long-term investment and the wholesale modernisation of the estate to bring energy efficiency and ventilation up to modern standards will be required.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, how much funding the Defence Infrastructure Organisation has allocated to the damp and mould mitigation package for 4000 families as of 8 January 2024.

As part of the £400 million additional funding announced in the July 2023 Defence Command Paper Refresh over this financial year and next, the Department has made tackling damp and mould in Service Family Accommodation (SFA) a key priority. Service families will not be placed in homes suffering from damp and mould and we have developed processes to assess and tackle new cases as they arise.

We are spending £29 million over the next 12 months on a programme of mitigation works to address damp and mould in over 4,000 SFA, including first responder visits and installation of improved ventilation. Additionally, £94 million is being dedicated to more substantial works, including replacement doors and windows, upgraded heating systems including boilers, improvements to groundwater drainage and repairs to damp-proof courses, roof repairs and/or replacement and installation of external wall insulation to make SFA more energy efficient and to prevent damp and mould reoccurring.

We are dealing with decades of under-investment in SFA and, as such, damp and mould will inevitably recur and require a constant and ongoing programme of activity. As such we cannot provide a definitive estimate of the costs; what is clear that long-term investment and the wholesale modernisation of the estate to bring energy efficiency and ventilation up to modern standards will be required.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he has plans to expand the National Shipbuilding Office.

The size and effectiveness of the National Shipbuilding Office (NSO) is regularly reviewed to ensure delivery against its remit.

The NSO has been highly effective in delivering on the National Shipbuilding Strategy Refresh.

For evidence of effectiveness, please see the answer I gave on 8 November 2023 to Question 93.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, how many members of staff work in the VIVO Customer Experience team as of 8 January 2024.

There are nine members of staff in the VIVO Customer Experience Team as of 8 January 2024.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, how many additional out-of-hours staff have VIVO recruited as of 8 January 2024.

VIVO’s core operational team’s resource has increased by 551 staff (a 59% uplift) since their contracts In Service Date of 1 April 2022.

This includes engineers, schedulers and management staff who work on a rotational basis to ensure all aspects of maintenance are delivered in line with the contract out of hours. VIVO have also employed two additional schedulers who work solely out of hours to coordinate urgent repairs.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, what his planned timetable is for completing the replacement of (a) kitchens and (b) bathrooms.

The Department allocated £400 million additional funding over this financial year and next for Service Family Accommodation (SFA); £220 million for FY2023-24 and £180 million for FY 2024-25. The £220 million for this financial year was received at the end of July 2023 and since then the Defence Infrastructure Organisation has been working at pace to instruct works to improve SFA.

This financial year, £15 million has been allocated to fund a nationwide programme to replace kitchens and bathrooms in circa 1060 SFA. These replacement works are underway and should be complete by the end of this financial year.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, how much funding the Defence Infrastructure Organisation has allocated to replacing the (a) kitchens and (b) bathrooms in homes as of 8 January 2024.

The Department allocated £400 million additional funding over this financial year and next for Service Family Accommodation (SFA); £220 million for FY2023-24 and £180 million for FY 2024-25. The £220 million for this financial year was received at the end of July 2023 and since then the Defence Infrastructure Organisation has been working at pace to instruct works to improve SFA.

This financial year, £15 million has been allocated to fund a nationwide programme to replace kitchens and bathrooms in circa 1060 SFA. These replacement works are underway and should be complete by the end of this financial year.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, how much funding the Defence Infrastructure Organisation has allocated to the (a) boiling and (b) heating upgrades of homes as of 8 January 2024.

£8 million of funding for this financial year has been allocated for the replacement of boilers and other heating upgrades.

It is not possible to separate this into boiler and heating upgrades elements because in some homes the boiler replacement will be part of an overall heating upgrade package.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 8 November 2023 on External Scrutiny Team Report, 2022 and 2023, HCWS18, what estimate he has made of the date by which all recommendations from the Haythornthwaite Review will be fully implemented.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 15 November 2023 to Question 468 to the hon. Member for Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport (Mr Pollard).

https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2023-11-07/468

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 November 2023 on Service Family Accommodation and Winter Planning, HCWS28, how much funding the Defence Infrastructure Organisation has allocated for the routine preparation of homes ready for Move In as of 8 January 2024.

This financial year, the Defence Infrastructure Organisation has allocated £72.3 million for the routine preparation of homes for move in.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the National Shipbuilding Office over the last 12 months.

The size and effectiveness of the National Shipbuilding Office (NSO) is regularly reviewed to ensure delivery against its remit.

The NSO has been highly effective in delivering on the National Shipbuilding Strategy Refresh.

For evidence of effectiveness, please see the answer I gave on 8 November 2023 to Question 93.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of JSP 763 Behaviours and informal complaint resolution Part 1: Directive – understanding behaviours in Defence, how many climate assessments were triggered by concerning findings from a level 1 climate assessment in each year since 2019.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of JSP 763 Behaviours and informal complaint resolution Part 1: Directive – understanding behaviours in Defence, how many climate assessments were triggered by a high number of personnel citing (a) bullying, (b) harassment and (c) discrimination as a reason for leaving in exit data in each year since 2019.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of JSP 763 Behaviours and informal complaint resolution Part 1: Directive – understanding behaviours in Defence, how many climate assessments were triggered by a high number of informal complaints in each year since 2019.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of JSP 763 Behaviours and informal complaint resolution Part 1: Directive – understanding behaviours in Defence, how many climate assessments were triggered by a high number of formal complaints in each year since 2019.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of JSP 763 Behaviours and informal complaint resolution Part 1: Directive – understanding behaviours in Defence, how many climate assessments were triggered by a high number of personnel (a) on sick leave and (b) medically downgraded in each year since 2019.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of JSP 763 Behaviours and informal complaint resolution Part 1: Directive – understanding behaviours in Defence, how many climate assessments were triggered by a high number of calls to helplines in each year since 2019.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 20 of JSP 763 entitled Behaviours and informal complaint resolution Part 1 (Directive), how many incidents have been recorded by Lead D&I(As) in each month since January 2020.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Question. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 4.8 of JSP 763 Behaviours and informal complaint resolution Part 1: Directive – understanding behaviours in Defence, published in June 2021, how many and what proportion of diversity and inclusion (a) advisers and (b) practitioners in his Department have not fully completed their training by the Defence Academy as of 19 December 2023.

None. Delegates who do not complete their training cannot become D&I Advisors or Practitioners.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people reported (a) bullying, (b) harassment and (c) discrimination as a reason for leaving his Department in exit data in each of the last five years.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member's Question. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 21 of JSP 763 Behaviours and informal complaint resolution Part 1: Directive – understanding behaviours in Defence, how many climate assessments conducted in civilian Top Level Budgets reported (a) bullying, (b) harassment and (c) discrimination in each year since 2019.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 21 of JSP 763 entitled Behaviours and informal complaint resolution Part 1 (Directive), how many climate assessments conducted in civilian Top Level Budgets were made in each year since 2019.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Questions. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many active bystander training courses diversity and inclusion (a) advisers and (b) practitioners conducted for his Department in each year since 2019.

Neither Diversity and Inclusion Advisers or Practitioners are tasked with delivering Active Bystander Training. Active Bystander Training has been an eLearning course since 2020.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many diversity and inclusion (a) adviser and (b) practitioner posts in his Department are vacant as of 19 December 2023.

I refer the hon. Member to my previous answer provided to 186813 on 9 June 2023.

The Ministry of Defence is committed to making changes required to create a more inclusive environment, enabling everyone, irrespective of background, to deliver our Defence outputs, enhance our operational effectiveness and better defend and represent the nation.

The requested information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the budget for diversity and inclusion (a) advisers and (b) practitioners was in his Department in each financial year since 2019-20.

Diversity and Inclusion Advisers/Practitioners undertake this role on a voluntary basis in addition to their normal duties. Costs incurred in conducting these duties would be small and absorbed within wider Unit budgets. Disaggregating these costs from wider budgets would exceed the cost limit for answering a Parliamentary Question.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 3 of his Department's publication entitled JSP 763 Behaviours and informal complaint resolution, Part 1, how many investigations into incidents of unacceptable behaviour leaders in his Department have conducted in each year since 2019.

The requested information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 3 of the guidance entitled JSP 763: Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution: Part 1: Directive - Understanding Behaviours in Defence, published in June 2021, on how many occasions leaders in his Department have investigated incidents of unacceptable behaviours that have been brought to their attention since June 2021.

The requested information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people employed by Department have been disciplined for matters relating to their online behaviour in each year since 2019.

The information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many investigations into the online behaviour of people employed in his Department have been conducted by his Department in each year since 2019.

The information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many civilian employees contacted Defence Business Services casework services to report (a) bullying, (b) harassment and (c) discrimination in each year since 2019.

The information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many staff members participated in training courses that were provided externally in each financial year since 2019-20.

The information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 19 of JSP 763 entitled Behaviours and informal complaints resolution Part 1 (Directive), how many people in his Department participated in active bystander training in each year since 2019.

The information requested is given below:

2019: 1,740

2020: 27,629

2021: 46,185

2022: 73,229

2023: 61, 801

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many diversity and inclusion (a) advisers and (b) practitioners have been employed by his Department in each year since 2019.

I refer the hon. Member to my previous answer provided to 186813 on 9 June 2023.

The Ministry of Defence is committed to making changes required to create a more inclusive environment, enabling everyone, irrespective of background, to deliver our Defence outputs, enhance our operational effectiveness and better defend and represent the nation.

The requested information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 3 of JSP 763 entitled Behaviours and informal complaint resolution Part 1 (Directive), if he will publish the civilian formal bullying, harassment, and discrimination complaint process.

Although some Service and wholeforce (covering both Service personnel and civilian employees) policy and procedure documents are published externally, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) does not routinely publish civilian-only policy and procedure documents externally. This is in line with many other government departments' approach. The MOD has no plans to change this approach.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 17 of the guidance entitled JSP 763: Behaviours and Informal Complaint Resolution: Part 1: Directive - Understanding Behaviours in Defence, published in June 2021, how many people who made a complaint of (a) bullying, (b) harassment and (c) discrimination within his Department decided to not take the matter further but keep a personal record.

The below table shows the number of admissible complaints withdrawn before determination across the Royal Navy, Army and RAF.

Year

Reporting Category

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

Total

Bullying

17

16

11

12

9

65

Discrimination

8

9

6

3

2

28

Harassment

8

5

3

3

0

19

This information is not centrally held for civilian complaints.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many casework advisers were employed to work in Defence Business Services in each year since 2019.

The below table shows the number of HR caseworkers at the end of each financial year since March 2019.

Month

March

March

March

March

March

Year

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

Number of HR caseworkers

32

26

29

32

31

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department spent on professional fees in each financial year since 2019-20.

Details of spending on professional fees are disclosed as part of the published Annual Report and Accounts (ARAC) each financial year.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department spent on training courses that were provided externally in each financial year since 2019-20.

The amount spent on training fees over the previous four financial years is as follows:

External Training

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

£ million

229.3

212.8

307.2

338.9

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many times his Department referred itself to the Information Commissioner's Office in each year since 2019.

The following table shows the number of times that the Ministry of Defence referred itself to the Information Commissioner’s Office since 2019.

Year

Number of times Ministry of Defence referred itself to information Commissioner’s Office

2019

5

2020

8

2021

10

2022

6

2023 (up to 18 Dec)

2

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many spare parts his Department has (a) in total and (b) for equipment no longer in use.

The requested information is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many UK personnel have served in UN peacekeeping missions in each year since 2019.

Since 2019, the UK has contributed to the following UN Peacekeeping missions: MINUSMA (Mali), MONUSCO(DRC), UNFICYP(Cyprus), UNIFIL(Lebanon), UNMISS (South Sudan), UNSMIL(Libya), UNSOM(Somalia).

The total number of UK personnel who have served on these missions in each year since 2019 is outlined below.

2019: 2,284

2020: 1,115

2021: 1,844

2022: 1,978

2023: 1,211

The figures provided capture those directly employed on the UN Missions. Where the UK deployed at Unit level and above, the figures also include those who served as part of the National Support Element.

The figures do not include the UK troops training and mentoring partner forces in advance of their deployment on UN operations.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much funding his Department plans to contribute to NATO training exercises in the (a) 2023-24, (b) 2024-25 and (c) 2025-26 financial year.

On current plans, the Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) contributions to NATO common funding, of which Alliance training and exercising forms a part, are as follows:

£ million

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

2023-24

2024-25

2025-26

UK Share of common funding

149.4

153.2

173.9

201.1

264.0

316.6

388.1

This table shows the UK’s share of common funding, detailing the actual amounts the MOD contributed in Financial Years 2019-20 – 2022-23 and the forecast for 2023-24 and beyond.

The costs associated with UK involvement in NATO training exercises are spread across multiple budgets within Defence and could only be disaggregated from other national exercising costs at disproportionate cost.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much funding his Department contributed to NATO training exercises in each financial year since 2019-20.

On current plans, the Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) contributions to NATO common funding, of which Alliance training and exercising forms a part, are as follows:

£ million

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

2023-24

2024-25

2025-26

UK Share of common funding

149.4

153.2

173.9

201.1

264.0

316.6

388.1

This table shows the UK’s share of common funding, detailing the actual amounts the MOD contributed in Financial Years 2019-20 – 2022-23 and the forecast for 2023-24 and beyond.

The costs associated with UK involvement in NATO training exercises are spread across multiple budgets within Defence and could only be disaggregated from other national exercising costs at disproportionate cost.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the annual budget for the Ministry of Defence Police was in each financial year since 2019-20.

The annual budget for the Ministry of Defence Police on 31 March each financial year, since 2019-2020 is:

Financial Year

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

2023-24

Budget (£million)

152.5

156.5

167.2

161.3

167.2*

*this includes funding transfers of £6.5 million received in year

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what annual budget he has allocated to the Ministry of Defence Police in (a) 2023-24, (b) 2024-25 and (c) 2025-26.

The annual budget allocated for the Ministry of Defence Police for the next three years is:

Year

2023-24

2024-25

2025-26

Budget (£million)

167.2*

170.5

165.7

*this includes funding transfers from other Top Level Budgets of £6.5million received in year

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many qualified pilots were employed by the RAF in each year since 2019.

I am withholding the information requested as its disclosure would, or would be likely to prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the Armed Forces.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many civil servants in his Department were in the redeployment pool in each year since 2019.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Members Question. I will write to her when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Ministry of Defence Police officers were employed by his Department in each financial year since 2019-20.

The strength number for the Ministry of Defence Police on 31 March each year since 2019 is:

Year

2019

2020

2021

2022

MDP ¹

2,515

2,643

2,768

2,701

¹ Ministry of Defence Police officers

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of how many Ministry of Defence Police Officers will be employed by his Department in (a) 2023-24, (b) 2024-25 and (c) 2025-26.

The current strength number for the Ministry of Defence Police is 2,473 full time equivalents (FTE) as of 19 December 2023. Estimated numbers for 2024-25 and 2025-26 are dependant on the outcomes of the Strategic Workforce Planning (SWP) and other ongoing reviews within Defence.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the categories are of expenses which can be claimed by staff in his Department.

Business travel expenses are categorised into travel, accommodation and subsistence.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department spent on administration in each financial year since 2019-20.

Details of administration spend are disclosed within Annex C of the published Annual Report and Accounts (ARAC) each financial year.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department spent on (a) marketing and (b) advertising in each financial year since 2019-20.

A full Departmental response could only be provided at disproportionate cost. The amount spent by the Department on advertising that is readily available can be provided for financial years 2019-20 which was £37,142,211; 2020-21 was £34,178,742; 2021-22 was £30,876,441; 2022-23 was £40,562,477; and for 2023-24 was £19,462,174 to date. The figures in this answer have been provided by the Royal Navy, Army, Royal Air Force, and the Ministry of Defence Police (MDP). The majority of expenditure is accounted for by advertising by the three branches of the Armed Forces and the MDP to aid recruitment. Marketing and additional advertising expenditure outside of this remit is not held centrally.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many civil servants he plans to employ in his Department in each of the next three financial years.

The latest Ministry of Defence (MOD) civilian staff indicative planned full-time equivalent figures (FTE), rounded to the nearest ten, are in the table below. These represent our current forecasts, but we recognise that the Chancellor has committed to reducing headcount across the Civil Service so we are working with HM Treasury to determine the implications for the MOD. As such, it should be noted that these are indicative numbers are used for planning purposes only; they are not a target and represent business decisions subject to ongoing variation. It should also be noted these figures represent only one part of MOD's workforce and actual figures may be impacted by changes to the size and shape of other workforce types such as contractors, military staff etc.

Financial Year

2024-25

2025-26

2026-27

Projected civilian staff (FTE)

60,600

61,530

61,540

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average length of time an RAF aircraft was unable to fly due to it needing to be repaired was in each year since 2019.

The average length of time that an RAF aircraft is unable to fly due to needing maintenance is not a metric which is recorded. The time required for repairs of individual airframes can range from hours to months. Types of repairs include:

1) short-term unserviceable aircraft which undergo minor works, unforeseen rectification or technical inspection that can arise on a day-to-day basis and can often be rectified between planned flights;

2) repairs which are deferred to be undertaken during periods of planned maintenance inspections or periods of upgrade;

3) complex repairs which require specialist long-term rectification or detailed technical advice from the manufacturer, which can take many months.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many RAF aircraft were operational in each month since January 2023.

It will take time to collate the requested information. I will write to the right hon. Member and place a copy of the letter in the Library of the House.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many RAF aircraft were unable to fly in each month since January 2023; and for what reasons.

It will take time to collate the requested information. I will write to the right hon. Member and place a copy of the letter in the Library of the House.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many referrals for post-traumatic stress disorder for (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) RAF personnel were made in each year since 2019.

The table below presents the number of UK Armed Forces personnel with an initial assessment of post-traumatic stress disorder at a MOD Department for Community Mental Health (DCMH) between 1 April 2019 and 31 March 2023, broken down by service and financial year.

Service

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

UK Armed Forces

336

173

229

277

Royal Navy

71

37

34

67

Army

222

107

175

179

Royal Air Force

43

29

20

31

The Royal Navy includes both Rotal Navy and Royal Marines

DCMH staff record the initial mental health assessment during a patient’s first appointment, based on presenting complaints. A patient’s final diagnosis may differ as some patients do not present the full range of symptoms, signs, or clinical history during their first appointment when the initial assessment of post-traumatic stress disorder is made.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many RAF pilots were (a) recruited and (b) fully trained in each year since 2019.

I am withholding the information requested as its disclosure would, or would be likely to prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the Armed Forces.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department spent on supporting legacy IT systems in each financial year since 2019-20.

I refer the hon. Member to my answer on 4 December 2023 to Question 3661, on Ministry of Defence spending on legacy IT.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average length of service of staff who left employment with his Department was at each job grade in each year since 2019.

The average length of service based on any of the core workforce who left the Department between 1 January 2019 and 18 December 2023, and calculated by the time between their termination date, and the date of their continual service in the MOD is detailed below:

Grade Grouping

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

Avg (Grade)

Senior Civil Service

18.7

13.1

14.1

10.3

11.4

12.9

Grade 6

21.1

18.4

20.3

17.7

12.3

17.1

Grade 7

17.9

18.8

17.6

15.5

12.7

15.9

Senior Executive Officer

17.1

15.6

12.8

13.7

13.8

14.3

Higher Executive Officer

13.9

12.7

14.0

13.2

12.0

13.1

Executive Officer

13.2

13.1

13.1

11.6

12.6

12.6

Administrative Officer

13.5

11.3

13.3

12.8

14.1

13.0

Administrative Assistant

11.6

13.3

10.5

8.6

10.4

10.6

Skillzone 1

20.1

22.1

17.2

20.1

20.8

20.0

Skillzone 2

13.5

13.7

13.5

12.8

13.5

13.4

Skillzone 3

17.4

21.4

15.4

16.5

16.6

16.9

Skillzone 4

20.1

18.3

17.3

18.6

19.7

18.8

Senior Leadership Group (DE&S)

26.1

15.5

21.0

26.3

12.3

20.8

Senior Professional (DE&S)

20.5

21.7

21.3

19.9

20.0

20.4

Professional II (DE&S)

14.4

12.3

13.3

10.7

12.8

12.6

Professional I (DE&S)

18.6

19.9

16.3

14.1

16.2

16.5

Sen Administrator/Specialist (DE&S)

10.3

9.4

10.4

8.9

9.4

9.6

Administrator/Specialist (DE&S)

9.6

8.8

11.0

9.7

10.1

9.9

Average (Year)

13.9

13.2

13.3

12.3

12.8

13.0

Before the introduction of the Human Resources Management System (HRMS) in 2003, there were limited records for periods of service, including breaks in service, so the calculations are based on the most recent hire, or rehire date recorded in either HRMS or its replacement MyHR introduced in 2002. Figures are broken down by year and grade grouping.

The figures are fractionalised, so for example, someone with three years and six months service, would be calculated as 3.5 years’ service.

The figures do not include anyone who left between 2019 and today, who have since been rehired. This is because their most recent hire or rehire date will reflect their current employment.

These figures include civil service equivalent and Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) grades. Personnel on grading structures outside civil service equivalent and DE&S grades have been excluded.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) laptops and PCs, (b) mobile phones and (c) other technological devices issued by his Department were reported (i) lost, (ii) stolen and (iii) damaged in each year since 2019.

The following table includes the number of lost or stolen devices in the Ministry of Defence in the last five years.

Year

Laptops

Mobile Phones

USBs

Hard Disk Drives

2019

239

106

60

25

2020

163

73

49

24

2021

148

79

85

27

2022

281

112

51

40

2023 (up to 18 Dec)

176

92

20

67

All Departmental IT is fully security encrypted.

The departmental security unit records and investigates each reported loss from the Department. If appropriate, the police are invited to undertake further inquiries.

Any mobile device reported as lost is immediately and remotely deactivated, and the contents are deleted. The user account on any laptop reported as lost is immediately and remotely locked.

It should be noted that these figures only account for lost and stolen devices as damaged devices aren’t classed as a security issue. We do not differentiate between lost and stolen devices and treat both the same for security reasons. Individual departments hold information on the number of devices damaged and therefore this is not information that we hold centrally and to gather it would be at a disproportionate cost.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) laptops and PCs, (b) mobile phones and (c) other technological devices issued by his Department were deemed unrepairable in each year since 2019.

I am providing figures for the MODNET Official network, which is the MOD's corporate ICT system serving the largest number of users, some 206,000 based in the UK and Overseas.

In 2020 MODNET Official moved from a predominantly desktop PC estate to a mainly laptop-based estate. While the primary access to MODNET is via laptops and fixed devices, alternative solutions are provided through iPads and iPhones. These are procured by internal organisational areas based on their individual requirement.

MODNET Official PCs and Laptops, iPhones and iPads issued by Year.

Desktop PC

Laptops

iPhones

iPads

Total

2019

0

0

2,118

495

2,613

2020

105

21,503

8,081

3,131

32,820

2021

8,748

115,496

3,140

560

127,944

2022

7,594

25,117

7,198

1,286

41,195

2023

2,650

13,696

2,221

1,365

19,932

MODNET laptop devices are delivered through a managed service which includes a repair service. Devices which are deemed Beyond Economic Repair (BER - those which are broken and faulty, and not economically fit to be repaired) are cannibalised for parts and/or sent for either destruction or, where possible, recycling. BER data was not captured in 2019 and 2020 while the new laptop deployment was underway and Defence was largely a Desktop based organisation. MODNET iPhones and iPads are disposed of via an approved disposal route at the end of their serviceable life.

MODNET Official Laptops declared BER.

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

0

0

1,118

43

3,428


James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) laptops and PCs, (b) mobile phones and (c) other technological devices were issued by his Department in each year since 2019.

I am providing figures for the MODNET Official network, which is the MOD's corporate ICT system serving the largest number of users, some 206,000 based in the UK and Overseas.

In 2020 MODNET Official moved from a predominantly desktop PC estate to a mainly laptop-based estate. While the primary access to MODNET is via laptops and fixed devices, alternative solutions are provided through iPads and iPhones. These are procured by internal organisational areas based on their individual requirement.

MODNET Official PCs and Laptops, iPhones and iPads issued by Year.

Desktop PC

Laptops

iPhones

iPads

Total

2019

0

0

2,118

495

2,613

2020

105

21,503

8,081

3,131

32,820

2021

8,748

115,496

3,140

560

127,944

2022

7,594

25,117

7,198

1,286

41,195

2023

2,650

13,696

2,221

1,365

19,932

MODNET laptop devices are delivered through a managed service which includes a repair service. Devices which are deemed Beyond Economic Repair (BER - those which are broken and faulty, and not economically fit to be repaired) are cannibalised for parts and/or sent for either destruction or, where possible, recycling. BER data was not captured in 2019 and 2020 while the new laptop deployment was underway and Defence was largely a Desktop based organisation. MODNET iPhones and iPads are disposed of via an approved disposal route at the end of their serviceable life.

MODNET Official Laptops declared BER.

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

0

0

1,118

43

3,428


James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many meetings (a) has he, (b) have Ministers in his Department and (c) have senior civil servants had with Prospect trade union to discuss (i) bullying, (ii) discrimination and (iii) harassment within his Department.

Regular engagement on behalf of Secretary of State and Ministers occurs between Senior Civil Servants and Trade Unions, including Prospect, as a minimum twice a year to enable matters of importance to both Trade Unions and Defence to be addressed. Prospect attended a meeting in early December this year with Senior Civil Servants where bullying, harassment and discrimination were discussed in relation to the focussed matter of women working in Defence.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) formal and (b) informal complaints of sexual harassment have been made by staff members in his Department in each year since 2019.

The below table shows the number of military complaints upheld for bullying, discrimination and harassment in each year since 2019.

Case type

Calendar Year

Bullying

Discrimination

Harassment

Total

2019

63

35

8

106

2020

70

39

7

116

2021

95

33

18

146

2022

69

18

14

101

2023 (up to 15 December)

64

21

7

92

Total

361

146

54

561

The below table shows the number of civilian complaints upheld for bullying, discrimination and harassment in each year since 2019. This data is representative of MOD Main Department core workforce, including DE&S and SDA, with numbers based on the year of the final outcome date.

Case type

Calendar Year

Bullying

Discrimination

Harassment

Total

2019

9

0

7

17

2020

24

0

9

42

2021

24

0

1

27

2022

24

3

1

28

2023 (up to 15 December)

33

5

4

42

Total

114

20

22

156

It is important to note that before 2022, ‘discrimination’ was not an explicitly defined category available for civilian data, so it is not possible to be able to say which – if any – complaints were due to Discrimination.

The below table shows the number of military sexual harassment complaints received in each year since 2019.

Year

Number of sexual harassment complaints received

Informal

Formal

2019

7

8

2020

6

4

2021

13

14

2022

13

2023

8

Total

28

47

The below table shows the number of civilian sexual harassment complaints received in each year since 2019. This data is for MOD main, however does not included DE&S and SDA.

Year

Number of sexual harassment complaints received

2019

7

2020

6

2021

3

2022

2

2023

16

Total

34

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many complaints of (a) bullying, (b) discrimination and (c) harassment have been upheld in his Department in (i) 2019, (ii) 2020, (iii) 2021, (iv) 2022 and (v) 2023.

The below table shows the number of military complaints upheld for bullying, discrimination and harassment in each year since 2019.

Case type

Calendar Year

Bullying

Discrimination

Harassment

Total

2019

63

35

8

106

2020

70

39

7

116

2021

95

33

18

146

2022

69

18

14

101

2023 (up to 15 December)

64

21

7

92

Total

361

146

54

561

The below table shows the number of civilian complaints upheld for bullying, discrimination and harassment in each year since 2019. This data is representative of MOD Main Department core workforce, including DE&S and SDA, with numbers based on the year of the final outcome date.

Case type

Calendar Year

Bullying

Discrimination

Harassment

Total

2019

9

0

7

17

2020

24

0

9

42

2021

24

0

1

27

2022

24

3

1

28

2023 (up to 15 December)

33

5

4

42

Total

114

20

22

156

It is important to note that before 2022, ‘discrimination’ was not an explicitly defined category available for civilian data, so it is not possible to be able to say which – if any – complaints were due to Discrimination.

The below table shows the number of military sexual harassment complaints received in each year since 2019.

Year

Number of sexual harassment complaints received

Informal

Formal

2019

7

8

2020

6

4

2021

13

14

2022

13

2023

8

Total

28

47

The below table shows the number of civilian sexual harassment complaints received in each year since 2019. This data is for MOD main, however does not included DE&S and SDA.

Year

Number of sexual harassment complaints received

2019

7

2020

6

2021

3

2022

2

2023

16

Total

34

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will commission an external audit of his Department’s bullying, discrimination and harassment policy.

The Wigston Review into unacceptable behaviours was published in July 2019 and a full review of Bullying Harassment and Discrimination (BHD) policy was undertaken and updated throughout 2020 and published in June 2021 in Joint Service Publication 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaints Resolution: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/jsp-763-the-mod-bullying-and-harassment-complaints-procedures. This defined what unacceptable behaviours are for the first time and mandated the use of Climate Assessments to measure prevalence of BHD in units.

In December 2020 Danuta Gray published her follow up report into the implementation of the Wigston Review; her work included her independent scrutiny of the Ministry of Defence’s BHD policies. The House of Commons Defence Committee has scrutinised the Department’s BHD policies over the last two years and made a number of recommendations aimed at redressing the balance to ensure that women in the Armed Forces feel valued and want to continue their service once they join.

The Department continues to review and update its policies on BHD subjects, published its Zero Tolerance of Sexual Harassment policy in 2022, and will update the relevant Joint Service guidance in 2024; this will be undertaken in conjunction with the Armed Forces.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will conduct an internal review into his Department’s bullying, discrimination and harassment policy.

The Wigston Review into unacceptable behaviours was published in July 2019 and a full review of Bullying Harassment and Discrimination (BHD) policy was undertaken and updated throughout 2020 and published in June 2021 in Joint Service Publication 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaints Resolution: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/jsp-763-the-mod-bullying-and-harassment-complaints-procedures. This defined what unacceptable behaviours are for the first time and mandated the use of Climate Assessments to measure prevalence of BHD in units.

In December 2020 Danuta Gray published her follow up report into the implementation of the Wigston Review; her work included her independent scrutiny of the Ministry of Defence’s BHD policies. The House of Commons Defence Committee has scrutinised the Department’s BHD policies over the last two years and made a number of recommendations aimed at redressing the balance to ensure that women in the Armed Forces feel valued and want to continue their service once they join.

The Department continues to review and update its policies on BHD subjects, published its Zero Tolerance of Sexual Harassment policy in 2022, and will update the relevant Joint Service guidance in 2024; this will be undertaken in conjunction with the Armed Forces.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when did his Department last conduct a review into its bullying, discrimination and harassment policy.

The Wigston Review into unacceptable behaviours was published in July 2019 and a full review of Bullying Harassment and Discrimination (BHD) policy was undertaken and updated throughout 2020 and published in June 2021 in Joint Service Publication 763 Behaviours and Informal Complaints Resolution: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/jsp-763-the-mod-bullying-and-harassment-complaints-procedures. This defined what unacceptable behaviours are for the first time and mandated the use of Climate Assessments to measure prevalence of BHD in units.

In December 2020 Danuta Gray published her follow up report into the implementation of the Wigston Review; her work included her independent scrutiny of the Ministry of Defence’s BHD policies. The House of Commons Defence Committee has scrutinised the Department’s BHD policies over the last two years and made a number of recommendations aimed at redressing the balance to ensure that women in the Armed Forces feel valued and want to continue their service once they join.

The Department continues to review and update its policies on BHD subjects, published its Zero Tolerance of Sexual Harassment policy in 2022, and will update the relevant Joint Service guidance in 2024; this will be undertaken in conjunction with the Armed Forces.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2023 to Question 3427 on Ministry of Defence: Fraud, when he plans to send the letter to the Rt hon. Member for Garston and Halewood.

I will respond to the right hon. Member shortly.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 27 November 2023 to Question 3737 on Ministry of Defence: Senior Civil Servants, when he plans to send the letter to the Rt hon. Member for Garston and Halewood.

I responded to the right hon. Member on 20 December 2023.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he is taking to help tackle (a) bullying, (b) discrimination and (c) harassment within his Department.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 18 December 2023, to Question 6427.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 6 December 2023 to Question 4062 on Armed Forces, how the Pan Defence Skills Framework will improve transparency in appraisal and promotion processes.

The Pan Defence Skills Framework (PDSF), as a modernized approach to skills management, has the potential to enhance transparency in appraisal and promotion processes; the exploitation of the PDSF for the military is closely linked with the Future Appraisal review work which is taking place. Some areas being explored are:

  1. Standardization of Skill Definitions: PDSF establishes unified standards for skill definitions across different branches of defence. This standardization ensures that personnel, regardless of their specific roles or service branches, are assessed based on the same criteria. It reduces ambiguity and subjectivity in skill evaluation, leading to a more transparent and fair appraisal process.
  2. Data-Driven Decision Making: by leveraging data analytics, PDSF could enable data-driven decision-making in appraisals and promotions. This approach uses objective data and analytics to assess performance and potential, reducing biases and inconsistencies in the decision-making process.
  3. Clear Career Pathways: PDSF provides clear and structured career development frameworks, outlining the skills and competencies required for each role and level within the Defence sector. This greater transparency in career pathways will ensure that individuals understand the criteria for promotion and what they need to achieve for career progression.
  4. Enhanced Communication: the PDSF fosters clear communication about skills and roles. By using a common language to define skills and roles, it ensures that all personnel, including appraisers and those being appraised, have a mutual understanding of the criteria and processes involved in appraisals and promotions.
  5. Feedback Mechanisms: using skills in feedback loops. Regular feedback on performance, aligned with the skills framework, provides individuals with actionable insights into their development areas, contributing to a more transparent and growth-oriented appraisal process.
  6. Comparability: The PDSF allows for comparability of skills and roles across different areas within Defence. This comparability ensures that promotions are fair and equitable, even when individuals transition between areas or roles.
  7. Talent Pipelines: The PDSF has the potential to give the Front Line Commands and Centre insight into the health of talent pipelines, especially in niche or specialist career fields.
  8. Goal setting: the PDSF has the potential to support personnel to develop annual goals and objectives, leading to the targeted acquisition of skills related to their chosen career path.
Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department spent on off-payroll engagements in each financial year since 2019-20.

The Department collects information centrally on the numbers of off-payroll engagements in line with the mandatory disclosure requirements for reporting in the Annual Report and Accounts.

The Department does not collect all the information that would be required to address this question centrally and it is considered the time and resource required to do so retrospectively would be disproportionate.

The Department will consider the scope to expand the data collected on off-payroll engagements from 2023-24 to enable analysis of this type to be provided in the future.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people in his Department have been employed under an off-payroll engagement for (a) 5-10 years and (b) longer than 10 years.

The Department collects information centrally on the numbers of off payroll engagements in line with the mandatory disclosure requirements for reporting in Annual Report and Accounts.

For off-payroll engagements between five years and 10 years in length, the Department recorded that there were: 39 in 2022-23; 26 in 2021-22; four in 2020-2021; and two in 2019-20.

For off-payroll engagements over 10 years in length, the Department recorded that there were: three in 2022-23; 3 in 2021-22; zero in 2020-21; and one in 2019-20.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 12 December 2023 to Question 5784 on Army: Procurement, what mechanisms his Department has for (a) continuous reassessment and (b) updating of the 20-year comprehensive investment plan.

The Army’s Capability Investment Plan is managed on an ongoing basis throughout the year and informed annually by the Capability Audit and the Balance of Investment process.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 20 November 2023 to Question 2085 on Ministry of Defence: Technology, when he plans to send the letter to the Rt hon. Member for Garston and Halewood.

I am now in a position to answer the right hon. Member's Questions 1450 and 2085.

The Department initially believed it could provide some costs in scope of these requests; however, upon further analysis, I must advise that these aspects are not considered under a single or dedicated programme and are generally considered as components or elements of much larger programmes across Defence and in multiple domains.

This information is not held centrally, and I therefore confirm that the requested information could be provided only at disproportionate cost and would in any event be unlikely to be an accurate reflection of all spend incurred.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 21 November 2023 to Question 1450 on Ministry of Defence: Technology, when he plans to write to the Rt hon. Member for Garston and Halewood.

I am now in a position to answer the right hon. Member's Questions 1450 and 2085.

The Department initially believed it could provide some costs in scope of these requests; however, upon further analysis, I must advise that these aspects are not considered under a single or dedicated programme and are generally considered as components or elements of much larger programmes across Defence and in multiple domains.

This information is not held centrally, and I therefore confirm that the requested information could be provided only at disproportionate cost and would in any event be unlikely to be an accurate reflection of all spend incurred.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 12 December 2023 to Question 4936 on Shipbuilding: Innovation, when he plans to publish the comprehensive study by Maritime Research and Innovation UK of the UK’s academic capability and capacity for shipbuilding.

The report into the UK's Academic Capability and Capacity for Shipbuilding was published by Maritime Research and Innovation UK on Wednesday 13 December 2023. It can be found here: The UK's Academic Capacity & Capability for Shipbuilding - Maritime Research and innovation UK (marri-uk.org)

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 68 of the Land Industrial Strategy, published by his Department on 18 May 2022, with which industry partners he has shared the comprehensive investment plan; and on what dates.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 12 December 2023, to Question 5784.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 12 December 2023 to Question 5784 on Army: Procurement, whether he has made an assessment of the potential impact of the report by the NAO entitled The Equipment Plan 2022 to 2032, HC 907, published 29 November 2023, on the 20-year comprehensive investment plan.

Whilst it is correct that there is planning provision within the Army’s Capability Investment Plan (CIP) that considers the next 20 years, this is not a formally endorsed plan nor is there any intent to publish externally. Moreover, the Secretary of State was clear in his recent Parliamentary Statement on GCAP that - whilst we acknowledge the impact of inflation on the Equipment Plan and take note of the NAO’s report - this represented a ‘snap-shot ‘in time from April, and one which predated the Defence Command Plan Refresh.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 5 December 2023 to Question 3734 on Ministry of Defence: Employment Schemes, how many and what proportion of people who participated in the (a) Rise and (b) Elevate schemes have since left his Department.

The number and proportion of women who participated in Rise and Elevate schemes since their launch in 2021 are as follows:

Rise

In 2021, 15 women (approximately 65% of scheme participants) took part in the first cohort of the Rise scheme. One subsequently left the Ministry of Defence (MOD).

In 2022, 35 women (approximately 73% of scheme participants) took part in the second cohort of the Rise scheme. One subsequently left the MOD.

Elevate

The Elevate scheme lasts for two years so the same cohort participated in both 2021 and 2022. 13 women (approximately 43% of scheme participants) took part and none have left the MOD.

Of those participating in Rise and Elevate during 2021 and 2022, five have left the MOD: three from Rise and two from Elevate out of 101 total participants. This is approximately 5%.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 5 December 2023 to Question 3734 on Ministry of Defence: Employment Schemes, how many women in his Department participated in both the Rise and Elevate schemes in (a) 2021 and (b) 2022.

The number and proportion of women who participated in Rise and Elevate schemes since their launch in 2021 are as follows:

Rise

In 2021, 15 women (approximately 65% of scheme participants) took part in the first cohort of the Rise scheme. One subsequently left the Ministry of Defence (MOD).

In 2022, 35 women (approximately 73% of scheme participants) took part in the second cohort of the Rise scheme. One subsequently left the MOD.

Elevate

The Elevate scheme lasts for two years so the same cohort participated in both 2021 and 2022. 13 women (approximately 43% of scheme participants) took part and none have left the MOD.

Of those participating in Rise and Elevate during 2021 and 2022, five have left the MOD: three from Rise and two from Elevate out of 101 total participants. This is approximately 5%.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of interview panels for roles within his Department did not include any female panel members in the last 12 months.

The information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

It is a requirement of Ministry of Defence Civ HR policy that all selection panels must comprise a minimum of two people, and a recommendation that all panels are diverse, with a mix of different experiences, ethnic backgrounds and should not be of a single gender.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many staff were employed to work on the confidential hotline for fraud in each year since 2019.

The permanent staffing levels for the Confidential Hotline, for each calendar year since 2019, are set out in the table below:

Year

FTE*

2019

4

2020

4

2021

5

2022

5

2023

7

*based on the average Full Time Equivalent staff in post across the year.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2023 to Question 3434 on Ministry of Defence: Fraud, how many cases a) bribery and (b) corruption were referred to the Ministry of Defence Police in each year from 2019 to 2023.

The following numbers of cases of bribery and corruption have been referred by the Confidential Hotline to the Ministry of Defence Police since 2019:

Calendar Year

Corruption Cases Referred

Bribery Cases Referred

2019

0

0

2020

1

1

2021

2

2

2022

1

3

2023*

2

1

*Up to 14 December 2023

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2023 to Question 2506 on Service Justice System Review, what steps he plans to take to ensure that the remaining recommendations are implemented in a timely and effective manner.

Assisted by the organisations that deliver the Service Justice System (SJS), the SJS Review (SJSR) team will undertake an internal assessment to establish a realistic timeframe in which implementation of the remaining recommendations may be achieved. It will report ahead of the next Service Justice Executive Group (SJEG) meeting on 6 March 2024.

Completion of the remaining SJSR recommendations remain a priority for Defence. A dedicated SJSR team is responsible for their delivery and is held to account by the SJEG and the Service Justice Board, which I chair. The remaining recommendations will continue to be delivered, although their greater complexity and the availability of resources to progress individual measures will be key factors in the timeliness of their delivery.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 5 December 2023 to Question 3734 on Ministry of Defence: Employment Schemes, what steps he is taking to ensure that the (a) Rise and (b) Elevate schemes attract a diverse range of talent.

The Rise and Elevate Schemes have been advertised together widely across the department to heighten awareness and attract as much of the Ministry of Defence’s diverse range of talent as possible. Multiple channels were used, including; department-wide MODNet intranet articles; engagement workshops; local communications from Top Level Budget business area talent leads; engagement with staff networks, including the growing Women’s and Race Networks; and information sessions as part of National Inclusion and Learning at Work weeks.

Selection utilised fair, open and merit-based recruitment principles. Best practice for attracting diverse talent included anonymised applications and providing requested reasonable adjustments.

To attract colleagues from some minority groups and support them once they have joined, the Rise and Elevate schemes offer additional coaching before, during and after participation. The Rise and Elevate schemes are part of a much broader talent offer (including other schemes such as Step Up and Step Across and a pilot programme Aspire) that supports the development of diverse talent and provides under-represented groups with the tools to progress into more senior grades. We also actively take part in the wider government talent schemes detailed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/civil-service-talent-management/civil-service-talent-management

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2023 to Question 2508 on Ministry of Defence: Contracts, for what reason two procurement projects had a social value weighting higher than 10%.

In the instances identified the teams used the following weightings 10.2% & 12%.

We do not routinely record individual procurements rationale for using weightings above the 10% minimum.

Teams will determine weightings as part of their evaluation strategy, informed by the drivers and priorities of the individual procurement.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 5 December to Question 3729 on Ministry of Defence: Women, what the criteria are for selecting interview panel members.

All selection panel members must have completed and passed their mandatory learning, this includes Inclusion within the Civil Service or Civil Service Expectations. In addition to this, panel members must have at least one diverse (as defined in the Equality Act 2010) member on the panel. The panel composition is made up from the hiring manager (one grade above the grade being advertised), a representative of the customer facing organisation and a senior HR Business Partner as a minimum.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he is taking to increase diversity in his Department’s leadership positions.

It can take a number of years for recruits into the Civil Service and Armed Forces to reach senior leadership positions, which is why we are working hard to increase the number of people from underrepresented groups including those from ethnic minority backgrounds, women, and LGBT+ individuals.

We guarantee Senior Civil Service recruitment panels are represented by a mix of genders, and also include ethnic minority or disabled members.

Ministry of Defence civilian job adverts are reviewed for use of plain and inclusive language, and we have invested in contracts with organisations such as Vercida to ensure we encourage a diverse applicant pool. Also, the Armed Forces recruitment processes highlight the Services’ commitment to diversity, with the aim of attracting a diverse range of new recruits including potential future senior leaders.

Civilian and military development schemes are available to colleagues from all backgrounds, and we utilise opportunities such as the Future and Senior Leaders Schemes to grow our internal talent pipelines.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 5 December to Question 3729 on Ministry of Defence: Women, what targeted development opportunities his Department provides for female staff below SCS.

Defence Equipment & Support (DE&S) has developed and is running a programme titled ‘Becoming’, which is specifically aimed at women in DE&S below the Senior Civil Servant grade. To date 88 women have completed this programme, with a further 60 women currently participating in the programme. The intention is to run this programme through to 2026, which will result in over 500 women attending in total. In addition to this programme, DE&S also sponsors female colleagues on the Women in Defence mentoring programme, with funded placements for ten mentors and ten mentees.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 5 December to Question 3729 on Ministry of Defence: Women, what steps he is taking to increase opportunities for flexible working in his Department.

Flexible working opportunities along with hybrid working arrangements are clearly stated in job adverts for not only Senior Civil Service positions at Defence Equipment & Support (DE&S), but those in delegated grades as well. DE&S offers job sharing, and part-time roles where requirements of the business allow for these types of working arrangements. Additionally, upon employment all DE&S civil servants have the opportunity to apply for flexible working through their immediate Line Manager.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 5 December to Question 3729 on Ministry of Defence: Women, what the (a) terms of reference and (b) expected outcomes are of the work of the executive search agency.

The terms of reference for the Executive Search company are to attract talented and diverse individuals into Senior Civil Service positions in Defence Equipment & Support. During the current financial year there has been an additional target placed upon them in that 30% of shortlisted candidates selected for interview must have a diverse background as defined in the Equality Act 2010. This has been achieved for all but two of the 11 campaigns completed in financial year 2022-23.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what outreach strategies his Department uses to help increase the number of women employees.

Defence is committed to attracting, recruiting, and developing the best talent from a wide range of skills and backgrounds, to reflect the society we serve. Women are an integral part of our Armed Forces and Civil Service workforce and the Ministry of Defence (MOD) is developing proactive outreach strategies to understand the talent that we have now, and we need in the future. There are a range of activities ongoing across the Department to promote the MOD as an employer of choice, including attending career events, developing engaging online Employee Value Proposition and branding materials, and promoting opportunities on online platforms (such as LinkedIn and Civil Service Careers). Defence is working with colleagues from the Armed Forces and Civil Service teams to ensure that we are maximising effectiveness with our current and future outreach strategies.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)