Tracey Crouch Portrait

Tracey Crouch

Conservative - Chatham and Aylesford

First elected: 6th May 2010


Shark Fins Bill
9th Nov 2022 - 16th Nov 2022
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
3rd Jul 2017 - 1st Nov 2018
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
8th May 2015 - 3rd Jul 2017
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission
22nd Nov 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Political and Constitutional Reform Committee
31st Oct 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
29th Oct 2012 - 30th Mar 2015


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Tracey Crouch has voted in 804 divisions, and 24 times against the majority of their Party.

26 Jan 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 352 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 217 Noes - 360
26 Jan 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 354 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 227 Noes - 354
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 344 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 353 Noes - 277
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative No votes vs 319 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 308
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 353 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 353 Noes - 270
4 Nov 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative No votes vs 330 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 331 Noes - 272
12 Oct 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Conservative No votes vs 327 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 332 Noes - 279
1 Jul 2020 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative Aye votes vs 317 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 232 Noes - 321
17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
2 Jun 2020 - Proceedings during the Pandemic - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative Aye votes vs 240 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 185 Noes - 242
13 May 2020 - Remote Division result: New Clause 2 - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative Aye votes vs 326 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 277 Noes - 328
20 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative No votes vs 265 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 268 Noes - 204
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 60 Conservative No votes vs 258 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 385 Noes - 100
22 Mar 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 230
22 Mar 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Conservative No votes vs 296 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 313 Noes - 227
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 286 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 290 Noes - 242
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Conservative No votes vs 279 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 284 Noes - 242
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative No votes vs 281 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 285 Noes - 243
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 273 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 234
17 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 281 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 289 Noes - 220
17 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 279 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 227
17 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative No votes vs 280 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 284 Noes - 226
4 Dec 2023 - Victims and Prisoners Bill - View Vote Context
Tracey Crouch voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 22 Conservative Aye votes vs 238 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 246 Noes - 242
View All Tracey Crouch Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Steve Barclay (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
(10 debate interactions)
Nigel Huddleston (Conservative)
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
(9 debate interactions)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
(6 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Legislation Debates
Criminal Justice Bill 2023-24
(1,835 words contributed)
Seals (Protection) Bill 2021-22
(1,420 words contributed)
Animal Welfare (Sentience) Act 2022
(943 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Tracey Crouch's debates

Chatham and Aylesford Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want suicide spoken about in schools in a safe and age-appropriate way. Speaking about suicide saves lives
The Dept for Education are conducting a review of the RSHE curriculum; this petition calls on the DfE to include suicide prevention within the statutory guidelines of the new curriculum.

The Government should prohibit the sale, use and manufacture of free-running snares under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, putting them in the same category as self-locking snares, which are already illegal.

Hundreds of thousands of people signed numerous petitions calling for actions that the Government has included in the Kept Animals Bill. The Government should urgently find time to allow the Bill to complete its journey through Parliament and become law.

Every year across the UK, millions of farmed animals are kept in cages, unable to express their natural behaviours and experiencing huge suffering. These inhumane systems cannot be the future of British farming. The UK Government must legislate to ‘End the Cage Age’ for all farmed animals.


Latest EDMs signed by Tracey Crouch

17th April 2024
Tracey Crouch signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Wednesday 17th April 2024

Derek Underwood MBE

Tabled by: Tracey Crouch (Conservative - Chatham and Aylesford)
That this House acknowledges the sad passing of Kent and England cricketer Derek Underwood MBE, who represented England from 1966 until 1982; notes that he claimed 297 wickets over 86 Test match appearances at an average of 25.83, making him the sixth leading wicket taker to represent England and the …
1 signatures
(Most recent: 17 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 1
26th March 2024
Tracey Crouch signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Tuesday 26th March 2024

Let Girls Play campaign

Tabled by: Tracey Crouch (Conservative - Chatham and Aylesford)
That this House congratulates the Football Association (FA) and Barclays for hosting its third Biggest Ever Football Session on International Women’s Day, as part of its Let Girls Play Campaign; notes a record breaking 475,000 girls from 5,000 schools across England took part; further notes that this year, the Biggest …
9 signatures
(Most recent: 17 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 3
Labour: 3
Conservative: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
View All Tracey Crouch's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Tracey Crouch, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Tracey Crouch has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Tracey Crouch has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Tracey Crouch


A Bill to amend the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 to make the intentional or reckless disturbance or harassment of seals an offence; to make further provision about the protection of seals; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 6th May 2022

A Bill to amend the Sexual Offences Act 2003 to make sports coach a position of trust for the purposes of child sex offences; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 17th June 2020
(Read Debate)

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
12th Dec 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if she will take steps to tackle access refusal of people with assistance dogs by businesses.

No one should be refused access to businesses or services because they legitimately have an assistance dog.

The Equality Act 2010 places a duty on businesses and service providers to make reasonable adjustments to improve disabled people’s access to goods and services so they are not placed at a substantial disadvantage compared to non-disabled people. This reasonable adjustment duty is an anticipatory duty, meaning that those who provide goods, facilities and services to members of the public are expected to anticipate the reasonable adjustments that disabled customers may require, including auxiliary aids.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is the public body responsible for enforcing the Equality Act. In 2017, the Commission published two pieces of guidance – a guide to help businesses understand what they can do to meet their legal duties to assistance dog owners, and a guide to help tourism businesses welcome people with access requirements. The EHRC supports disabled individuals who have experienced discrimination to take their cases to court.

In recent years, case law has strengthened the equalities law for people with assistance dogs. There have been a number of significant cases brought under the Equality Act involving assistance dogs, which have been successfully litigated, for example, Bloch v Kassim (assistance dogs in taxis); Clutton and Williams v Pen-y-Bryn Group (assistance dogs in restaurants); and McCafferty v Miah (assistance dogs in shops). The Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS), the equalities and human rights helpline, receives about 35,000 customer contacts a year, more than 60% of which concern disability issues. The EASS can intervene directly with or assist the complainant to take the case up with the relevant service provider in many cases, including those involving assistance dogs.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
19th May 2020
To ask the hon. Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, what assessment the Church of England has made of the potential effect on public health of reopening churches.

The House of Bishops meets regularly to review its own guidance to clergy in light of Government and public health advice.

On 5th May the House of Bishops issued new guidance, which can be seen at: https://www.churchofengland.org/more/media-centre/news/house-bishops-backs-phased-approach-revising-access-church-buildings

While church buildings remain closed for public worship in line with Government advice, the Bishops agreed in principle to a phased approach to lifting restrictions, in time and in parallel with the Government's approach, with three broad stages. The first, effective immediately, allows clergy limited access to church buildings for activities such as streaming of services or private prayer, so long as the necessary hygiene and social distancing precautions are taken; the decision being made by individual clergy after discussion with their diocesan bishop. The second and third will see access for some rites and ceremonies, and for worship services with limited congregations meeting, when Government restrictions are eased to allow it.

Senior staff of the National Church Institutions have joined two of the Government’s ‘unlocking’ work streams, within the Department for Culture Media and Sport and Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister of the Cabinet Office, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of recognising people who work in the cleaning and hygiene sector as key workers.

While a list of key workers was used previously in the Covid-19 response, the Cabinet Office does not keep a current list of key workers.

When responding to any future emergency, the Government will continue to consider, on a case by case basis, the merits of renewing key worker designation, and its scope.

17th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what progress she has made on meeting the 2015 net zero targets.

The UK has met all its carbon budgets to date. The Government is committed to its carbon budgets and Nationally Determined Contribution, which keep the UK on track to meet net zero in 2050.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
11th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions the Government has had with Ofcom on the financial sustainability of (a) Royal Mail and (b) the Universal Postal Services Order.

Ministers and officials meet with Ofcom regularly to discuss a range of issues in relation to its role as the regulatory authority for the postal sector, including the provision of the universal service obligation.

Ofcom, as the independent regulator for the postal sector, has a duty to ensure the provision of a financially sustainable and efficient universal postal service. Ofcom publishes an annual report summarising its monitoring programme on its website (www.ofcom.org.uk/postal-services/information-for-the-postal-industry/monitoring_reports).

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to amend the minimum requirements in the Postal Services Act 2011 to allow Royal Mail to move to a five day letter service.

The Government currently has no plans to change the minimum requirements of the universal postal service which are set out in the Postal Services Act 2011.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to legislate on the accessibility and sale of fireworks.

The Government recognises that people want to enjoy fireworks, while reducing the risks and disturbances to individuals, animals and property. The Government has no current plans to legislate further but continues to monitor the situation.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of energy companies who have increased their electricity prices for customers with a renewable energy tariff in response to the general rise in energy costs.

The Government does not set electricity prices, because setting tariffs is a commercial decision for suppliers, within the constraints of the price cap.

The Government has recently published a consultation setting out options as part of its Review of Electricity Market Arrangements (REMA). REMA is considering how the role of gas as a price setter for electricity could be reduced. This will include examining reforms for helping bring forward investment in low carbon generation, leading to less frequent use of gas so that it sets the price of electricity for shorter periods, as well as wholesale market reform options that could help to reduce the link.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of increasing regulation of petrol prices, in the same way that household energy prices are regulated.

I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave the hon. Member for Strangford on 17 June to Question 14492.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what progress her Department has made on tackling loneliness.

Many people experience loneliness and social isolation, and the Government is committed to reducing the stigma associated with loneliness, and building a more connected society. Government, local councils, health systems and voluntary and community sector organisations all have an important role to play in achieving this.

Since publishing the first ever government Strategy for Tackling Loneliness and appointing the world’s first Minister for Loneliness in 2018, we have invested almost £80 million in tackling loneliness. These interventions include a national communications campaign that aims to reduce the stigma of loneliness, which has reached at least 25 million people across the country. The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is also delivering the ‘Know Your Neighbourhood Fund’ to boost volunteering and reduce loneliness in 27 disadvantaged areas across England. We have also brought together over 750 people from across the public, private and charity sectors through our Tackling Loneliness Hub, where members can learn from events and workshops, share the latest research and collaborate on new initiatives.

Last March, we published the fourth annual report of our Tackling Loneliness Strategy. It contains over 60 new and ongoing commitments from 11 government departments. So far, we have made progress against at least 46 of these commitments and at least 7 have been completed. Due to the nature of the commitments many have now been incorporated into business as usual. The fifth annual report will provide a full update on commitments, and is due to be published in March.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she plans to provide funding for the additional sports that will be included at the Olympics in 2028.

We welcome the additional sports that have been approved for the LA28 Olympic Programme.

UK Sport’s investment process for Los Angeles is underway with currently funded sports, in line with their strategic plan. UK Sport will consider new sports that have been added to the programme. Should they make a case for investment, it would be considered alongside the currently funded sports in UK Sport’s evaluation process.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking with (a) Cabinet colleagues and (b) social media platforms to prevent the Russian Embassy in the UK from sharing hateful content relating to the ongoing conflict in Ukraine via its official Twitter account.

The Government takes the issue of disinformation seriously. The DCMS Counter Disinformation Unit leads the domestic operational and policy response for countering disinformation across HMG, working closely with major social media platforms to encourage them to swiftly remove disinformation and coordinated inauthentic or manipulated behaviour, as per their Terms of Service. We also engage with platforms to understand policy changes and other countermeasures related to Russian information activities, and the effectiveness of these actions. This work aids HMG assessment bodies and the UK Government Information Cell, which brings together the government’s counter-disinformation expertise and capabilities to identify and counter Russian information aggression and disinformation.

It remains of significant concern that the network of Russian diplomatic accounts continues to disseminate pro-Russian content with the aim of sowing distrust and questioning the veracity of reports of Russian atrocities committed in Ukraine. Although the government welcomes steps that platforms have taken in response, including demonetising, deamplifying and labelling content from Russian state affiliated accounts, the government is clear that there is more that needs to be done and that the recent tweets from the Russian Embassy in the UK are unacceptable. In our view Twitter should apply its policies consistently, removing content that it has acknowledged breaches its Terms of Service.

27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when he plans to make a decision on the timescale for the resumption of grassroots rugby during the period of covid-19 restrictions.

Sports and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health, and are a vital weapon against coronavirus. That’s why we made sure that people could exercise at least once a day even during the height of the first period of enhanced national restrictions and why we opened up grassroots sport and leisure facilities as soon as it was safe to do so.

However, as the Prime Minister said on 23 November national restrictions will end on Wednesday 2 December. This will allow both rugby union and rugby league to resume in accordance with their return to play guidance. Higher risk activity such as scrums have been removed from both codes of the game to ensure the risk of transmission is reduced.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential benefits to children's mental health of allowing UK scouting to recommence as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Government recognises the unprecedented impact which Covid-19 has had on young people, particularly on their mental health.

We recognise the impact Uniformed Youth groups like the Scouts have on the wellbeing of young people, helping them to develop life skills and be a part of their communities.

Youth centres and Uniformed Youth groups are able to re-open from 4th July, and DCMS has supported the National Youth Agency to produce guidance for youth organisations on operating safely during Covid-19.

3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what support his Department has provided to Chatham Historic Dockyard during the covid-19 outbreak.

During the COVID-19 outbreak DCMS has maintained a consistent line of communication with Chatham Historic Dockyard Trust. Officials have worked closely with the Trust to understand the challenges they are facing and ensure they are aware of the support available to them at this time.

DCMS supports Chatham Historic Dockyard through an ongoing funding arrangement that enables vital conservation and maintenance work.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with (a) English Heritage, (b) Historic England, (c) Historic Royal Palaces and (d) the Churches Conservation Trust on (i) support for and (ii) the preservation of built heritage during the covid-19 outbreak.

The government fully recognises the significant impact that COVID-19 is having on the heritage sector. From the very beginning of this crisis, I have been hosting weekly meetings with the sector to better understand how it is affecting organisations and where we can provide support. English Heritage, Historic England, Historic Royal Palaces and the Churches Conservation Trust are either represented directly at these meetings or are members of other organisations that are.

They continue to provide a valuable opportunity for me to listen to concerns of the sector and for the attendees to flag any emerging issues including those related to the preservation and support of our built heritage.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to improve PE training for trainee primary school teachers.

The government does not prescribe the curriculum of initial teacher training (ITT) courses. The ITT Core Content Framework (CCF) sets out a minimum entitlement to training that accredited ITT providers must incorporate into their primary and/or secondary ITT courses. The ITT Core Content Framework does not set out the full ITT curriculum for trainee teachers. It remains for individual providers to design curricula appropriate for the subject, phase and age range that the trainees will be teaching. Providers should ensure their curricula encompass the full entitlement described in the ITT Core Content Framework, as well as integrating additional analysis and critique of theory, research and expert practice as they deem appropriate. The ITT CCF is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-itt-core-content-framework.

The department is continually exploring opportunities to further improve teacher training and professional development, including reviewing the content of the CCF alongside the Early Career Framework. The review is due to be published in early 2024.

Primary schools can use the PE and sport premium to provide staff with professional development, mentoring, training and resources to help them improve the quality of their PE, sport and physical activity provision to all pupils, and to embed physical activity across the school day.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
5th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to ensure that all school-aged girls have access to a range of team sports within the PE curriculum.

The government is committed to supporting all boys and girls to access sports and physical activities at school. Schools can organise and deliver a diverse and challenging PE and school sport offer which best suits the needs of their pupils. Factors influencing that decision include the spaces available for sports, along with available equipment.

On 8 March 2023, the department announced over £600 million in the 2023/24 and 2024/25 academic years for the primary PE and sport premium, and £57 million up to March 2025 for the Opening School Facilities programme. Schools can use this funding to increase their sport provision, raise overall quality of PE, and improve the opportunities for all boys and girls to access team sports.

In July 2023, the department published the School Sport and Activity Action Plan, which set out the expectation for schools to provide girls and boys with the same access and opportunity to play sports in PE and wider school sport. To encourage this, the government has overseen a change to the School Games Mark, which is delivered by the Youth Sport Trust. From September 2023, schools must demonstrate how they are overcoming gender barriers faced by girls and boys in PE and wider school sport as part of their planning and delivery.

To tackle the specific barriers faced by girls in accessing PE and sport, the department has invested almost £980,000 in the 'Your Time' programme. The programme has provided girls with opportunities to access competitive team sports during PE and extracurricular time.

Additionally, the department plans to publish non-statutory guidance to exemplify how schools already offer equal access to PE and wider school sport. Departmental officials are currently working closely with a wide range of stakeholders, such as subject associations and other sporting bodies like the Football Association (FA) and Women in Sport, to finalise this non-statutory guidance for publication in early 2024.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many parents of deaf children participated in British sign language courses that were funded through the adult education budget in Kent and Medway in each of the last three years.

The department is continuing to invest in education and skills training for adults through the Adult Education Budget (AEB), which was £1.34 billion in the 2022/23 financial year.

This includes qualifications in, or focusing on, British Sign Language (BSL) up to and including level 2. These qualifications include, for example, the Level 1 Award in BSL which allows learners to communicate in BSL on a range of topics that involve simple, everyday language use, thereby giving them the basic skills and confidence in production and reception of BSL.

About 60% of the AEB has been devolved to Mayoral Combined Authorities and the Greater London Authority, who determine which provision to fund for learners who live in their areas. The Education and Skills Funding Agency provides the remaining funding for learners who live in non-devolved areas. Where community learning providers offer BSL courses, those providers are responsible for determining the course fees, including levels of fee remission.

There were 60 adult (19+) education and training learning aim enrolments in the 2021/22 academic year by learners living in Kent or Medway with ‘British Sign Language’ or ‘BSL’ in their aim title. In 2020/21, there were 35 enrolments and in 2019/20, there were 87. The department does not hold information as to whether the learners taking these aims have deaf children.

These figures do not correspond to learners, as learners may enrol on multiple aims. Additionally, these are funded adult (19+) education and training aim enrolments. This will include AEB-funded learning, as well as other funding provision, such as advanced learner loans.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
17th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many defibrillators have been delivered to state-funded schools in (a) Medway and (B) Kent in 2023 as part of her Department's work with the Oliver King foundation.

On 20 January 2023, the Department announced that the first deliveries of defibrillators had taken place. More information on the announcement can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/defibrillator-deliveries-begin-for-all-schools-that-need-one.

Since this announcement, as part of the ongoing rollout, the Department has delivered over 3,500 defibrillators to state funded schools.

As of 12 April 2023, 98 defibrillators have been delivered to state funded schools in Kent and 31 to schools in Medway Local Authorities. All eligible schools in Kent and Medway are expected to receive a defibrillator by the end of the 2022/23 academic year. Schools will be contacted by the supplier, Lyreco, once their defibrillator has been dispatched.

The Department would again like to express thanks to Mark King and the Oliver King Foundation.

1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance is issued to early years providers on the collection of fees for children who are self-isolating due to a positive Covid-19 test in their family.

The department thanks those who work in the early years sector and those who have dedicated their time, effort, and skills to providing high-quality early years education and childcare during these challenging circumstances. The Competition and Markets Authority issued an open letter on 28 July 2020 to the early years sector, following complaints from parents about allegedly unfair charging practices early during the COVID-19 outbreak. The letter supports the government’s position that providers must be balanced and fair in their dealings with parents, and that they must avoid unfair charging practices. This letter is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/904194/Open_letter_to_Nursery_and_Early_Years__settings.pdf.

The department is not aware of any significant rise in consumer complaints since the open letter was published. Since then, the circumstances providers are operating in have changed, but the principles set out in this letter are still relevant. While contracts are a private arrangement between consumers and providers, the provisions of the letter are still broadly applicable. If parents or their children test positive for COVID-19, or are contacted by NHS Test and Trace, the principle that parents should not be charged for a service that cannot be provided without breaching government legal requirements would apply.

17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to extend the Primary PE and Sport Premium beyond 2020-21; and if he will make a statement.

The Government will confirm arrangements for the PE and Sport Premium in the 2020-21 academic year as soon as possible. The position for the 2021-22 academic year and beyond will be considered at the forthcoming Spending Review.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of regulations on the use of snares.

An industry-owned code of practice for the use of snares to control foxes in England sets out clear principles for the legal use of snares, using evidence from snare-use research to improve snare deployment and design.

Anyone using snares has a responsibility under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 to ensure their activities do not harm protected species or cause any unnecessary suffering. Anyone committing an offence can face prosecution, an unlimited fine or even a custodial sentence.

We are looking at how snares are regulated as part of our continued drive to maintain the highest animal welfare standards in the world, and working to ensure the regulated use of the most appropriate trap and cull method which causes the least suffering whilst providing the greatest protection to crops, game birds or endangered species.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the potential impact of the further authorisation of the emergency use of neonicotinoids on global pesticide reduction targets.

The decision to authorise the short-term emergency use of a pesticide is never taken lightly and is based on robust assessment of the risks and benefits. The emergency authorisation we have issued this year for the use of a neonicotinoid on sugar beet is subject to strict conditions to mitigate risks to the wider environment.

We remain absolutely committed to the targets agreed in the Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework. UK diplomatic leadership was critical to agreeing the framework and we will continue to champion the framework’s implementation.

We welcome the text in target 7, as Integrated Pest Management (IPM) lies at the heart of the UK's approach to minimise the environmental impact of pesticides.

In addition, the Government recently held a roundtable with members of the British sugar industry and environmental organisations to discuss the industry’s progress on implementing alternative pest control measures to neonicotinoids. I urge British Sugar and others in the sector to drive forward these plans, so that their outputs can be implemented in the field at pace.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent progress he has made on meeting his environmental targets.

Our 13 Environment Act 2021 targets were set in law by January 2023 and are included in our revised Environmental Improvement Plan (EIP23). Interim targets were also set at this point and will help tackle some of the biggest environmental pressures and make tangible progress over the next five years of EIP23.

We have been making progress in delivery of our new environmental targets and are due to report on them, and other EIP commitments, in our EIP Annual Progress Report in the summer.

We will continue to monitor and adjust our delivery to reach the long-term environmental goals outlined in the EIP23, including on our wider statutory targets.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to improve animal welfare transparency on labelling of food products.

Defra ran a Call for Evidence in 2021 to gather data on the impacts of different types of animal welfare labelling reforms. Based on the information gathered, we will continue to work with stakeholders to explore how we can harness the market to improve food information for consumers. We will continue to gather evidence on the impacts of a wide range of market interventions, as well as how they could align with wider labelling proposals such as eco-labelling.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to prohibit the import of hunting trophies.

We are disappointed that the Hunting Trophies Bill failed to progress in the House of Lords in the previous session, despite overwhelming support from hon. Members for our proposals. We are committed to delivering on our manifesto pledge to ban the import of hunting trophies and will continue to explore ways to bring this forward.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to end the use of cages on farm animals.

We are firmly committed to maintaining our strong track record on animal welfare and to delivering continued improvements, in the course of this Parliament and beyond. We do not consider the time is right to consult on cage reforms, being mindful of the challenges the sectors are facing.

The market is already driving the move away from using cages for laying hens with over 60% of eggs coming from free range production. The UK also has a significant outdoor pig sector with 40% of the national sow breeding herd farrowing freely on outdoor units with no option for confinement.

We continue to work with the farming industry to maintain and enhance our high standards. The Animal Health and Welfare Pathway, part of our new domestic agricultural policy, supports farmers to produce healthier, higher welfare animals. The Government’s welfare priorities for the Pathway include supporting producers to transition away from confinement systems.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what her planned timeframe is for concluding the evidence gathering process that will inform proposals to ban the import and sale of fur.

Defra published a formal call for evidence on the fur trade in Great Britain, which has now closed. A summary of responses, setting out the results and any next steps in this policy space, will be published soon.

We are continuing to build our evidence base on the fur sector, which will be used to inform any future action on the fur trade. This includes commissioning the Animal Welfare Committee to explore current responsible sourcing practices in the fur industry.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress she has made in negotiations with the European Commission on awarding Great Britain Part 1 listed status to enable pet owners to travel outside the UK with fewer restrictions.

We are continuing to engage with the European Commission on awarding Great Britain 'Part 1' listed status and recognition of the UK's tapeworm-free status.

17th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to work with Southern Water and the Environment Agency on addressing sewage discharges into the River Medway.

In February 2023, the Secretary of State asked water and sewerage companies to set an action plan on every storm overflow in England.

The Environment Agency is working closely with Southern Water to identify improvement schemes required to improve the water quality of the Medway. These schemes will reduce excess nutrients in rivers and the frequency of storm overflow discharges. This work is ongoing and part of the WINEP Price Review 2024.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the potential benefits of nature on mental health and wellbeing.

The Government recognises the health and wellbeing benefits of spending time in nature and has committed to ensure that everyone lives within a 15-minute walk of a green and blue space. The Environmental Improvement Plan, published on 31 January this year, states that the “evidence is clear that spending time in nature is beneficial for our physical and mental health” and sets out our plans to incorporate green and blue spaces into the healthcare system.

8th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what her policy is on green social prescribing; and if she will make a statement.

In October 2020, the Government launched a £5.77 million programme, led by Defra, aimed at preventing and tackling mental ill health through green social prescribing. The programme has already recorded over 6,000 referrals.

The programme is being evaluated by a consortium led by the University of Sheffield, and is assessing processes, outcomes and value for money, in order to inform implementation and future policy and practice. The interim evaluation report provides us with some very encouraging findings about the success of the programme so far and is due to be published shortly. A full evaluation report will follow in June 2023.

After the programme closes in March 2023, we will continue to take action to embed and scale green social prescribing across Government and within society.

The Environmental Improvement Plan sets out our current policy position on green social prescribing. The Secretary of State does not plan to make any further statement.

8th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the green social prescribing projects announced in July 2020.

In October 2020, the Government launched a £5.77 million programme, led by Defra, aimed at preventing and tackling mental ill health through green social prescribing. The programme has already recorded over 6,000 referrals.

The programme is being evaluated by a consortium led by the University of Sheffield, and is assessing processes, outcomes and value for money, in order to inform implementation and future policy and practice. The interim evaluation report provides us with some very encouraging findings about the success of the programme so far and is due to be published shortly. A full evaluation report will follow in June 2023.

After the programme closes in March 2023, we will continue to take action to embed and scale green social prescribing across Government and within society.

The Environmental Improvement Plan sets out our current policy position on green social prescribing. The Secretary of State does not plan to make any further statement.

1st Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she made an assessment of the potential impact of the authorisation of the emergency use of neonicotinoids for a third year on global pesticide reduction targets.

We remain absolutely committed to the targets agreed in the Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework. UK diplomatic leadership was critical to agreeing the framework and we will continue to champion the framework’s implementation

We welcome target 7, which talks about “reducing the overall risk from pesticides and highly hazardous chemicals by at least half including through integrated pest management, based on science, taking into account food security and livelihoods”. IPM lies at the heart of the UK's approach to minimise the environmental impact of pesticides, both domestically and internationally and this is set out in our 25 Year Environment Plan.

We have strict restrictions that do not permit the general use of neonicotinoids to protect crops. The decision to allow use on sugar beet crops was based on an assessment and balancing of environmental risks and benefits to food production and livelihoods. The emergency authorisation we have issued is subject to strict conditions to mitigate risks to pollinators and the wider environment.

We expect the steps needed to achieve Target 7 to vary by country, according to their current usage levels, and the agricultural and regulatory context. The pesticide specific indicator for Target 7 will be developed further over the coming year, informed by a group of independent global specialists.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department has taken to work with the (a) Environment Agency and (b) trade unions to provide a settlement to end industrial action.

My Department works closely with the Environment Agency through the provision of its Corporate Services, including HR, to support it in developing a pay offer for its staff that whilst ensuring it meets the requirements of the government’s pay guidance of the day. The Environment Agency, as a non-departmental public body, recognises trade unions for the purposes of collective bargaining including pay, and rightfully conducts its own relevant consultation and negotiations on such matters.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government has taken to protect seals from disturbances since the Seals (Protection) Bill was introduced to the House.

Marine mammals, including seals, are protected in the UK under legislation that makes it an offence to intentionally kill, injure or take any wild marine mammal. The level of protection is therefore already very high and enforced by law. However, work to explore the possibility of further strengthening legislation in respect to seals is underway.

In the meantime, we are taking forward various initiatives to increase public awareness about the impact of disturbance on marine mammals. Defra is drafting a Marine and Coastal Wildlife Code to help minimise disturbance and the risk of harm to marine wildlife, including seals, from encounters with the public. We are aiming to publish this later in 2023.

‘Operation Seabird’ aims to tackle increases in disturbance to marine wildlife, including seals, by providing education and guidance to prevent wildlife disturbances from occurring and, to prosecute with the support of local police forces where necessary. Targeted ‘Days of Action’ involving Police, the MMO and RSPCA, in partnership with other organisations, take place across UK coastlines across to focus on specific concerns regarding marine life for that area.

Together with the Seal Research Trust, Defra launched a Government-backed campaign in 2021, ‘Give Seals Space’, to help raise awareness of the impact that human disturbance can have on seals and to help reduce it. As part of this campaign, Defra is providing funding for signs to be put up on the banks of the Thames to help raise awareness of the impact of disturbance on seals and the importance of keeping dogs under close control.

6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate her Department has made of the number of puppies smuggled into Great Britain each year; and what steps she is taking to prevent puppy smuggling.

APHA does not hold specific data on the total number of puppies illegally smuggled into Great Britain each year.


APHA seized 691 puppies in 2021 and 264 puppies in 2022 which landed in Dover and were not compliant with our import requirements.


The Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill includes measures to tackle puppy smuggling. The Bill was re-introduced to the House of Commons in May 2022.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of the Nature Recovery Green Paper on the protection of (a) bats and (b) bat habitats.

No specific assessments of the potential impact on the Nature Recovery Green Paper on the protection of bats and their habitats have been made. The Nature Recovery Green Paper set out our proposals to create a legislative system for nature which better reflects the latest science and impending impacts of climate change, tailored to our native species such as bats.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate his Department has made of the number of healthy dogs that are euthanised each year in the UK; and if he will bring forward legislative proposals to legally require vets to scan for rescue back up contact details on microchips and confirm the person presenting the animal is registered on the microchip prior to euthanising a healthy or treatable animal.

The Department does not hold data on the number of dogs euthanised each year.

We committed in the Action Plan for Animal Welfare to seek greater assurance that alternatives to euthanasia are explored before a healthy dog is put down.

In 2021, we worked closely with the veterinary profession to develop an approach that works for all parties. Following these discussions, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons agreed to incorporate the principle of scanning before euthanasia into the guidance that underpins their Code of Professional Conduct, which applies to all veterinary surgeons practising in the UK.

The Code requires veterinary surgeons to scan for a microchip in dogs prior to euthanasia where, in their professional judgement, it is not necessary to put the dog down on animal health or welfare grounds.

In addition, we recently held a consultation on proposed changes to the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015 to consider whether a microchip database record should include a ‘back-up support’ field to record the contact details of a person who may offer the animal an alternative to euthanasia in certain circumstances. We are currently analysing the consultation responses and will issue our response to the consultation later this year.

Scott Mann
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
10th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when his Department will publish its response to the consultation on Fur market in Great Britain, which closed on 28 June 2021.

The recent call for evidence published by Defra on the fur trade in Great Britain was a key step in helping us to meet the commitment set out in the Action Plan for Animal Welfare to better understand the fur sector in Great Britain and gather evidence from those with an interest in it.

We received around 30,000 responses from businesses, representative bodies and individuals, demonstrating the strong public interest in this area. A summary of responses setting out the results and key findings will be published soon.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Government plans to bring forward its Animals Abroad Bill; and whether that proposed legislation will include a ban on the import of hunting trophies.

We have already introduced our Animal Sentience and Kept Animals Bills to Parliament and published the Government's Action Plan for Animal Welfare. The Action Plan for Animal Welfare demonstrates this Government's commitment to animals both at home and abroad.

We have pledged to bring forward legislation to ban imports of hunting trophies from thousands of species. This ban looks to go beyond our manifesto commitment and it will be among the strongest in the world, leading the way in protecting endangered animals and helping to strengthen and support long-term conservation. We intend to bring this forward as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to ensure that recreational sea anglers are consulted on the implementation of Highly Protected Marine Areas.

The Benyon Review was commissioned to investigate whether and how Highly Protected Marine Areas (HPMAs) could be introduced in English waters.

The Government is considering the Review’s recommendations and has started to engage with stakeholders including recreational fishers. Since publication of the Review, Minister Pow has met the Angling Trust (14 July) and Defra officials have met recreational sea anglers (29 July) and the Angling Trust (13 August) to discuss the recommendations of the Review. Further meetings with these groups are planned for early September.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure that the Government’s biodiversity net gain plan is fully implemented.

The Government is fully committed to the implementation of biodiversity net gain. We have brought forward clauses in the Environment Bill to make the achievement of a 10% gain mandatory for housing and other types of development.

Throughout the two-year transition period, we will continue to work with industry bodies to make sure that appropriate training, expertise and guidance are made available.

The Government recognises the pressure that many local planning authorities are under. The net additional cost of new burdens placed on local authorities through biodiversity net gain will be assessed and funded.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure that the outcomes of biodiversity net gain are (a) monitored and (b) enforced.

The Government’s response to the net gain consultation, which was published last year, acknowledged the importance of effective monitoring and enforcement in securing meaningful gains for nature and communities.

The Environment Bill includes provisions for a public register of habitat improvement sites. This will provide an accessible public record of habitat enhancements undertaken outside the development site. This register will, as a minimum, detail the location of compensation sites, how many units and of what habitat types are created, and the planning reference of the development to which the units relate.

For delivery of habitats within development sites, planning application data is routinely published by local authorities and will provide key information about how new developments will achieve biodiversity net gain.

The Government does not propose to introduce new enforcement mechanisms for net gain; existing enforcement mechanisms in the planning system will be used. The exception to this is where habitats are secured by conservation covenants. In these cases responsibility for monitoring and enforcement would sit with the organisation that holds the covenant.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Biodiversity Net Gain, what steps he is taking to ensure that the mitigation hierarchy is fully adhered in advance of decision-making on that net gain.

The Government has been clear in its consultation on net gain, the subsequent Government response to that consultation, and in the Environment Bill’s policy paper that biodiversity net gain should not undermine the importance of the mitigation hierarchy. We have also been clear that biodiversity net gain tools and guidance will instead reinforce and support adherence to the mitigation hierarchy which is already well established in planning policy.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure that the Biodiversity Net Gain system will not undermine protections in relation to (a) ancient woodland and (b) other irreplaceable habitats.

A proposal to deliver biodiversity net gain does not affect the weight that should be given to other planning considerations, matters of planning policy, or legal obligations including those relating to protection of irreplaceable habitats.

Our irreplaceable habitats such as ancient woodland, ancient trees and veteran trees are afforded the strongest protection and we committed in our 25 Year Environment Plan to increase protection of our existing trees and forests. As part of this, we have already strengthened the protection of ancient woodlands through the National Planning Policy Framework and the accompanying Planning Policy Guidance.

Through this strengthening, any development resulting in the loss or deterioration of irreplaceable habitats should be refused unless there are wholly exceptional reasons and a suitable compensation strategy exists.

In circumstances in which development results in the loss of irreplaceable habitat, these losses cannot be directly replaced. The requirement for a measurable 10% net gain will therefore not apply to irreplaceable habitat. Bespoke compensation agreements should continue to be made. The Government will continue to engage with stakeholders as secondary legislation is developed for irreplaceable habitats.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)