David Burrowes

Conservative - Former Member for Enfield, Southgate

Home Affairs Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Public Accounts Committee
23rd Jun 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Minister (Justice)
3rd Jul 2007 - 6th May 2010
Public Administration Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 6th May 2010
Draft Human Tissue and Embryos Bill (Joint Committee)
2nd May 2007 - 8th Aug 2007
Draft Legal Services Bill (Joint Committee)
17th May 2006 - 25th Jul 2006
Armed Forces Bill Committee
19th Dec 2005 - 9th May 2006


Division Voting information

David Burrowes has voted in 1980 divisions, and 20 times against the majority of their Party.

9 Mar 2016 - Enterprise Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 25 Conservative Aye votes vs 281 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 317 Noes - 286
16 Nov 2015 - Council of Europe - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative Aye votes vs 170 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 34 Noes - 171
24 Nov 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 47 Conservative Aye votes vs 117 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 204 Noes - 125
24 Nov 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 71 Conservative Aye votes vs 85 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 119 Noes - 193
27 Oct 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 110 Conservative Aye votes vs 135 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 166 Noes - 340
5 Mar 2014 - Judgments - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 83 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 360 Noes - 104
5 Mar 2014 - Registration of Births, deaths and marriages etc - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 81 Conservative No votes vs 124 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 363 Noes - 100
5 Mar 2014 - Registration of births, deaths and marriages etc - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 83 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 366 Noes - 103
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 81 Conservative No votes vs 126 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 100
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 84 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 365 Noes - 103
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 79 Conservative No votes vs 126 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 368 Noes - 98
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 87 Conservative No votes vs 142 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 241 Noes - 256
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 93 Conservative Aye votes vs 139 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 267 Noes - 233
7 Sep 2011 - Health and Social Care (Re-committed) Bill - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 94 Conservative Aye votes vs 115 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 118 Noes - 368
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 40 Conservative Aye votes vs 70 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 71 Noes - 393
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 50 Conservative Aye votes vs 67 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 84 Noes - 387
6 May 2008 - Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 48 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 0 Noes - 0
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Conservative Aye votes vs 134 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 178 Noes - 392
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 75 Conservative Aye votes vs 96 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 267
1 Nov 2006 - Legislative Process - View Vote Context
David Burrowes voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative Aye votes vs 105 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 122 Noes - 354
View All David Burrowes Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
David Cameron (Conservative)
(47 debate interactions)
Theresa May (Conservative)
(42 debate interactions)
Chris Grayling (Conservative)
(33 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(154 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(118 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(101 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all David Burrowes's debates

Latest EDMs signed by David Burrowes

8th November 2016
David Burrowes signed this EDM on Thursday 24th November 2016

TRIGGERING OF ARTICLE 50

Tabled by: John Penrose (Conservative - Weston-super-Mare)
That this House supports the triggering of Article 50 of the Treaty on the European Union according to the Government's timetable.
40 signatures
(Most recent: 6 Dec 2016)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 35
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Independent: 1
View All David Burrowes's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by David Burrowes, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by David Burrowes

Monday 10th October 2016

David Burrowes has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by David Burrowes


A Bill to enable a person to make his or her instructions concerning burial and related matters binding on their personal representative or beneficiary; to enable a person to make provision about the use of a burial space he or she acquired while living after the person’s burial; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 17th January 2017
(Read Debate)

A Bill to equalise the assessment and enforcement of child maintenance arrangements of children of self-employed parents with that of children of other employed parents; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 12th May 2017

David Burrowes has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


168 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
14 Other Department Questions
11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, pursuant to the Answer of 20 October 2015 to Question 12101, for what reasons the Family Test assessment on Sunday trading has not yet been published; when he expects that assessment to be published; and if he will ensure that that assessment is published before consideration of new clauses in the Enterprise Bill [Lords].

Since the answer of 20 October 2015, the Government has been carefully considering the issues raised in the consultation, and plans to publish the Impact Assessment, including results of the family test, shortly.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many (a) business representative bodies, (b) central government bodies, (c) charity and social enterprises, (d) individuals, (e) large businesses, (f) legal representatives, (g) local authorities, (h) medium-sized businesses, (i) micro businesses, (j) religious organisations, (k) small businesses, (l) trade union or staff associations and (m) other bodies responded to the consultation on Sunday trading devolution; how many of each category (i) supported and (ii) opposed devolution; and if he will make a statement.

The Department does not hold full data from this consultation broken down by specific question as a large portion of respondents chose to respond in their own words rather than addressing the consultation questions directly, and/or did not indicate the type of organisation they represented.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what proportion of responses to the Sunday trading consultation supported the devolution of Sunday trading hours.

The Department does not hold full data from this consultation broken down by specific question as a large portion of respondents chose to respond in their own words rather than addressing the consultation questions directly, and/or did not indicate the type of organisation they represented.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many responses his Department received from (a) convenience stores, (b) shop workers and (c) faith groups to the consultation on Sunday trading devolution.

The Department does not hold full data from this consultation broken down by specific question as a large portion of respondents chose to respond in their own words rather than addressing the consultation questions directly, and/or did not indicate the type of organisation they represented.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of Sunday trading devolution on the premium pay of shopworkers.

In view of the will of the House of Commons, we are no longer proposing to give local authorities the ability to extend the Sunday trading hours of large shops.

21st Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, pursuant to the Answer of 21 October 2015 from the Prime Minister, Official Report, column 947, when the results of the Government's consultation on Sunday trading will be published.

We will publish the results of the consultation on Sunday trading shortly.

15th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, pursuant to the Answer to Question 10161 of 22 September 2015, on Sunday trading, when he plans to publish the results of the Family Test.

Pursuant to the answer given to Question 10161 of 22 September 2015, we still anticipate that the results of the Family Test will be published alongside the Government’s response to the consultation.

14th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, when the Government plans to publish a family impact assessment relating to the proposal to devolve and deregulate Sunday trading laws.

We expect to publish the results of the Family Test alongside the Government’s response to the consultation shortly.

14th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many responses have been received to the consultation on the devolution of Sunday trading laws from (a) small businesses, (b) large businesses, (c) trades unions, (d) faith groups, (e) individuals and (f) others.

The consultation closed on 16 September and the Department is currently in the process of analysing the responses. A full breakdown of the number of responses by category will be provided as part of the Government’s response to the consultation.

14th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, when his Department plans to publish the results of its consultation on Sunday trading.

The Government is determined to devolve powers previously held in Whitehall to local areas. We are pleased that many business, shoppers and interested groups have taken this opportunity to share their views on giving local leaders the power to determine whether extended Sunday trading is right for their area. We are currently considering all the responses and will publish the Government’s response in due course.

11th Jun 2015
To ask the Prime Minister, pursuant to the contribution of 10 June 2015, Official Report, column 1210, what steps he is taking to ensure the (a) ratification of the Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict and (b) implementation of the EU Directive on The Return of Cultural Objects.

The Government is looking at options for introducing the necessary legislation to allow UK ratification of the Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict.

Directive 93/7/EEC of 15 March 1993 on the return of cultural objects unlawfully removed from the territory of a Member State was implemented in UK law in the Return of Cultural Objects Regulations 1994. This Directive was recast in Directive 2014/60/EU of 15 May 2014, and will be implemented by Government before the deadline of 18 December 2015.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of his Department's policies on the family.

Assessing the impact of the Department’s policies on families is an integral part of policy development in the Department.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, with reference to Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps she is taking to assess the impact of her Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 through the publication of guidance for officials:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/368894/family-test-guidance.pdf

The objective of the Test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

DECC has not applied the Test to date. DECC is working with the DWP to embed the Test in the policymaking process.

DECC does publish analysis of the estimated impacts of energy and climate change polices on household energy bills across different types of households showing that for each different household composition, energy bills are estimated to be lower on average as a result of these policies. [1] We will continue to consider the impacts on families where relevant, for example when implementing the fuel poverty strategy.

[1] DECC (2014) ‘Estimated impacts of energy and climate change policies on energy prices and bills’, available online at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/estimated-impacts-of-energy-and-climate-change-policies-on-energy-prices-and-bills-2014 Analysis refers to 2020.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Attorney General, with reference to the press release released by the Prime Minister on 18 August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of the Law Officers' Departments' policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 through the publication of guidance for officials -Family Test Guidance

The objective of the Test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

The Law Officers’ Departments have not applied the Test to date, however where applicable they would work with the DWP to embed the Test in policymaking processes.

Robert Buckland
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of his Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014, through the publication of guidance for officials - which can be found online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/368894/family-test-guidance.pdf

The objective of the Test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

The Cabinet Office is working with the Department for Work and Pensions, and other government departments, to embed the Test in the policymaking process.

16th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many responses her Department has received to the Review of Gaming Machines and Social Responsibility Measures from (a) local authorities, (b) representatives of the gambling industry, (c) charities and (d) individuals.

The call for evidence for the Review of Gaming Machines and Social Responsibility closed on 4 December 2016. I and my officials have regular meetings with the Gambling Commission on this and other matters relating to gambling. The Call for Evidence on the Review of Gaming Machines and Social Responsibility received 275 responses with a) 29 from local authorities; b) 45 from the gambling industry; c) 29 from interest groups including charities; and d) 167 from the public. The remaining five responses came from MPs.

16th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions she has had with the Gambling Commission after the date of the closure of the call for evidence for the Review of Gaming and Social Responsibility Measures.

The call for evidence for the Review of Gaming Machines and Social Responsibility closed on 4 December 2016. I and my officials have regular meetings with the Gambling Commission on this and other matters relating to gambling. The Call for Evidence on the Review of Gaming Machines and Social Responsibility received 275 responses with a) 29 from local authorities; b) 45 from the gambling industry; c) 29 from interest groups including charities; and d) 167 from the public. The remaining five responses came from MPs.

16th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the contribution of 10 June 2015 from the Prime Minister, Official Report, column 1210, what steps he is taking to implement EU Directive 2014/60/EU of 15 May 2014 on the return of cultural objects unlawfully removed from the territory of a member state.

The Secretary of State will introduce regulations to implement the changes brought about by the recast Directive 2014/60/EU of 15 May 2014 before 18 December 2015.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of his Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 through the publication of guidance for officials - Family Test Guidance

The objective of the Test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has not applied the Test to date. The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is working with the DWP to embed the Test in the policymaking process.

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to support plans for development of the site and premises of St Andrew the Apostle Greek Orthodox Free School.

We are taking every step we can, in partnership with the London Borough of Barnet, the Greater London Authority and the owners of the school’s current site in North London Business Park to allow it to remain there permanently.

14th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 10 June 2015 to Question 842, what steps her Department is taking to ensure (a) the availability at GCSE and A-level of (i) Turkish, (ii) Greek, (iii) Gujarati, (iv) Modern Hebrew, (v) Punjabi, (vi) Polish, (vii) Bengali and (viii) other community languages and (b) effective liaison between awarding organisations and Ofqual on the provision of GCSEs and A-levels in those languages.

The Department for Education is in discussion with awarding organisations and Ofqual to consider how best to enable as wide a range of languages as possible to be maintained at GCSE and A level, including those languages listed in the question. We are committed to securing the future of community language qualifications. I will make a further announcement in due course, explaining our proposed approach.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
13th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 10 June 2015 to Question 842, what the timescale is, and what methodology is being used for, the consultation on the future of modern languages teaching.

The Department for Education is in discussion with awarding organisations and Ofqual to consider how best to enable as wide a range of languages as possible to be maintained at GCSE and A level, including those languages listed in the question. We are committed to securing the future of community language qualifications. I will make a further announcement in due course, explaining our proposed approach.

The Secretary of State and I have held meetings with diplomats and officials who have made representations to the department.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
13th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 10 June 2015 to Question 842, with which organisations she has met in connection with ensuring that awarding organisations are liaising effectively with Ofqual; and what further steps her Department has taken to safeguard the future of modern languages at GCSE and A-level in subjects (a) Turkish, (b) Greek, (c) Gujarati, (d) Modern Hebrew, (e) Panjabi, (f) Polish, (g) Bengali and (h) other community languages.

The Department for Education is in discussion with awarding organisations and Ofqual to consider how best to enable as wide a range of languages as possible to be maintained at GCSE and A level, including those languages listed in the question. We are committed to securing the future of community language qualifications. I will make a further announcement in due course, explaining our proposed approach.

The Secretary of State and I have held meetings with diplomats and officials who have made representations to the department.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
2nd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of recent changes introduced to improve safeguarding of children who go missing from care on the number of children who go missing from (a) care, (b) placements outside the local authority boundaries and (c) distant placements; and if she will make a statement.

Statutory guidance on missing children was revised in January 2014 and can be found online here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/children-who-run-away-or-go-missing-from-home-or-care.

It is not possible to draw conclusions about the impact of the changes in guidance on the number of children missing from care as many factors contribute to this. However, we are working, with support from local authorities, to better understand their responses to missing children and the effect of recent changes. All local authorities must now inform the Department for Education about all incidences of children going missing from care as part of their annual statistical return to the department on looked after children. This, along with more accurate figures on the number of children missing from care available in September 2015, will inform future policy on missing children.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps she is taking to assess the impact of her Department's policies on the family.

The Department for Education has developed comprehensive internal guidance on the Family Test and its application. The Department is confident in the approach it has taken to provide guidance and support to staff in applying the Family Test to new policies.

2nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her policy is on the future of A-levels and GCSEs for (a) Turkish, (b) Greek, (c) Gujarati, (d) Modern Hebrew, (e) Panjabi, (f) Polish, (g) Bengali and (h) other community languages; and if she will outline steps that will be taken in pursuit of that policy.

The Department for Education is currently considering what further support and encouragement can be provided to awarding organisations to enable as wide a range of languages as possible to be maintained at GCSE and A level.

The government has been clear that it wants to see all pupils provided with the opportunity to take a core set of academic subjects, including modern foreign languages. The number of pupils entering for a modern language GCSE has increased by 20% since 2010 due to the introduction of the English Baccalaureate. There are considerable benefits to learning a second language and the government is keen to see the range of languages at GCSE and A level preserved. To this end, the Secretary of State wrote to exam boards during the pre-election period in April to express her concern about their decision to stop awarding qualifications in some languages. She asked awarding organisations to work with Ofqual on the future of these qualifications and committed, if there is no further action, to launching a consultation on how best to secure the future of these qualifications.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps she is taking to assess the impact of her Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 through the publication of guidance for officials - Family Test Guidance

The objective of the test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

Defra is following guidance issued by the Department of Work and Pensions to embed and implement the test in the policymaking process. Where the test identifies impacts on the family, this will be evidenced as part of the formal Impact Assessment.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps she is taking to deal with the humanitarian situation in Rakhine, Kachin and Northern Shan States, Burma.

The UK remains deeply concerned about the humanitarian situation in Rakhine, Kachin and Northern Shan. We continue to raise our concerns with both military and civilian Ministers in the Government of Burma as a matter of urgency.

The UK has long been one of the biggest humanitarian donors in Burma and in Rakhine State, providing over £23 million in humanitarian assistance in Rakhine since 2012. No financial aid is provided to the Government of Burma. The UK currently provides humanitarian support to around 100,000 people in the state including to people in internally displaced people camps outside of northern Rakhine and some limited support in northern Rakhine. The UK has provided over £18.1 million in essential humanitarian and health assistance in Kachin and Northern Shan states from 2012 until the end of last financial year, and will provide a further £5 million approximately this year.

2nd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to tackle child trafficking in Nepal; what assessment she has made of (a) the role of Childreach's Taught Not Trafficked and (b) other preventative education programmes in such work; and if she will make a statement.

Our Work in Freedom programme tackles human trafficking and promotes safe migration in Nepal and across the region, providing community training, support to victims in destinations and helping to improve laws and policies. In 2015, the programme reached more than 54,000 people in Nepal, including about 40,000 women and children through door to door visits.

Following the devastating earthquake last year, DFID Nepal supported work with the Nepal Police, Women and Children Service Directorate and Ministry of Women and Social Welfare to create women and children safe spaces, and stop trafficking of women and children. We also support wider work that contributes to helping children avoid the risk of being trafficked, including improving livelihoods, providing skills training and helping families to better withstand natural disasters.

DFID is not currently engaged in work directly with Childreach.

14th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how aid disbursed by her Department's Palestinian Programme tackles anti-Israeli incitement.

The UK deplores incitement on both sides of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. We monitor any allegations of incitement closely and raise instances with both the Palestinian Authority and Government of Israel. Our financial assistance to the Palestinian Authority is governed by a Memorandum of Understanding which reaffirms the PA’s commitment to non-violence and a negotiated solution to the conflict. We accompany our support for UNRWA with stringent attention to their neutrality and values of peace. UNRWA continues to implement a human rights, conflict resolution and tolerance policy, which applies to all its schools in its five fields of operation, supplementing the host country curriculums. We take allegations of incitement very seriously and raise them with UNRWA whenever appropriate.


4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps she is taking to assess the impact of her Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 for domestic policies through the publication of guidance for officials – Family Test Guidance.

The objective of the Test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy-making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

The Department for International Development (DFID) leads the UK’s work to end extreme poverty internationally. In this respect the welfare of the world’s poorest – both individuals and families – are central to DFID’s work. DFID does not however have a leading responsibility for domestic policies and has not therefore made any assessments using the Family Test.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
10th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the humanitarian implications of the recent armed conflict in the Kachin State of Burma.

Some 100,000 people have been living in camps for displaced people for over three years since the fighting restarted between the Kachin Independence Army and Government forces.

Clashes and shelling in Kachin and Northern Shan have stepped up since early November. We are monitoring the situation carefully and have been in frequent contact with the UN and local organisations about the humanitarian implications of recent fighting. While there has been no significant new displacement or humanitarian needs in the last few months we will continue to monitor these issues closely.

Between 2012 and 2015 DFID has allocated over £17 million for humanitarian assistance for internally displaced persons (IDP) in Kachin and Northern Shan States in Burma affected by the violence. This aid is providing food security, sanitation and health in line with accepted humanitarian standards as well as to strengthening IDP communities’ capacity to manage health hazards and risks.

1st Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment her Department has made of reports of a food crisis in Chin State, Burma; and what food support her Department is providing in that region.

DFID has contributed to a food security programme in Chin State through the Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund which is helping increase agricultural production through activities such as better quality seeds, and also helping farmers get their produce to markets.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if she will make it her policy that UK public funds should not be used for the purposes of campaigning for more liberal abortion laws in another country.

In many countries abortion may be permitted only on limited or highly restricted grounds. In these circumstances, we can consider support to increase awareness among policy-makers, legislators, national health authorities and health personnel of the circumstances under which abortion is allowed. We can also work to highlight the consequences arising from the complications of unsafe abortion, such as the burden of maternal ill-health and high health service costs.

In addition we can also consider support to locally-led efforts to enable legal and policy reform in circumstances where the existing law and policy are contributing to high maternal mortality and morbidity; and to regional or international initiatives that are working to prevent unsafe abortion.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of his Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 through the publication of guidance for officials - Family Test Guidance

The objective of the Test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

The Department for Transport’s internal procedures have been updated to reflect this guidance.

28th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to his oral contribution of 27 March 2017, Official Report, column 9, what the financial budget allocated to support claimants who would otherwise have received work-related activity payment is.

The “Improving Lives: The Work, Health and Disability Green Paper” was published on 31 October 2016 and announces the Department’s new Personal Support Package.

In his 2015 Summer Budget, the Chancellor announced the removal of the Work Related Activity Component (WRAC) and the Limited Capability for Work (LCW) element from April 2017.

Announced alongside this was a support package of £330m over four years to support this group from April 17. In addition, an extra £15m will be made available through the Flexible Support Fund in both 2017/18 and 2018/19 to offer more targeted support at a local level.

‘Improving Lives, The Work, Health and Disability Green Paper’ provides further details of the overarching Personal Support Package for people with health conditions and disabilities, with a range of new interventions and initiatives designed to provide support that is tailored to the individual needs of claimants.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
7th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps the Government is taking to promote Marriage Week in February 2017.

This government believes we cannot afford to overlook the importance of the family as the basic building block upon which we build a successful economy and a stable society. While my department has no plans to promote Marriage Week we continue to support policies like the Marriage Tax Allowance which recognise the position and significance of marriage within society.

21st Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the review, entitled What works to enhance inter-parental relationships and improve outcomes for children, published in March 2016, what steps his Department is taking to support the training of the future workforce to deliver the expert couple interventions.

The Early Intervention Foundation review showed that children exposed to frequent, intense and poorly resolved conflict between their parents are at risk of poorer long term outcomes. Our new approach to relationship support responds to this evidence.

Since April 2016 we have doubled the funding available for relationship support for the remainder of this Parliament. From 2017/18 we will be contracting for relationship support services which will include help targeted at the most disadvantaged families experiencing relationship distress. As part of this approach we will be working to build the capability of key professionals on the frontline to identify conflict within the family and to provide first line help as well as effective referral. We will also continue to build on our work with local authorities to embed proven interventions into local service design. This means more families will have access to programmes with stronger evidence of impact.

20th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, for what reasons refugees with disabilities who have been deemed entitled to disability living allowance have different backdating entitlements depending on whether their claim happened to be stockpiled before or after the Upper Tribunal ruling of 17 March 2016 on the past presence test.

No claims were stockpiled before the Upper Tribunal ruling of 17 March 2016, 40 Disability Living Allowance claims were stockpiled after the ruling.

Section 27 of the Social Security Act 1998 provides that, where the Upper Tribunal decides on a social security appeal that the Secretary of State has made an error of law in his original decision and other claims subsequently fall to be decided by the Secretary of State, the judgment generally is not to be applied in relation to any period that predates the Upper Tribunal’s decision (s.27(3)). This statutory rule does not apply to the person who brought the original appeal, to people who have already lodged an appeal against a decision or who are still in time to do so, or to people whose case the Secretary of State has stockpiled (or whose appeal he has stayed) pending the judgment under section 25 of the Act.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
20th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claims were stockpiled (a) before and (b) after the Upper Tribunal ruling of 17 March 2016 on the unlawful and discriminatory use of the past presence test.

No claims were stockpiled before the Upper Tribunal ruling of 17 March 2016, 40 Disability Living Allowance claims were stockpiled after the ruling.

Section 27 of the Social Security Act 1998 provides that, where the Upper Tribunal decides on a social security appeal that the Secretary of State has made an error of law in his original decision and other claims subsequently fall to be decided by the Secretary of State, the judgment generally is not to be applied in relation to any period that predates the Upper Tribunal’s decision (s.27(3)). This statutory rule does not apply to the person who brought the original appeal, to people who have already lodged an appeal against a decision or who are still in time to do so, or to people whose case the Secretary of State has stockpiled (or whose appeal he has stayed) pending the judgment under section 25 of the Act.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
21st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans the Government has for the allocation of the £70 million funding for relationship support announced by the Prime Minister on 11 January 2016; and what the timetable will be for the distribution of that funding over the Parliament.

The Department is developing the detail of how the funding will be allocated. For 2016/17 we are extending our programme of relationship support provision which will include supporting local authorities to improve the quality of couple or co-parenting relationships and extending the evidence base in this policy area.

We are also exploring which interventions can maximise the important links between parenting and relationship support.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
21st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much the Government plans to spend on relationship support in 2016-17; and on what programmes that funding will be spent.

The Department is developing the detail of how the funding will be allocated. For 2016/17 we are extending our programme of relationship support provision which will include supporting local authorities to improve the quality of couple or co-parenting relationships and extending the evidence base in this policy area.

We are also exploring which interventions can maximise the important links between parenting and relationship support.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
21st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much was spent by the Government on relationship support in 2015-16; and to what programmes that funding was allocated.

A total of £11.2m is forecast to be spent in the full year 2015/16 on relationship support as follows:

Legacy Relationship Support Contracts £7.0m

Evaluation of Legacy Relationship Support Contracts £0.3m

Innovation Fund £2.5m

Evaluation of Innovation Fund £0.5m

Local Family Offer £0.7m

Perinatal Pilot £0.2m

Total £11.2m

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
11th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will ensure that the Government publishes a family impact test in respect of all future primary and secondary legislation.

While we encourage departments to publish Family Test assessments, there is no requirement to do so, as this may not always be appropriate. Assessments against the Family Test are completed by policy officials in the course of developing advice on new policy; this may include some ideas that do not progress beyond the design stage.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
11th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and which family test assessments he has seen in the last six months.

We do not record the number of assessments conducted. Assessments against the Family Test are completed by policy officials in the course of developing advice on new policy and can be included in submissions to Ministers. Assessments can be completed for some policies in the early stages of development, including for some ideas that do not progress beyond the design stage.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
16th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to Schedule 6 of the Welfare Reform Act 2009, when he expects the Government to implement equal birth registration.

The Government is currently reviewing this policy.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
16th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he is taking under his Department's social justice strategy to reduce family breakdown.

This government is committed to strengthening families which are key to giving children the best start in life and supporting them to develop and flourish.

We are funding provision which includes preventative relationship support and help for those experiencing difficulties.

We are also piloting relationship education in perinatal classes and supporting Local Authorities to develop strategies to improve the quality of family relationships.

In addition to this we are providing wider help for families via the Marriage Tax Allowance, introduction of shared parental leave, expansion of free childcare, the Troubled Families Programme and reforms to the adoption system.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of his Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 through the publication of guidance for officials - Family Test Guidance

The objective of the Test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

DWP has applied the Test to a number of policies and is also working to embed the Test across Government.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
13th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, which prisons make available eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing therapy for prison staff or prisoners; and how such therapy is funded.

Prisoners are entitled to the same quality of healthcare treatments and services as people in the community. Psychotherapy treatments, including eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) may be provided in any prison, where clinically recommended by an appropriate healthcare professional.

The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) centrally funds psychological treatments for workplace trauma for prison staff, including EMDR, according to need and across the whole NOMS prison estate. NHS England is responsible for commissioning prisoner healthcare and all treatment and services provided to prisoners are funded from its overall budget.

12th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much his Department spent on counselling or therapy in prisons for (a) prisoners and (b) prison staff with post-traumatic stress disorder in (i) 2014, (ii) 2015 and (iii) 2016.

Information on spending on counselling or therapy for prisoners with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is not collected centrally by NHS England.

Spending by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) on psychological therapies delivered to NOMS’ staff for work related trauma was £22,131.06 in 2014, £150,336.09 in 2015 and £199,690.03 in 2016. NOMS’ data do not identify the proportion of PTSD-related cases within this spend.

11th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many addicts have received pharmaceutical heroin from the public purse in (a) England and Wales, (b) Scotland and (c) Northern Ireland in each year since 2000.

The National Drug Treatment Monitoring System collects information on structured treatment for drug and/or alcohol users in England, but does not collect data on which drugs are used in opioid substitution treatment.

As health is a devolved matter we cannot answer for the devolved administrations.

7th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when the NHS England Specialised Commissioning Oversight Group plans to make an announcement on the recommendations of the Clinical Priorities Advisory Group.

The Specialised Services Commissioning Committee is due to meet at the end of June 2016. The recommendations of the Clinical Priorities Advisory Group will be announced after that meeting.

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what progress is being made on conducting antenatal mental health assessments.

Our commitment to improving perinatal mental health was demonstrated by the Prime Minister’s recent announcement of a £290 million investment over the next five years to 2020/21 in perinatal mental health services. This builds on the initial investment of £75 million announced in the March 2015 Budget, making a total investment from 2015/16 to 2020/21 of £365million.

The National Institute for Health Care and Excellence guidelines recommend that during a pregnant women’s first contact with primary care or when booking her first appointment she should be asked how she is feeling. This will enable a sensitive conversation and, if appropriate, for a referral to her general practitioner for further assessment or, if a severe mental health problem is suspected, to a mental health professional.

It has been recognised that more information is needed about perinatal mental health. The Health and Social Care Information Centre is working on the implementation of a new Mental Health Services Dataset which will seek to increase the amount of data available about antenatal mental health assessments. We expect that some initial data on perinatal mental health will be available later this year. We will use this initial information to refine how data on perinatal mental health is collected going forward.

19th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many times ambulances have been required to attend prisons as a result of emergency call-outs relating to (a) illegal drugs, (b) prescribed drugs and (c) psychoactive substances in the last 12 months.

Information about the frequency of emergency ambulance call-outs to prisons is not collected centrally by the Department or NHS England.


In February 2013, the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) issued guidance to prisons and immigration removal centres operated by NOMS concerning emergency ambulance call-outs. This guidance, Prison Service Instruction (PSI) 03/2013 Medical Emergency Response Codes outlines the medical symptoms in a prisoner, but not behaviours such as drug misuse, for which a prison must always call out an emergency ambulance. This PSI is mandatory in all prisons in England.


A copy of the guidance is available at:


http://www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/offenders/psipso/psi-2013/psi-03-2013-medical-emergency-response-codes.doc



21st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the (a) proposed timescale and (b) scope will be of the Government's consultation on its proposed reduction of £200 million in the funding of public health.

We are committed to implementing these savings in a way which will minimise any impact on services. We consulted from 31 July to 28 August on the best way of delivering the required savings and are currently considering responses. The consultation included a question on seeking more information about the effects of these savings.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of his Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 through the publication of guidance for officials - Family Test Guidance.

The objective of the Test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

The Department is working to raise awareness of the Family Test amongst its policy staff, so that the impact of policy on the family is considered as a matter of course. The Family Test is highlighted in policy induction training, which is available to staff who are new to policy roles in the Department. The Family Test is also highlighted through the PolicyKit, an online resource for the Department’s policy officials.

4th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what arrangements are in place for regulating and ensuring correct practice by approved independent sector places for abortion services which fail to comply with the requirements of the revised Procedures for the Approval of Independent Sector Places for the Termination of Pregnancy and his Department's Guidance in Relation to the Requirements of the Abortion Act, both published in May 2014.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers I gave on 15 January 2015 to Question 220148 and 5 February to Question 222044.

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 26 January 2015 to Questions HL4063 and HL4228, how the Expert Panel convened by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) were assured that the children concerned were genetically normal; whether each of the mitochondrial diseases listed in Annex D of the Department of Health's consultation document Mitochondrial Donation is associated with an abnormal karyotype; and if he will place in the Library a copy of the correspondence between the member of the HFEA's Expert Panel and the Zhang research group.

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has advised that the term ‘genetically normal’ was used in reference to the detail outlined in the Zhang et al abstract regarding the outcome of genetic tests, as follows:

“Nuclear genetic fingerprinting confirmed that the nuclear DNA from 24 and 29 wk fetuses matched that of the patient’s. Mt DNA profiles in fetal red blood cells were similar to those from cytoplast donor with no detection of patient (karyoplast donor) Mt DNA.“

We are also advised that all of the mitochondrial diseases listed in the consultation document are due to point mutations or deletions and thus there is a normal karyotype.

On the question of correspondence between a member of the HFEA convened Expert Panel and the Zhang research group, I have nothing further to add to the information given to Questions HL4063 and HL4228.

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what procedures apply to independent sector places when there has been a failure to comply with the requirements of the revised Procedures for the Approval of Independent Sector Places for the Termination of Pregnancy and his Department's Guidance in Relation to the Requirements of the Abortion Act, both published in May 2014.

Failure to comply with the Required Standard Operating Procedures is considered on a case by case basis. Investigations into breaches of the Abortion Act are a matter for the police.

8th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many inspections of approved independent places for the termination of pregnancy have been carried out to ensure compliance with the revised Procedures for the Approval of Independent Sector Places for the Termination of Pregnancy and his Department's Guidance in Relation to the Requirements of the Abortion Act, both published in May 2014.

Between 23 May 2014 and 15 January 2015 the Care Quality Commission has published eight inspections of independent healthcare organisation locations registered for the regulated activity of Termination of Pregnancy, covering five separate locations.

8th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what measures his Department has in place to ensure that independent-sector providers of abortion services comply with the requirements of the Procedures for the Approval of Independent Sector Places for the Termination of Pregnancy, published in May 2014.

All independent sector places undertaking termination of pregnancy are required to comply with:

- the Abortion Act 1967 and regulations made under that Act;

- the requirements set out in regulations made under the Health and Social Care Act 2008; and

- the Required Standard Operating Procedures (RSOPs) published in May 2014, incorporating new guidance relating to the legal requirements of the Abortion Act.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is responsible for ensuring that the requirements under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 are maintained through a system of monitoring and, where appropriate, inspection visits. If a CQC inspection identifies instances of non-compliance with the Health and Social Care Act and Regulations then appropriate regulatory action will be taken. Action will similarly be taken where providers are found not to be acting in accordance with the Abortion Act and RSOPs.

17th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to the press release by the Department for Work and Pensions on 31 October 2014 on the families test, whether his Department has conducted such a test on its policy on long-term prescribing of methadone for opiate addicts.

Treatment for an addiction to opiates is a clinical matter, to be agreed between the individual and their treatment provider in the context of the relevant evidence-base and related authoritative guidance. Proper professional practice of those prescribing for addiction is regulated through mechanisms established by Parliament.

A 2013 inspection by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission praised joint working between children’s social care and drug and alcohol services to ensure that children affected by their parents’ or carers’ difficulties were supported and safe.

3rd Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 20 November 2014 to Question 214086, how many members of the expert group with responsibility for updating the UK guidelines for the Clinical Management of Drugs Misuse and Dependence have a financial interest in the prescribing of methadone.

The expert group updating the UK guidelines for the clinical management of drug misuse and dependence consists of a broad spectrum of stakeholders, including practising clinicians, pharmacists, service users, carers, psychologists, commissioners and academics. Each is required to complete a declaration of interests and keep this updated.

Public Health England, which provides the secretariat for the group, has reviewed these declarations and on the basis of the information provided believes that no expert group members have a financial interest in the prescribing of specific medicines for the treatment of dependence.

Clinicians’ declarations will be published alongside the updated clinical guidelines by early 2016.

10th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the implications for his Department's policy on long-term methadone prescribing for opiate addicts of the findings of the Second Report of the Recovery Committee of the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs.

Public Health England, on behalf of the United Kingdom Government and the devolved administrations, has convened an expert group with responsibility for updating the UK guidelines for the Clinical Management of Drug Misuse and Dependence.

In updating the clinical guidelines the Expert Group will be looking at all the available evidence, including reports from the Recovery Committee of the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs.

11th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, in which single or multiple technology appraisals for pharmacological treatments for cancer the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has considered the sequential use of the appraised technology with another available treatment; and whether in each such appraisal this resulted in a recommendation on sequential use in each year since NICE was established.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has advised that providing all the information in the format requested would incur disproportionate cost.

Information about technology appraisals where NICE has recommended a technology only in circumstances in which a patient has not been treated with a previously recommended technology can be found within each published technology appraisal on NICE's website at:

www.nice.org.uk

Information about where NICE has considered or made recommendations regarding the sequential use of technologies can also be found within each published technology appraisal on the website.

11th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what (a) pharmacological treatments and (b) associated indications the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has recommended only for patients who have not been treated with a previously appraised drug.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has advised that providing all the information in the format requested would incur disproportionate cost.

Information about technology appraisals where NICE has recommended a technology only in circumstances in which a patient has not been treated with a previously recommended technology can be found within each published technology appraisal on NICE's website at:

www.nice.org.uk

Information about where NICE has considered or made recommendations regarding the sequential use of technologies can also be found within each published technology appraisal on the website.

11th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what (a) pharmacological treatments and (b) associated indications the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recommended for (i) prostate cancer, (ii) lung cancer, (iii) bowel cancer, (iv) breast cancer and (v) kidney cancer through either single or multiple technology appraisals and under the end of life criteria in each year since NICE was established.

The consideration of end of life criteria was introduced into the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence's (NICE) technology appraisal process in January 2009. NICE has advised that it has recommended the following treatments for prostate, lung, bowel and kidney cancer under its technology appraisal programme where the end of life criteria were applied. No treatments for breast cancer have been recommended under the end of life criteria.

Cancer

Appraisal

Technolo-gy appraisal

Prostate

abiraterone in combination with prednisone or prednisolone for the treatment of castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer previously treated with one docetaxel-containing regimen

TA259

Lung

oral topotecan for small cell lung cancer

TA184

pemetrexed (maintenance treatment) for non-small cell lung cancer

TA190

Bowel

sunitinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumours

TA179

Kidney

sunitinib (first-line) for renal cell carcinoma

TA169

pazopanib for the first-line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma

TA215

Source: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to appeal to the Government of Burma on the (a) release of Lahpi Gam on medical grounds and (b) medical care required by that prisoner.

We remain concerned about Lahpi Gam's ongoing detention and by reports of his poor physical health. In 2013, the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention opined that his imprisonment constituted arbitrary detention and raised a number of concerns about the fairness of his trial. We regularly raise our concerns regarding political prisoners with the Burmese authorities.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
13th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking to resolve the escalation in conflict in Kachin and northern Shan States, Burma, and the displacement of several thousands of civilians in that area.

We have been a consistent supporter of Burma's peace process, aimed at ending the long-running conflict between the military and the ethnic armed groups. This includes practical support delivered through both the multi-donor Joint Peace Fund and the Peace Support Fund, as well as technical advice and expertise. The UK has provided over £18.1 million in essential humanitarian and health assistance in Kachin and Northern Shan states from 2012 until the end of last financial year, and will provide approximately a further £5 million this year.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
13th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what diplomatic steps his Department is taking to press for humanitarian access to Rakhine, Kachin and Northern Shan States, Burma; and what the results have been of any such diplomatic actions take to date.

We are deeply concerned by continuing restrictions on humanitarian access to Rakhine, Kachin and Northern Shan States. The Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my noble Friend, the Rt Hon. Baroness Anelay of St Johns, visited Burma from 9-12 November and urged Burmese Government Ministers to ensure the full resumption of humanitarian aid and to set up an independent investigation into allegations of human rights violations in Rakhine. I also raised this in person with the Burmese Minister of Construction, when he visited London, on 29 November. The UK has long been one of the biggest humanitarian donors to Burma and to Rakhine State, providing over £23 million in humanitarian assistance to Rakhine since 2012. The Government of Burma has committed to restoring humanitarian access. In practice, worrying restrictions remain and we, together with other countries and the UN, will continue to monitor developments closely and to raise our concerns at every opportunity.

For Kachin and Northern Shan we continue to raise with the Government of Burma the restriction of humanitarian access to internally displaced people. Baroness Anelay discussed this with the Burmese Minister for Defence during her visit. The UK has provided over £18.1 million in essential humanitarian and health assistance in Kachin and Northern Shan states from 2012 until the end of last financial year, and will provide a further £5 million approximately this year. We continue to provide political and practical support to State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi's 'Panglong' peace initiative, which successfully brought together the main players last year, in a bid to end this long-running internal conflict.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
13th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the humanitarian and human rights situation in Rakhine State, Burma.

We remain deeply concerned by the humanitarian and human rights situation in Rakhine. We are particularly concerned by reports from a range of human rights organisations of human rights violations by the security forces following the attack on border posts on 9 October, and the subsequent security response to these attacks. We are also concerned about the humanitarian impact if aid is not resumed quickly, particularly impacting those already affected by malnutrition. We have made several representations to the government of Burma and called for humanitarian access both through our Ambassador and also through Ministerial contacts. The Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my noble Friend, the Rt Hon. Baroness Anelay of St Johns, visited Burma from 9-12 November and urged Burmese Government Ministers to ensure the full resumption of humanitarian aid and to set up an independent investigation into allegations of human rights violations. I also raised this in person with the Burmese Minister of Construction, when he visited London, on 29 November. We will continue to monitor developments closely and to raise our concerns at every opportunity.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
3rd Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he will be raising the case of Andargachew Tsege on his next visit to Ethiopia.

The Government takes the detention and welfare of Mr Andargachew Tsege very seriously. The Foreign Secretary, my Rt Hon. Friend the Member for Runnymede and Weybridge (Mr Hammond) raised Mr Tsege’s case with the Ethiopian Prime Minister and Foreign Minister during his visit to Ethiopia on 1 June 2016. The Foreign Secretary received assurances that Mr Tsege will be allowed access to independent legal advice to allow him to discuss options under the Ethiopian legal system. We will continue to press the Ethiopians as necessary, including during any future Ministerial visits, to ensure that Mr Tsege has legal representation. During the visit, the Foreign Secretary despatched a senior Foreign Office official, travelling with him, to visit Mr Tsege in prison.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if his Department will update its travel checklist to include advice and warnings about the danger posed by carbon monoxide when travelling abroad.

While the number of consular cases involving British nationals affected by carbon monoxide poisoning overseas is low, this remains a concern. The travel industry has an important role to play in addressing this issue, including through communications, although care must be taken to ensure the onus is not placed entirely on the traveller. Holiday providers should provide a safe environment without requiring holidaymakers to, for example, carry carbon monoxide alarms. In the UK, the energy industry is providing important advice to the public on carbon monoxide poisoning through its ‘Be Alarmed’ campaign. Our foreign travel checklist on the GOV.UK website signposts travellers to their advice.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will request the government of Burma to release former monk U Gambira from custody.

We are aware of the arrest of U Gambira, a well known political activist and former political prisoner, on 19 January, for alleged immigration offences. Our Embassy in Rangoon is following the case closely. The UK regularly raises our concern over political prisoners with the government of Burma, both publicly and privately. Most recently our Embassy in Rangoon issued a statement on 25 January calling for the government of Burma to ensure that all remaining political prisoners are released. We remain concerned that some 78 remain incarcerated, and will continue to raise this with the Burmese authorities.

4th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will support the establishment of a full, international, independent investigation by the UN into claims of genocide against the Rohingya in Burma.

The UK deplores the treatment of the Rohingya community in Rakhine State, who are subject to persecution and denied the most basic rights. We welcome the work of the highly effective UN Special Rapporteur on Burma, who has shone a spotlight on violations against the Rohingya in Rakhine. She has not characterised the treatment of the Rohingya as genocide, and neither did the UN Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide in his 4 November statement on Burma’s elections. However, any judgement on whether genocide has occurred is a matter for international judicial decision, rather than for governments or non-judicial bodies. A UN investigation would require high level international support for which, we assess, there is little prospect of agreement at this stage. Our approach is to seek an end to all violations, irrespective of whether or not they fit the definition of specific international crimes. I and other British Government Ministers take every appropriate opportunity, both publicly and in private, to press the Burmese authorities to take urgent steps to address the situation of the Rohingya. I did this with senior Burmese Ministers during my visit to Burma in July, when I travelled to Rakhine State for the second time. Most recently, I raised the issue with the Burmese Foreign Minister, Wunna Maung Lwin, in September in New York. After the 8 November elections, the UK will continue our efforts to address the serious ongoing human rights violations against the Rohingya in Rakhine State.

18th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether the IAEA has been granted access to the Arak facility in Iran.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has monthly access to the reactor at Arak. The IAEA Director General’s 29 May Iran report confirms that the Agency carried out an inspection at Arak on 11 May 2015 and observed that no new major components had been installed. Iran continues to abide by its commitments under the Joint Plan of Action.

18th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether the proposed permanent nuclear deal between Iran and the P5+1 would permit the IAEA to conduct anytime, anywhere inspections of Iran's nuclear facilities.

A comprehensive nuclear deal with Iran must include robust monitoring of Iran’s nuclear activities, and Iran’s implementation of its Additional Protocol which provides for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) access to nuclear facilities. Full implementation of the Additional Protocol under a comprehensive agreement is vital in order to reassure the international community that Iran’s nuclear programme is exclusively peaceful.comprehensive nuclear deal with Iran must include robust monitoring of Iran’s nuclear activities, and Iran’s implementation of its Additional Protocol which provides for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) access to nuclear facilities. Full implementation of the Additional Protocol under a comprehensive agreement is vital in order to reassure the international community that Iran’s nuclear programme is exclusively peaceful.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of his Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 through the publication of guidance for officials - Family Test Guidance.

The objective of the Test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

The Foreign and Commonwealth (FCO) has not applied the Test to date as The Family Test applies to domestic policy only.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make representations to the UN Secretary-General to urge him to (a) lead personally a response to the situation of Rohingya people on the Andaman Sea and (b) lead negotiations with the government of Burma on addressing the root causes of that situation and securing unhindered access for international humanitarian aid to Rakhine state.

We are deeply concerned about the crisis in the Bay of Bengal, and particularly for the thousands of people adrift in the Andaman Sea and Malacca Straits.

It is vital that Burma addresses the longer-term issues which lie at the root of the problem - namely the desperate conditions in which Rohingya communities are living in Rakhine State. I asked the Burmese Ambassador in London to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on 18 May to express our concern at the situation, and press Burma to take urgent steps to deal with the humanitarian implications of the crisis, as well as the underlying causes in Rakhine. I also met the Bangladeshi Foreign Secretary on 20 May and raised the need for Bangladesh to work within the region to address people trafficking and irregular migration.

It is clear that this is an issue that requires a comprehensive regional response, and as such we welcomed the Thai authorities’ decision to call a regional summit on 29 May to tackle the broader issues. Our Ambassador in Bangkok attended this summit as an observer. We also very much welcome the 20 May decision, from the Foreign Ministers of Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia, to provide humanitarian assistance to the Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants.

As I made clear in a Parliamentary debate in January, we encourage a wider UN leadership role to help bring about a long term solution to bring peace and reconciliation to all communities in Rakhine State. UN Secretary General Ban-ki Moon called Burmese President Thein Sein on 20 May to discuss this issue. It was also discussed at the UN Security Council on 28 May.

The UK is playing its part to resolve the dire situation in Rakhine. Since 2012, the UK has been one of the largest bilateral humanitarian donors in Rakhine State. We have invested over £18m in humanitarian support there, which helps to provide shelter; water sanitation and hygiene; nutrition and protection activities; and non-food items for over 122,000 people. We also strongly support the UN’s coordination of the international humanitarian response.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking to (a) raise urgently the situation of Rohingya people on the Andaman Sea with the governments of Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia and the Association of South-East Asian Nations and (b) urge those governments to rescue Rohingyas still at sea and not send boats away.

We are deeply concerned about the crisis in the Bay of Bengal, and particularly for the thousands of people adrift in the Andaman Sea and Malacca Straits.

It is vital that Burma addresses the longer-term issues which lie at the root of the problem - namely the desperate conditions in which Rohingya communities are living in Rakhine State. I asked the Burmese Ambassador in London to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on 18 May to express our concern at the situation, and press Burma to take urgent steps to deal with the humanitarian implications of the crisis, as well as the underlying causes in Rakhine. I also met the Bangladeshi Foreign Secretary on 20 May and raised the need for Bangladesh to work within the region to address people trafficking and irregular migration.

It is clear that this is an issue that requires a comprehensive regional response, and as such we welcomed the Thai authorities’ decision to call a regional summit on 29 May to tackle the broader issues. Our Ambassador in Bangkok attended this summit as an observer. We also very much welcome the 20 May decision, from the Foreign Ministers of Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia, to provide humanitarian assistance to the Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants.

As I made clear in a Parliamentary debate in January, we encourage a wider UN leadership role to help bring about a long term solution to bring peace and reconciliation to all communities in Rakhine State. UN Secretary General Ban-ki Moon called Burmese President Thein Sein on 20 May to discuss this issue. It was also discussed at the UN Security Council on 28 May.

The UK is playing its part to resolve the dire situation in Rakhine. Since 2012, the UK has been one of the largest bilateral humanitarian donors in Rakhine State. We have invested over £18m in humanitarian support there, which helps to provide shelter; water sanitation and hygiene; nutrition and protection activities; and non-food items for over 122,000 people. We also strongly support the UN’s coordination of the international humanitarian response.

4th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking to support the return of Famagusta in accordance with the UN Security Council Resolutions 550(1984) and 789(1992).

I understand the strength of feeling about Varosha, the present state of which reflects the consequences of the continued division of Cyprus.

We fully support all relevant Security Council resolutions, including Resolutions 550 and 789. We have raised this issue with the Turkish Cypriots and with the Turkish authorities. I remain convinced that, ultimately, a comprehensive settlement is the best chance of resolving these complex issues. The UK will continue to support the UN-led negotiations which will address the questions of Varosha, Famagusta and other issues related to a comprehensive settlement.

We also welcome measures to build confidence between the two communities. These can have great value in fostering reconciliation between the communities and in facilitating a comprehensive settlement. I was very pleased that on 2 March the Foreign and Commonwealth Office hosted a meeting at which the Chambers of Commerce of both Greek and Turkish Cypriot communities were represented by their Presidents, both of whom spoke eloquently about the way in which a settlement would increase the prosperity of everyone on the island.

19th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent steps he has taken to seek the release of Raif Badawi.

We are seriously concerned by Raif Badawi’s case. The UK condemns the use of cruel, inhuman or degrading punishment in all circumstances. We have recently raised the case of Raif Badawi at a senior level with the Saudi authorities.

The UK is a strong supporter of freedom of expression around the world. We believe that people must be allowed to freely discuss and debate issues, peacefully challenge their governments, exercise the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, and speak out against violations of human rights wherever they occur.

15th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps the Government is taking through the Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative to help to prevent further sexual violence in Burma and to bring the perpetrators of sexual violence to justice.

In June, after considerable lobbying from the UK, Burma endorsed the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict. The authorities now need to demonstrate that they will honour these commitments. We continue to make clear to the Burmese government that all allegations of human rights abuses must be dealt with through clear, independent and transparent investigative and prosecutorial processes which meet international standards.

I raised this issue with Deputy Foreign Minister U Thant Kyaw on 13 June 2014 during the Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict. More recently, in October the Minister of State for International Development, my right hon. Friend the Member for New Forest West (Mr Swayne), discussed the issue when he met Burma’s Minister for Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement.

The UK is providing over £300,000 towards projects training women in basic legal skills, helping leaders prevent sexual violence in their own communities and working with non-state armed groups to promote adherence to international standards in respect of sexual violence and gender discrimination. Additionally, in conflict areas in Burma, the Department for International Development (DFID) provides over £500,000 in humanitarian funding directly supporting the prevention of sexual violence and assistance to survivors.

17th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the extent to which Iran is in fulfilment of its obligations under Article 18 of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

In 2013, President Rouhani made a number of comments in support of greater religious freedom in Iran. Unfortunately there has been no change in Iran’s approach over the past year. Religious minority groups in Iran continue to face widespread discrimination. The UK has repeatedly called on the Iranian government to end all persecution of individuals on the basis of their faith, and to guarantee the human rights of all Iranians. The UK most recently raised the issue of freedom of religion and belief during Iran's Universal Periodic Review on 31 October.

17th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he has taken in response to Turkey's intrusion into the Exclusive Economic Zone of the Republic of Cyprus in October 2014; and if he will make a statement.

Our Ambassador in Ankara has conveyed UK concerns to Turkey about plans to conduct commercial seismic surveys in the Republic of Cyprus’ Exclusive Economic Zone. I raised the need to resolve the situation with my Turkish counterpart on 17 November, and we have also had discussions with the Cypriots, UN, EU, and other partners. This ongoing dispute puts at risk UN-facilitated efforts to reach a comprehensive settlement. We and our partners will continue to urge the parties to reduce tensions, and we strongly support the resumption of settlement talks.

11th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what support his Department provides to ensure Hamas does not acquire construction materials for terror purposes.

The UK, as a donor, follows very carefully the course of internationally provided construction materials into Gaza, and we are confident in the effectiveness of the new UN agreed monitoring mechanism.

Imports of construction materials, including concrete, are currently only permitted for UN-led humanitarian projects with strict controls mitigating the risk of transfer of materials for use other than that intended. There remains a clear need for further legitimate construction work in Gaza.

17th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the prospects for a successful solution to the Cyprus problem; and what steps he is taking to assist this development.

Since talks resumed on 11 February 2014, the two communities have engaged in substantive negotiations. Both sides now have a much better sense of each other’s positions and concerns, and they have begun seeking the common ground in a number of areas. The parties have expressed a wish to intensify their efforts in the months ahead.

We welcome the leaders’ commitment to reach a comprehensive settlement as soon as possible. Their level of ambition, Turkey’s engagement, and the recognition of the political and economic benefits all mean that a successful solution is possible through this round of talks. No-one should underestimate the scale of the potential challenges ahead, but there has been no better time in recent years to achieve a lasting solution. Given those prospects, we are encouraging the two sides to begin building public support for a comprehensive settlement.

We have been active in supporting the UN-facilitated talks. I recently invited the two chief negotiators to London, and was struck by their seriousness and determination to reach an agreement.

Our diplomatic network has been engaged in regular discussions of the need for progress in Cyprus not only with Cypriot leaders but with Turkey, Greece, and others.

17th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what response the Government has made to the petition presented to 10 Downing Street on 9 December 2013 on the return of Famagusta to its lawful inhabitants and the opening of the city's seaport; and what steps the UK is taking to support the return of that city to its former inhabitants.

I wrote to the organisers of the petition on 15 January 2014. I understand the strength of feeling for the return of the Varosha area of Famagusta. The present state of that once-bustling town and nearby port reflects the consequences of the continued division of Cyprus.

We fully support all relevant Security Council resolutions, including Resolutions 550 and 789 which address the future of Varosha. We have raised this issue with the Turkish Cypriots and with the Turkish authorities. I remain convinced that, ultimately, a comprehensive settlement is the best chance of resolving this complex issue. The UK will continue to support the negotiations for a settlement, which will also address the question of Varosha.

1st Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he has raised the jailing of journalist Zaw Pe with the government of Burma.

Our Ambassador has discussed the case of Zaw Pe, and those of other arrested journalists, with the Burmese Deputy Minister of Information Ye Htut, raising our concerns and encouraging the government to ensure a safe environment for journalists to conduct their work. The cases of Zaw Pe and many other individuals were also raised during the first EU-Burma Human Rights Dialogue in May.

17th Feb 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the level of uptake of the marriage tax allowance is; what steps he is taking to increase the uptake of that allowance; and if he will make a statement.

The Marriage Allowance was introduced in April 2015, to recognise the importance of marriage in the tax system and support those on low incomes. Over 1.6 million couples have successfully applied for the Marriage Allowance, with around one million applying so far in this tax year.

The Government is committed to raising awareness of the savings the allowance will bring to eligible couples. HM Revenue and Customs ran a marketing campaign in the autumn of 2016, comprising radio, digital, social media and search engine advertising. A further round of advertising commenced on 20 February and will run through to 31 March 2017.

As with all efforts to promote awareness of tax reliefs and allowances, the Government will keep the effectiveness of these marketing campaigns under review.

5th Sep 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the cost to the public purse was of providing the married couples allowance in each financial year since 2001.

The Married Couple’s Allowance (MCA) is an additional allowance for married couples worth between £322 and £835.50 per couple in 2016-17. Prior to 2000-01, MCA was available to all married couples irrespective of age, but on the introduction of the tax credit system it remained available to married couples where at least one of them was born before 6 April 1935.

The estimated cost and the estimated number of claimants of MCA for the financial years 2002-03 to 2015-16 are given in the table below.

Married Couple's Allowance

Cost (£millions)

Number of Claimants (000s)

2002-03

450

1160

2003-04

610

1510

2004-05

590

1450

2005-06

530

1320

2006-07

520

1230

2007-08

450

1050

2008-09

*

*

2009-10

440

890

2010-11

340

670

2011-12

400

760

2012-13

360

650

2013-14

320

570

2014-15

285

490

2015-16

245

420

*Data not currently available

Up to 2012-13 these estimates are based on the Survey of Personal Incomes (SPI) for the years concerned. Later years are projected from the 2012-13 SPI using the Office for Budget Responsibility’s Autumn Statement 2015 economic and fiscal outlook. Data for 2000-01, 2001-02 and 2008-09 are not currently available.

5th Sep 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many couples claimed the married couples allowance in each financial year since 2001.

The Married Couple’s Allowance (MCA) is an additional allowance for married couples worth between £322 and £835.50 per couple in 2016-17. Prior to 2000-01, MCA was available to all married couples irrespective of age, but on the introduction of the tax credit system it remained available to married couples where at least one of them was born before 6 April 1935.

The estimated cost and the estimated number of claimants of MCA for the financial years 2002-03 to 2015-16 are given in the table below.

Married Couple's Allowance

Cost (£millions)

Number of Claimants (000s)

2002-03

450

1160

2003-04

610

1510

2004-05

590

1450

2005-06

530

1320

2006-07

520

1230

2007-08

450

1050

2008-09

*

*

2009-10

440

890

2010-11

340

670

2011-12

400

760

2012-13

360

650

2013-14

320

570

2014-15

285

490

2015-16

245

420

*Data not currently available

Up to 2012-13 these estimates are based on the Survey of Personal Incomes (SPI) for the years concerned. Later years are projected from the 2012-13 SPI using the Office for Budget Responsibility’s Autumn Statement 2015 economic and fiscal outlook. Data for 2000-01, 2001-02 and 2008-09 are not currently available.

13th Apr 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if his Department will apply the family test to the Finance Bill and publish the results.

The Government carefully considers all relevant legal obligations – including the Family Test – when formulating policy. This includes policies implemented via the Finance Bill or other legislation.

14th Mar 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the reasons are for the difference between the duty imposed on cider with alcohol content of 7.5 per cent and beer with a similar alcohol content.

There are higher duty rates on both beer and cider above 7.5 per cent alcohol by volume compared to standard strength beers and ciders. This is to encourage the production and consumption of lower strength products.

The Chancellor keeps all duty rates under review as part of the Budget process.

4th Jun 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of his Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 through the publication of guidance for officials - The Family Test - Guidance for Government Departments available at gov.uk.

The objective of the Test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

The Treasury has been working with the DWP to embed the Test in the policymaking process.

9th Mar 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people affected by the higher income child benefit charge who have failed to declare it to HM Revenue and Customs.

Of 1.1 million individuals expected to be affected in the first year, 2012/13, 45,000 did not register for Self Assessment to pay the charge. HMRC is contacting people who have not complied to ensure the charge is paid.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
15th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to table AS 08 Q of the Quarterly Immigration Stastics, October to December 2016, how many applications for asylum made during quarter 4 of 2016 were made by unaccompanied children who arrived in the UK (a) under section 67 of the Immigration Act 2016, (b) through the Dublin III Regulation and (c) by their own initiative.

The period October to December saw 1,161 asylum claims registered by unaccompanied asylum seeking children. It is not currently possible to provide a breakdown however I have committed to publishing more detailed figures in future data releases.

8th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Oral Answer of 6 March 2017, Official Report, column 561 on immigration: indefinite detention, on what date her Department plans to publish its plan for the future of the immigration detention estate.

The Department’s strategy for the future of the immigration detention estate will be communicated in due course.

7th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish her Department's plan for the future of the immigration detention estate.

The Department’s strategy for the future of the immigration detention estate will be communicated in due course.

7th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the oral contribution of the hon. Member for Enfield, Southgate of 6 March 2017, Official Report, column 561, when the current system of detention reviews will be replaced by individual removal assessments and reviews.

Following publication of the Government’s response to Stephen Shaw’s Report into the welfare in detention of vulnerable persons on 14 January 2016, work continues on designing and implementing a more effective case management process to replace the existing method of reviewing detention. Case Progression Plans are intended to act as the single caseworking record for all individuals entering immigration detention. These Plans will replace detention reviews and other documentation currently used by the Detention Gatekeeper when assessing suitability for detention, and will ensure that caseworkers focus on progression towards an individuals’ return.

Wider rollout of Case Progression Plans is planned for later this year, subject to the findings from the evaluation of the pilot phase.

17th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which local authorities (a) provided and (b) offered places under section 67 of the Immigration Act 2016; and how many places were so provided or offered by each such authority.

In accordance with the Immigration Act 2016 the Government conducted a comprehensive consultation with local authorities across the UK in order to assess capacity for the care of unaccompanied children. On the 13 May 2016 the then Immigration Minister wrote to all local authorities to provide an update on the launch of the National Transfer Scheme (NTS) and to encourage local authorities to participate in all schemes designed for children. On 7 June 2016 the then Immigration Minister, the Minister for Vulnerable Children and Families and the then Minister with responsibility for Syrian Refugees attended a national launch event in London which was attended by local authorities from across the UK.

This was followed by regional events in Leicester, Exeter, Middlesbrough, Leeds, Huntingdon, Bedford, Birmingham, Manchester, Llandidrod Wells, Edinburgh and two further events in London. These events outlined how unaccompanied children arriving from Europe would be placed into local authority care through the National Transfer Scheme (NTS) for unaccompanied asylum seeking children (UASC) and were attended by representatives from over 400 local authorities.


Following this nationwide programme of events, in September 2016 I wrote again to all local authorities in England, Wales and Scotland asking them to confirm how many unaccompanied asylum seeking children they could accommodate under the NTS. Home Office officials also maintained an ongoing dialogue with individual local authorities and regional Strategic Migration Partnerships.

We asked local authorities to consider carefully whether they have the infrastructure and support networks needed to ensure the appropriate care of these unaccompanied children before participating in the NTS


Local authorities told us they had capacity for an additional 400 UASC until the end of the 2016/17 financial year. This is in addition to the unaccompanied children already in local authority care. We estimate that at least 50 of the family reunion cases will require a local authority placement in circumstances where the reunion does not work out


It is for individual local authorities to decide the number of children they are able to accommodate but we continue to work with those not currently participating in the National Transfer Scheme to support them to do so at the earliest opportunity.

11th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many doctors are specially licensed to provide pharmaceutical heroin to addicts in (a) England and Wales, (b) Scotland and (c) Northern Ireland.

The Home Office has, since April 2011, issued 196 licences to enable Doctors to provide treatment for addicts in England and Wales by prescribing one or more of the following three substances - diamorphine (“pharmaceutical heroin”), dipipanone or cocaine. The cost of providing a breakdown by substance for these 196 licences would be disproportionate. The responsibility for issuing such licences to doctors practising in Scotland is devolved to Scottish Ministers, and in Northern Ireland to the Department of Health - Northern Ireland.

3rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans that paragraph 11 of Schedule 10 to the Immigration Act 2016 will come into force.

We are currently working with the Ministry of Justice, Her Majesty’s Court Service and the First-tier Tribunal to implement the Secretary of State’s duty to arrange consideration of bail, as set out in paragraph 11 of Schedule 10 to the Immigration Act 2016.

This is just one part of a large number of changes necessary to implement the wider immigration bail provisions in Schedule 10 and will be commenced alongside those other provisions in due course.

24th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the £10 million package announced on 4 September 2016 for resettled Syrian refugees, how many hours of additional English language teaching per refugee that funding will provide.

The ESOL funding is provided to help refugees learn English and integrate into British society.

Although it is expected that standards of English will improve, there is currently no standard set attainment level, as ability levels will differ. The ESOL courses should be at least 12 hours a week, for a 3 – 6 month period.

24th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the £10 million funding package for English language tuition for resettled Syrian refugees announced on 4 September 2016, how many ESOL levels those eligible to participate will be expected to attain.

The ESOL funding is provided to help refugees learn English and integrate into British society.

Although it is expected that standards of English will improve, there is currently no standard set attainment level, as ability levels will differ. The ESOL courses should be at least 12 hours a week, for a 3 – 6 month period.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many unaccompanied minors have had their take charge request accepted in (a) Calais, (b) Greece and (c) Italy in the latest period for which figures are available.

Since the beginning of this year, over 120 unaccompanied asylum-seeking children in Europe have been accepted for transfer to the UK, over 70 of which are from France. The Government does not routinely publish statistics on the number of take charge requests accepted for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children transferring to the UK under the Dublin III regulation broken down by country or region.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average time was for the family reunification process to be completed in (a) Calais, (b) Greece and (c) Italy in the latest period for which figures are available.

For unaccompanied refugee children accepted for transfer to the UK, transfer requests are generally processed within 10 days and children transferred within weeks. However transfer arrangements are set by the transferring member state who have six months to do so under the III Dublin Regulations.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many requests have been made by (a) France, (b) Greece and (c) Italy for the UK to take charge of an asylum application under the family reunification articles of the Dublin III Regulation in the last six months.

Whilst all asylum claims including those accepted under Dublin III are registered on the Home Office Case Information Database (CID), this data is not currently held in a way that allows it to be reported on automatically and is therefore not currently available.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to reduce the time taken to process applications related to refugee family reunion.

Customer service is a key priority for UK Visas and Immigration, and the efficiency and effectiveness of the visa application process is kept under regular review, including by the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration. The published service standard for resolving refugee family reunion applications is within 12 weeks, or 60 working days.

Where an application is complex and likely to take longer than the advertised processing times, UKVI will contact the applicant to inform them of this.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for Stephen Shaw to complete his follow-up review of the use of immigration detention.

The follow up to Stephen Shaw’s review into the welfare in detention of vulnerable persons will take place in late 2017, with timings to be agreed with Mr Shaw.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Written Statement of 14 January 2016, HCWS470, when she plans to publish the Immigration Enforcement's Business Plan for 2016-17.

Immigration Enforcement planning for 2016-17 and beyond will be reviewed by the new Secretary of State and published in due course.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what consultation her Department has undertaken on the draft Adults at Risk policy for vulnerable people detained under immigration powers.

Stephen Shaw carried out a comprehensive consultation in preparing his report of his review of the welfare of vulnerable people in immigration detention, and the draft adults at risk policy forms part of the Government’s response to Mr Shaw’s review. The Government saw no reason to duplicate this in developing the adults at risk policy. However, when the draft policy was published on 26 May, the Government wrote to a wide range of relevant non-Governmental organisations and offered them the opportunity to discuss it. Subsequently, Home Office officials have held meetings with a number of interested organisations, and the views of these organisations have been taken into account as the policy has been developed further.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department plans to publish the number of applications for refugee family reunion which were granted outside the rules in its quarterly migration statistics.

The Home Office does not currently plan to change the data that is published on this category of applications. The question covers a number of different casework operations and the information is not recorded in a way which can be reported directly.

The Home Office keeps under review the statistics that are published in line with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics, balancing user needs against burdens on data suppliers.

15th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 10 May 2016 to Question 36436, what progress she has made on (a) reflecting on the recommendations of other parties on the rollout of independent child trafficking advocates and (b) that rollout.

The Government is committed to introducing appropriate support for trafficked children. It is important we get these structures right, given the significant risks to these children. We are working with a broad range of interested parties as well as Parliamentarians to further develop an approach so that we deliver an improved service for trafficked children. I will update Parliament in due course.

7th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Answer of 9 May 2016 to Question 36277, how many requests have been made for asylum applications to be transferred for consideration by the UK from (a) Greece and (b) Italy since UK experts were deployed to support the respective Dublin units.

Whilst all asylum claims including those accepted under Dublin III are registered on the Home Office Case Information Database (CID), this data is not currently held in a way that allows it to be reported on automatically and is therefore not currently available.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the number of people whose asylum application has been transferred for consideration by the Government under the Dublin III Regulation as part of quarterly immigration statistics.

The information published in the quarterly Immigration Statistics is kept under review, taking into account the needs of users, burdens on suppliers and producers, in line with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics. There are currently no plans to publish data relating to asylum applications transferred under Dublin III Regulation.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many places have been made available by each London borough for (a) the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme, (b) the Children at Risk from the Middle East and North Africa scheme and (c) unaccompanied asylum seeking children in Europe.

For those refugees resettled in the UK under the Syrian Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme the Home Office publishes the number of people resettled, broken down by local authority, on a quarterly basis. The most recent statistics were published on 26 May 2016 (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-january-to-march-2016) These figures show the number of refugees that were resettled in each area up to the end of March 2016.

As the Prime Minister announced on 4 May and as set out in the new Immigration Act 2016, we will work to admit unaccompanied refugee children from Europe to the UK. The very nature of this legislation means we must take the time to consult Local Authorities and others before bringing final proposals on how to implement this scheme.

We will consult local authorities to establish how best to implement this commitment and the recently announced Children at Risk resettlement scheme, which is the only other resettlement to include unaccompanied children, as part of our wider discussion with them about the transfer of unaccompanied asylum seeking children who have arrived spontaneously, which is designed to relieve the pressure on authorities such as Kent.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) asylum seekers and (b) refugees have been accommodated by each London borough in the last three years.

Figures on asylum seekers in receipt of Section 95 support (dispersed accommodation or subsistence only) by local authority, are published quarterly by the Home Office in the Immigration Statistics release, in table as_16q in volume 4 of the Asylum data tables. The following table gives the number of asylum seekers housed in dispersed accommodation in each London local authority, as at the end of March for the last three years.

A copy of the latest release, Immigration Statistics January to March 2016, is available from:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-january-to-march-2016.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children have been reunited with their families in the UK in (a) the last five years and (b) the last year under (i) the EU Dublin III Regulations, (ii) part 11 of the UK immigration rules, (iii) other parts of the UK immigration rules and (iv) under exceptional circumstances.

It is not possible to provide a full answer to this question. I shall write to the hon. Gentleman on the issues he has raised.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
4th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress her Department has made on rolling out independent child trafficking advocates.

The Government is committed to introducing appropriate support for trafficked children. It is important we get these structures right however, given the significant risks to these children.

In line with the requirements of Section 48(7) of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, the Government laid a report before Parliament in December 2015 setting out the steps we proposed to take in relation to independent child trafficking advocates. The full report can be obtained here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/independent-child-trafficking-advocates-trial-government-report

Since December 2015, we have worked to address issues identified during the trial. We have engaged with Members of both Houses, the offices of the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner and Children’s Commissioner for England. We have also sought views from the voluntary sector and statutory organisations in England and Wales. This engagement has been valuable in assessing how best to deliver an improved service for trafficked children in England and Wales.

As part of this engagement, I wrote to the Chairs of the three All Party Parliamentary Groups with the strongest interest in the trial in March, saying that I would wait to receive their views in writing before making a statement to the House about how we will proceed. This week I received letters from the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery and from the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner. I am reflecting on their recommendations and will provide an update to Parliament once we have had an opportunity to consider their valuable input.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Written Statement of 21 April 2016 on Refugees and Resettlement, HCWS687, how many of the 75 expert personnel will be working to identify and process individuals who are eligible for family reunification transfers to other EU countries under the Dublin III Regulation.

Pursuant to my statement of 21 April, HCWS687, the 75 UK expert personnel deployed to Greece to support implementation of the EU-Turkey Migration Agreement will conduct a number of duties. A proportion of the UK expert personnel will work closely with European Asylum Support Officer (EASO) coordinators and the Greek Asylum Service to process cases through the admissibility process and provide expert support to the Greek authorities and other EU partners on overall co-ordination of the response. Supporting the operation of the Greek asylum service is a fundamental part of this Government’s approach to identifying children in need of protection at the earliest possible opportunity and ensuring children are identified as eligible for family reunification consideration under the terms of Dublin Regulation.

This of course is in addition to the support that we are already providing to European partner Dublin Units. Following calls from EASO we have already deployed two UK experts to support the Greek Dublin Unit and a third is due to be deployed in May. We are also deploying an expert to the Italian Dublin Unit in May under the hotspot operation mission. This deployment is in addition to the long term support we are providing to the Italian Dublin through a bilateral agreement. We are confident that through our concerted joint efforts we can identify and facilitate the swift transfers of cases through our national systems and make effective use of the Dublin Regulation.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
29th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether a Minister of her Department plans to attend the UNHRC high-level meeting on global responsibility sharing through pathways for admission of Syrian refugees in Geneva on 30 March 2016.

I am currently planning to attend the UNHCR high level meeting on global responsibility sharing through pathways for admission of Syrian refugees in Geneva on 30 March 2016.

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will suspend the powers of enforcement contained in the Psychoactive Substances Bill in relation to alkyl nitrates pending the outcome of the review announced in response to the Home Affairs Select Committee First Report of Session 2015-16, published on 23 October 2015.

Pending the outcome of the review announced in the response to the report of the Home Affairs Select Committee, we will seek to ensure a proportionate response to the sale of poppers by all those enforcing the legislation and that this approach is reflected in the guidance currently being drafted by enforcement partners.

The Bill has lower penalties than the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and provides for civil sanctions, as an alternative to a criminal prosecution, to enable law enforcement agencies to adopt a graded response in tackling the trade in the range of psychoactive substances. The Bill does not criminalise simple possession of poppers and this will also be borne in mind by partners when enforcing the legislation.

In consultation with the Department of Health and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), we will consider whether there is evidence to support the claims that ‘poppers’ have a beneficial health and relationship effect and, if so, whether it is sufficient to justify exempting the alkyl nitrites group (or individual substances in the group).

Should we conclude that a case has been made to include alkyl nitrites in the list of exempted substances, we intend to complete this consideration in time to enable any such draft regulations to be laid before both Houses and approved before the summer recess.

3rd Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to lay before Parliament a report on the steps the Government proposes to take in relation to independent child trafficking advocates, pursuant to section 48(7) of the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Section 48(7) of the Modern Slavery Act requires the Government to lay before Parliament a report setting out the steps it proposes to take in relation to independent child trafficking advocates within nine months of Royal Assent of the Modern Slavery Act. The Government will publish this report by 16 December, whilst Parliament is sitting.

15th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 12 October 2015 to Question 10467, when she plans for the results of the application of the Family Test on orders seeking to control drugs that are dangerous or otherwise harmful when misused to be published.

The Family Test was considered when developing previously published Impact Assessments on drug control orders but, in accordance with the published guidance, it was concluded there were no tangible direct impacts on families and it was not proportionate to apply the specific test. Impact assessments published alongside future orders seeking to control drugs will evidence consideration of the Family Test.

15th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the results of the Family Test applied to the policies proposed in the Immigration Bill.

In accordance with the public sector equality duty, the Home Office has conducted an equality assessment of all policies in the Immigration Bill. The additional Family Test is designed to support strong and stable family relationships among those families legally resident in the United Kingdom. The Immigration Bill is designed to ensure that people in the UK illegally cannot work and access services. Any impact on people while they are in the United Kingdom illegally which results from the Immigration Bill is temporary, until the point of their departure, and as such the Family Test is not engaged.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her announcement on 9 February 2015 on an independent review of policies and procedures affecting the welfare of those held in immigration removal centres, and pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister for Immigration of 10 September 2015, Official Report, column 601, when she expects that review will be published.

Stephen Shaw CBE, the former Prisons and Probation Ombudsman for England and Wales, has recently completed his independent review into welfare in detention and his report has been submitted. His findings are being carefully considered before the report is published by laying it before Parliament, alongside the Government’s response to the recommendations.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Government is taking to tackle the skills shortage facing the UK curry industry following the cap on skilled curry chefs from outside the EU.

I have been asked to reply of behalf of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

Skills provision must meet the needs of employers. This is why employer-led Trailblazers are currently leading the way in the design and delivery of new more rigorous apprenticeship standards.

Standards relating to several chef roles have already been developed and these are intended to cover specialisms such as Indian cuisine. Employers in the curry industry may therefore wish to contact the Trailblazer leads Kathryn.Porter@Hilton.co.uk or Annette.Allmark@people1st.co.uk for more details of how to get involved in the standards’ development. If they identify a particular skills gap not accommodated by the existing standards, then they could come together and apply to develop a specific standard to meet their needs.

16th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Answer of 8 September 2015 to Question 47 by the Minister of Immigration to the Home Affairs Committee, how many Syrian refugees will be accommodated in order to meet the UNHCR requirement for 130,000 vulnerable Syrian refugees by 2016.

As the Prime Minister announced on 7 September, the Government will expand existing resettlement schemes to resettle 20,000 Syrians in need of protection during this Parliament. This is in addition to the thousands who receive protection in the UK under normal asylum procedures and through the refugee family reunion route. The UK is making a serious and substantial contribution to resettling vulnerable Syrian refugees. We will continue to work with the UNHCR and play our full part in helping these vulnerable people.

16th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's assessment of the risk of prosecution to Christians in Pakistan in its publication, Country Information and Guidance, Pakistan: Christians and Christian converts, published in February 2015, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the finding of the report commissioned by the British Pakistan Christian Association, entitled Education, Human Rights Violations in Pakistan and the Scandal Involving UNHRC and Asylum Seekers in Thailand, published in February 2015.

The Home Office will be considering the report commissioned by the British Pakistani Christian Association alongside a range of other material to make a full assessment of the situation of Christians in Pakistan, and will revise its country information and guidance if necessary.

The Home Office considers that the treatment of asylum seekers in Thailand is primarily a matter for the Thai authorities.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the contribution of 26 March 2015 by the then Parliamentary under Secretary of State, on Immigration: Detention, Official Report, House of Lords, column 1587, what recent assessment she has made of changes in the number of people held in immigration removal centres; and what steps she is taking to reduce growth in such numbers.

Home Office published statistics show that as at 30 June 2015, 3418 people were in detention, an increase on the number recorded at the end of June 2014 (3,079). This data is available online https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2015/detention.

Capacity of the detention estate is kept under constant review. Decisions will continue to be made according to operational priorities. Haslar Immigration Removal Centre was transferred back to the National Offender Management Service in April 2015, reducing the overall detention estate capacity.

On 9 February the Home Secretary announced an independent review of detainee welfare in immigration detention, led by Stephen Shaw. The report is expected in the autumn and the Government will publish the report by laying it before Parliament, alongside the Government’s response to the recommendations.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the contribution of the Minister for Policing, Crime and Criminal Justice in the Second Delegated Legislation Committee on the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (Temporary Class Drug) (No. 2) Order 2015 on 14 September 2015, whether the family impact test will be included in all future impact assessments.

As part of the policy development process Home Office officials are expected to consider the published Family Test guidance when assessing the impacts of the Department’s policies. In accordance with this guidance, the Family Test will be applied for all future orders seeking to control drugs that are dangerous or otherwise harmful when misused, where there are tangible impacts on families and it is proportionate to do so.

25th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum applications from Eritrean nationals were decided in (a) April and (b) May 2015; and what decision was taken in each such case.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum decisions on a quarterly and annual basis. Quarterly statistics for the period April to June 2015 will be published on 27 August 2015.

A copy of the latest release, ‘Immigration Statistics January – March 2015’ is available from https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/home-office/series/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will review and update her Department's country guidance on Eritrea relating to illegal exit and national service to take better account of the UN Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in Eritrea.

We are currently reviewing our country information and guidance on Eritrea to take into account the advance version of the Report of UN Commission of Inquiry on the human rights situation in Eritrea released in early June and other recently published country information.

We will issue updated and revised guidance on both illegal exit and national service shortly.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much compensation her Department paid following the unlawful detention of individuals under immigration powers in the financial year 2014-15.

I am unable to disclose financial data for 2014/15 until the Home Office’s 2014/15 Annual Report and Accounts are audited and published.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of August 2014, what steps she is taking to assess the impact of her Department's policies on the family.

As part of the policy development process Home Office officials are expected to consider the published Family Test guidance when assessing the impacts of the Department’s policies. The Family Test is actively being considered for a number of Home Office policies currently in development. The guidance can be found here -

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/368894/family-test-guidance.pdf

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the UK's policy will be on substantial changes to the international drugs control regime at the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs in Vienna in March 2015.

The Coalition Government and our strategic international partners do not support substantial change to the UN drug control conventions.

The Conventions provide a robust framework for tackling the harms caused by drugs. We continue to work with our partners to promote a balance and evidence-based international approach to drugs within the UN conventions.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of his Department's policies on the family.

Armed Forces families are an integral and valued part of the Armed Forces community. We ask a great deal of our Service personnel and, in return, they deserve to have confidence that their families are appropriately supported.

Over the last five years this Government has achieved significant successes in this area; we amended the schools admissions code to allow schools in England to allocate a place in advance of a Service family arriving in the area, and enabled infant schools in England to admit Service children over the class size of 30. In addition, we allocated £20 million in LIBOR money in Financial Year 2014-15 to support childcare infrastructure for Service families.

One of the key tools we use to understand how Armed Forces families feel about the policies which affect them is the annual Families Continuous Attitude Survey (FAMCAS) which monitors the views of spouses and civil partners of Service personnel in key welfare areas, including employment, schooling, healthcare and accommodation. The results of the survey are used to help develop and track military personnel policies. In excess of 7,000 people completed the 2014 FAMCAS survey, with the responses showing improvements in areas such as full-time employment rates for spouses which increased from 33% in 2010 to 40% in 2014 and the numbers owning their own home, which increased from 55% to 58% in the same period.

In addition to the use of FAMCAS, officials work closely with each Service, the Service Families Federations and Armed Forces charities to understand and respond to family issues. At a senior level, the Families Forum meetings and Service Charities Partnership Board meetings provide regular opportunities for family issues to be raised and monitored with Ministers and the Chief of Defence People.

I recognise that there is more we can do to support families, which is why I am determined to drive forward projects such as the New Employment Model which aims to produce a modernised offer that reduces the impact of Service life on individuals and their families.

14th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what discussions his Department had with the Scottish Government on provisions in the Housing (Scotland) Act 2014 which require landlords to install carbon monoxide alarms to all properties that contain fixed-combustion burning appliances; and if he will make a statement.

Housing is a devolved issue and therefore the shaping and implementation of all relevant Scottish Housing legislation is at the discretion of the Scottish Government. There is regular dialogue between the four UK administrations, and we will be in further contact with the Scottish Government when we begin the planned review, for October 2017, of the smoke and carbon monoxide alarm requirements on private landlords in England.

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether the local government finance settlement will be subject to a needs-led review.

The consultation on the provisional local government finance settlement for 2016-17 closed on 15 January. We are considering carefully all the responses and other representations made and will present final proposals soon to enable local authorities to set their budgets for 2016-17.

At the outset of the current system of business rates retention in 2013-14, we said there would be periodic reviews to take account of changes to needs and resources. As part of the move towards 100% business rates retention by the end of this Parliament, we will work with local government on the approach to implementing these reforms, including on the treatment of needs and resources, and will consult on proposed changes.

Marcus Jones
Vice Chamberlain (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
15th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, if he will publish the results of the Family Test applied to the policies proposed in the Cities and Local Government Devolution Bill [Lords].

The Cities and Local Government Devolution Bill is an enabling Bill. The Government will undertake the appropriate tests and publish them before any implementation orders are made.

2nd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to paragraph 1.77 of Autumn Statement, Cm 8961, what progress he has made on further integrating services by developing and extending the principles underpinning the Troubled Families programme approach to other groups of people with multiple needs.

The expanded Troubled Families Programme was rolled out in April 2015, to work with up to another 400,000 families with multiple problems - and to help transform the way services work with these vulnerable families. Officials from my Department have also been exploring futher potential opportunities for this approach with other government departments.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of his Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 through the publication of guidance for officials - Family Test Guidance

The objective of the Test is to introduce a family perspective to the policy making process, specifically to make the potential impacts on family functioning and relationships explicit.

DCLG leads on delivery of the Troubled Families Programme which is a leading example of this approach and is working with the Department for Work and Pensions to embed the Test across its wider policy-making process.

9th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many adult and juvenile repeat offenders in London who have not received a non-custodial sentence since Section 28 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 came into effect have had (a) more than one previous knife conviction and (b) a previous conviction for a violent offence in addition to their previous knife crime conviction.

The government continues to monitor sentencing for bladed and offensive weapon offences. On 9 March the latest knife possession sentencing quarterly statistics bulletin was published and is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/knife-possession-sentencing-quarterly-brief-october-to-december-2016.

After the introduction of our two strikes legislation, people caught carrying a knife a second time are now more likely than ever before to go to prison.

Since commencement of Section 28 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015, London police forces secured:

(a) 364 sentencing occasions resulting in a custodial sentence where the offender had more than one previous knife possession offence. Of these, 298 resulted in immediate custody and 66 in a suspended sentence.

(b) 535 sentencing occasions resulting in a custodial sentence where the offender was previously convicted or cautioned for a violence against the person offence (other than knife possession). Of these, 375 resulted in immediate custody and 160 in a suspended sentence. The figures reflect whether the offender had a previous conviction or caution for a violence against the person offence (other than knife possession), before they committed their subsequent knife possession offence. The conviction or caution for the violence against the person offence may have occurred at the same time as, or on a separate occasion to, the previous knife possession offence.

The figures provided include both adult and juvenile offenders.

1st Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the oral contribution of 24 January 2017, Official Report, column 144, on prison staff, if she will assess the effect of the reduction in accommodation fabric checks on (a) the incidence of self-harm and (b) maintaining order and security in prisons; and whether the outcomes set out in Prison Service Instruction 28/2011 and Prison Service Instruction 09/2016 have been achieved.

Prisons employ a range of operational security measures aimed at keeping prisons safe and secure. Accommodation Fabric Checks (AFCs) support this by disrupting the ability of prisoners to store prohibited items in their cells either for their own purposes or on behalf of others. Each prison must assess the frequency of AFCs required to meet their own security and safety needs. Any reduction in the frequency of AFCs may be more effectively offset by targeted and intelligence led searches.

There is no direct link between the frequency of AFCs and self-harm. Other than through ensuring the integrity of the cell, an AFC does not allow for any meaningful interaction between officer and prisoner.

MoJ is investing an extra £100m annually to boost the frontline by 2,500 prison officers so that every prisoner will have a dedicated officer to support them. Not only will a greater officer presence provide a deterrence to prisoner behaviour that threatens the safe running of prisons but officers will be better able to pick up on any signs of vulnerability in the prisoners assigned to them.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many court orders have been issued following non-compliance with a child arrangement order in the latest period for which figures are available.

The Ministry of Justice publishes quarterly figures on the number of children involved in Public or Private law orders made in Family courts in England and Wales. Data for 2011 to 2015 can be found in Table 4 via the link below: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/518299/tables-for-family-court-statistics-quarterly-q4-2015.xls

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many online sellers of knives have been (a) prosecuted and (b) convicted under section 141A of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 for selling knives to people under 18 since that section came into force; and what sentences were handed down to people so convicted.

This information is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
17th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many suppliers of knives have been convicted and prosecuted under section 141A of the Criminal Justice Act 1998 since that Act's implementation; and what average length of custodial sentence was received for such convictions.

Knife crime has no place on our streets and the Government continues to work with the police and partners, including retailers, to ensure that we reduce violence and knife crime. Selling knives, and certain articles with a blade or point, to under 18s is a criminal offence enforced by the police and Trading Standards with a maximum penalty of six months’ imprisonment and/or an unlimited fine. The law is clear that a retailer commits a criminal offence if they do not take proper steps to make sure they are not selling knives to under-18s.

The number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty and sentenced at all courts of offences under S141A Criminal Justice Act 1988, England and Wales, from 1997 to 2003, can be viewed in the table.

Persons proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty and sentenced at all courts for offences under S141A Criminal Justice Act 1988, England and Wales, 1997 to 2003(1)(2)

Year

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Sentenced

of which

Immediate Custody

Average custodial sentence length (4)

1997

2

2

2

1

*

1998

2

2

2

-

-

1999

3

2

2

-

-

2000

-

-

-

-

-

2001

9

8

8

-

-

2002

11

10

10

-

-

2003

17

17

17

-

-

' - ' = Nil

* = Figure suppressed as number too small to give meaningful average.

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.

PQ 31364/31365

Data for 2004 to 2014 is available within the Criminal Justice Statistics publication at the link below.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2014 .

One person has been given an immediate custodial sentence for this offence therefore there is no average custodial sentence length.

Dominic Raab
Foreign Secretary and First Secretary of State
16th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many suppliers of knives have been convicted and prosecuted under section 141A of the Criminal Justice Act 1998 since that Act's implementation; and what the average length of custodial sentence received was for such convictions.

Knife crime has no place on our streets and the Government continues to work with the police and partners, including retailers, to ensure that we reduce violence and knife crime. Selling knives, and certain articles with a blade or point, to under 18s is a criminal offence enforced by the police and Trading Standards with a maximum penalty of six months’ imprisonment and/or an unlimited fine. The law is clear that a retailer commits a criminal offence if they do not take proper steps to make sure they are not selling knives to under-18s.

The number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty and sentenced at all courts of offences under S141A Criminal Justice Act 1988, England and Wales, from 1997 to 2003, can be viewed in the table.

Persons proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty and sentenced at all courts for offences under S141A Criminal Justice Act 1988, England and Wales, 1997 to 2003(1)(2)

Year

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Sentenced

of which

Immediate Custody

Average custodial sentence length (4)

1997

2

2

2

1

*

1998

2

2

2

-

-

1999

3

2

2

-

-

2000

-

-

-

-

-

2001

9

8

8

-

-

2002

11

10

10

-

-

2003

17

17

17

-

-

' - ' = Nil

* = Figure suppressed as number too small to give meaningful average.

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.

PQ 31364/31365

Data for 2004 to 2014 is available within the Criminal Justice Statistics publication at the link below.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2014 .

One person has been given an immediate custodial sentence for this offence therefore there is no average custodial sentence length.

Dominic Raab
Foreign Secretary and First Secretary of State
10th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people under the age of 18 have been convicted under section 141A of the Criminal Justice Act 1998 since that Act's implementation; and what the average length of custodial sentence was received for such convictions.

No juvenile offenders have been sentenced to immediate custody under section 141A of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 in England and Wales since its implementation. Data for 2004 to 2014 is available in the Criminal Justice Statistics outcome by offence data tool available at the below link;

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2014

No juveniles were convicted before 2006. Court proceedings data for 2015 is planned for publication in May 2016.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
9th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been convicted and given mandatory sentences for two knife crime convictions in the last three years.

Section 28 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 provides for a minimum custodial sentence for a second (or further) conviction for possession of a knife or offensive weapon. This provision was commenced by the Government on 17 July 2015 and applies to those offenders who committed a second offence after this date. The latest quarterly sentencing bulletin for knife possession offences contains information about repeat offences:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/483951/knife-possession-sentencing-bulletin-q3-2015.pdf .


These statistics only show a small number of cases of knife crime possession dealt with under the most recent sentencing provisions, given the short time since implementation. However, the next quarterly bulletin will start to provide a clearer picture of the impact of the minimum sentence, but we would normally look to assess the impact of a new provision on the basis of at least 12 months data.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders have been sentenced for what length of time pursuant to (a) section 1 of the Prevention of Crime Act 1953, as amended by the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 and (b) section 139 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988, as amended by the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 to date.

The data requested on offences amended by the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 is not yet available and will be published in due course.

16th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress has been made on implementing New Clauses 6 and 7 which were added to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill on 17 June 2014.

Section 28 and Schedule 5 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 provides a minimum custodial sentence for those convicted for a second or subsequent time for possession of a knife or offensive weapon. This will be implemented as soon as possible.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps he is taking to assess the impact of his Department's policies on the family.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014 through the publication of guidance for officials - Family Test Guidance

The Ministry of Justice has applied the Test since it was introduced. The DWP is working with all departments to embed the Test in the policymaking process.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people received a (a) custodial sentence, (b) community penalty, (c) financial penalty and (d) other disposal for offences related to class (i) A, (ii) B and (iii) C drugs in the most recent year for which figure are available.

Sentences are getting more severe and crime is falling. Since 2010, offenders are more likely to go to prison, and for longer.

The number of offenders found guilty and sentenced at all courts, with outcomes, and the number of other disposals issued, for possession of class A, class B and class C drugs, in England and Wales for 2013 (the latest data available), can be viewed on the Ministry of Justice website at the available link:-

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/311455/cjs-outcomes-by-offence-2009-2013.xls

Under Offence drop down list select:

1) Possession of a controlled drug class A

2) Possession of a controlled drug class B

3) Possession of a controlled drug class C

15th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many youth custodial sentences have been awarded for drug offences in the last five years; and how many of those sentences are for (a) primary offences and (b) non-Class A offences.

The principal aim of the youth justice system in England and Wales is the prevention of offending by children and young people under the age of 18. Courts must have regard to this aim and to the welfare of the offender when sentencing a child or young person with the emphasis being on approaches that seem most likely to be effective with young people.

Table 1: Number of Juveniles sentenced to immediate custody for all drug offences[1] and for primary non-Class A drug offences[2] England and Wales 2009-2013[3][4]

All Drug Offences1

Number of Juveniles sentenced

Primary Non-Class A Drug Offences2

Number of Juveniles sentenced

2009

223

2009

56

2010

222

2010

84

2011

185

2011

68

2012

129

2012

47

2013

137

2013

31

Custodial sentences are available for those young people who commit the most serious offences and who fail to respond to community interventions.

There are also a number of community sentences which are available to the courts which are not covered by the figures above. As part of the Youth Rehabilitation Order, a Drug Treatment Requirement is available, where the young person’s drug use has been identified as a substantive factor in their offending behaviour. The Drug Treatment Requirement means that the young person must submit to treatment during the period specified in the order with a view to the reduction or elimination of the young person’s dependency on, or propensity to misuse, drugs.

[1] Data includes Sections 12, 13, 19(a), (b) Criminal Justice Co-Operation Act 1990, RR.6(5), 7, 8, & 9(2) Controlled Drugs (Drug Precursors)(Community External Trade) Regs 2008, Misuse of Drugs Act 1971, Customs and Excise Management Act 1979 (SS.50(2), (3) & (5), 68 (2) & (4) & 170(1), (2), (3) & (4) & Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 SS 327-330, 333, 334 (1,2) & 336 (5) & (6)

[2] Data excludes the following offence descriptions and corresponding statutes: Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 SEC 4(2)(3) SS.170(1)(b) & (3) & (4) & Sch.1,P.1 SEC 19, SEC 8, Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 SEC 4(2)(3) SS.170(1)(b) & (3) & (4) & Sch.1,P.1 SEC 19, SEC 8, Criminal Justice (International Co-operation) Act 1990 S.19(a)(b)

[3] The statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

[4] Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
15th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many maximum custodial sentences were awarded for class (a) A, (b) B and (c) C drugs in the most recent year for which figures are available.

Drug offending is serious in itself and drug abuse also underlies a huge volume of acquisitive and violent crime which can blight communities.

Parliament sets the maximum penalty for an offence at a level to deal with the worst possible case. This means that there will, rightly, be few cases where the maximum sentence is imposed. The independent Sentencing Council issued a sentencing guideline on drug offences, effective from February 2012, which brought sentencing guidance together for the first time to help to ensure consistent and proportionate sentencing for all drug offences that come before courts.

The number of offenders sentenced to immediate custody that were given the maximum sentence for class A, B and C drug offences at all courts in England and Wales for 2013 (the latest data available), can be viewed in the table.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, with reference to the Prime Minister's press release of 18 August 2014, what steps she is taking to assess the impact of her Department's policies on the family.

The majority of Northern Ireland policy which has an impact on the family is devolved. The Northern Ireland Office will consider any implications for, and impact on, families in its policymaking process.

13th Apr 2016
To ask the Leader of the House, pursuant to his oral contribution of 10 March 2016, Official Report, column 444, whether he expects primary and secondary legislation to be subject to the family test and the results published.

A Family Test was introduced by the Government in 2014 – it aims to bring a family perspective into policy making. It will ensure that impacts on family relationships and functioning, both positive and negative, are recognised in the process of policy development and help inform the policy decisions, and any subsequent legislation, made by Ministers.

The Test is not a ‘tick box’ or ‘pass v fail’ exercise, it is about thinking carefully how new policy can support or potentially undermine family relationships. Policy is always about trade-offs but the Family Test ensures family considerations are explicitly considered and recognised when making those trade-offs.

While the guidance encourages publication, there is no requirement to do so.