Nusrat Ghani Portrait

Nusrat Ghani

Conservative - Wealden

Select Committees
Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee (since March 2020)
Panel of Chairs (since June 2020)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Jan 2018 - 13th Feb 2020
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
11th Jul 2019 - 17th Dec 2019
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission
12th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
9th Jan 2018 - 11th Jul 2019
Committees on Arms Export Controls (formerly Quadripartite Committee)
10th Oct 2017 - 20th Feb 2018
Foreign Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 20th Feb 2018
Committees on Arms Export Controls
10th Oct 2017 - 20th Feb 2018
Home Affairs Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Armed Forces Bill Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 24th Nov 2015


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 1st February 2022
09:45
Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Post-pandemic economic growth: State Aid and Post Brexit Competition Policy
1 Feb 2022, 9:45 a.m.
At 10.30am: Oral evidence
Andrea Coscelli - Chief Executive at Competition and Markets Authority
Dame Melanie Dawes - Chief Executive at Ofcom, and Chair at Digital Regulation Cooperation Forum
At 11.30am: Oral evidence
Neil Ross - Head of Policy at techUK
Camilla de Coverly Veale - Head of Regulation at The Coalition for a Digital Economy
Sunil Patel - Chief Data Officer at PwC
View calendar
Division Votes
Wednesday 26th January 2022
Business without Debate
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 292 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 176
Speeches
Monday 24th January 2022
Throwline Stations
Before we begin, I remind Members that they are expected to wear face coverings when not speaking in the debate. …
Written Answers
Thursday 20th January 2022
Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office: World Uyghur Congress
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Minister for Asia has met with …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 13th December 2021
1. Employment and earnings
15 November 2021, payment of £5,000 from Holman Fenwick Willan (law firm), Friary Court, 65 Crutched Friars, London EC3N 2AE, …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Nusrat Ghani has voted in 326 divisions, and 9 times against the majority of their Party.

22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Nusrat Ghani voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 29 Conservative Aye votes vs 318 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 300 Noes - 318
22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Nusrat Ghani voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 297
9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Nusrat Ghani voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 303
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Nusrat Ghani voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative No votes vs 319 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 308
13 Oct 2020 - Public Health: Coronavirus Regulations - View Vote Context
Nusrat Ghani voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 82
17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Nusrat Ghani voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
2 Jun 2020 - Proceedings during the Pandemic - View Vote Context
Nusrat Ghani voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative Aye votes vs 240 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 185 Noes - 242
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Nusrat Ghani voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Nusrat Ghani voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 60 Conservative No votes vs 258 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 385 Noes - 100
View All Nusrat Ghani Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Nigel Adams (Conservative)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
(16 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(15 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(13 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(25 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(21 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(17 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Nusrat Ghani's debates

Wealden Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Mark Allen, aged 18, drowned after jumping into a freezing reservoir on a hot day in June 2018.

In May 2019 we watched whilst 3 throwlines were installed where he died.

Mark could have possibly been saved if they were in place beforehand.

We, the people, demand that health and social care workers are given the right to exercise free will in relation to any medical procedure and so to be able to refuse to take the covid 19 vaccination without fear of facing discrimination at work or in wider society.

The individual must remain sovereign over their own body, discrimination against those who cannot or will not be vaccinated against COVID is incompatible with a free democracy. The Government must take firm action to prevent 'vaccination passports' and discriminatory 'no jab, no job' policies.

In the event of a spike we would like you not to close gyms as a measure to stop any spread of Covid. Also for gyms to not be put in the same group as pubs in terms of risk or importance. Gyms are following strict guidelines and most members are following rules in a sober manner.

Isolation essential to the Government’s strategy for fighting coronavirus, and UK citizens must remain healthy and exercise whilst keeping adequate distance between people. The Government should allow golf courses to open so families or individuals can play golf in order to exercise safely.


Latest EDMs signed by Nusrat Ghani

Nusrat Ghani has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Nusrat Ghani, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Nusrat Ghani

Thursday 4th February 2021

2 Adjournment Debates led by Nusrat Ghani

Wednesday 7th July 2021
Tuesday 15th September 2020

Nusrat Ghani has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Nusrat Ghani has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


81 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3 Other Department Questions
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, pursuant to the Answer of 23 September 2021 to Question 49182, what steps the Government is taking to strengthen the ability of local authorities to encourage faster build out rates.

The issue of slow build out has been raised in response to the Planning for the Future consultation. There are instances where delays in starting or progressing sites may be avoidable and the Government wants to empower authorities with the tools to respond to such cases. Consequently, we are exploring options to support faster build out as part of the wider package of proposed planning reforms. We are continuing to reflect on the many responses received to last year's White Paper and an announcement on next steps will be made.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if he will consider providing step-in rights for local authorities to take control of the land to support development in their area.

The Government is clear that new homes should be built out as soon as possible once planning permission is granted. Where build-out is delayed, it is for councils and developers to work closely together to overcome any barriers.

Local authorities have various compulsory purchase powers they can use to acquire land, including for the delivery of new housing. These are intended as a last resort and there must always be a compelling case in the public interest to justify intervention. Government is keen to encourage local authorities to make more effective use of compulsory purchase powers and we will continue to explore ways of supporting them in doing so.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what steps his Department is taking to help tackle potential staffing shortages that local authorities face in the recruitment of (a) senior planning staff and (b) other planning and housing specialists.

We are considering the responses to the Planning for the Future consultation and will be publishing our response.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, who leads the China National Strategy Implementation Group; when that group last met; and what minutes of that group have been published in relation to Xinjiang.

The China National Strategy Implementation Group (NSIG), a cross-Whitehall group of senior officials, prepares NSC discussions and implements our detailed approach to China in line with policy agreed by the NSC. The China NSIG is chaired by the Deputy National Security Adviser. It meets monthly. Minutes are not published, reflecting normal practice for internal meetings between civil servants.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many British companies have approached his Department seeking advice on supply chains in China following publication of the G7 Trade Ministers' Communique on 28 May 2021.

The Government regularly engages with British companies on supply chain matters, including in China. We recommend that British businesses operating in China should make use of the Overseas Business Risk guidance that is published online. That guidance is regularly updated, with the guidance for China being most recently updated in August 2021.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many British companies have approached his Department seeking supply chain advice in China since 2017; and how that guidance has changed since 2017.

The Government regularly engages with British companies on supply chain matters, including in China. We recommend that British businesses operating in China should make use of the Overseas Business Risk guidance that is published online. That guidance is regularly updated, with the guidance for China being most recently updated in March 2021.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what advice his Department has given British companies operating supply chains in Xinjiang in response to President Biden changing import controls by placing Withhold Release Orders against Hoshine Silicon Industry Co. Ltd; and whether his Department is working with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office to add new companies to the sanctions list in light of the most recent WRO.

All British businesses should take heed of the updated Overseas Business Risk (OBR) guidance on Xinjiang to understand the human rights risks associated with sourcing from that region and to take appropriate remedial action based on their circumstances. The government is engaging businesses to help them understand what this guidance means for them. The Department for International Trade continues to provide practical support to British businesses operating in China, and is happy to answer questions from businesses about this guidance.

On 22 March, my Rt hon Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, announced that the UK has imposed, under our Global Human Rights sanctions regime, asset freezes and travel bans against four Chinese government officials, as well as the Public Security Bureau of the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps, the organisation responsible for enforcing the repressive security policies across many areas of Xinjiang. These measures were taken alongside the US, Canada and the EU, sending a clear message to the Chinese Government that the international community will not turn a blind eye to such serious and systematic violations of basic human rights. We keep all evidence and potential listings under close review.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 18 May 2021 to Question 1109 on Belt and Road Initiative: China, which Belt and Road Initiative projects the Belt and Road Initiative Strategic Oversight Board is engaging with; within which countries it is engaging with those projects; and with which companies it is engaging with as part of those projects.

The Belt and Road Initiative Strategic Oversight Board is not engaging directly with any Belt and Road Initiative projects. The Board provides an oversight function across Government, seeking to ensure UK engagement with the BRI considers the wider spectrum of UK interests, the strategic context, and priorities such as adherence to international standards, particularly with regard to environmental and social issues, debt-sustainability and transparency.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of (a) how many British businesses operate in Xinjiang, China and (b) proportion of those businesses have published Modern Slavery statements.

We do not have data setting out trade and investment flows between the UK and individual Chinese provinces. However, we are undertaking some internal analysis to strengthen our evidence base. Businesses can have complex, multi-tiered global supply chains which create significant challenges in having visibility over working conditions throughout the supply chain. This means that companies need to be constantly vigilant in assessing and addressing their risk exposure. We have provided detailed and specific guidance to UK businesses, and we will continue to engage them on this issue.

Section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 established the UK as the first country in the world to require businesses to report annually on steps taken to prevent modern slavery in their operations and supply chains. In order to assess compliance rates, the Home Office contracted the Business & Human Rights Resource Centre (BHRRC) from September 2019 to January 2020 to undertake an audit of compliance on the Home Office’s behalf. The audit findings on levels of compliance were published on 17 September 2020 in the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner’s annual report (available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/independent-anti-slavery-commissioners-annual-report-2019-to-2020).

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what role his Department has in the Belt and Road Initiative Strategic Oversight Board; who the primary lead is for that Board; what the objectives are of that board; who attends meetings of that board and in what capacity; which other (a) Government departments and (b) external individuals attend meetings of that board; how often such meetings take place; who the lead Minister is of those meetings; and whether the board Minutes are published online.

The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) Strategic Oversight Board is a cross-Government coordination mechanism led by senior Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) officials. Other departments represented on the Board at senior civil service level include HM Treasury, the Ministry of Defence (MoD), the Department for International Trade (DIT), the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), the Ministry of Justice (MoJ), the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), and the Cabinet Office. Through the Board, the FCDO ensures that other departments considering engagement with projects associated with the BRI are aware of the wider spectrum of UK interests, the strategic context, and priorities such as adherence to international standards. This applies to both engagement with specific BRI projects and to Government activities intended to influence the BRI at a more systemic level. BEIS representatives have attended regarding China’s climate influence through the BRI. The Board meets quarterly or as required. Minutes are not published, reflecting normal practice for internal meetings between civil servants. There are no external or Ministerial attendees.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when wedding venues are allowed to resume viewings for prospective couples as part of the reopening during the covid-19 outbreak.

The 'Stay at Home' restrictions will be lifted from 29 March, at which point wedding couples will be able to visit venues which are legally open (indoors in household groups, or outdoors following the Rule of 6 or 2 households). The categories of venues that can legally open under each of the Steps are set out in our ‘COVID-19 Response – Spring 2021’ document.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Covid-19 Response: Spring 2021 published on 22 February 2021, what steps he is taking to issue guidance to wedding venues in (a) East Sussex and Wealden and (b) England on the date on which those venues can resume showing couples around their premises.

BEIS officials and I meet regularly with the industry-led Weddings Taskforce to discuss and take forward the issue of guidance for the reopening of the wedding industry. On 22nd February, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister published the Government’s ‘COVID-19 Response - Spring 2021’. The roadmap is a step-by-step plan to ease restrictions in England cautiously, starting with education. Across the four steps, the roadmap sets out the sequencing and indicative timing for easing restrictions, including those on the wedding sector.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on further support for the live events sector during the covid-19 outbreak.

We continue to engage with the live events sector and HM Treasury to discuss the on-going challenges facing the industry. We will analyse the impact of the funds we have already announced.

The Secretary of State announced an unprecedented £1.57 billion support package for the cultural sector which will benefit the live events sector by providing support to venues and many other cultural organisations to stay open and continue operating. £333 million was awarded to 1973 arts organisations which had applied for grants less than £1 million from Arts Council England. Funded organisations included venues, festivals, theatres, museums and cultural organisations. Over the coming weeks further Culture Recovery Fund awards will be announced - including grants over £1 million, and the Capital Kickstart and Repayable Finance programmes.

The Chancellor has announced the Winter Economy Plan to protect jobs and support businesses over the coming months, once the existing Self-Employment Income Support Scheme and Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme come to end. We are also offering businesses who face a drop in demand for their services and possible cash flow issues generous terms for the repayment of deferred taxes and government-backed loans.

We are continuing to meet with live events stakeholders to provide support and guidance for venues to re-open and stage live events.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to support freelance venue technicians and producers unable to access Government support.

We recognise the crucial role that individuals play in making our arts and creative industries world-leading.

Arts Council England (ACE) has already distributed £104m through its Emergency Response Package to ensure the immediate resilience of this vital sector. The package included £80.7 million of support for cultural organisations, and £23.1 million of financial support for individuals, including freelancers. More than 9000 organisations and individuals were successful in applying for this emergency funding.

To complement Government Funding, ACE have made over £115m of funding available for individuals, including freelancers, to apply for. This includes:

  • £17.1m through the Emergency Response Fund for individuals;

  • £18m through their Developing Your Creative Practice fund;

  • £75m through National Lottery Project Grants (available to both individuals and orgs); and

  • £6m distributed by a series of Benevolent Funds focused on the self-employed.

The Secretary of State announced an unprecedented £1.57 billion support package for the cultural sector which will benefit the live events sector by providing support to venues and many other cultural organisations to stay open and continue operating. £333 million was awarded to 1973 arts organisations which had applied for grants less than £1 million from Arts Council England. Funded organisations included venues, festivals, theatres, museums and cultural organisations. Over the coming weeks further Culture Recovery Fund awards will be announced - including grants over £1 million, and the Capital Kickstart and Repayable Finance programmes.

The Chancellor has announced the Winter Economy Plan to protect jobs and support businesses over the coming months, once the existing Self-Employment Income Support Scheme and Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme come to end. We are also offering businesses who face a drop in demand for their services and possible cash flow issues generous terms for the repayment of deferred taxes and government-backed loans.

We continue to engage with the sector to discuss the on-going challenges facing the industry.

16th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he plans to make an assessment of the implications for his guidance on holding live events and festivals of the ability of venues to accommodate people on the basis of the rule of six.

The Government recognises that the pandemic presents a significant challenge to the live entertainment industry.

As part of the Government’s roadmap to get the performing arts and live entertainment sectors back up and running, venues and organisations are able to put on live performances in front of a socially-distanced audience in line with the latest Covid secure guidance.

Venues and events such as theatres, concert halls and other entertainment venues that are already able to host more than six people, and are COVID-secure in line with the relevant guidance, will continue to be able to do so. Groups within an event must follow restrictions set out in Local Covid Alert levels. In line with the Performing Arts guidance, there cannot be any interaction between separate and distinct groups of no more than 6 (In Medium areas and outdoors) or individual households (in High and Very High areas) at any time (depending on Local Covid Alert Level restrictions).

In Medium Local Covid Alert Level areas it is against the law to gather in groups of more than six people within a venue or event, unless everyone is from the same household or support bubble. In High and Very High areas, it is against the law to gather indoors in groups which do not consist only of the same household and support bubble.

Venues and events located in very high alert level areas should check the specific rules for their areas.


7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to provide (a) financial and (b) teaching support for schools whose staff have to deliver free school meals to individual students’ families; and whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of reintroducing the free school meals voucher scheme.

Now that schools and their kitchens are open, the provision of healthy, nutritious meal options for all children who are in school has resumed. Meals should be available free of charge to all infant pupils, and pupils who meet the benefits-related free school meals eligibility criteria.

Schools should work with their existing suppliers to support eligible pupils who need to be at home due to self-isolation through the provision of food parcels. The guidance advises schools on what to do, and provides information on best practice. This includes details on what makes a good food parcel, as well as recommendations for weekly deliveries, rather than daily ones, to reduce time pressures. Further information on this guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance.

Building on the significant support given to the most vulnerable during the COVID-19 outbreak, the government has also announced a new £170 million COVID Winter Grant Scheme, which will be run by local authorities in England. Funding has already been distributed and will be ring-fenced, with at least 80% earmarked to assist with food and utility bills. This will cover the period up to the end of March 2021.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether teachers will remain responsible for covid-19 track and trace for their students over the Christmas 2020 holiday period.

Schools should ask parents and staff to inform them immediately of the results of a positive COVID-19 test. Schools must take swift action when they become aware that someone who has attended has tested positive for COVID-19. They can contact the dedicated advice service who will inform them of what action is needed based on the latest public health advice.

Based on their advice, schools must send home those people who have been in close contact with the person who has tested positive, advising them to self-isolate for 14 days since they were last in close contact with that person when they were infectious.

In cases where the onset of symptoms has been more than 48 hours since the confirmed case was last in school, parents and guardians of pupils should follow the NHS Test and Trace guidance and this will not usually involve school leaders.

Where necessary any updates to how contact tracing should be managed will be communicated to education settings ahead of the Christmas holiday period. We recognise that teachers deserve the opportunity to rest and recharge over the Christmas break.

15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to review the guidance for overnight residential trips in outdoor education centres for regions with low rates of covid-19 infections.

The Department’s educational visits advice is in line with guidance from Public Health England, the Cabinet Office and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and will be reviewed again in November 2020. The advice can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

The Department continues to work with representatives of the tour industry, devolved administrations, trade unions and other government departments as it works towards the November review.

The Government has made available to UK businesses a number of support measures and more information on business support can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus/business-support. The Government has also recently announced the Job Support Scheme, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/job-support-scheme.

15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to review the guidance for overnight residential trips in outdoor education centres that are covid-safe and can accommodate class bubbles.

The Department’s educational visits advice is in line with guidance from Public Health England, the Cabinet Office and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and will be reviewed again in November 2020. The advice can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

The Department continues to work with representatives of the tour industry, devolved administrations, trade unions and other government departments as it works towards the November review.

The Government has made available to UK businesses a number of support measures and more information on business support can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus/business-support. The Government has also recently announced the Job Support Scheme, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/job-support-scheme.

15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of the ongoing closure of outdoor education centres on children’s physical and mental health.

The Department’s educational visits advice is in line with guidance from Public Health England, the Cabinet Office and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and will be reviewed again in November 2020. The advice can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

The Department continues to work with representatives of the tour industry, devolved administrations, trade unions and other government departments as it works towards the November review.

The Government has made available to UK businesses a number of support measures and more information on business support can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus/business-support. The Government has also recently announced the Job Support Scheme, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/job-support-scheme.

12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department (a) has and (b) plans to fund the cleaning costs incurred by schools in Wealden (i) to make them covid-19 safe and (ii) regardless of whether those schools have a suspected or confirmed case of covid-19.

The Department is providing additional funding to schools, on top of existing budgets, to cover unavoidable costs incurred between March to July due to the COVID-19 outbreak that cannot be met from their existing resources.

Schools, including those in Wealden, have been eligible to claim for: increased premises related costs associated with keeping schools open over the Easter and summer half term holidays; support for free school meals for eligible children who are not in school, where schools are not using the national voucher scheme; and additional cleaning costs, only where they were required due to confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases, over and above the cost of existing cleaning arrangements. The Department has published detailed guidance on the fund at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-schools.

The first claims window for the fund closed on 21 July. All claims for funding within the published cost categories and up to the maximum limit have already been paid. The Department is assessing all other claims, which will be paid later in the autumn if approved.

There will also be a further opportunity in autumn for schools to claim for exceptional costs they faced between March to July. This second claims window will be for available for schools who were unable to claim in the summer and will be for the same eligible cost categories.

Getting all children and young people back into school for the new academic year has been a national priority. As set out in the Department’s reopening guidance, schools should use their existing resources when planning to welcome all children back for the autumn. The guidance can be viewed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-early-years-and-childcare-closures/coronavirus-covid-19-early-years-and-childcare-closures#funding.

10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many individual applications for wildlife management licencees for control of (a) jackdaws, (bi) jays and (c) rooks within (a) European protected sites and (b) buffer zones for those sites were granted by Natural England in the latest period for which information is available.

In 2020 Natural England has refused 19 such individual licences for jackdaws, 13 for jays and 11 for rooks within European protected sites and a 300 metre buffer zone around them.

Natural England has not granted any such licences for jackdaws or rooks this year but has granted one for jays.

Before granting such an individual licence Natural England requires evidence that:

  • there is a genuine problem to resolve or need to satisfy, for which a statutory licensing purpose applies
  • there are no satisfactory alternatives, including non-lethal solutions having been tried or considered and shown to be ineffective
  • the licensed action will contribute to resolving the problem or meeting the need
  • the action to be licensed is proportionate to the problem or need
  • the licenced action will not have an adverse effect on the conservation status of any species or habitat
Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what evidence is required for applications for individual licences for the control of (a) jackdaws, (b) jays and (c) rooks to conserve wildlife within (a) European protected sites and (b) the buffer zones of those sites.

In 2020 Natural England has refused 19 such individual licences for jackdaws, 13 for jays and 11 for rooks within European protected sites and a 300 metre buffer zone around them.

Natural England has not granted any such licences for jackdaws or rooks this year but has granted one for jays.

Before granting such an individual licence Natural England requires evidence that:

  • there is a genuine problem to resolve or need to satisfy, for which a statutory licensing purpose applies
  • there are no satisfactory alternatives, including non-lethal solutions having been tried or considered and shown to be ineffective
  • the licensed action will contribute to resolving the problem or meeting the need
  • the action to be licensed is proportionate to the problem or need
  • the licenced action will not have an adverse effect on the conservation status of any species or habitat
Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many applications for individual licences for the control of (a) jackdaws, (b) jays and (c) rooks to conserve wildlife within European protected sites have been refused.

In 2020 Natural England has refused 19 such individual licences for jackdaws, 13 for jays and 11 for rooks within European protected sites and a 300 metre buffer zone around them.

Natural England has not granted any such licences for jackdaws or rooks this year but has granted one for jays.

Before granting such an individual licence Natural England requires evidence that:

  • there is a genuine problem to resolve or need to satisfy, for which a statutory licensing purpose applies
  • there are no satisfactory alternatives, including non-lethal solutions having been tried or considered and shown to be ineffective
  • the licensed action will contribute to resolving the problem or meeting the need
  • the action to be licensed is proportionate to the problem or need
  • the licenced action will not have an adverse effect on the conservation status of any species or habitat
Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 12 July 2021 to Question 28243 on Overseas Trade: China, whether her Department plans to begin discussions on (a) state-to-state trade or (b) a Sino-British Investment deal with China while that country maintains sanctions on hon. Members, British lawyers and British academics.

HM Government has no plans to negotiate a trade deal with China. We do not have dates for the next United Kingdom-China Joint Economic and Trade Committee (JETCO), which is our long-established trade dialogue with China.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 1 July 2021 to Question 23243 on Forced Labour, what progress has been made on convening a technical discussion with G7 partners to share data and evidence and develop recommendations based on best practices to prevent, identify, and eliminate forced labour in global supply chains.

Department for International Trade officials convened a technical discussion with G7 partners on the 7th of September to share data, evidence and develop recommendations based on best practices to prevent, identify, and eliminate forced labour in global supply chains. Experts from international and domestic organisations and the United Kingdom's Modern Slavery Envoy were invited to identify challenges and opportunities for governments. G7 members shared their respective best practices and identified areas for strengthened cooperation. G7 Trade Ministers will discuss the recommendations when they meet in October.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps her Department is taking in response to President Ursula von der Leyen's State of the Union 2021 address in which she said that the EU will propose a ban on products on its market that have been made with forced labour; and what steps she plans to take to work with President von der Leyen to help ensure that products made by force labour from Xinjiang are not sold in the UK.

HM Government continues to keep its policy response to goods produced using forced labour under close review. We are working closely with our international partners, through the G7 trade track to ensure that global supply chains are free from the use of forced labour. G7 Trade Ministers will aim to identify areas for strengthened cooperation and collective action towards the eradication of forced labour in global supply chains in October.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 5 July 2021 to Question 4244 on Overseas Trade: China, whether her Department plans to progress trade discussions with China while that country maintains sanctions on hon. Members, lawyers and academics.

HM Government has no plans to negotiate a trade deal with China.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 21 June 2021 to Question 15295 on Overseas Trade: China, what steps her Department plans to take in response to the sanctioning of hon. Members by the Chinese Government; what assessment she has made of the compatibility of the statement in that Answer that her Department's trade policy with China is rooted in the UK's values and interests with trade with that country in the context of the sanctioning of those hon. Members; and what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of human rights violations committed against Uyghur people in Xinjiang, China.

I refer my hon. Friend to the answers I gave her on 26th May (UIN: 5209), 7th June (UIN: 8649) and 14th June (UIN: 13118) with regard to HM Government’s response to Chinese sanctions, including on trade policy; and to those given by my Rt. hon Friend the Minister of State for Trade Policy on 24th May (UIN: 3030) and 21st June (UIN: 15295) with regard to the violations of rights in Xinjiang.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions she has had with her European counterparts on freezing trade or bilateral trade discussions with China following the sanctions placed on hon. Members of Parliament and the EU's freezing of the EU-China Comprehensive Agreement on Investment.

China’s attempt to silence those highlighting violations of human rights in Xinjiang is unwarranted and unacceptable. The Prime Minister has made clear that the freedom to speak out in opposition to human rights violations is fundamental and HM Government stands firmly with those who have been sanctioned. Whilst the Comprehensive Agreement on Investment is a matter for the EU, the United Kingdom will continue to work alongside the EU and other partners to send the clearest possible signal of the international community’s serious concern and our collective willingness to act.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which (a) organisations, (b) Government departments, (c) Non-Governmental Organisations and (d) others attended the roundtables on forced labour in Xinjiang in March 2021.

I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave on 24 May, UIN: 3032.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to Answer of 14 June 2021 to Question 13118 on Trade Agreements, whether it is her policy to increase bilateral trade with China.

Our approach to China remains clear-eyed and rooted in our values and our interests. We will pursue a positive economic relationship with China, including through mutually beneficial trade, whilst adhering to our values.

China is an authoritarian state with different values to the UK. The UK consistently acts on matters on which we do not agree, including human rights. In January 2021, the government announced measures to ensure UK businesses are not complicit in human rights violations against Uyghur people in Xinjiang.

We are committed to making the global trading system free and fair. We will call out unfair trading practices wherever they arise. Some market-distorting economic practices undermine the functioning of the global trading system and prevent free and fair trade. It is in everyone’s interest, including China’s, to see this system strengthened.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 7th June 2021 to Question 8649 on Trade Agreements, what impact, if any, sanctions placed upon Members of the UK Parliament by the People’s Republic of China have had on trade policy.

The Prime Minister has made clear that the freedom of Parliamentarians to speak out in opposition to violations of rights and responsibilities is fundamental, and that is why HM Government stands firmly with all those who have been sanctioned.

Our approach to China is rooted in our values and interests. We want a mutually beneficial trading relationship, but we will not sacrifice our values, and we have no plans to negotiate a trade deal with China.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what measures are in place to ensure that her Department adheres to sanctions placed on the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps (XPCC) by the Government under the Global Human Rights Regulations.

Under the Global Human Rights Regulations, British businesses must comply with sanctions against the individuals and entities appearing on a regularly updated GOV.UK list. Businesses continue to be notified about sanctions and designated persons too.

On 22nd March, HM Government took the significant step of imposing asset freezes and travel bans against four senior Chinese officials as well as the Public Security Bureau of the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps responsible for the serious violations of rights and responsibilities that take place in Xinjiang.

The United Kingdom will continue to work alongside its international partners to send the clearest possible signal of the international community’s serious concern and our collective willingness to act on this issue.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 26 May 2021 to Question 5209 on Trade Agreements, if the Government will make it its policy to refuse to negotiate trade agreements with any country that has sanctioned hon. Members of the UK Parliament.

I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave her to the same question on 26th May 2021 (UIN: 5209).

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if the Government will make it its policy to refuse to negotiate trade deals with any country that has sanctioned hon. Members of the UK Parliament.

Trade underpins stable, open and prosperous global economies, promoting property rights and the rule of law.

We have no plans to negotiate a trade deal with China but, through our ambitious programme of trade negotiations, we will build relationships with other trading partners to break down barriers to trade, supporting growth in every corner of our country as we become a truly Global Britain.

The United Kingdom has long promoted her values globally. We are clear that more trade does not have to come at the expense of our values.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the outcomes of the comprehensive programme of engagement with business and UK trade bodies set out as part of the Overseas Business Risk guidance.

HMG’s Overseas Business Risk guidance provides geopolitical and economic analysis on over 100 overseas markets to new and expanding exporters. The guidance, which is available on GOV.UK, also provides information on potential risks including human rights issues, bribery and corruption, terrorism, criminal activity and intellectual property. Section 6.1 of the guidance for China was updated on 12 January 2021 following a change in the government’s policy on Xinjiang.

HMG is keen to encourage businesses to share their perspectives on how they are responding to the situation in Xinjiang. Following the update to the guidance, HMG’s Ministers engaged with UK businesses to make clear that they should act without delay to ensure they are not complicit in any way in these gross violations of human rights.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which (a) organisations, (b) Government Departments, (c) NGOs and (d) others attended the roundtables on forced labour in Xinjiang in March 2021; what the job titles were of those representing organisations; and how many of those attendee organisations have (i) published a Modern Slavery statement and (ii) removed their supply chains from Xinjiang.

On 10th and 11th March, the Secretary of State for International Trade hosted two roundtables on the issue of forced labour in Xinjiang. 22 organisations attended, including representatives from the technology and retail sectors, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and business organisations.

Under section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, commercial organisations with a turnover of £36m or more, that a have a footprint in the United Kingdom, are required to publish a modern slavery statement. Organisations are responsible for determining whether the legislation applies to them and those in scope of the Act are required to publish statements for each financial year online.

HM Government is keen to encourage businesses to share their perspectives on how they are responding to the situation in Xinjiang, and we continue to make clear that they should act without delay to make sure they are not complicit in any way in the violation of rights and responsibilities.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the scope of the Global Travel Taskforce’s 12 April 2021 report on the reopening of international travel is planned to include the cruise sector for national cruises and international cruises.

The Global Travel Taskforce report will consider a safe and sustainable reopening of international travel. International cruises will be included within the scope of this report.

Domestic cruises within England will restart under step three of the Government’s Roadmap out of lockdown. This will align with the opening up of domestic indoor tourism and hospitality and will occur no earlier than 17 May.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to protect the interests of UK recreational boaters who travel to the EU after the end of the transition period.

Recreational vessels bought in the UK after the end of transition or another non-EU country will be subject to VAT rules when entering the customs territory of the EU. To avoid payment of customs duties or VAT, owners would be able to use the EU’s temporary admission procedure. The rules for temporary admission are confirmed in the EU Commission guidance.

In addition, national rules will apply to recreational vessels in individual EU Member States. In most cases these will not be affected by the end of the Transition Period. We are aware that prospective changes to these rules in some EU Member States might affect UK recreational boaters. The Government is making representations to these Member States on behalf of recreational boaters affected by such national legislation. However, it is for recreational boaters to ensure they meet national rules that apply in the relevant Member State.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with representatives of the cruise ship sector on resumption of their operations as covid-19 restrictions are eased.

I fully recognise the impact that the global COVID-19 pandemic has had on the UK cruise sector and I would like to place on record my recognition of the proactive action it took to suspend operations and to work tirelessly with Government to repatriate thousands of passengers and crew.

The cruise sector and, the supply chains it supports, makes a highly significant contribution to the UK economy with the industry estimating that it generates a total of around £10bn for the Country’s economy each year.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, my Department’s officials and I have held regular calls with the cruise sector on a wide range of operational and financial issues and continue to do so. We will actively support the sector as it develops a pathway towards the safe resumption of cruises which I know many millions of people in the UK have enjoyed and will want to again.

19th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the cruise ship sector will be required to follow the covid-19 public health guidelines as set out for the public transport sector or the hospitality industry.

The Department has been working closely with the cruise industry to assist in their development of robust guidance to enable a safe resumption of operations.

Due to the variety of environments on board a cruise ship, the cruise industry will apply guidelines for both the hospitality and transport sector. These should be applied where appropriate.

Officials continue to work with the cruise industry, together with other government departments, including Public Health England, to ensure the necessary measures and protocols are put in place.

19th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the economic contribution was of the cruise ship sector to the UK economy in 2019; and what estimate he has made of that economic contribution in 2020.

I fully recognise the impact that the global COVID-19 pandemic has had on the UK cruise sector and I would like to place on record my recognition of the proactive action it took to suspend operations and to work tirelessly with Government to repatriate thousands of passengers and crew.

The cruise sector and, the supply chains it supports, makes a highly significant contribution to the UK economy with the industry estimating that it generates a total of around £10bn for the Country’s economy each year.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, my Department’s officials and I have held regular calls with the cruise sector on a wide range of operational and financial issues and continue to do so. We will actively support the sector as it develops a pathway towards the safe resumption of cruises which I know many millions of people in the UK have enjoyed and will want to again.

12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the UK Government has made an assessment under the Genocide Convention of (a) whether genocide is taking place and (b) the level of risk of genocide in Xinjiang.

Any judgment as to whether genocide has occurred is a matter for a competent court, rather than for governments or non-judicial bodies. This does not prevent us from taking robust action to address serious violations of human rights, as we are doing in the case of Xinjiang.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she has met with representatives of the World Uyghur Congress.

As referenced in my response to written questions 100589 and 100590, FCDO Ministers and officials regularly meet members of the Uyghur diaspora and maintain a dialogue with leading human rights Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) about the situation in Xinjiang. Most recently, in December, I hosted a roundtable for human rights NGOs attended by a representative of the World Uyghur Congress.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether her Department has made an assessment of the level of potential risk of genocide regarding treatment of Uyghurs and other minorities in the Uyghur region of China, in response to the judgment of the International Court of Justice in Bosnia & Herzegovina v Serbia & Montenegro, 2007.

Any judgment as to whether genocide has occurred is a matter for a competent court, rather than for governments or non-judicial bodies. This does not prevent us from taking robust action to address serious violations of human rights, as we are doing in the case of Xinjiang.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Minister for Asia has met with representatives of the World Uyghur Congress.

As referenced in my response to written questions 100589 and 100590, FCDO Ministers and officials regularly meet members of the Uyghur diaspora and maintain a dialogue with leading human rights Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) about the situation in Xinjiang. Most recently, in December, I hosted a roundtable for human rights NGOs attended by a representative of the World Uyghur Congress.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Minister for Asia has met people involved in the Uyghur Tribunal (a) before and (b) after that tribunal's verdict of Uyghur genocide in Xinjiang.

FCDO Ministers and senior officials have engaged extensively with the Chair of the Uyghur Tribunal, Sir Geoffrey Nice, over the last year to discuss the Tribunal's work. We recognise and welcome the Tribunal's contribution to building international awareness and understanding of the human rights violations occurring in Xinjiang.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Minister for Asia made representations to the Chinese Ambassador on the matter of slave labour in UK supply chains with particular reference to Xinjiang during their meeting of 15 December 2021; and whether the Ambassador provided assurances that UK customers will not be purchasing Uyghur slave made goods.

As referenced in my response to written questions 98338 and 98339, I [Minister Milling] raised the UK's serious concerns regarding human rights in Xinjiang during my meeting with Ambassador Zheng on 15 December. The UK has taken robust action to help ensure that no British organisations are profiting from or contributing to human rights violations against the Uyghurs or other minorities. We have introduced new guidance for UK businesses on the risks of doing business in Xinjiang - supported by a programme of Ministerial engagement - and announced enhanced export controls, as well as a commitment to introduce financial penalties for non-compliance with section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she has people involved in the Uyghur Tribunal (a) before and (b) after that tribunal's verdict of Uyghur genocide in Xinjiang.

FCDO Ministers and senior officials have engaged extensively with the Chair of the Uyghur Tribunal, Sir Geoffrey Nice, over the last year to discuss the Tribunal's work. We recognise and welcome the Tribunal's contribution to building international awareness and understanding of the human rights violations occurring in Xinjiang.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, in the context of the conviction of Hang-tung Chow in Hong Kong and with reference to the Six-monthly report on Hong Kong 1 January to 30 June 2021, published on 14 December 2021, if she will revise her assessment that British judges can continue to play a positive role in supporting this judicial independence.

Hong Kong authorities' decision to target leading pro-democracy figures for prosecution is unacceptable. Freedom of expression and the right to peaceful protest, which are protected in both the Joint Declaration and the Basic Law, are fundamental to Hong Kong's way of life.

The National Security Law poses real questions for the rule of law in Hong Kong and the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms promised by China in the Joint Declaration. Our assessment of Hong Kong's judicial independence is increasingly finely balanced. We will continue to follow developments in this area closely.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Minister for Asia has met people involved in the World Uyghur Congress.

FCDO Ministers and officials regularly meet members of the Uyghur diaspora and maintain a dialogue with leading human rights Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) about the situation in Xinjiang. Most recently, in December, I hosted a roundtable for human rights NGOs attended by a representative of the World Uyghur Congress.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when the Minister for Asia met with the Chinese Ambassador Zheng Zeguang on 15 December 2021, whether she raised the cases of Parliamentarians who have been sanctioned by the People's Republic of China; and what the outcome of that meeting was.

In my meeting with Ambassador Zheng on 15 December 2021, I raised the UK's serious concerns regarding human rights in Xinjiang, noting these concerns are widely shared by the international community. I urged the Chinese Government to engage with the evidence provided by the Uyghur Tribunal. I also raised the unacceptable and unwarranted sanctions imposed upon UK Parliamentarians by the People's Republic of China. I emphasised the importance of freedom of speech and Parliamentary independence in the UK, as well as the necessity for Parliamentarians to be able to raise their legitimate concerns.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Minister for Asia has met with the Parliamentarians and academics who were sanctioned by the People's Republic of China.

The Foreign Secretary is clear that the freedom to speak out in opposition to human rights violations is fundamental, and the Government stands firmly with those who have been sanctioned.

The Prime Minister and former Foreign Secretary held meetings with the Parliamentarians named in China's announcement in March 2021, and Lord Ahmad has met other individuals and entities targeted. Through this engagement we have provided guidance and ongoing support, including a designated FCDO point of contact, and specialist briefing from relevant Government departments. We continue to offer our full support to those affected.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when the Minister for Asia met with the Chinese Ambassador Zheng Zeguang on 15 December 2021, whether she discussed the Uyghur Tribunal’s verdict of genocide with the Ambassador; what the outcome of that meeting was; and who was present at that meeting.

In my meeting with Ambassador Zheng on 15 December 2021, I raised the UK's serious concerns regarding human rights in Xinjiang, noting these concerns are widely shared by the international community. I urged the Chinese Government to engage with the evidence provided by the Uyghur Tribunal. I also raised the unacceptable and unwarranted sanctions imposed upon UK Parliamentarians by the People's Republic of China. I emphasised the importance of freedom of speech and Parliamentary independence in the UK, as well as the necessity for Parliamentarians to be able to raise their legitimate concerns.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether officials from the diplomatic service, including ambassadors and civil servants, were present at the diplomatic briefing on the Beijing 2022 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games held on 26 November 2021.

Officials from British Embassy Beijing attended the briefing on 26 November, alongside diplomats from a range of countries.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has (a) asked for, (b) had sight of and (c) discussed the evidence used by the US Administration to declare genocide in Xinjiang.

It is the long-standing policy of the UK Government that any judgment as to whether genocide has occurred is a matter for a competent court. The UK's approach, shared by many countries around the world, does not prevent us from taking action to address serious human rights violations, as we have done in the case of Xinjiang. The US has a different process that is not linked to a court decision. We regularly discuss the situation in Xinjiang and related questions of policy with the US.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, which Minister will be responsible for overseeing the UK’s role in the Build Back Better World initiative.

The Foreign and Development Minister will have lead responsibility for overseeing the UK's role in the B3W initiative launched by G7 leaders.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the genocide determination by the US Administration in respect of the treatment by China of Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities.

It is the long-standing policy of the UK Government that any judgment as to whether genocide has occurred is a matter for a competent court. The US has a different process that is not linked to a court decision. The UK's approach, shared by many countries around the world, does not prevent us from taking action to address serious human rights violations, as we have done in the case of Xinjiang.

On 22 March, the Foreign Secretary announced that the UK had imposed, under the Global Human Rights sanctions regime, asset freezes and travel bans against four Chinese government officials, as well as the Public Security Bureau of the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps. These measures were taken alongside the US, Canada and the EU, sending a clear message to the Chinese Government that the international community will not turn a blind eye to such serious and systematic violations of basic human rights.

The UK has also led international efforts to holding China to account at the United Nations. On 22 June, a global UK diplomatic effort helped deliver the support of over 40 countries for a statement on Xinjiang at the UN Human Rights Council calling on China to grant unfettered access to the region for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. We also led the first joint statements on this issue at the UN Human Rights Council in June 2020 and the UN General Assembly Third Committee in October 2019. The growing caucus of international concern reflects UK diplomatic leadership.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to his sanctioning of the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps XPCC, what penalties apply to UK-based companies that continue to contract with the XPCC.

On 22 March, we imposed sanctions under the Global Human Rights sanctions regime against the Public Security Bureau of the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps, along with four senior Chinese officials responsible for the serious human rights violations that take place in Xinjiang.

Full details of the prohibitions put in place by financial sanctions can be found in the General Guidance for Financial Sanctions published by the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/961516/General_Guidance_-_UK_Financial_Sanctions.pdf. Breaching financial sanctions is a criminal offence and may result in a prosecution or a monetary penalty. The maximum value of a monetary penalty ranges from 50% of the value of total breach, or £1 million - whichever is the greater value.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the viability of the route to court determination regarding alleged genocide and crimes against humanity perpetrated by the People's Republic of China against Uyghurs and other predominantly Turkic minorities in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, if he will review his policy on genocide determination.

The Government remains deeply concerned about the human rights situation in Xinjiang, and continues to monitor closely the significant volume of credible evidence suggesting that serious, systemic human rights violations are occurring in the region. On 22 March, we took the significant step of imposing asset freezes and travel bans against four senior Chinese officials as well as a security body responsible for the egregious human rights violations. By acting with 30 other countries we increased the reach and impact of these measures and sent the clearest possible signal of the international community's serious concern and collective willingness to act. It remains the long-standing policy of the UK Government that any judgment as to whether genocide has occurred is a matter for a competent court, rather than for governments or non-judicial bodies. It should be decided after consideration of all the evidence available in the context of a credible judicial process.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what role his Department has in the Beijing COP26 Core Group; what the aim is of that Core Group; who attends the meetings of that group and in what capacity; which other external individuals attend those meetings; how often such meetings take place; who the lead Minister is of those group meetings; and whether the group Minutes are published online.

The 'Beijing COP26 Core Group' is an internal meeting of officials from different teams across the British Embassy in Beijing. This includes experts leading on climate, environment, energy, transport, nature, green finance, international trade, communications, and multilateral policy, in support of the UK's COP26 objectives. The group usually meets fortnightly, supplemented by other ad hoc meetings. Minutes are not taken or published, reflecting normal practice for many internal meetings between civil servants. There are no external or Ministerial attendees.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the conclusions of the UNITAD investigations led by Karim Khan QC, if the Government will use the term genocide in connection with atrocities perpetrated by ISIL against Yazidis and other minorities in Northern Iraq and Syria.

The UK Government's long standing policy is that any determination of genocide should only be made by competent courts, rather than for governments or non-judicial bodies.

In order to support the prosecution of Daesh crimes in Iraq, the UK has contributed nearly £2 million to the UN Investigative Team for the Accountability of Daesh (UNITAD) and is encouraging close co-operation between UNITAD and the Government of Iraq to achieve justice for Daesh's victims.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the implications for its policies of the legal opinion by Alison Macdonald QC, Jackie McArthur, Naomi Hart and Lorraine Aboagye on International criminal responsibility for crimes against humanity and genocide against the Uyghur population in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, published on 26 January 2021.

The Government has taken careful note of the recently published legal opinion by Alison Macdonald QC et al. Our deep concern about the serious and widespread human rights violations in Xinjiang is a matter of record. The UK has led international efforts to hold China to account, and on 12 January the Foreign Secretary announced a package of measures to help ensure that British organisations, whether public or private sector, are not complicit in, nor profiting from, the human rights violations in Xinjiang.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 20 January 2021, Official Report, column 959, that that the attribution of genocide is a judicial matter, whether it is his policy that the recognition of genocide is a matter for the courts.

Genocide is an international crime with a strict legal meaning. It is the policy of the UK Government that any judgment on whether genocide has occurred is a matter for competent courts, rather than for governments or other non-judicial bodies. Competent courts include international courts and domestic criminal courts meeting international standards of due process. The determination as to whether a situation constitutes genocide is factually and legally complex and should only be made by a competent court following a careful and detailed examination.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the joint statement by the UN World Tourism Organisation and the International Maritime Organisation on the safe resumption of cruise ship operations following the COVID-19 pandemic published on 5th November 2020, what his timescale is for updating his Department's ocean cruise travel advice published on 9 July 2020.

The FCDO advises against ocean cruising based on medical risk assessments by public health officials. We keep this advice under continuous review.

The FCDO remains fully committed to working closely with public health experts, the Department for Transport and key industry leaders to agree on the steps required to restart cruises safely.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with his US counterpart on the evidence base for that country's imposition of Magnitsky sanctions on Chinese officials for the abuse of Uighur minorities in Xinjiang; and what recent assessment he has made of whether evidence against those officials meets the threshold required for imposition of UK sanctions.

On 6 July, the UK Government established the Global Human Rights ('Magnitsky') sanctions regime by laying regulations in Parliament. It is not appropriate to speculate who may be designated under this sanctions regime in the future, as to do so could reduce the impact of the designations. We are aware of the US designations under their regime, and we keep all evidence and potential listings under close review. The UK has taken a leading international role in holding China to account for its human rights violations in Xinjiang, both at the UN and by raising our concerns directly with Chinese authorities. Most recently, on 6 October, the UK and 38 other countries joined a statement at the UN Third Committee in New York expressing deep concern at the situation in Xinjiang, including the mass detention of Uyghurs in detention camps.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department has taken to provide assurance that infrastructure funding supports housing development in places where rigid strategies exist such as the Road Investment Strategy.

It is important that local authorities plan well for the infrastructure required to support housing development, taking into account Government funding streams such as the Road Investment Strategy and securing appropriate contributions from developers. Developer contributions can be secured through section 106 planning obligations or the Community Infrastructure Levy. The 'Planning for the Future' White Paper' proposes a new 'Infrastructure Levy' to replace the existing system. The consultation on 'Planning for the Future' closed on 29 October 2020 and we will be responding formally.

The Government published its second Road Investment Strategy in October 2019, which allocated grant funding of £27.4 billion from 2020-2025. Other funding streams include NHS England, the Environment Agency, and various schools funding programmes. We recognise there is still a need for further infrastructure funding, which is why the Government committed £4.3 billion from the Housing Infrastructure Fund for 133 projects across England unlocking over 300,000 homes.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will review the five-year plan to assume that homes will be built within five years to remove incentives for developers to delay development and speculate on land.

The National Planning Policy Framework is clear that local planning authorities should identify and update annually a supply of specific deliverable sites sufficient to provide a minimum of five years' worth of housing against their housing requirement set out in adopted strategic policies.

The Government wants to see homes built faster and expects house builders to build out as soon as possible once planning permission is granted.

Where build-out is delayed, it is for councils and developers to work closely together to overcome any barriers. To support them, this Government is looking at strengthening the tools available to local authorities to encourage faster build out rates. We are considering the responses to the Planning for the Future consultation and will publish our response.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will provide local councils with the ability to raise a Community Infrastructure Levy within one year of the grant of consent to ensure delivery of homes and infrastructure delivery.

We have consulted on introducing a new infrastructure levy to replace section 106 planning obligations and the Community Infrastructure Levy. We are currently analysing the 44,000 responses to the 'Planning for the Future' consultation and will be publishing our response.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, for what reason housing allocations in the Wealden district council area are based not on 2018 population projections but on 2014 data used in the Current Standard Method.

Following consultation last year on the standard method for assessing local housing need, and after a year of uncertainty due to COVID-19, it became apparent that it was particularly important to provide stability and certainty for plan-making and decision-making. This is so local areas can plan based on a method and level of ambition that they are familiar with.

The Government therefore carefully considered whether to use the 2018-based household projections and concluded that, in the interests of stability for local planning and for local communities, it will continue to expect only the use of the 2014-based household projections. This gives local areas the best possible chance of meeting the deadline of December 2023, the date by which all authorities are expected to have up-to-date plans.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of the community infrastructure levy and infrastructure levy falling due within 12 months of planning permission being granted to help deliver infrastructure with and in advance of housing.

The Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) must be paid within sixty days of works commencing on a development, unless an authority chooses to exercise discretion by setting its own instalment policy allowing payment over a longer term. An authority is also able to make use of temporary flexibilities to defer payments from small or medium enterprises, introduced in response to COVID-19. Overall therefore, CIL payments can, and often will, be payable, and be available to an authority to fund infrastructure, prior to the completion of the development liable to pay.

However, we intend to reform the current approach to developer contributions by creating a new, single system, the Infrastructure Levy. This new levy would be a flat rate, value-based charge, set nationally, at either a single rate, or at area specific rates, and charged on the final value of a development. We also intend to allow authorities to borrow against revenues from the new levy to better enable them to forward fund infrastructure.

Our proposals were set out in our ‘Planning for the Future’ consultation which closed on 29 October. We are analysing the consultation feedback thoroughly and holding meetings with industry and local authority representatives to understand the effects of our proposals. We will respond formally as soon as possible.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to issue advice to local authorities on property transactions that have commenced and not completed and searches have been lodged with them, prior to the deadline for the stamp duty holiday being applied.

We have always been clear to local authorities that they should complete local searches within 10 working days and we continue to monitor their performance. Authorities are aware of the importance of home moves at this time and are balancing this with the need to respond to COVID-19. We have no plans to issue any further advice in respect of the SDLT holiday.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the Government plans to extend the maximum sentence for necrophilia from two years for cases that are consecutive.

The government is reviewing the statutory maximum penalty available for the offence of sexual penetration of a corpse under section 70 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003. This review is taking place alongside the independent inquiry into the events surrounding David Fuller’s horrific offending in hospitals in Kent. That inquiry is due to publish interim findings shortly, with a final report published at a later date. Our review of available maximum penalties is likely to follow similar timescales, to ensure findings from the wider inquiry can be taken into account.

The current statutory maximum penalty is for one offence; where more than one offence is sentenced at the same time, each offence will be sentenced individually and the overall sentence passed will reflect the totality of offending behaviour, which may mean sentences being served consecutively. Our review of the statutory maximum penalty is considering instances of the commission of multiple, as well as single, offences.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the Government's timescale is for the decision on whether to extend the maximum sentence for necrophilia.

The government is reviewing the statutory maximum penalty available for the offence of sexual penetration of a corpse under section 70 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003. This review is taking place alongside the independent inquiry into the events surrounding David Fuller’s horrific offending in hospitals in Kent. That inquiry is due to publish interim findings shortly, with a final report published at a later date. Our review of available maximum penalties is likely to follow similar timescales, to ensure findings from the wider inquiry can be taken into account.

The current statutory maximum penalty is for one offence; where more than one offence is sentenced at the same time, each offence will be sentenced individually and the overall sentence passed will reflect the totality of offending behaviour, which may mean sentences being served consecutively. Our review of the statutory maximum penalty is considering instances of the commission of multiple, as well as single, offences.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)