Siobhain McDonagh Portrait

Siobhain McDonagh

Labour - Mitcham and Morden

Select Committees
Panel of Chairs (since January 2020)
Treasury Committee (since May 2020)
Panel of Chairs
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Women and Equalities Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 13th Jun 2016
Education Committee
10th Sep 2012 - 30th Mar 2015
London Regional Select Committee
14th Dec 2009 - 6th May 2010
Unopposed Bills (Panel)
14th Nov 2002 - 6th May 2010
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
2nd Jul 2007 - 12th Sep 2008
Health and Social Care Committee
27th Nov 2000 - 12th Jul 2005
Social Security
14th Jul 1997 - 28th Nov 1997


Select Committee Meeting
Monday 1st November 2021
11:00
Treasury Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021
1 Nov 2021, 11 a.m.
At 11.05am: Oral evidence
Richard Hughes - Chairman at Office for Budget Responsibility
Professor Sir Charlie Bean - Member of Budget Responsibility Committee at Office for Budget Responsibility
Andy King - Member of Budget Responsibility Committee at Office for Budget Responsibility
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Monday 1st November 2021
15:00
Treasury Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021
1 Nov 2021, 3 p.m.
At 3.15pm: Oral evidence
Rt Hon Rishi Sunak MP - Chancellor of the Exchequer at HM Treasury
Dan York-Smith - Director of Strategy, Planning and Budget at HM Treasury
Conrad Smewing - Director of Public Spending at HM Treasury
View calendar
Division Votes
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 165 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 321 Noes - 220
Speeches
Tuesday 21st September 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill (Second sitting)

We will now hear oral evidence from Councillor Roger Gough, from Kent County Council, who is joining us virtually, and …

Written Answers
Wednesday 27th October 2021
Liver Diseases: Screening
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the impact …
Early Day Motions
Monday 20th September 2021
Palliative care
That this House notes with concern a recent report by Marie Curie which predicts a 42 per cent increase in …
Bills
Monday 15th June 2020
Internet Access (Children Eligible for Free School Meals) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to place a duty on the Secretary of State to ensure that all children eligible for free school …
MP Financial Interests
Saturday 11th January 2020
2. (a) Support linked to an MP but received by a local party organisation or indirectly via a central party organisation
Name of donor: Lord Waheed Ali
Address of donor: private
Amount of donation, or nature and value if donation in …
EDM signed
Thursday 16th September 2021
Trodelvy
That this House welcomes the news that Trodelvy, a new treatment for women living with incurable metastatic triple negative breast …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 16th June 2020
Automatic Electoral Registration Bill 2019-21
A Bill to impose certain duties upon Her Majesty’s Government to ensure the accuracy, completeness and utility of electoral registers; …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Siobhain McDonagh has voted in 208 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Siobhain McDonagh Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Vicky Ford (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(12 debate interactions)
Nick Gibb (Conservative)
(11 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(10 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
View all Siobhain McDonagh's debates

Mitcham and Morden Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Mitcham and Morden signature proportion
Petition Debates Contributed

Bring in a law which enforces professional football clubs to have at least 51% fan ownership similar to how the Bundesliga operates this rule.

The Government should use the recently established fan led review of football to introduce an Independent Football Regulator in England to put fans back at the heart of our national game. This should happen by December 2021.

Legislate to allow parents to have the option to remove their children from school if there is a pandemic e.g. Coronavirus or similar without negative action by schools or local authorities. They shouldn’t lose the child’s place in the school or face any kind of prosecution.


Latest EDMs signed by Siobhain McDonagh

10th September 2021
Siobhain McDonagh signed this EDM on Thursday 16th September 2021

Trodelvy

Tabled by: Mick Whitley (Labour - Birkenhead)
That this House welcomes the news that Trodelvy, a new treatment for women living with incurable metastatic triple negative breast cancer, has been licensed through Project Orbis for use in Great Britain; expresses concern that women now face a delay before they can access the drug and potentially miss out …
37 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 20
Liberal Democrat: 7
Conservative: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Independent: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
20th September 2021
Siobhain McDonagh signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Thursday 16th September 2021

Palliative care

Tabled by: Siobhain McDonagh (Labour - Mitcham and Morden)
That this House notes with concern a recent report by Marie Curie which predicts a 42 per cent increase in demand for end-of-life care by 2040; acknowledges the lack of funding for palliative care in the UK; recognises the crucial role end-of-life care has played during the covid-19 pandemic; understands …
31 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 19
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Liberal Democrat: 3
Independent: 2
Scottish National Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
View All Siobhain McDonagh's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Siobhain McDonagh, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Siobhain McDonagh has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Siobhain McDonagh has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

5 Bills introduced by Siobhain McDonagh


A Bill to place a duty on the Secretary of State to ensure that all children eligible for free school meals have a broadband connection and facilities to access the internet at home; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Monday 15th June 2020

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 to make provision about the welfare of women undergoing any medical, surgical or obstetric treatment services provided for the purpose of assisting such women to carry children; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 21st March 2018
(Read Debate)

A Bill to impose certain duties upon Her Majesty’s Government to ensure the accuracy, completeness and utility of electoral registers; to make provision for the sharing of data for the purposes of electoral registration; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 3rd February 2016

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to introduce a requirement that electoral registration be a condition of access to public services; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 17th July 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to introduce a requirement that electoral registration be a condition of access to public services; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 29th November 2011

107 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average number of days taken to register a death has been in each of the last 12 months.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average number of days taken to register a birth has been in each of the last 12 months.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people who have died from covid-19 in the UK had underlying health conditions.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the most common underlying health conditions are for people who have died from covid-19 in the UK.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people have died from covid-19 in the UK, by faith group.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what targets the Government has set for gender representation in the civil service.

In the 2017 Civil Service Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) Strategy we committed to increasing transparency around our workforce composition by creating a D&I dashboard on GOV.UK, through which we publish quarterly updates on gender in the Civil Service.

The dashboard shows that overall, 53.9% of the Civil Service were women in 2019. This varies by grade from 45.0% in the Senior Civil Service (SCS), to 45.3% at G6, 47.5% at G7, 50% at HEO/SEO, 56.1% at EO and 57.2% at AA/AO level. The overall percentage of female civil servants has remained fairly stable since 2010 but for the SCS, the percentage of women has increased each year.

We currently publish individual department’s gender data on the D&I dashboard but this does not currently include a breakdown by Civil Service grade.

Our data shows that we continue to make steady and positive progress on representation of women across the grades, therefore we have not set Civil Service-wide targets on gender.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what progress each Government department has made on reaching its targets on gender split within the civil service.

In the 2017 Civil Service Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) Strategy we committed to increasing transparency around our workforce composition by creating a D&I dashboard on GOV.UK, through which we publish quarterly updates on gender in the Civil Service.

The dashboard shows that overall, 53.9% of the Civil Service were women in 2019. This varies by grade from 45.0% in the Senior Civil Service (SCS), to 45.3% at G6, 47.5% at G7, 50% at HEO/SEO, 56.1% at EO and 57.2% at AA/AO level. The overall percentage of female civil servants has remained fairly stable since 2010 but for the SCS, the percentage of women has increased each year.

We currently publish individual department’s gender data on the D&I dashboard but this does not currently include a breakdown by Civil Service grade.

Our data shows that we continue to make steady and positive progress on representation of women across the grades, therefore we have not set Civil Service-wide targets on gender.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the gender split is at each civil service grade in each Government department.

In the 2017 Civil Service Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) Strategy we committed to increasing transparency around our workforce composition by creating a D&I dashboard on GOV.UK, through which we publish quarterly updates on gender in the Civil Service.

The dashboard shows that overall, 53.9% of the Civil Service were women in 2019. This varies by grade from 45.0% in the Senior Civil Service (SCS), to 45.3% at G6, 47.5% at G7, 50% at HEO/SEO, 56.1% at EO and 57.2% at AA/AO level. The overall percentage of female civil servants has remained fairly stable since 2010 but for the SCS, the percentage of women has increased each year.

We currently publish individual department’s gender data on the D&I dashboard but this does not currently include a breakdown by Civil Service grade.

Our data shows that we continue to make steady and positive progress on representation of women across the grades, therefore we have not set Civil Service-wide targets on gender.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 October 2020 to Question 98870, how many proposed redundancies were indicated on HR1 forms received by the Redundancy Payments Service in (a) October and (b) November 2020.

The table below sets out the number of HR 1 forms received in October and November 2020, and the number of proposed dismissals indicated on those forms:

Month

Number of HR1 forms received

Number of proposed dismissals on HR1s

Oct 20

844

51,351

Nov 20

552

36,686


Employers are only required to file a Form HR1 where they are “proposing” to dismiss 20 or more employees at a single “establishment”.

“Propose” and “establishment” have distinct meanings in this context.

The aggregate number could include proposed dismissals due to insolvency, restructuring of a solvent/continuing business, or proposed relocation of employees, for example.

It should be noted that a proposal to make a given number of dismissals does not necessarily result in all or any of the proposed dismissals occurring.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 October 2020 to Question 98870, how many proposed redundancies were indicated on HR1 forms received by the Redundancy Payments Service in each of the last 12 months.

Forms received from all employers where there are proposals to dismiss 20 or more employees at an establishment, over the last 12 months, are set out in the following table:

Month

Number of HR1 Forms received from all employers

Number of proposed dismissals on HR1s

Sep 19

303

26,716

Oct 19

343

23,882

Nov 19

305

27,820

Dec 19

196

16,733

Jan 20

372

29,884

Feb 20

329

28,674

Mar 20

485

44,465

Apr 20

447

62,443

May 20

871

73,331

Jun 20

1,888

155,739

Jul 20

1,784

149,688

Aug 20

966

58,056

Sep 20

1,734

82,029

Please note that employers are only required to file a Form HR1 where they are “proposing” to dismiss 20 or more employees at a single “establishment”.

“Propose” and “establishment” have distinct meanings in this context.

The aggregate number could include proposed dismissals due to insolvency, restructuring of a solvent/continuing business, changes to terms and conditions, or proposed relocation of employees, for example.

It should also be noted that a proposal to make a given number of dismissals does not necessarily result in all or any of the proposed dismissals occurring.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total number of employees made redundant in each of the last 12 months is based on the HR1 forms that have been received by the Redundancy Payments Service.

Employers are required to file an HR1 Form with the Redundancy Payments Service where they are proposing to dismiss 20 or more employees at a single establishment. The Redundancy Payments Service is not notified where less than 20 dismissals may be proposed.

The HR1 Form does not detail actual redundancies made, only the numbers of dismissals proposed. The HR1 data includes proposed dismissals due to the restructuring of a solvent/continuing business and proposed dismissals where the employer is insolvent. A proposal does not necessarily result in all or any redundancies occurring.

The Redundancy Payments Service is responsible for processing redundancy payments where actual redundancies result from the insolvency of an employer or, in a small number of cases, where a solvent employer cannot or will not pay the statutory redundancy. The number of claims received by the Redundancy Payments Service in respect of employees of insolvent employers (including a small number for solvent employers), and total HR1 Forms received from all employers where there are proposals to dismiss 20 or more employees at an establishment, over the last 12 months, are set out in the following table:

Month

Number of individuals claiming redundancy payments from the Redundancy Payments Service

Number of HR1 Forms received from all employers

Sep 19

9,619

303

Oct 19

9,265

343

Nov 19

5,874

305

Dec 19

5,367

196

Jan 20

7,855

372

Feb 20

7,855

329

Mar 20

14,931

485

Apr 20

8,745

447

May 20

8,745

871

Jun 20

12,045

1,888

Jul 20

9,551

1,784

Aug 20

11,894

966

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to clarify (a) which schools are participating in the National School Breakfast Programme and (b) whether the purpose of that programme is to alleviate classroom hunger.

The government is committed to continuing support for breakfast clubs and we are funding up to a further £24 million to continue our programme over the next two years. This funding will support around 2,500 schools in disadvantaged areas meaning that thousands of children in low income families will be offered nutritious breakfasts.

The focus of the programme is to target the most disadvantaged areas of the country, including the Department for Education’s Opportunity Areas. Schools will be eligible for the programme if they have 50% or more pupils within bands A-F of the Income deprivation affecting children index (IDACI) scale. When schools join the programme, they will sign a partnership agreement that requires them to identify and target those children that are most in need of support. Our provider, Family Action, will monitor attendance data at each participating school, and will support those schools with their targeting where needed. This will ensure that the programme benefits the children who are most in need of support.

The enrolment process for schools joining the programme is currently ongoing, and we have seen a strong interest so far from eligible schools since we invited the expressions of interest. Schools are currently still able to apply to join the programme. As we are still registering schools for the programme, it is too early to publish a list of participating schools. However, we will consider the best opportunities to share information on the programme as it progresses.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which schools in Mitcham and Morden constituency will be supported by the new National School Breakfast Programme tender during the academic year 2021-2022.

The government is committed to continuing support for school breakfast clubs and we are investing up to £24 million to continue our national programme for the next two years. This funding will support around 2,500 schools in disadvantaged areas meaning that thousands of children from low-income families will be offered free nutritious breakfasts to better support their attainment, wellbeing and readiness to learn.

The focus of the programme is to target the most disadvantaged areas of the country, including the Department for Education’s Opportunity Areas. Schools’ eligibility for the programme is based on the Income deprivation affecting children index (IDACI) – a nationally recognised indicator of need – to ensure provision is directed where it is most needed. Schools will be eligible for the programme if they have 50% or more pupils within bands A-F of the IDACI scale.

The enrolment process for schools joining the programme is currently ongoing, and we have seen a strong interest so far from eligible schools since we invited the expressions of interest. Schools are currently still able to apply to join the programme. As we are still registering schools for the programme, it is too early to publish a list of participating schools. However, we will consider the best opportunities to share information on the programme as it progresses.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the changes to the amount of pupil premium funding schools will receive as a result of basing allocations on the October 2020 census rather than the January 2021 census.

The January 2021 census will be used to determine pupil premium eligibility for alternative provision and pupil referral units for the financial year 2021-22. Pupil premium eligibility for mainstream and special schools will be based on the October 2020 census.

Per pupil funding rates will be the same as in 2020-21, which is expected to increase pupil premium funding from £2.4 billion in 2020-21 to more than £2.5 billion in 2021-22 as more children have become eligible for free school meals. In addition to this the Government announced a further £300 million for a one-off Recovery Premium which will be allocated to schools based on the same methodology as the pupil premium. In this way, schools with more disadvantaged pupils will receive larger amounts.

The Department will confirm pupil premium allocations for the financial year 2021-22 in June 2021. This will provide the public with information on the specific amounts that regions, local authorities and schools are receiving through the pupil premium for 2021-22.

Data on the number of pupils who have become eligible for free school meals since 2 October 2020 is currently being collected in the spring school census and is not yet available.

The Department publishes information on pupil premium allocations and the number of pupils eligible annually. The most recent publicly available figures can be found via this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2020-to-2021.

10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether provision of technology to schools for remote learning during the covid-19 outbreak is subject to open competition.

For the initial programme tender, the Department concluded that a direct award offered the best chance of securing devices quickly in a global market of high demand and limited supply. A contract was awarded to Computacenter (UK) Limited through an existing Crown Commercial Service framework for technology products and associated services under PPN 01/20. The Department also sought assurance about the ability of Computacenter to deliver against the contract from Information and Communications Technology industry representatives.

All subsequent procurements for devices and 4G routers were awarded following competitive tendering on Crown Commercial Service Frameworks. 38 approved Crown Commercial Service suppliers were given the opportunity to bid for the laptop and tablet contracts. Providing options in device brand and model also contributed to achieving value for money driving optimum competition within the market.

We believe that this approach struck the best balance between achieving value for money while ensuring that devices were available for children to use as quickly as possible.

All Department contracts awarded to suppliers of £10,000 or more are published on Contracts Finder: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) laptops and tablets and (b) 4G wireless routers have been delivered to (i) schools, (ii) local authorities and (iii) academy trusts as of 9 March 2021.

As of Monday 8 March, over 1.2 million laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, academy trusts, local authorities, and further education colleges. More information can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/laptops-and-tablets-progress-data-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

The Department publishes this data every week during term time, the next publication will be Tuesday 16 March.

The Department has partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help over 30,000 disadvantaged children get online. We are not able to provide a breakdown of the numbers of requests received for each provider as this information is commercially sensitive for providers.

We are grateful to EE, Lycamobile, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, BT Mobile, Vodafone, iD Mobile and giffgaff for supporting the mobile data offer. The Department is currently engaged with additional mobile network operators and continues to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his department has made of the number of electronic devices that have been allocated to disadvantaged pupils during national covid-19 restrictions since March 2020.

The Department is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care. We are making available 1.3 million laptops and tablets to schools, colleges, academy trusts and local authorities, supporting disadvantaged children and young people who would not otherwise have access to a digital device.

As of Monday 15 March, over 1.2 million laptops and tablets have been delivered. More information can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/laptops-and-tablets-progress-data-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

The Department has been publishing this data every week during term time. The next publication will be due on Tuesday 23 March.

Once received, the laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts, local authorities or further education colleges who can lend these to children and young people who need them the most. These laptops and tablets are intended to give schools the flexibility to provide remote education support and can continue to be used in the longer term either in the classroom or from home.

The Department does not collect any data on how devices are used once they are received by the school.

We know that a range of other local and community initiatives have also provided technology for remote education, and that some schools have also invested in technology at this time. We do not hold comprehensive data on device provision outside of the Get Help with Technology Programme during this period.

Over 5,000 schools are now accessing a digital platform for remote education via the department’s grant funded Digital Platforms Programme

The Department plans to examine the broader impact of these interventions over the coming year.

From the 8 March, attendance is mandatory for all pupils of compulsory school age. Schools affected by the remote education temporary continuity direction are still required to provide remote education for pupils where their attendance would be contrary to government guidance or legislation around COVID-19. This includes, for example, where such guidance means that a class, group, or small number of pupils need to self-isolate, or that clinically extremely vulnerable children need to shield.

Where it is needed, schools are expected to offer pupils 3-5 hours of remote education. This includes either recorded or live direct teaching alongside time for pupils to work independently to complete assignments that have been set.

We have recently updated our guidance and resources for schools around safeguarding and delivery of remote education, which can be accessed here: https://get-help-with-remote-education.education.gov.uk/safeguarding.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what data his Department holds on the number of schools that have used (a) allocated devices and (b) digital platforms to deliver teaching.

The Department is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care. We are making available 1.3 million laptops and tablets to schools, colleges, academy trusts and local authorities, supporting disadvantaged children and young people who would not otherwise have access to a digital device.

As of Monday 15 March, over 1.2 million laptops and tablets have been delivered. More information can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/laptops-and-tablets-progress-data-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

The Department has been publishing this data every week during term time. The next publication will be due on Tuesday 23 March.

Once received, the laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts, local authorities or further education colleges who can lend these to children and young people who need them the most. These laptops and tablets are intended to give schools the flexibility to provide remote education support and can continue to be used in the longer term either in the classroom or from home.

The Department does not collect any data on how devices are used once they are received by the school.

We know that a range of other local and community initiatives have also provided technology for remote education, and that some schools have also invested in technology at this time. We do not hold comprehensive data on device provision outside of the Get Help with Technology Programme during this period.

Over 5,000 schools are now accessing a digital platform for remote education via the department’s grant funded Digital Platforms Programme

The Department plans to examine the broader impact of these interventions over the coming year.

From the 8 March, attendance is mandatory for all pupils of compulsory school age. Schools affected by the remote education temporary continuity direction are still required to provide remote education for pupils where their attendance would be contrary to government guidance or legislation around COVID-19. This includes, for example, where such guidance means that a class, group, or small number of pupils need to self-isolate, or that clinically extremely vulnerable children need to shield.

Where it is needed, schools are expected to offer pupils 3-5 hours of remote education. This includes either recorded or live direct teaching alongside time for pupils to work independently to complete assignments that have been set.

We have recently updated our guidance and resources for schools around safeguarding and delivery of remote education, which can be accessed here: https://get-help-with-remote-education.education.gov.uk/safeguarding.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of providing disadvantaged pupils with (a) devices and (b) other technology after covid-19 restrictions have ended.

The Department is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care. We are making available 1.3 million laptops and tablets to schools, colleges, academy trusts and local authorities, supporting disadvantaged children and young people who would not otherwise have access to a digital device.

As of Monday 15 March, over 1.2 million laptops and tablets have been delivered. More information can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/laptops-and-tablets-progress-data-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

The Department has been publishing this data every week during term time. The next publication will be due on Tuesday 23 March.

Once received, the laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts, local authorities or further education colleges who can lend these to children and young people who need them the most. These laptops and tablets are intended to give schools the flexibility to provide remote education support and can continue to be used in the longer term either in the classroom or from home.

The Department does not collect any data on how devices are used once they are received by the school.

We know that a range of other local and community initiatives have also provided technology for remote education, and that some schools have also invested in technology at this time. We do not hold comprehensive data on device provision outside of the Get Help with Technology Programme during this period.

Over 5,000 schools are now accessing a digital platform for remote education via the department’s grant funded Digital Platforms Programme

The Department plans to examine the broader impact of these interventions over the coming year.

From the 8 March, attendance is mandatory for all pupils of compulsory school age. Schools affected by the remote education temporary continuity direction are still required to provide remote education for pupils where their attendance would be contrary to government guidance or legislation around COVID-19. This includes, for example, where such guidance means that a class, group, or small number of pupils need to self-isolate, or that clinically extremely vulnerable children need to shield.

Where it is needed, schools are expected to offer pupils 3-5 hours of remote education. This includes either recorded or live direct teaching alongside time for pupils to work independently to complete assignments that have been set.

We have recently updated our guidance and resources for schools around safeguarding and delivery of remote education, which can be accessed here: https://get-help-with-remote-education.education.gov.uk/safeguarding.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department plans to issue new guidance on the use of technology in schools for self-isolating (a) pupils and (b) staff as covid-19 restrictions are eased.

The Department is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care. We are making available 1.3 million laptops and tablets to schools, colleges, academy trusts and local authorities, supporting disadvantaged children and young people who would not otherwise have access to a digital device.

As of Monday 15 March, over 1.2 million laptops and tablets have been delivered. More information can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/laptops-and-tablets-progress-data-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

The Department has been publishing this data every week during term time. The next publication will be due on Tuesday 23 March.

Once received, the laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts, local authorities or further education colleges who can lend these to children and young people who need them the most. These laptops and tablets are intended to give schools the flexibility to provide remote education support and can continue to be used in the longer term either in the classroom or from home.

The Department does not collect any data on how devices are used once they are received by the school.

We know that a range of other local and community initiatives have also provided technology for remote education, and that some schools have also invested in technology at this time. We do not hold comprehensive data on device provision outside of the Get Help with Technology Programme during this period.

Over 5,000 schools are now accessing a digital platform for remote education via the department’s grant funded Digital Platforms Programme

The Department plans to examine the broader impact of these interventions over the coming year.

From the 8 March, attendance is mandatory for all pupils of compulsory school age. Schools affected by the remote education temporary continuity direction are still required to provide remote education for pupils where their attendance would be contrary to government guidance or legislation around COVID-19. This includes, for example, where such guidance means that a class, group, or small number of pupils need to self-isolate, or that clinically extremely vulnerable children need to shield.

Where it is needed, schools are expected to offer pupils 3-5 hours of remote education. This includes either recorded or live direct teaching alongside time for pupils to work independently to complete assignments that have been set.

We have recently updated our guidance and resources for schools around safeguarding and delivery of remote education, which can be accessed here: https://get-help-with-remote-education.education.gov.uk/safeguarding.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of digital teaching in increasing youth participation in extracurricular activities.

The government recognises the important role that extra-curricular activities and other out-of-school settings play in providing enriching activities which support children’s physical and mental health, as well as the development of skills and attitudes which promote their wellbeing. That is why we ensured that all before and after-school clubs, holiday clubs, and other out-of-school settings were able continue to stay open for those children that need or rely on these settings most, for the duration of the national lockdown, and why we have extended eligibility of attendance when children returned to school on 8 March 2021.

At present, providers can offer face-to-face provision for all children, where that provision supports certain essential purposes; with vulnerable children and young people able to continue accessing provision under any circumstance. We have updated our protective measures guidance for the sector, which outlines eligibility and aims to support providers to allow them to open for as many children as safely as possible. This guidance can be found here:  https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

Where children are not eligible to attend face-to-face provision, we have suggested in our guidance that providers move to remote provision where possible. The department does not hold a central register of out-of-school activities providers and is therefore unable to make an assessment of the effect of digital learning on participation in such activities. We do, however, recognise that a lack of digital access may make participating in remote activities challenging, in particular for disadvantaged children and young people. The government is therefore investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people. We have also partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help 30,000 disadvantaged children and young people in schools, sixth forms and further education institutions to get online as well as delivering over 70,000 4G wireless routers for students without connection at home.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the remote education support scheme being offered by mobile phone networks in partnership with his Department, how many pupils are receiving support offered by (a) EE, (b) O2, (c) Sky Mobile, (d) SMARTY, (e) Tesco Mobile, (f) Three, (g) Virgin Mobile and (f) Vodafone as of 22 February 2021.

As of Monday 15 February 2021, over one million laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, trusts, local authorities and further education providers. More information can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data/2021-week-7.

We publish this data every week during term time and the next publication will be Tuesday 2 March 2021.

We have partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online. We will provide official statistics on the number of requests received for uplifts in mobile data in early March 2021. We will not be able to provide a breakdown of the numbers of requests received for each provider as this information is commercially sensitive for providers.

We are grateful to EE, Lycamobile, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, BT Mobile, Vodafone, iD Mobile and giffgaff for supporting the mobile data offer. We are currently engaged with additional mobile network operators to provide further support through this offer.

Additionally, we are grateful to BT and EE, who have made access to BBC Bitesize resources free from the end of January 2021.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) laptops and tablets and (b) 4G wireless routers have been delivered to (i) schools, (ii) local authorities and (iii) academy trusts as of 22 February 2021.

As of Monday 15 February 2021, over one million laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, trusts, local authorities and further education providers. More information can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data/2021-week-7.

We publish this data every week during term time and the next publication will be Tuesday 2 March 2021.

We have partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online. We will provide official statistics on the number of requests received for uplifts in mobile data in early March 2021. We will not be able to provide a breakdown of the numbers of requests received for each provider as this information is commercially sensitive for providers.

We are grateful to EE, Lycamobile, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, BT Mobile, Vodafone, iD Mobile and giffgaff for supporting the mobile data offer. We are currently engaged with additional mobile network operators to provide further support through this offer.

Additionally, we are grateful to BT and EE, who have made access to BBC Bitesize resources free from the end of January 2021.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the remote education support scheme being offered by mobile phone networks in partnership with his Department, how many pupils are receiving support offered by (a) EE, (b) O2, (c) Sky Mobile, (d) SMARTY, (e) Tesco Mobile, (f) Three, (g) Virgin Mobile and (f) Vodafone as of 15 February 2021.

As of Monday 15 February 2021, over one million laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, academy trusts, local authorities and further education providers. More information can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data. This data is published every week during term time.

The Department has partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online. We will provide official statistics on the number of requests received for uplifts in mobile data in early March 2021. We will not be able to provide a breakdown of the numbers of requests received for each provider as this information is commercially sensitive for providers.

We are grateful to EE, Lycamobile, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, BT Mobile, Vodafone, iD Mobile and giffgaff for supporting the mobile data offer. We are currently engaged with additional mobile network operators to provide further support through this offer.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) laptops and tablets and (b) 4G wireless routers have been delivered to (i) schools, (ii) local authorities and (iii) academy trusts as of 15 February 2021.

As of Monday 15 February 2021, over one million laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, academy trusts, local authorities and further education providers. More information can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data. This data is published every week during term time.

The Department has partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online. We will provide official statistics on the number of requests received for uplifts in mobile data in early March 2021. We will not be able to provide a breakdown of the numbers of requests received for each provider as this information is commercially sensitive for providers.

We are grateful to EE, Lycamobile, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, BT Mobile, Vodafone, iD Mobile and giffgaff for supporting the mobile data offer. We are currently engaged with additional mobile network operators to provide further support through this offer.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many school pupils (a) are eligible to take part in the mass asymptomatic covid-19 testing programme in schools, (b) have parental consent to take part in the scheme and (c) do not yet have parental consent and are unable to be tested under the scheme.

To date, all secondary and college pupils are eligible to take part in the Mass Asymptomatic Testing Programme. Regarding consent, schools and colleges are the individual data controllers responsible for processing any personal data, including obtaining and maintaining records of consent, for testing carried out on their sites. As part of testing, schools and colleges share data on tests carried out with the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC), at which point DHSC becomes the data controller. Therefore, the Department for Education does not hold the requested information.

8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the remote education support scheme being provided by mobile phone networks in partnership with his Department, how many pupils are receiving support from (a) EE, (b) O2, (c) Sky Mobile, (d) SMARTY, (e) Tesco Mobile, (f) Three, (g) Virgin Mobile, and (f) Vodafone as of 4 February 2021.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

As of Monday 8 February 2021, over 986,000 laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, academy trusts, local authorities, and further education providers.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts or local authorities who can lend these to the children and young people who need them most, during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Figures on the number of devices already delivered is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data/2021-week-6. These figures are broken down by local authority and academy trust.

The Department has already provided over 63,000 4G wireless routers, with free data for the academic year, and continues to provide 4G wireless routers where children need to access remote education. Data regarding the number of routers delivered is also published at the site above.

To support access to the internet, the Department has partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home.

The Department is grateful to EE, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, Vodafone, BT Mobile and Lycamobile for supporting this offer. We are continuing to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer. Data regarding the number of pupils receiving free mobile data will be published shortly.

8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) laptops and tablets and (b) 4G wireless routers have been delivered to (i) schools, (ii) local authorities and (iii) academy trusts as of 4 February 2021.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

As of Monday 8 February 2021, over 986,000 laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, academy trusts, local authorities, and further education providers.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts or local authorities who can lend these to the children and young people who need them most, during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Figures on the number of devices already delivered is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data/2021-week-6. These figures are broken down by local authority and academy trust.

The Department has already provided over 63,000 4G wireless routers, with free data for the academic year, and continues to provide 4G wireless routers where children need to access remote education. Data regarding the number of routers delivered is also published at the site above.

To support access to the internet, the Department has partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home.

The Department is grateful to EE, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, Vodafone, BT Mobile and Lycamobile for supporting this offer. We are continuing to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer. Data regarding the number of pupils receiving free mobile data will be published shortly.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the geographic variation in the uptake of funding to help schools set up remote learning platforms.

The Department is currently working with Google and Microsoft providers to deliver the Digital Education Platforms programme. The programme provides Government funded support for schools and colleges to get set up on one of two free to use digital platforms, which includes G Suite for Education (Google Classroom), and Office 365 Education (Microsoft Teams).

The funding covers the technical set up of the platform including all staff, pupil and student accounts.

Support is available to state funded:

  • primary schools
  • secondary schools
  • special schools
  • pupil referral units
  • further education colleges
  • sixth-form colleges

The funded support is for schools and colleges that:

  • do not have a digital education platform
  • have access to Office 365 Education or G Suite for Education, but are not yet set up to assign work and communicate with pupils and students

The Microsoft and Google platforms were chosen as they are free to use to the education sector and had the unified technology and support to set up and deliver effective remote education provision.

Google and Microsoft also offer several features and functionalities that are suitable for school needs.

As of 1 February 2021, £4.8 million has been spent out of a programme budget of £14.23 million, leaving £9.43 million of remaining funding.

The numbers of schools applying to the programme by RSC region is as follows:

  • South East England and South London: 968
  • North West London and South Central: 937
  • Lancashire and West Yorkshire: 851
  • East Midlands and the Humber: 579
  • West Midlands: 525
  • South West England: 519
  • East of England and North East:481
  • North of England: 273

The Department wants to ensure all schools are set up with a remote learning platform and are keeping this under constant review.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has plans to increase the funding for technical support to enable schools to access remote education platforms.

The Department is currently working with Google and Microsoft providers to deliver the Digital Education Platforms programme. The programme provides Government funded support for schools and colleges to get set up on one of two free to use digital platforms, which includes G Suite for Education (Google Classroom), and Office 365 Education (Microsoft Teams).

The funding covers the technical set up of the platform including all staff, pupil and student accounts.

Support is available to state funded:

  • primary schools
  • secondary schools
  • special schools
  • pupil referral units
  • further education colleges
  • sixth-form colleges

The funded support is for schools and colleges that:

  • do not have a digital education platform
  • have access to Office 365 Education or G Suite for Education, but are not yet set up to assign work and communicate with pupils and students

The Microsoft and Google platforms were chosen as they are free to use to the education sector and had the unified technology and support to set up and deliver effective remote education provision.

Google and Microsoft also offer several features and functionalities that are suitable for school needs.

As of 1 February 2021, £4.8 million has been spent out of a programme budget of £14.23 million, leaving £9.43 million of remaining funding.

The numbers of schools applying to the programme by RSC region is as follows:

  • South East England and South London: 968
  • North West London and South Central: 937
  • Lancashire and West Yorkshire: 851
  • East Midlands and the Humber: 579
  • West Midlands: 525
  • South West England: 519
  • East of England and North East:481
  • North of England: 273

The Department wants to ensure all schools are set up with a remote learning platform and are keeping this under constant review.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the cost to the public purse has been of technical support to help schools set up accounts for Google and Microsoft during lockdown; and (b) how much funding is left for that purpose.

The Department is currently working with Google and Microsoft providers to deliver the Digital Education Platforms programme. The programme provides Government funded support for schools and colleges to get set up on one of two free to use digital platforms, which includes G Suite for Education (Google Classroom), and Office 365 Education (Microsoft Teams).

The funding covers the technical set up of the platform including all staff, pupil and student accounts.

Support is available to state funded:

  • primary schools
  • secondary schools
  • special schools
  • pupil referral units
  • further education colleges
  • sixth-form colleges

The funded support is for schools and colleges that:

  • do not have a digital education platform
  • have access to Office 365 Education or G Suite for Education, but are not yet set up to assign work and communicate with pupils and students

The Microsoft and Google platforms were chosen as they are free to use to the education sector and had the unified technology and support to set up and deliver effective remote education provision.

Google and Microsoft also offer several features and functionalities that are suitable for school needs.

As of 1 February 2021, £4.8 million has been spent out of a programme budget of £14.23 million, leaving £9.43 million of remaining funding.

The numbers of schools applying to the programme by RSC region is as follows:

  • South East England and South London: 968
  • North West London and South Central: 937
  • Lancashire and West Yorkshire: 851
  • East Midlands and the Humber: 579
  • West Midlands: 525
  • South West England: 519
  • East of England and North East:481
  • North of England: 273

The Department wants to ensure all schools are set up with a remote learning platform and are keeping this under constant review.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he is taking steps to ensure that the list of suggested digital education platforms in the Constituency framework: education and childcare setting (excluding universities) guidance includes the full range of common platforms used by schools beyond Microsoft and Google.

The Department is currently working with Google and Microsoft providers to deliver the Digital Education Platforms programme. The programme provides Government funded support for schools and colleges to get set up on one of two free to use digital platforms, which includes G Suite for Education (Google Classroom), and Office 365 Education (Microsoft Teams).

The funding covers the technical set up of the platform including all staff, pupil and student accounts.

Support is available to state funded:

  • primary schools
  • secondary schools
  • special schools
  • pupil referral units
  • further education colleges
  • sixth-form colleges

The funded support is for schools and colleges that:

  • do not have a digital education platform
  • have access to Office 365 Education or G Suite for Education, but are not yet set up to assign work and communicate with pupils and students

The Microsoft and Google platforms were chosen as they are free to use to the education sector and had the unified technology and support to set up and deliver effective remote education provision.

Google and Microsoft also offer several features and functionalities that are suitable for school needs.

As of 1 February 2021, £4.8 million has been spent out of a programme budget of £14.23 million, leaving £9.43 million of remaining funding.

The numbers of schools applying to the programme by RSC region is as follows:

  • South East England and South London: 968
  • North West London and South Central: 937
  • Lancashire and West Yorkshire: 851
  • East Midlands and the Humber: 579
  • West Midlands: 525
  • South West England: 519
  • East of England and North East:481
  • North of England: 273

The Department wants to ensure all schools are set up with a remote learning platform and are keeping this under constant review.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he made of the potential merits of different platforms prior to including (a) Microsoft and (b) Google and not other commonly used platforms in the Constituency framework: education and childcare setting (excluding universities) guidance.

The Department is currently working with Google and Microsoft providers to deliver the Digital Education Platforms programme. The programme provides Government funded support for schools and colleges to get set up on one of two free to use digital platforms, which includes G Suite for Education (Google Classroom), and Office 365 Education (Microsoft Teams).

The funding covers the technical set up of the platform including all staff, pupil and student accounts.

Support is available to state funded:

  • primary schools
  • secondary schools
  • special schools
  • pupil referral units
  • further education colleges
  • sixth-form colleges

The funded support is for schools and colleges that:

  • do not have a digital education platform
  • have access to Office 365 Education or G Suite for Education, but are not yet set up to assign work and communicate with pupils and students

The Microsoft and Google platforms were chosen as they are free to use to the education sector and had the unified technology and support to set up and deliver effective remote education provision.

Google and Microsoft also offer several features and functionalities that are suitable for school needs.

As of 1 February 2021, £4.8 million has been spent out of a programme budget of £14.23 million, leaving £9.43 million of remaining funding.

The numbers of schools applying to the programme by RSC region is as follows:

  • South East England and South London: 968
  • North West London and South Central: 937
  • Lancashire and West Yorkshire: 851
  • East Midlands and the Humber: 579
  • West Midlands: 525
  • South West England: 519
  • East of England and North East:481
  • North of England: 273

The Department wants to ensure all schools are set up with a remote learning platform and are keeping this under constant review.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what framework he used to determine which digital platforms are included in the Department’s Constituency framework: education and childcare setting (excluding universities) guidance.

The Department is currently working with Google and Microsoft providers to deliver the Digital Education Platforms programme. The programme provides Government funded support for schools and colleges to get set up on one of two free to use digital platforms, which includes G Suite for Education (Google Classroom), and Office 365 Education (Microsoft Teams).

The funding covers the technical set up of the platform including all staff, pupil and student accounts.

Support is available to state funded:

  • primary schools
  • secondary schools
  • special schools
  • pupil referral units
  • further education colleges
  • sixth-form colleges

The funded support is for schools and colleges that:

  • do not have a digital education platform
  • have access to Office 365 Education or G Suite for Education, but are not yet set up to assign work and communicate with pupils and students

The Microsoft and Google platforms were chosen as they are free to use to the education sector and had the unified technology and support to set up and deliver effective remote education provision.

Google and Microsoft also offer several features and functionalities that are suitable for school needs.

As of 1 February 2021, £4.8 million has been spent out of a programme budget of £14.23 million, leaving £9.43 million of remaining funding.

The numbers of schools applying to the programme by RSC region is as follows:

  • South East England and South London: 968
  • North West London and South Central: 937
  • Lancashire and West Yorkshire: 851
  • East Midlands and the Humber: 579
  • West Midlands: 525
  • South West England: 519
  • East of England and North East:481
  • North of England: 273

The Department wants to ensure all schools are set up with a remote learning platform and are keeping this under constant review.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what criteria the Department used to include (a) Microsoft and (b) Google but not other commonly used platforms in its list of suggested providers in the Constituency framework: education and childcare setting (excluding universities) guidance.

The Department is currently working with Google and Microsoft providers to deliver the Digital Education Platforms programme. The programme provides Government funded support for schools and colleges to get set up on one of two free to use digital platforms, which includes G Suite for Education (Google Classroom), and Office 365 Education (Microsoft Teams).

The funding covers the technical set up of the platform including all staff, pupil and student accounts.

Support is available to state funded:

  • primary schools
  • secondary schools
  • special schools
  • pupil referral units
  • further education colleges
  • sixth-form colleges

The funded support is for schools and colleges that:

  • do not have a digital education platform
  • have access to Office 365 Education or G Suite for Education, but are not yet set up to assign work and communicate with pupils and students

The Microsoft and Google platforms were chosen as they are free to use to the education sector and had the unified technology and support to set up and deliver effective remote education provision.

Google and Microsoft also offer several features and functionalities that are suitable for school needs.

As of 1 February 2021, £4.8 million has been spent out of a programme budget of £14.23 million, leaving £9.43 million of remaining funding.

The numbers of schools applying to the programme by RSC region is as follows:

  • South East England and South London: 968
  • North West London and South Central: 937
  • Lancashire and West Yorkshire: 851
  • East Midlands and the Humber: 579
  • West Midlands: 525
  • South West England: 519
  • East of England and North East:481
  • North of England: 273

The Department wants to ensure all schools are set up with a remote learning platform and are keeping this under constant review.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools have a sibling who attends the same school in England and Wales.

The Department does not collect information on whether pupils have siblings attending the same school.

29th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with regards to the remote education support scheme being offered by mobile phone networks in partnership with the Department for Education, how many pupils are receiving the support offered by (a) EE, (b) O2, (c) Sky Mobile, (d) SMARTY, (e) Tesco Mobile, (f) Three, (g) Virgin Mobile, (f) Vodafone as of 28th January 2021.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

As of 8 February 2021, over 986,000 laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, trusts, local authorities, and further education providers.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, trusts or local authorities who can lend these to children and young people who need them most, during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Figures on the number of devices already delivered is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data/2021-week-6. These figures are broken down by local authority and academy trust.

The Department have already provided over 63,000 4G wireless routers, with free data for the academic year, and continue to provide 4G wireless routers where children need to access remote education. Data regarding the number of routers delivered is also published at the site above.

To support access to the internet, the Department have partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home.

The Department are grateful to EE, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, Vodafone, BT Mobile and Lycamobile for supporting this offer. We are continuing to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer. Data regarding the number of pupils receiving free mobile data will be published shortly.

29th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) laptops and tablets and (b) 4G wireless routers have been delivered to (i) schools, (ii) local authorities and (iii) academy trusts as of 28 January 2021.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

As of 8 February 2021, over 986,000 laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, trusts, local authorities, and further education providers.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, trusts or local authorities who can lend these to children and young people who need them most, during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Figures on the number of devices already delivered is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data/2021-week-6. These figures are broken down by local authority and academy trust.

The Department have already provided over 63,000 4G wireless routers, with free data for the academic year, and continue to provide 4G wireless routers where children need to access remote education. Data regarding the number of routers delivered is also published at the site above.

To support access to the internet, the Department have partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home.

The Department are grateful to EE, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, Vodafone, BT Mobile and Lycamobile for supporting this offer. We are continuing to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer. Data regarding the number of pupils receiving free mobile data will be published shortly.

21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) laptops and tablets and (b) 4G wireless routers have been delivered to (i) schools, (ii) local authorities or (iii) academy trusts as of 21 January 2021.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people. As of Monday 25 January, we have delivered over 870,000 laptops and tablets to schools, trusts and local authorities. More information can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/laptops-and-tablets-progress-data-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

Data on delivery of 4G wireless routers will be published in due course.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, trusts or local authorities who can lend these to children and young people who need them most, during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the outbreak.

We have partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online, as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home.

We are grateful to EE, O2, Sky Mobile, Smarty, Tesco Mobile, Three, Virgin Mobile, and Vodafone for their collaboration. We continue to invite a range of mobile network providers to support the offer.

All four major mobile network operators - Vodafone, O2, Three and EE - have also committed to working together to make access to Oak National Academy free for school children. Additionally, the Department is grateful to BT and EE, who are making access to BBC Bitesize resources free from the end of January 2021.

24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many dongles and other mifi devices have been procured to support remote education since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has already provided over 51,000 4G wireless routers, with free data for the rest of the academic year. We continue to provide 4G wireless routers, with free data, where schools face disruption and children need to access remote education.

Local authorities, academy trusts and schools are responsible for distributing the 4G wireless routers and are best placed to know which children and young people need access to the internet.

In partnership with mobile network operators, we are providing access to free additional mobile data for the academic year, offering families flexibility to access the resources that they need the most.

The mobile data uplifts will be in place until the end of the academic year. Schools will be able to request free mobile data uplifts for disadvantaged children up to Year 11 via the Get Help with Technology service, when they experience disruption to face-to-face education or for clinically extremely vulnerable children.

24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many dongles and other mifi devices have been distributed to families to support remote education since the start of the covid-9 outbreak.

The Department has already provided over 51,000 4G wireless routers, with free data for the rest of the academic year. We continue to provide 4G wireless routers, with free data, where schools face disruption and children need to access remote education.

Local authorities, academy trusts and schools are responsible for distributing the 4G wireless routers and are best placed to know which children and young people need access to the internet.

In partnership with mobile network operators, we are providing access to free additional mobile data for the academic year, offering families flexibility to access the resources that they need the most.

The mobile data uplifts will be in place until the end of the academic year. Schools will be able to request free mobile data uplifts for disadvantaged children up to Year 11 via the Get Help with Technology service, when they experience disruption to face-to-face education or for clinically extremely vulnerable children.

24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many dongles and mifi devices distributed to support remote education are in active use by families.

The Department has already provided over 51,000 4G wireless routers, with free data for the rest of the academic year. We continue to provide 4G wireless routers, with free data, where schools face disruption and children need to access remote education.

Local authorities, academy trusts and schools are responsible for distributing the 4G wireless routers and are best placed to know which children and young people need access to the internet.

In partnership with mobile network operators, we are providing access to free additional mobile data for the academic year, offering families flexibility to access the resources that they need the most.

The mobile data uplifts will be in place until the end of the academic year. Schools will be able to request free mobile data uplifts for disadvantaged children up to Year 11 via the Get Help with Technology service, when they experience disruption to face-to-face education or for clinically extremely vulnerable children.

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which companies supplied dongles and mifi devices to his Department as part of the scheme to help children and families access remote education during the covid-19 outbreak; and what the cost to the Department was of that equipment.

As part of over £195 million invested to support access to remote education and social care, the Department has already provided over 51,000 4G wireless routers, with free data for the academic year, to support disadvantaged children. The Department continues to provide 4G wireless routers, with free data, where schools experience disruption to face to face education and pupils need to access remote education.

To date, the Department has invested over £6 million in connectivity, including hardware (4G wireless routers) and data (SIM cards and data roaming). The current contract is held by Computacenter.

In partnership with mobile network operators, the Department is also providing access to free additional mobile data for the academic year. Schools can request free mobile data uplifts, via the Get Help with Technology service, when they experience disruption to face to face education or for clinically extremely vulnerable children.

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which companies supplied SIMs to provide connectivity to the MiFi devices supplied as part of his Department's remote education support; and what the total cost was of that supply.

As part of over £195 million invested to support access to remote education and social care, the Department has already provided over 51,000 4G wireless routers, with free data for the academic year, to support disadvantaged children. The Department continues to provide 4G wireless routers, with free data, where schools experience disruption to face to face education and pupils need to access remote education.

To date, the Department has invested over £6 million in connectivity, including hardware (4G wireless routers) and data (SIM cards and data roaming). The current contract is held by Computacenter.

In partnership with mobile network operators, the Department is also providing access to free additional mobile data for the academic year. Schools can request free mobile data uplifts, via the Get Help with Technology service, when they experience disruption to face to face education or for clinically extremely vulnerable children.

16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answers of 4 November 2020 to Question 109149 on Remote Education: Merton and of 13 November 2020 to Question 109150 on Remote Education: Coronavirus, how many devices (a) had been distributed, (b) had been allocated and (c) were available for allocation to schools by (i) 20 October 2020 and (ii) 24 October 2020.

As part of over £195 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care, over 340,000 laptops and tablets are being made available this term to support disadvantaged children in year 3 to 11 whose face-to-face education may be disrupted. This supplements over 220,000 laptops and tablets and over 51,000 4G wireless routers, which have already been delivered during the summer term.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, trusts or local authorities who can lend these to the children and young people who need them most and who may experience disruption to face-to-face education due to COVID-19.

Information on the devices provided this term to schools, local authorities and academy trusts as of 23 October 2020 is published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/929064/Ad-hoc_stats_note_shipped_data_231020_FINAL.pdf

Devices provided as of 27 August 2020 is published here, which includes 547 devices delivered to Merton Council: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/912888/Devices_and_4G_wireless_routers_progress_data_as_of_27_August_2020.pdf

Allocations were originally equivalent to a school’s potential need if it fully closed. Attendance data suggests most schools are not closing fully, but instead are supporting small groups of children that are not able to attend school because they are self-isolating. The Department has changed the number of devices allocated to each school to reflect this. In the context of significant global demand for laptops and tablets, this ensures that as many children as possible can benefit from a device at the point at which their face-to-face education is disrupted. If schools are experiencing disruption to face-to-face education and believe they have a need for additional devices, they should contact the Department’s service team to request additional laptops or tablets.

9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 4 November to Question 109149, what was the total number of devices (a) distributed to schools on or before 20 October, (b) available to be allocated to schools on 20 October and (c) available to be allocated to schools on 24 October.

As part of over £195 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care, over 340,000 laptops and tablets are being made available this term to support disadvantaged children in Years 3 to 11 whose face-to-face education may be disrupted.

This supplements over 220,000 laptops and tablets, which have already been delivered during the summer term. This represents an injection of over half a million laptops and tablets by the end of the year.

Each school has a number of devices allocated to them by the Department, based on the number of pupils eligible for free school meals and estimates of school-owned devices and privately-owned devices.

Allocations were originally equivalent to a school’s potential need if it fully closed. Attendance data suggests most schools are not closing fully, but instead are supporting small groups of children that are not able to attend school because they are self-isolating. The Department has changed the number of devices allocated to each school to reflect this. In the context of significant global demand for laptops and tablets, this ensures that as many children as possible can benefit from a device at the point at which their face-to-face education is disrupted.

Where a school has a disruption that impacts a greater number of children without access to a device, they can contact the Department to request additional devices. This means the number of devices delivered to a school can be greater than their initial allocation. If a school is fully closing, their Regional Schools Commissioner will work with them to ensure they receive enough devices to meet the needs of all disadvantaged children in Years 3 to 11 who do not already have one.

Information on the devices provided this term to schools, local authorities and academy trusts as of 23 October 2020 is published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/929064/Ad-hoc_stats_note_shipped_data_231020_FINAL.pdf.

Devices provided as of 27 August 2020 is published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/912888/Devices_and_4G_wireless_routers_progress_data_as_of_27_August_2020.pdf.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many devices were available to schools to support remote education requirements as of (a) 20 October 2020 and (b) 24 October 2020.

The Department has invested over £195 million to support remote education and access to online social care, delivering over 220,000 laptops and tablets during the summer term for disadvantaged children who would not otherwise have had access to a digital device.

The Department is adding to this support by making over 340,000 additional laptops and tablets available to support disadvantaged children that might face disruption to their education. Since September, over 100,000 of these have been delivered to schools. On 20 October 2020, schools who had reported disruption to face-to-face education and been invited to order devices were able to order their full number of allocated devices.

In the context of significant global demand, the Department has updated the number of devices allocated to each school to more accurately align orders with the number of students schools typically have self-isolating, ensuring as many children as possible benefit from receiving a device this term. Original allocations were based on a school’s total need, should they fully close.

On 23 October 2020, the Department paused ordering over half-term when children were not reliant on remote education. On Monday 2 November 2020, ordering reopened and schools who had reported disruption to face-to-face education and been invited to order devices were able to order against their revised allocation.

The Department recognises that levels of self-isolation may be higher in different areas of the country and that face-to-face education is being prioritised in all eventualities. Where schools believe they have a strong need for additional devices, they should contact covid.technology@education.gov.uk.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many devices were available to schools in Merton to support remote education requirements as of (a) 20 October 2020 and (b) 24 October 2020.

As part of over £195 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care, over 340,000 laptops and tablets are being made available this term to support disadvantaged children in Years 3 to 11 whose face-to-face education may be disrupted.

This supplements over 220,000 laptops and tablets, which have already been delivered during the summer term. This represents an injection of over half a million laptops and tablets by the end of the year.

Each school has a number of devices allocated to them by the Department, based on the number of pupils eligible for free school meals and estimates of school-owned devices and privately-owned devices.

Allocations were originally equivalent to a school’s potential need if it fully closed. Attendance data suggests most schools are not closing fully, but instead are supporting small groups of children that are not able to attend school because they are self-isolating. The Department has changed the number of devices allocated to each school to reflect this. In the context of significant global demand for laptops and tablets, this ensures that as many children as possible can benefit from a device at the point at which their face-to-face education is disrupted.

Where a school has a disruption that impacts a greater number of children without access to a device, they can contact the Department to request additional devices. This means the number of devices delivered to a school can be greater than their initial allocation. If a school is fully closing, their Regional Schools Commissioner will work with them to ensure they receive enough devices to meet the needs of all disadvantaged children in Years 3 to 11 who do not already have one.

Information on the devices provided this term to schools, local authorities and academy trusts as of 23 October 2020 is published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/929064/Ad-hoc_stats_note_shipped_data_231020_FINAL.pdf.

Devices provided as of 27 August 2020 is published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/912888/Devices_and_4G_wireless_routers_progress_data_as_of_27_August_2020.pdf.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many devices had been allocated to schools to support remote education requirements on (a) 20 October 2020 and (b) 24 October 2020.

As part of over £195 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care, over 340,000 laptops and tablets are being made available this term to support disadvantaged children in Years 3 to 11 whose face-to-face education may be disrupted.

This supplements over 220,000 laptops and tablets, which have already been delivered during the summer term. This represents an injection of over half a million laptops and tablets by the end of the year.

Each school has a number of devices allocated to them by the Department, based on the number of pupils eligible for free school meals and estimates of school-owned devices and privately-owned devices.

Allocations were originally equivalent to a school’s potential need if it fully closed. Attendance data suggests most schools are not closing fully, but instead are supporting small groups of children that are not able to attend school because they are self-isolating. The Department has changed the number of devices allocated to each school to reflect this. In the context of significant global demand for laptops and tablets, this ensures that as many children as possible can benefit from a device at the point at which their face-to-face education is disrupted.

Where a school has a disruption that impacts a greater number of children without access to a device, they can contact the Department to request additional devices. This means the number of devices delivered to a school can be greater than their initial allocation. If a school is fully closing, their Regional Schools Commissioner will work with them to ensure they receive enough devices to meet the needs of all disadvantaged children in Years 3 to 11 who do not already have one.

Information on the devices provided this term to schools, local authorities and academy trusts as of 23 October 2020 is published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/929064/Ad-hoc_stats_note_shipped_data_231020_FINAL.pdf.

Devices provided as of 27 August 2020 is published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/912888/Devices_and_4G_wireless_routers_progress_data_as_of_27_August_2020.pdf.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many devices had been allocated to schools in Merton to support remote education requirements on (a) 20 October 2020 and (b) 24 October 2020.

As part of over £195 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care, over 340,000 laptops and tablets are being made available this term to support disadvantaged children in Years 3 to 11 whose face-to-face education may be disrupted.

This supplements over 220,000 laptops and tablets, which have already been delivered during the summer term. This represents an injection of over half a million laptops and tablets by the end of the year.

Each school has a number of devices allocated to them by the Department, based on the number of pupils eligible for free school meals and estimates of school-owned devices and privately-owned devices.

Allocations were originally equivalent to a school’s potential need if it fully closed. Attendance data suggests most schools are not closing fully, but instead are supporting small groups of children that are not able to attend school because they are self-isolating. The Department has changed the number of devices allocated to each school to reflect this. In the context of significant global demand for laptops and tablets, this ensures that as many children as possible can benefit from a device at the point at which their face-to-face education is disrupted.

Where a school has a disruption that impacts a greater number of children without access to a device, they can contact the Department to request additional devices. This means the number of devices delivered to a school can be greater than their initial allocation. If a school is fully closing, their Regional Schools Commissioner will work with them to ensure they receive enough devices to meet the needs of all disadvantaged children in Years 3 to 11 who do not already have one.

Information on the devices provided this term to schools, local authorities and academy trusts as of 23 October 2020 is published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/929064/Ad-hoc_stats_note_shipped_data_231020_FINAL.pdf.

Devices provided as of 27 August 2020 is published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/912888/Devices_and_4G_wireless_routers_progress_data_as_of_27_August_2020.pdf.

14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what equality impact assessment his Department has undertaken on the effect of delaying GCSE examinations by three weeks in the 2020-21 academic year due to the covid-19 outbreak on (a) disabled candidates and (b) candidates with special educational needs.

The Department has considered the impact on students with particular protected characteristics, including those with special educational needs and disabilities, of a delay to the GCSE, AS and A level exam series in the summer. The additional teaching time released next year will benefit all students. There may be a particularly positive impact on those who are likely to be most affected by the disruption to education caused by COVID-19 (disadvantaged students, amongst whom students with special educational needs and disabilities are over-represented). As part of its consultation on changes to GCSE, AS and A level exams and assessments in 2021, Ofqual carried out an equalities impact assessment and did not identify specific negative impacts relating to a delay to exams next year.

Ofqual consulted on its proposed measures for academic year 2020/21 assessments of vocational and technical qualifications (VTQs) – which includes BTECs. These measures could include awarding organisations delivering VTQs considering the timing of assessments. As part of its consultation, Ofqual conducted an Equalities Impact Assessment on the impact of its proposals on students and did not identify specific negative impacts relating to timing of assessments.

Decisions about the timing of qualifications, other than GCSE, AS and A levels, are for individual awarding organisations – in the case of BTECs, Pearson is the awarding organisation. Pearson is currently consulting with its customers on the timetable for its BTEC examinations and will publish the timetable in due course.

Awarding organisations must also comply with the Equality Act 2010, and so are subject to their duties under the legislation when deciding on adaptations to their qualifications.

14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has undertaken an equality impact assessment on the effect of delaying A levels examinations by three weeks in the 2020-21 academic year due to the covid-19 outbreak on (a) disabled candidates and (b) candidates with special educational needs.

The Department has considered the impact on students with particular protected characteristics, including those with special educational needs and disabilities, of a delay to the GCSE, AS and A level exam series in the summer. The additional teaching time released next year will benefit all students. There may be a particularly positive impact on those who are likely to be most affected by the disruption to education caused by COVID-19 (disadvantaged students, amongst whom students with special educational needs and disabilities are over-represented). As part of its consultation on changes to GCSE, AS and A level exams and assessments in 2021, Ofqual carried out an equalities impact assessment and did not identify specific negative impacts relating to a delay to exams next year.

Ofqual consulted on its proposed measures for academic year 2020/21 assessments of vocational and technical qualifications (VTQs) – which includes BTECs. These measures could include awarding organisations delivering VTQs considering the timing of assessments. As part of its consultation, Ofqual conducted an Equalities Impact Assessment on the impact of its proposals on students and did not identify specific negative impacts relating to timing of assessments.

Decisions about the timing of qualifications, other than GCSE, AS and A levels, are for individual awarding organisations – in the case of BTECs, Pearson is the awarding organisation. Pearson is currently consulting with its customers on the timetable for its BTEC examinations and will publish the timetable in due course.

Awarding organisations must also comply with the Equality Act 2010, and so are subject to their duties under the legislation when deciding on adaptations to their qualifications.

14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has undertaken an equality impact assessment on the effect of delaying Btec examinations by three weeks in the 2020-21 academic year due to the covid-19 outbreak on (a) disabled candidates and (b) candidates with special educational needs.

The Department has considered the impact on students with particular protected characteristics, including those with special educational needs and disabilities, of a delay to the GCSE, AS and A level exam series in the summer. The additional teaching time released next year will benefit all students. There may be a particularly positive impact on those who are likely to be most affected by the disruption to education caused by COVID-19 (disadvantaged students, amongst whom students with special educational needs and disabilities are over-represented). As part of its consultation on changes to GCSE, AS and A level exams and assessments in 2021, Ofqual carried out an equalities impact assessment and did not identify specific negative impacts relating to a delay to exams next year.

Ofqual consulted on its proposed measures for academic year 2020/21 assessments of vocational and technical qualifications (VTQs) – which includes BTECs. These measures could include awarding organisations delivering VTQs considering the timing of assessments. As part of its consultation, Ofqual conducted an Equalities Impact Assessment on the impact of its proposals on students and did not identify specific negative impacts relating to timing of assessments.

Decisions about the timing of qualifications, other than GCSE, AS and A levels, are for individual awarding organisations – in the case of BTECs, Pearson is the awarding organisation. Pearson is currently consulting with its customers on the timetable for its BTEC examinations and will publish the timetable in due course.

Awarding organisations must also comply with the Equality Act 2010, and so are subject to their duties under the legislation when deciding on adaptations to their qualifications.

17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 8 September 2020 to Question 81506, if he will make it his policy to extend the eligibility for technology support for 16 to 19 year olds to under-16-year olds who are not eligible for a student bursary.

The Department has already delivered over 220,000 laptops and tablets and over 50,000 4G wireless routers to children and young people who would not otherwise have online access, as part of over £100 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care. This included devices for children aged 0 to 19 with a social worker, care leavers and disadvantaged pupils in year 10.

The Department is now supplementing this support by making available additional devices – initially 150,000 – in the event that face to face schooling is disrupted as a result of local COVID-19 restrictions and children become reliant on remote education. This scheme is intended to enable schools to support disadvantaged children in year 3 to year 11 who cannot afford their own devices. Schools will also be able to order devices for disadvantaged children across all year groups who are shielding as a result of official or medical advice, all year groups who attend hospital schools and those completing their Key Stage 4 at a further education college.

In addition to providing laptops, tablets and 4G wireless routers, the Department is piloting two methods to provide internet connectivity to families with children and young people up to 16 years old. In partnership with BT, we are piloting a service to provide children and young people free access to BT Wi-Fi hotspots. Through the pilot, up to 10,000 families are able to access a BT Wi-Fi connection. We are also working with the major telecommunications companies to pilot an approach where mobile network operators are providing temporary access to free additional data, offering families more flexibility to access the resources that they need the most.

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what data his Department holds on the number of pupils without access to an (a) internet-enabled laptop or (b) tablet at home.

The Department has allocated a number of digital devices to each school in the case that they experience disruption to face-to-face education because of COVID-19 related restrictions.

To arrive at this allocated number, the Department used data on the number of pupils eligible for free school meals in each school, alongside an assumption that pupils’ device needs will be met to some extent by the device endowments of schools and colleges. To construct this assumption, the Department used the British Educational Suppliers Association ICT 2019 survey data on the average number of laptops and tablets in primary and secondary schools and assumed that these are distributed between teachers and pupils. The Department also referred to the Teacher Tapp survey from March 2020, which shows the proportion of teachers provided with a device by their school.

Schools can access their allocated number of devices from the 150,000 devices available when they experience disruption to face-to-face education and become reliant on remote education. They are able to request additional devices if their original allocation by the Department does not meet their needs.

The devices are an injection of support, alongside local initiatives, and are in addition to the 220,000 laptops and tablets the Department has already delivered to local authorities, academy trusts and schools between May to July.

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 8 September 2020 to Question 81506 on Education: Digital Technology, what was the source of the data his Department used to estimate the 150,000 devices required for children eligible for technology support in the event of disruption to face-to-face learning.

The Department has allocated a number of digital devices to each school in the case that they experience disruption to face-to-face education because of COVID-19 related restrictions.

To arrive at this allocated number, the Department used data on the number of pupils eligible for free school meals in each school, alongside an assumption that pupils’ device needs will be met to some extent by the device endowments of schools and colleges. To construct this assumption, the Department used the British Educational Suppliers Association ICT 2019 survey data on the average number of laptops and tablets in primary and secondary schools and assumed that these are distributed between teachers and pupils. The Department also referred to the Teacher Tapp survey from March 2020, which shows the proportion of teachers provided with a device by their school.

Schools can access their allocated number of devices from the 150,000 devices available when they experience disruption to face-to-face education and become reliant on remote education. They are able to request additional devices if their original allocation by the Department does not meet their needs.

The devices are an injection of support, alongside local initiatives, and are in addition to the 220,000 laptops and tablets the Department has already delivered to local authorities, academy trusts and schools between May to July.

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many student bursaries were awarded to 16- to 19-year olds between 23 March and 1 September 2020; and what comparative assessment his Department has made of that figure and the number of those bursaries awarded during the same period in each of the past five years.

16 to 19 Bursary funding is designed to help students overcome the individual financial barriers to participation that they face, and institutions must ensure the funds go to those who genuinely need them. It has 2 elements, the discretionary bursary, and the bursary for defined vulnerable groups.

Education providers draw down the funding for the bursary for defined vulnerable groups when they have identified an eligible student. Information on this element of the bursary fund is below (latest full year data is not yet available).

Academic Year

Number of students

2014/15

23,205

2015/16

22,160

2016/17

21,354

2017/18

21,377

2018/19

21,120

The discretionary bursary funding element is allocated to individual education institutions for them to administer to students. Because this is devolved to individual providers, the Department for Education does not hold information about the number of discretionary bursaries awarded or the total overall number of bursaries.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which (a) local authorities, (b) Academy Trusts and (c) other relevant organisations overseeing schools and social care responded to his Department’s invitation to order devices to assist with digital learning; and how many devices were requested by each respondent.

The Department has delivered over 220,000 laptops and tablets and over 50,000 4G wireless routers to children who would not otherwise have access, as part of over £100 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care.

The devices were an injection of support to help local authorities (LAs) and academy trusts (trusts) to provide access to education and social care during the COVID-19 lockdown period. LAs and trusts were responsible for distributing the devices as they are best placed to know which children and young people need access to a device.

On 27 August the Department published information on which LAs and trusts had received devices through the programme. This information can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/laptops-tablets-and-4g-wireless-routers-progress-data

We are now supplementing this support by making an initial 150,000 additional devices available in the event face-to-face schooling is disrupted as a result of local Covid-19 restrictions this academic year, resulting in children become reliant on remote education.

This scheme will enable schools to support disadvantaged children in years 3 to 11 who cannot afford their own devices. Schools will also be able to order devices for disadvantaged children across all year groups who are shielding as a result of official advice, all year groups who attend hospital schools and those completing their Key Stage 4 at a further education college.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to hold discussions with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on that Department's digital strategy which is planned to be published in autumn 2020.

The Digital Strategy addresses the increased importance of digital technology and the crucial role it must play to drive growth in the tech sector, especially as digital technology has been at the centre of support through the COVID-19 pandemic. We recognise the critical importance of digital skills both in everyday life and for the wider UK economy. Alongside other Government Departments, we are working with DCMS to support their vision for digital driven growth through the Digital Strategy.

We have already made significant investments in digital skills that supports the acquisition of digital skills from foundation level right through to those required for cutting edge digital industries. The new computing curriculum (introduced from September 2014) ensures pupils have the broad knowledge and skills they need to go on to specialise in innovative technologies and become active creators of digital technology. This new curriculum is supported by the National Centre for Computing Education (NCCE), which has been set up with £84 million of government funding. The NCCE are delivering a comprehensive programme to improve the teaching of computing and drive up participation in computer science, particularly amongst girls.

We are investing an additional £500 million per year on the implementation of new T Levels. The first of three new Digital T Levels (Digital Production, Design and Development) will be introduced this September with a further two (Digital Support and Services and Digital Business Services) to follow in 2021.

The Government is also investing up to £290 million of capital funding to establish 20 Institutes of Technology. These institutes will be the pinnacle of technical training, with unique collaborations between further education colleges, universities and businesses offering higher technical education and training in key sectors such as digital; digital is a popular sectoral specialism with 30% of the provision of the first 12 IoTs aligned to the digital technical route.

Finally, the Government introduced a new digital skills entitlement based on the new national standards in August 2020. Adults with no or low digital skills will have full funding to undertake improved digital skills qualifications, based on new national standards for essential digital skills, up to Level 1. The Government is also providing £2.5 billion (£3 billion when including Barnett funding for devolved administrations) for a new National Skills Fund to help adults learn new skills and prepare for the economy of the future. We will be consulting on the National Skills Fund in due course when those with an interest are better able to actively engage with it.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on what date the temporary extension of free school meals for children in families with No Recourse to Public Funds conditions will cease; and if he will publish a Children’s Rights Impact Assessment on the ending of that extension.

We are working with departments, across government, to evaluate access to free school meals for families with no recourse to public funds. In the meantime, the extension of eligibility will continue with the current income threshold until a decision on long-term eligibility is made. As part of this process, we will consider whether it would be appropriate to complete a Children’s Rights Impact Assessment.

At this point data is not currently available regarding the current costs of providing free school meals to certain groups of children subject to the no recourse to public funds condition.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the cost of temporarily providing free school meals to certain groups of children subject to the No Recourse to Public Funds condition.

We are working with departments, across government, to evaluate access to free school meals for families with no recourse to public funds. In the meantime, the extension of eligibility will continue with the current income threshold until a decision on long-term eligibility is made. As part of this process, we will consider whether it would be appropriate to complete a Children’s Rights Impact Assessment.

At this point data is not currently available regarding the current costs of providing free school meals to certain groups of children subject to the no recourse to public funds condition.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of the charitable status of independent schools.

The Department has made no recent estimate of the cost to the public purse of the charitable status of independent schools.

In May 2018, the Department for Education and the Independent Schools Council (ISC) agreed a joint understanding designed to expand the participation of independent schools across the system through cross-sector partnerships and initiatives such as targeted bursaries. The Government continues to work constructively with the independent schools’ sector, in line with the joint understanding, to maximise the social benefits that can be generated for their communities.

22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions his Department has had with representatives of internet providers on (a) providing internet access and (b) adequate devices for disadvantaged children who are out of school.

The Government wants to do everything it can to support schools and families to continue children’s education while they are at home.

We have committed over £100 million to support remote education. We are making laptops and tablets available to disadvantaged children who would otherwise not have access and are preparing for examinations in year 10, and to those receiving support from a social worker, including pre-school children, and care leavers.

Where care leavers, children with a social worker at secondary school and disadvantaged children in Year 10 do not have internet connections, we will be providing 4G wireless routers to them so that they can learn at home.

In May, the Department invited local authorities to order devices for the most vulnerable children first - children with a social worker and care leavers. In June, the Department started inviting academy trusts and local authorities to order their devices for disadvantaged year 10 pupils. The Department has published information about how many laptops, tablets and 4G wireless routers we have delivered or dispatched to local authorities and academy trusts as of 30 June, which can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/laptops-tablets-and-4g-wireless-routers-progress-data.

The Department is working with the major telecommunications companies to improve internet connectivity for disadvantaged and vulnerable families. For families who rely on a mobile internet connection, mobile network operators are working to provide access to free additional data while the COVID-19 outbreak requires children to learn from home and more social care services are online. In partnership with BT, the Department is also providing disadvantaged children and young people with free access to BT Wi-Fi hotspots.

22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions his Department has had about providing internet access and adequate devices for disadvantaged children who are out of school.

The Government wants to do everything it can to support schools and families to continue children’s education while they are at home.

We have committed over £100 million to support remote education. We are making laptops and tablets available to disadvantaged children who would otherwise not have access and are preparing for examinations in year 10, and to those receiving support from a social worker, including pre-school children, and care leavers.

Where care leavers, children with a social worker at secondary school and disadvantaged children in Year 10 do not have internet connections, we will be providing 4G wireless routers to them so that they can learn at home.

In May, the Department invited local authorities to order devices for the most vulnerable children first - children with a social worker and care leavers. In June, the Department started inviting academy trusts and local authorities to order their devices for disadvantaged year 10 pupils. The Department has published information about how many laptops, tablets and 4G wireless routers we have delivered or dispatched to local authorities and academy trusts as of 30 June, which can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/laptops-tablets-and-4g-wireless-routers-progress-data.

The Department is working with the major telecommunications companies to improve internet connectivity for disadvantaged and vulnerable families. For families who rely on a mobile internet connection, mobile network operators are working to provide access to free additional data while the COVID-19 outbreak requires children to learn from home and more social care services are online. In partnership with BT, the Department is also providing disadvantaged children and young people with free access to BT Wi-Fi hotspots.

6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the (a) cost to the public purse is each week and (b) average weekly cost is per child of the free school meal voucher scheme.

Where possible, schools are encouraged to work with their existing suppliers to provide meals or food parcels to free school meal-eligible children currently at home due to school closures. Where this is not possible, the national voucher scheme is available to support schools with this process.

The scheme allows schools to place orders for supermarket gift cards on behalf of parents and carers. These are worth £15 a week per child. Thousands of schools have already accessed the scheme, and many hundreds of thousands of families are already redeeming vouchers. Edenred has reported that over £70 million worth of voucher codes has been redeemed into supermarket eGift cards by schools and families through the scheme as of Tuesday 12 May.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what rate of commission Edenred is charging for its service to provide free school meal vouchers during the covid-19 outbreak.

The contract for the national free school meals voucher scheme was let against Crown Commercial Service framework RM6133. The successful provider is the sole provider on the framework and direct awards are permitted action. The department does not comment on the commercial arrangements of third parties but can confirm that we are only paying for the face value of goods delivered – in this case, vouchers.

The vouchers can currently be spent in a variety of supermarkets. Initially, the scheme includes supermarkets that already have e-gift card arrangements in place with Edenred, including Asda, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Morrisons, M&S and Waitrose. On 21 April, we were pleased to confirm that Aldi will be added to the list of supermarkets from the week commencing 27 April. We are working to see if additional supermarkets can be added to this list as soon as possible. Where families are unable to access any of these supermarkets, schools are able to buy vouchers for other retailers and we have published guidance setting out how we will compensate schools who incur additional costs in providing free school meals or vouchers to pupils affected by COVID-19.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what process his Department used to select the provider for the free school meal voucher programme during the covid-19 outbreak.

The contract for the national free school meals voucher scheme was let against Crown Commercial Service framework RM6133. The successful provider is the sole provider on the framework and direct awards are permitted action. The department does not comment on the commercial arrangements of third parties but can confirm that we are only paying for the face value of goods delivered – in this case, vouchers.

The vouchers can currently be spent in a variety of supermarkets. Initially, the scheme includes supermarkets that already have e-gift card arrangements in place with Edenred, including Asda, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Morrisons, M&S and Waitrose. On 21 April, we were pleased to confirm that Aldi will be added to the list of supermarkets from the week commencing 27 April. We are working to see if additional supermarkets can be added to this list as soon as possible. Where families are unable to access any of these supermarkets, schools are able to buy vouchers for other retailers and we have published guidance setting out how we will compensate schools who incur additional costs in providing free school meals or vouchers to pupils affected by COVID-19.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department made an assessment of the accessibility of all retailers when designing the free school meal voucher scheme during the covid-19 outbreak.

The contract for the national free school meals voucher scheme was let against Crown Commercial Service framework RM6133. The successful provider is the sole provider on the framework and direct awards are permitted action. The department does not comment on the commercial arrangements of third parties but can confirm that we are only paying for the face value of goods delivered – in this case, vouchers.

The vouchers can currently be spent in a variety of supermarkets. Initially, the scheme includes supermarkets that already have e-gift card arrangements in place with Edenred, including Asda, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Morrisons, M&S and Waitrose. On 21 April, we were pleased to confirm that Aldi will be added to the list of supermarkets from the week commencing 27 April. We are working to see if additional supermarkets can be added to this list as soon as possible. Where families are unable to access any of these supermarkets, schools are able to buy vouchers for other retailers and we have published guidance setting out how we will compensate schools who incur additional costs in providing free school meals or vouchers to pupils affected by COVID-19.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether schools will be reimbursed if they bought free school meals vouchers from another retailer due to being unable to access the Edenred scheme during the covid-19 outbreak.

To provide free school meals for pupils not attending school we are encouraging schools to speak to their catering team or provider in the first instance to see if they can prepare meals or food parcels that could be delivered to, or collected by, families. Where this is not possible, we have developed a national voucher scheme to enable schools to provide supermarket vouchers.

We are providing extra funding to schools, on top of existing budgets, to cover unavoidable costs incurred due to the coronavirus outbreak that cannot be met from their existing resources. This includes local free school meal arrangements set up by schools to support eligible children, where our national voucher scheme is not appropriate or before it was introduced. The guidance on this additional funding is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-schools.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions she has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on (a) extending the £20 uplift to universal credit and working tax credit beyond April 2021 and (b) extending that uplift to people on legacy benefits.

The Government introduced a package of temporary welfare measures worth around £9.3 billion this year to help with the financial consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. This included the £20 weekly increase to the Universal Credit Standard Allowance rates as a temporary measure for the 20/21 tax year.

Future decisions on spending will be made at the next appropriate fiscal event, and Parliament will be updated accordingly.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the impact of the covid-19 outbreak on testing for liver disease; and what steps he is taking to improve testing for that disease.

No formal assessment has been made. The NHS Long Term Plan recognises the importance of preventing avoidable disease through targeted policies to address lifestyle factors affecting healthy life expectancy, such as alcohol consumption and obesity. As part of the NHS Long Term Plan, NHS England and NHS Improvement, with support from the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities, have invested £27 million in a four year programme to 2023/24 to establish or improve alcohol care teams to provide specialist alcohol interventions in hospitals where needed.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether NHS Trusts including Epsom and St Helier NHS Trust have been asked to submit cheaper proposals for their proposed hospital rebuilds.

Organisations have been asked to submit a range of options for their new hospital schemes, with individual allocations for schemes to be determined once the respective full business cases have been reviewed and agreed.

The information requested from Epsom and St Helier NHS Trust will provide an objective evidence base for decision making at the business case stage. The central programme team are working with all lead organisations involved to ensure that schemes realise value for money, sustainability and digitalisation.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children and young people had NHS continuing care packages in each NHS clinical commissioning group area in England in each year from 2015-16 to 2020-21 inclusive.

The data requested is not held centrally.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, by what date he plans to publish guidance on the vaccination of unpaid carers against covid-19.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are currently developing a Stand Operating Procedure for unpaid carers to receive a vaccination. We expect this to be published in the near future.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
3rd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of evidence behind reports that covid-19 can cause brain injury; and what steps he is taking to ensure brain injury charities are able to meet a potential increase in demand for services.

The UK Research and Innovation-National Institute for Health Research Rapid Response Rolling Call has funded a large post-hospitalisation study. The study, announced in July, will establish a national consortium and a research platform embedded within clinical care to understand and improve long-term outcomes for survivors following hospitalisation with COVID-19.

In recognition of the impact on charities, including brain injury charities, in dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic and a potential increase in demand for services, a number of measures have been put in place. Including a funding package of £750 million for the wider voluntary and charity sector. In addition, charities can access the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and are able to benefit from the three-month VAT deferral scheme.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the research undertaken by Xu K of the State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases at The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine and others, entitled Management of COVID-19: the Zhejiang experience, published on 21 February 2020.

The Government has undertaken no specific assessment of this research.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made for the implications of his policy of the Alzheimer’s Society survey, published 13 May 2020, that found over half of care homes surveyed felt unable to safely self-isolate residents with covid-19 symptoms.

The safety of residents and staff is our priority. If appropriate isolation or cohorted care is not available with a local care provider, the individual’s local authority will be asked to secure alternative appropriate accommodation and care for the remainder of the required isolation period, in line with the adult social care action plan.

Costs of providing this accommodation are covered by the £1.3 billion COVID-19 discharge funding via the National Health Service.

On 15 May we published our care homes support plan. This is the next phase of our response for care homes.

We have announced an additional £600 million Infection Control Fund for Adult Social Care to reduce transmission of COVID-19 in care homes as part of a wider support package.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made for the implications for his policy on the personal protective equipment (PPE) to care homes of the Alzheimer’s Society survey, published 13 May 2020, that found 43 per cent of care homes reported that they did not have adequate supplies of PPE.

Supplies of personal protective equipment (PPE) to the care sector is fundamental for both the good care of individuals with suspected symptoms of COVID-19 and equally vital to protect the care workers in social care settings.

To address this, the Government has stepped up support, supply and distribution of PPE to the care sector. As of 8 May, we have released 60.9 million items of PPE to designated wholesalers for onward sale to social care providers. In addition, between 6 April and 12 May, we have delivered over 94 million items of PPE across 38 Local Resilience Forums to respond to spikes in need.

Working with care sector representative bodies, PHE published tailored guidance: ‘COVID-19 How to work safely in care homes’ on 17 April, as well as a specialised training video demonstrating the donning and doffing of PPE in care home settings. The PHE guidance also provides tables on when and which PPE to use.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been admitted to hospital with covid-19 in the UK, by faith group.

This data is not held in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have died from covid-19 in the UK, by ethnicity.

The National Health Service England publishes deaths from COVID-19 reported in hospital settings on their website, which includes a breakdown by ethnicity. More information can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-daily-deaths/

The Office of National statistics publishes all information related to deaths by ethnic group in England and Wales and includes ethnic breakdowns of deaths by age and sex. Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures below are based on death registrations up to 17 April 2020 that occurred between 2 March and 10 April 2020 and will be updated regularly.

Public Health England (PHE) publishes weekly surveillance reports on GOV.UK with confirmed cases, hospitalisations and deaths broken down by ethnicity. PHE has also undertaken a rapid review to better understand how COVID-19 may be having an impact on different ethnic groups. The first results were published on 2 June.

Public Health England weekly surveillance reports can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-covid-19-surveillance-reports

All data released by the Department is robust and includes only cases officially confirmed by NHS England or the devolved administrations, following discussion with next of kin.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, by ethnicity, how many people have been admitted to hospital with covid-19 in the UK.

This data is not held in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the potential merits of using dementia research funding to investigate best practice in dementia care.

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded through the Department to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research.

Sharing best practice is key to this mission, with applications judged against a number of factors including the ability of the funder to involve patients, carers and the public in order to improve the reach, quality and impact of research.

The NIHR welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including dementia care.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the Government's priorities are for research into dementia.

Improving the lives of people living with dementia, including their families and carers, is a high priority, and the Government remains strongly committed to supporting research into dementia. We will be setting out our plans for supporting people with dementia in England for 2020-2025 later this year.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what advice his Department has provided to businesses based in London on ensuring that their businesses do not support the abuse of human rights in Hong Kong under the provisions of the National Security Law imposed on that formerly autonomous city by the Chinese Communist Party.

We are in close contact with a wide range of businesses with interests in Hong Kong, but it is for businesses themselves to make their own judgement calls. We would always advise businesses to conduct appropriate due diligence to satisfy themselves that their activities do not support, or risk being seen to be supporting, any human rights violations or abuses.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has held discussions with representatives of (a) HSBC and (b) Standard Chartered since their statements on their support for China’s national security legislation for Hong Kong.

We are in close contact with a wide range of businesses in Hong Kong, but it is for businesses themselves to make their own judgement calls.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what support he plans to provide to the independent tribunal on China's alleged genocide against Muslim Uighur population established by Sir Geoffrey Nice QC.

We have serious concerns about gross violations of human rights occurring in Xinjiang and welcome any work that is rigorous, balanced and raises awareness of the situation faced by Uyghurs and other minorities in China. We are aware of this initiative by Sir Geoffrey Nice QC, and will study any resulting report carefully.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on revenue accruing to the public purse of setting the Stamp Duty Land Tax non-UK resident surcharge at (a) 3 per cent and (b) 5 per cent; and if he will make a statement.

The new rates of Stamp Duty Land Tax for non-UK resident purchasers of residential property in England and Northern Ireland are set to be 2% higher than the rates applying to UK-resident purchasers. The expected revenue will be used to tackle rough sleeping and is set out on page 35 of the “Policy Costings” document published alongside the Red Book at Budget 2020.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/871948/Budget_2020_policy_costings.pdf

No assessment has been made of the effect of a 3% or 5% Stamp Duty Land Tax non-UK resident surcharge.

30th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on (a) revenue accruing to the public purse for (i) projects to tackle rough sleeping and (ii) other projects and (b) house price inflation of reducing the Stamp Duty Land Tax non-UK resident surcharge from 3 per cent to 2 per cent.

The new rates of Stamp Duty Land Tax for non-UK resident purchasers of residential property in England and Northern Ireland are set to be 2% higher than the rates applying to UK-resident purchasers. The expected revenue will be used to tackle rough sleeping and is set out on page 35 of the “Policy Costings” document published alongside the Red Book at Budget 2020.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/871948/Budget_2020_policy_costings.pdf

No assessment has been made of the effect of a 3% or 5% Stamp Duty Land Tax non-UK resident surcharge.

30th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the new Stamp Duty Land Tax non-UK resident surcharge due to come into force in April 2021 can be avoided by being resident in the UK on at least 183 days.

At the March Budget, the Government confirmed its intention to introduce a 2% SDLT surcharge on non-UK residents purchasing residential property in England and Northern Ireland from 1 April 2021.

After a public consultation, which took place between February and May 2019, the Government decided that an individual will be UK resident for the purposes of the surcharge where they are present in the UK for at least 183 days during any continuous 365-day period beginning 12 months before a transaction and ending 12 months after. A refund of the surcharge will be available only if individuals spend 183 days in the UK over the relevant period.

HMRC will publish guidance for taxpayers and agents in advance of the surcharge coming into effect. This guidance will include the information taxpayers and agents will be able to use to demonstrate their residence status.

30th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of adopting the Association of Accounting Technicians proposal to extend the residency requirements for the Stamp Duty Land Tax non-UK resident surcharge from 183 days to those of the residency requirements for (a) British Citizenship, five years and (b) the husband, wife or civil partner of a British citizen, three years.

At the March Budget, the Government confirmed its intention to introduce a 2% SDLT surcharge on non-UK residents purchasing residential property in England and Northern Ireland from 1 April 2021.

After a public consultation, which took place between February and May 2019, the Government decided that an individual will be UK resident for the purposes of the surcharge where they are present in the UK for at least 183 days during any continuous 365-day period beginning 12 months before a transaction and ending 12 months after. A refund of the surcharge will be available only if individuals spend 183 days in the UK over the relevant period.

HMRC will publish guidance for taxpayers and agents in advance of the surcharge coming into effect. This guidance will include the information taxpayers and agents will be able to use to demonstrate their residence status.

30th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he plans to take in relation to the new Stamp Duty Land Tax non-UK resident surcharge to ensure that overseas buyers are not refunded a surcharge when they state only that they intend to live in the UK for 183 days after purchasing property; and if he will make a statement.

At the March Budget, the Government confirmed its intention to introduce a 2% SDLT surcharge on non-UK residents purchasing residential property in England and Northern Ireland from 1 April 2021.

After a public consultation, which took place between February and May 2019, the Government decided that an individual will be UK resident for the purposes of the surcharge where they are present in the UK for at least 183 days during any continuous 365-day period beginning 12 months before a transaction and ending 12 months after. A refund of the surcharge will be available only if individuals spend 183 days in the UK over the relevant period.

HMRC will publish guidance for taxpayers and agents in advance of the surcharge coming into effect. This guidance will include the information taxpayers and agents will be able to use to demonstrate their residence status.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people with annual trading profits from £50,000 to £60,000 are not eligible to access support under the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

The SEISS, including the eligibility requirement that an individual’s trading profits must be no more than £50,000 and at least equal to their non-trading income, is designed to target those who most need it, and who are most reliant on their self-employment income.

Those with average profits above £50,000 may still benefit from other support, and individuals may have access to a range of grants and loans depending on their circumstances. The SEISS supplements the significant support already announced for UK businesses, including the Bounce Back Loan Scheme for small businesses, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, and the deferral of tax payments.

Applications for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) opened on 13 May. By midnight 31 May 2020, HMRC had received 2.5m claims representing a total of £7.2bn claimed.

SEISS is a new scheme and HMRC are currently working through the analysis they will be able to provide based on the data available. HMRC will update in due course on the types of data available and timescales for publication.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average wait time was to begin basic training in the Army by gender for the training facility at (a) Pirbright, (b) Winchester, (c) Harrogate and (d) Catterick in (i) 2019, (ii) 2020 and (iii) 2021 to date.

The average wait time to begin basic training in the Army by gender for the training facility at (a) Pirbright, (b) Winchester, (c) Harrogate and (d) Catterick in (i) 2019, (ii) 2020 and (iii) 2021 to date is given below:

Average Wait Time – Solider Assessment to Basic Training Start (in days)

Training Centre

Year

Gender

Ph 1 Input Trg School Name

Ph 1 Input Trg Year

F

M

Army Foundation College (AFC) Harrogate

2019/2020

135

145

2020/2021

158

138

Army Training Centre (ATC) Pirbright

2019/2020

139

130

2020/2021

202

162

2021/2022

162

149

Army Training Regiment (ATR) Winchester

2019/2020

137

125

2020/2021

204

153

2021/2022

158

142

Infantry Training Centre (ITC) Catterick

2019/2020

100

97

2020/2021

104

143

2021/2022

92

143

Notes/Caveats:

  1. This data has been provided from a single Service source rather than official statistics produced by Defence Statistics as they do not collate this information.
  2. For Training Year 2021/2022 the average has been calculated based on data held as of 07 September 2021.
  3. No courses have yet commenced at AFC Harrogate for this Training Year.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average wait time was to begin basic training in the Army by gender for (a) Reserves and (b) full-time soldiers in (i) 2019, (ii) 2020 and (iii) 2021 to date.

The average wait time to begin basic training in the Army by gender for (a) Reserves and (b) full-time soldiers in (i) 2019, (ii) 2020 and (iii) 2021 to date is given below:

Average Wait Time by Recruiting Year (in days)

Rank

Gender

19-20

20-21

21-22

Regular Other Ranks

Male

124

149

145

Female

128

167

137

Reserve Other Ranks

Male

36

34

17

Female

38

18

38

Notes/Caveats:

  1. This is one of two questions tabled by Siobhain McDonagh (Lab, Mitcham and Morden) on the average wait time to begin Basic Training by gender for British Army candidates. It is unclear what has prompted the questions.
  2. This data has been provided from a single Service source rather than official statistics produced by Defence Statistics as they do not collate this information.
  3. The figures represented show the average wait time in days by Recruiting Year (April – March). The average wait time for Recruiting Year 2021/2022 is based on candidates with an Assessment Centre date pass since 01 April 2021 who are booked to commence Basic Training prior to 31 March 2022 and thus is subject to change.
  4. For Regular Other Ranks the wait time is from Assessment Centre pass up until the commencement of Basic Training, at which point they are enlisted.
  5. For Reserve Other Ranks the wait time is from Assessment Centre pass until enlistment, which is completed within their Reserve Unit and occurs before the candidate commences Basic Training.
Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent estimate he has made of the number of families living in temporary accommodation in London who have to travel over an hour each way to their children’s schools.

Time spent in temporary accommodation means people are getting help and it ensures no family is without a roof over their head.

We do not collect data on the distance of temporary accommodation from the household’s school. The legislation and guidance set out that in the first instance, local authorities should try to place individuals within their own area, and retain established links with schools, doctors, social workers and other key services and support. However, when this is not possible, they should place the household as near as possible to the original local authority. Placing a household out of the local authority area should be as a last resort and authorities must consider the impact a change in location would have on a household.

If a local authority places a household into accommodation in another local area, they are required by law to notify the local authority of any placement, to ensure there is no disruption to schooling or employment for example.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the proposed expansion of the small sites exemption policy on the supply of social and affordable housing in England.

To aid small and medium-sized builders through economic recovery, we have consulted on a proposal to increase the current threshold at which affordable housing contributions can be collected on new developments. This proposal would ensure that sites that may not have been developed due to viability issues would go ahead creating the homes our country needs.

Details of the impact of this proposal are set out in the Changes to the current planning system consultation, which closed on 1 October: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/changes-to-the-current-planning-system

It is important that we consider the consultation feedback thoroughly. We will respond to the consultation in due course.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the proposed expansion of the small sites exemption policy on the supply of social and affordable housing in London.

To aid small and medium-sized builders through economic recovery, we have consulted on a proposal to increase the current threshold at which affordable housing contributions can be collected on new developments. This proposal would ensure that sites that may not have been developed due to viability issues would go ahead creating the homes our country needs.

Details of the impact of this proposal are set out in the Changes to the current planning system consultation, which closed on 1 October: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/changes-to-the-current-planning-system

It is important that we consider the consultation feedback thoroughly. We will respond to the consultation in due course.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the proposed expansion of the small sites exemption policy on the ability of SME developers to take on new projects.

To aid small and medium-sized builders through economic recovery, we have consulted on a proposal to increase the current threshold at which affordable housing contributions can be collected on new developments. This proposal would ensure that sites that may not have been developed due to viability issues would go ahead creating the homes our country needs.

Details of the impact of this proposal are set out in the Changes to the current planning system consultation, which closed on 1 October: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/changes-to-the-current-planning-system

It is important that we consider the consultation feedback thoroughly. We will respond to the consultation in due course.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number of additional homes that will be delivered by the proposed expansion of the small sites exemption policy.

To aid small and medium-sized builders through economic recovery, we have consulted on a proposal to increase the current threshold at which affordable housing contributions can be collected on new developments. This proposal would ensure that sites that may not have been developed due to viability issues would go ahead creating the homes our country needs.

Details of the impact of this proposal are set out in the Changes to the current planning system consultation, which closed on 1 October: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/changes-to-the-current-planning-system

It is important that we consider the consultation feedback thoroughly. We will respond to the consultation in due course.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans he has to establish a timeline for the introduction of space standards on new homes delivered under permitted development rights.

We laid regulations before Parliament on 11 November which will introduce a requirement that all homes delivered through permitted development rights meet, at a minimum, the nationally described space standards. This requirement will come into effect on 6 April 2021, and will apply to applications for prior approval submitted on or after that date.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
15th Jun 2020
What steps the Government is taking to support tenants in (a) multiple occupancy dwellings and (b) buildings with multiple residences during the covid-19 outbreak.

All tenants benefit from our unprecedented support package and protection from eviction. This is supported by guidance, including to tenants who are shielded or in accommodation with shared facilities. Tenants are spending more time at home so we’re clear that inspections and repairs to remedy direct risks should take place in all rented properties, in line with social distancing requirements.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the timetable is for the publication of the Accelerated Planning White Paper.

The Government will publish a Planning White Paper shortly. It will set out our ambitious agenda for planning reform over this Parliament to make the planning system clearer, more accessible and more certain for all users.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)