Andrew Murrison Portrait

Andrew Murrison

Conservative - South West Wiltshire

1 APPG membership (as of 29 Dec 2021)
Tunisia
4 Former APPG memberships
Armed Forces, Clinical Leadership and Management, Listed Properties, Morocco
Select Committee on the Armed Forces Bill
25th Feb 2021 - 1st Mar 2021
Armed Forces Bill Select Committee
22nd Feb 2021 - 22nd Feb 2021
Select Committee on the Armed Forces Bill
22nd Feb 2021 - 22nd Feb 2021
Minister of State (Foreign and Commonwealth Office) (Joint with the Department for International Development)
9th May 2019 - 13th Feb 2020
Liaison Committee Sub-committee on the effectiveness and influence of the select committee system
13th Feb 2019 - 15th May 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
6th Nov 2017 - 15th May 2019
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2017 - 15th May 2019
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
30th Nov 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Draft Investigatory Powers Bill (Joint Committee)
5th Nov 2015 - 11th Feb 2016
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office)
15th Jul 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Sep 2012 - 15th Jul 2014
Shadow Minister (Defence)
3rd Jul 2007 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Minister (Health)
10th Nov 2003 - 3rd Jul 2007
Science and Technology Committee
16th Jul 2001 - 17th Jul 2005
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
16th Jul 2001 - 17th Jul 2005


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 19th January 2022
Building Safety Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 294 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 181 Noes - 301
Speeches
Wednesday 19th January 2022
Covid-19 Update
I draw the attention of the House to my entry in the Register of Members’ Financial Interests. The Prime Minister …
Written Answers
Wednesday 15th December 2021
Dental Services
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what incentives are available to encourage NHS dentists to …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
Tuesday 4th January 2022
1. Employment and earnings
31 December 2021, received £1,557.38. Hours: 44 hrs. (Registered 04 January 2022)
EDM signed
Tuesday 24th January 2017
DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS WITH ARMENIA
That this House marks the 25th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between the UK and the Republic of …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Andrew Murrison has voted in 336 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Andrew Murrison Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(23 debate interactions)
Sajid Javid (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
(17 debate interactions)
James Cleverly (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(15 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(65 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(31 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(22 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Andrew Murrison's debates

South West Wiltshire Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest South West Wiltshire signature proportion
Petitions with most South West Wiltshire signatures
Andrew Murrison has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Andrew Murrison

19th January 2017
Andrew Murrison signed this EDM on Tuesday 24th January 2017

DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS WITH ARMENIA

Tabled by: Stephen Pound (Labour - Ealing North)
That this House marks the 25th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between the UK and the Republic of Armenia, and commends the choice made by the people of Armenia when they declared independence from the then Soviet Union; supports the government and people of Armenia in their promotion …
63 signatures
(Most recent: 30 Mar 2017)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 34
Scottish National Party: 14
Conservative: 9
Independent: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
The Independent Group for Change: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
25th February 2016
Andrew Murrison signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 25th February 2016

CAPTAIN ERIC BROWN CBE DSC AFC ROYAL NAVY (No.2)

Tabled by: Nicholas Soames (Conservative - Mid Sussex)
That this House pays tribute to the late Captain Eric Melrose "Winkle" Brown CBE DSC AFC Royal Navy for his outstanding service to our country, to naval aviation and to the cause of reconciliation; notes that he flew more aircraft types, 487, than any other person in the world, a …
17 signatures
(Most recent: 11 May 2016)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Labour: 2
Scottish National Party: 1
Independent: 1
View All Andrew Murrison's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Andrew Murrison, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Andrew Murrison has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Andrew Murrison

Tuesday 7th December 2021

Andrew Murrison has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Andrew Murrison has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


33 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
15th Oct 2021
To ask the President of COP26, whether he plans to use COP26 as an opportunity to make representations to developed countries on meeting the Climate Vulnerable Forum to discuss the effective (a) implementation and (b) financing of the Santiago Network on Loss and Damage recommendations and advice.

I have clearly stated, including in my letter to all Parties ahead of the pre-COP meeting in Milan, that Agreement on the development of the Santiago Network on Loss and Damage is a priority for the UK COP Presidency. I have encouraged and will continue to encourage all countries to work together to find a resolution to this issue at COP26.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the President of COP26, if the Government will back UN Secretary-General’s call for other countries and climate donors to set aside 50 per cent of their climate finance for climate adaptation.

The UK is ensuring a large majority of our own international climate finance is grant-based. We are pressing other donor countries for similarly ambitious commitments. Under our G7 Presidency, the G7 committed to scaling up adaptation finance, and we have seen concrete new individual pledges from Canada, Japan, the US, and Denmark in recent months to this effect.

The UK has committed to delivering a balance through our scaled up ICF and has launched - with other bilateral donors Ireland, Sweden, the Netherlands and Denmark - a Champions Group on Adaptation Finance, with a commitment to deliver a balance of adaptation in climate finance, in response to calls from developing countries. Since launching, Finland and Germany have joined.

Finance needs to be accessible, particularly for the most marginalised communities. Locally led adaptation is a central priority for the COP26 Presidency, amplifying the calls for greater support for locally led action, and also addressing the barriers that restrict and prevent finance flowing to the local level. Locally led adaptation means communities are directly involved in the design of the solutions.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of Professor David Miller's research at Bristol University on that university's ratings under the Research Excellence Framework.

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) assesses the quality of research from the submissions of UK higher education institutions, not individuals. The primary outcome of the REF is an overall quality profile for each submission, which will show the proportions of research activity judged to meet each of four starred quality levels. Alongside the quality profile, the funding bodies will publish the output, impact and environment sub-profiles that were combined to produce the overall quality profile for each submission. The HE funding bodies do not publish the scores for individual outputs or impact case studies. REF results inform future Quality-related (QR) research funding allocations from HE funding bodies, which are, also awarded at institutional level by the HE funding bodies, and not to individual researchers.

HE providers are independent and autonomous organisations, responsible for the management of their own affairs and for meeting their duties under the law, including those relating to freedom of expression and equalities. All HE providers should discharge their responsibilities fully and have robust policies and procedures in place to comply with the law, to investigate and swiftly address hate crime, including any antisemitic incidents that are reported.

Grant funding provided by HE Funding bodies, UK Research & Innovation and Office for Students is all subject to terms and conditions of funding set by the funder with which providers must comply. If a provider does not meet these, funding can be withdrawn or reclaimed by the relevant funder. For research grant funding this includes expectations concerning academic rigour, research integrity, open research, etc.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to take into account the conduct of Professor David Miller in the future letting of contracts to Bristol University.

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) assesses the quality of research from the submissions of UK higher education institutions, not individuals. The primary outcome of the REF is an overall quality profile for each submission, which will show the proportions of research activity judged to meet each of four starred quality levels. Alongside the quality profile, the funding bodies will publish the output, impact and environment sub-profiles that were combined to produce the overall quality profile for each submission. The HE funding bodies do not publish the scores for individual outputs or impact case studies. REF results inform future Quality-related (QR) research funding allocations from HE funding bodies, which are, also awarded at institutional level by the HE funding bodies, and not to individual researchers.

HE providers are independent and autonomous organisations, responsible for the management of their own affairs and for meeting their duties under the law, including those relating to freedom of expression and equalities. All HE providers should discharge their responsibilities fully and have robust policies and procedures in place to comply with the law, to investigate and swiftly address hate crime, including any antisemitic incidents that are reported.

Grant funding provided by HE Funding bodies, UK Research & Innovation and Office for Students is all subject to terms and conditions of funding set by the funder with which providers must comply. If a provider does not meet these, funding can be withdrawn or reclaimed by the relevant funder. For research grant funding this includes expectations concerning academic rigour, research integrity, open research, etc.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the evidential basis is for permitting the reopening of hairdressers but not beauty salons and nail bars as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Hairdressers and barbers in England were able to reopen from 4 July to offer hairdressing services. Other close contact services, like beauty salons, remain closed until further notice. The Ministerial Taskforces have been getting scientific input from Public Health England (PHE), who have been directly involved in the taskforce meetings, helping to resolve scientific issues as they draft the guidance. This guidance has been drawn up alongside businesses, business representative organisations, trade unions, and the Health and Safety Executive, taking into account the latest scientific and medical advice.

We appreciate that this is difficult for some businesses. Our approach is guided by the scientific and medical advice, and every step is weighed against the evidence, remembering that the more we open up the more vigilant we will need to be.

The Government is working with the remaining closed services to establish a timeline for when they can reopen safely.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department is undertaking an assessment of the validity of the charitable aims and objectives of the Islamic Centre of England.

The Charity Commission is the independent registrar and regulator for charities in England and Wales. Any evidence that a registered charity is not pursuing its charitable purpose should be referred to the Charity Commission.

In June 2020, the Charity Commission exercised its power under section 75A of the Charities Act 2011 to issue an Official Warning to the Islamic Centre of England as it found the trustees had failed to discharge their legal duties towards the charity, which resulted in misconduct and/or mismanagement. The Charity Commission has an open and ongoing regulatory case into the charity to follow up on compliance with the requirements of the Official Warning.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether Bristol University has shared with him the results and conclusions of its investigation into Professor David Miller's conduct towards Jewish students launched in March 2021.

The views of Professor Miller are ill-founded and wholly reprehensible, and the government wholeheartedly rejects them. We consider that the University of Bristol could do more to make its condemnation of that conduct clear to current and future students.

I understand the university is currently investigating these comments. The university has not yet completed the investigation. The government is not involved in this process and all details will remain confidential to the university until it has reached its conclusion.

I met with representatives of the University of Bristol in May 2021. I was reassured that the university recognises its obligations to keep Jewish students safe and to support them if they feel in any way threatened. I understand they are committed to completing the confidential investigation as quickly as possible with the rigour required for a complex investigation of this kind.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has received any representations on the views expressed by Professor David Miller at Bristol University on Jewish students and organisations.

The views of Professor Miller are ill-founded and wholly reprehensible, and the government wholeheartedly rejects them. We consider that the University of Bristol could do more to make its condemnation of that conduct clear to current and future students.

I understand the university is currently investigating these comments. The university has not yet completed the investigation. The government is not involved in this process and all details will remain confidential to the university until it has reached its conclusion.

I met with representatives of the University of Bristol in May 2021. I was reassured that the university recognises its obligations to keep Jewish students safe and to support them if they feel in any way threatened. I understand they are committed to completing the confidential investigation as quickly as possible with the rigour required for a complex investigation of this kind.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether music teachers can undertake one-to-one instruction in (a) school and (b) home environments during the current phase of the easing of the covid-19 lockdown restrictions; and what guidance for the safe working of those music teachers is (i) available and (ii) in preparation.

One-to-one instruction, including in music, can take place in school and home environments, as long as the relevant guidance is followed. The Department published detailed guidance on 2 July for schools for all children and young people to return to full-time education from September 2020. This guidance provides schools, colleges and nurseries with the details needed to plan for a full return, as well as reassuring parents about what to expect for their children, this guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

The Department has also published guidance for community activities, holiday and after-school clubs, as well as other out-of-school provision for children over the age of five, which sets out the protective measures that need to be in place to ensure that such out-of-school provision can open as safely as possible. This guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak/protective-measures-for-out-of-school-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

More detailed guidance on music will be published shortly.

The Government has also published specific guidance for people working out of the home, this can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/homes.

2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of adults in England have accessed NHS dentistry in each year since 2001.

This information is not available in the format requested. Data is available for the proportion of the adult population seen by a National Health Service dentist in the previous 24 months from 2007 to 2021, to align with the recommended longest interval between dental checks in the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s oral and dental health guidance.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of complaints to Healthwatch Wiltshire relate to NHS dental services.

The Department does not hold this data.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what incentives are available to encourage NHS dentists to practice in areas with unmet dental need.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are responsible for commissioning primary dental care services to meet local need. NHS England and NHS Improvement are developing proposals for dental system reform, designed with the support of the profession, encouraging improved dental provision in all areas and addressing unmet need.

Health Education England (HEE) is also working with service commissioners to develop National Health Service dental practices to provide more dental foundation training opportunities where access to NHS dentistry is a known issue. Nationally, HEE is reviewing future training posts to ensure an equitable distribution of NHS dentists in England.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has been made of the additional training and administrative cost for EU dentists seeking to work in the NHS beyond that required to enter private practice.

The Department has in place a period of continued automatic recognition, allowing European Union (EU) dentists continued ease of registration in the United Kingdom. In order to work in the National Health Service (NHS), dentists must also apply to the Dental Performers List. Holders of non-UK qualifications are required to undertake a foundation training programme before admittance to the performers list, however the exemption for EU applicants remains in place. This means that EU dentists do not currently incur any additional costs to practicing in the NHS than they did previously.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the value is of a unit of dental activity for each NHS dental practice in Wiltshire.

This information is not held in the format available. A general dental services contract or personal dental services agreement covers a range of activity and service. The units of dental activity, against which contracts are monitored, form only part of those arrangements and therefore are not assigned a specific value.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of foundation year dental graduates were employed in private practices in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

In the last five years, no dental foundation trainees have been employed in exclusively private practices. Health Education England appoint dental graduates to training practices with National Health Service contracts and where the educational supervisor is carrying out a high proportion of NHS dentistry.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many places at dental school will be available in each year to 2035, by dental school.

The Office for Students (OfS) allocates places to dental schools on an annual basis. In the academic year 2021/22, in England, there were 983 dental school places allocated, including places for overseas students. Allocations for the 2022/23 academic year will be issued by the OfS in December 2021.

The following table shows the number of dental places per dental school in 2021/22.

Dental school

Places

Birmingham

86

Bristol

93

University of Central Lancashire

34

King’s College London

162

Leeds

84

Liverpool

84

Manchester

92

Newcastle

71

Plymouth

82

Queen Mary University of London

107

Sheffield

88

Following the Spending Review 2021, spending plans for individual budgets, including for the training and education of the dental workforce, will be subject to a detailed financial planning exercise and finalised in due course. Longer term workforce planning will be subject to future spending reviews.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to ensure that families of armed service personnel are not disadvantaged in accessing (a) NHS dentistry and (b) NHS orthodontics.

All members of the armed forces community are protected against facing disadvantage in access to public services, including National Health Service dental and orthodontic care, through the Armed Forces Covenant.

NHS dental practices have been asked to prioritise urgent care, care for vulnerable groups followed by delayed planned care. This applies to all patients, including the families of armed forces personnel.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what provision he is making for potentially administering flu and covid-19 vaccinations simultaneously.

The National Health Service will follow guidance by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) and Public Health England on co-administration of flu and COVID-19 vaccines.

Based on current information about the COVID-19 vaccines that are likely to be available, it is expected there will be a recommended interval between seven and 28 days between flu and any successful COVID-19 vaccine, to avoid incorrect attribution of potential side effects. The JCVI keeps all information under review. The NHS, as a result, is planning accordingly for those who are eligible for both flu and COVID-19 vaccines and will ensure appropriate checks are built into patient records, and data systems and that communications are clear about booking COVID-19 vaccine appointments.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish the response to the consultation on Distributing vaccines and treatments for Covid-19 and flu.

The Government hosted a public consultation from 28 August to 18 September on changes to the Human Medicines Regulations to support the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines.

The formal Government response to that consultation can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/distributing-vaccines-and-treatments-for-covid-19-and-flu

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to (a) recruit and (b) train a workforce to administer a covid-19 vaccine safely.

The National Health Service is preparing to recruit people to be trained as COVID-19 vaccinators in support of the national effort to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. We are working with experienced NHS partners to prepare for when a vaccine becomes available to enable the NHS to vaccinate as many people as possible.

Secondary legislation enabling more healthcare workers to administer flu and potential COVID-19 vaccines has been introduced. This means that the NHS can expand the vaccination workforce by recruiting to clinical roles needed to support mass vaccinations in a safe way. Recruitment is focused on those who already have experience in handling vaccinations but may currently work outside of NHS settings, for example, independent nurses or allied health care professionals. We will also use existing schemes such as NHS Bring Back scheme to fill roles. Robust training and supervision will be provided for all those who will be part of the vaccination effort.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to page 34 of the Government's strategy document, Our Plan to Rebuild: the UK Government’s covid-19 recovery strategy, published in May 2020, how community hospitals will be included in the enhancement of step-down services.

Community hospitals continue to play a vital role in providing some individuals who have been discharged from acute hospital with ongoing care and support, as part of the step-down process. We want individuals to be cared for in the place that works best for them. This is usually in their own home, although we know this arrangement is not suitable for all. For those people where home is not appropriate, community hospitals continue to deliver key services that provide individuals with ongoing care and support, often leading to improved outcomes and enabling individuals to achieve their goals. As such, community hospitals will continue to be central to plans around step-down care.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reasons Public Health England has not incorporated in its advice to (a) care homes and (b) general practices (i) Resuscitation Council and (ii) WHO guidance on provision of Level 3 personal protective equipment in settings where cardiac arrest is likely.

The United Kingdom’s Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) guidance continues to recommend the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) for health and social care teams treating COVID-19 patients. It is crucial that everyone that needs it has access to the right protective equipment.

The Department’s, New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG) recently reviewed the evidence and has maintained this position, stating that they do “not consider that the evidence supports chest compressions or defibrillation being procedures that are associated with a significantly increased risk of transmission of acute respiratory infections”. Further information is available at the following link:

https://app.box.com/s/3lkcbxepqixkg4mv640dpvvg978ixjtf/file/657486851975

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the (a) evidence base used (b) authorities consulted by Public Health England in formulating its guidance on the use of PPE in care settings in which cardiac arrest is likely.

The United Kingdom’s Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) guidance continues to recommend the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) for health and social care teams treating COVID-19 patients. It is crucial that everyone that needs it has access to the right protective equipment.

The Department’s, New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG) recently reviewed the evidence and has maintained this position, stating that they do “not consider that the evidence supports chest compressions or defibrillation being procedures that are associated with a significantly increased risk of transmission of acute respiratory infections”. Further information is available at the following link:

https://app.box.com/s/3lkcbxepqixkg4mv640dpvvg978ixjtf/file/657486851975

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether care home staff are permitted without Level 3 PPE to undertake cardiopulmonary resuscitation on (a) residents who have tested positive for covid-19 (b) and residents whose covid-19 status is undetermined .

The United Kingdom’s Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) guidance continues to recommend the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) for health and social care teams treating COVID-19 patients. It is crucial that everyone that needs it has access to the right protective equipment.

The Department’s, New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG) recently reviewed the evidence and has maintained this position, stating that they do “not consider that the evidence supports chest compressions or defibrillation being procedures that are associated with a significantly increased risk of transmission of acute respiratory infections”. Further information is available at the following link:

https://app.box.com/s/3lkcbxepqixkg4mv640dpvvg978ixjtf/file/657486851975

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the relationship between the Islamic Centre of England and the Iranian Government.

The Islamic Centre of England (ICE) and its director, Hojjat al-Islam Seyyed Mousavi, are the official religious representative of Iran's Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, in the UK. The ICE is distinct from the Iranian Embassy in London, which is the official diplomatic representation of the Government of Iran.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has mechanisms to claw back covid-19 support funding from organisations with links to activities that are deemed not compatible with British values.

This Government has provided around £400 billion of direct support, to the economy during this financial year and last, which has helped to safeguard jobs, businesses and public services in the UK. Financial support during the pandemic included job and income support through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, as well as business grants and loans.

The eligibility requirements for these schemes do not include a specific test around the activities of an organisation, nor do they prevent access by organisations that have been censured by the Charity Commission provided they meet the requirements of the schemes.

Across the schemes, the Government has consistently taken steps to protect public money against error, fraud and abuse. Where the recipients of payments or loans are found not to have been entitled to the money they have received, the Government has made provision for relevant powers and mechanisms to allow the money to be recovered and, where appropriate, penalties issued. These mechanisms have already been used to make recoveries and further compliance work across the schemes is ongoing.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what criteria his Department used to screen potential recipients of covid-19 support funding for links to (a) activities not conducive to the public good and (b) activities censured by the Charities Commission.

This Government has provided around £400 billion of direct support, to the economy during this financial year and last, which has helped to safeguard jobs, businesses and public services in the UK. Financial support during the pandemic included job and income support through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, as well as business grants and loans.

The eligibility requirements for these schemes do not include a specific test around the activities of an organisation, nor do they prevent access by organisations that have been censured by the Charity Commission provided they meet the requirements of the schemes.

Across the schemes, the Government has consistently taken steps to protect public money against error, fraud and abuse. Where the recipients of payments or loans are found not to have been entitled to the money they have received, the Government has made provision for relevant powers and mechanisms to allow the money to be recovered and, where appropriate, penalties issued. These mechanisms have already been used to make recoveries and further compliance work across the schemes is ongoing.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans his Department has to audit covid-19 support funding provided to the Islamic Centre of England.

This Government has provided around £400 billion of direct support to the economy during this financial year and last, which has helped to safeguard jobs, businesses and public services in every region and nation of the UK. In doing so, the Government has struck a balance between making sure that support is available to those who need it most, while also protecting public money against error, fraud and abuse.

HM Treasury does not comment on the commercial or financial matters of private firms.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to use 2019-20 tax returns to determine eligibility for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

The Government recognises that taxpayers have faced immense challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic and it has prioritised delivering support to as many people as possible while guarding against the risk of fraud or abuse.

The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) is one of the most generous in the world and has received claims from almost 2.7 million people so far, totalling over £18.5 billion.

The practical issues that prevented the Government from being able to include the newly self-employed in 2019-20 in the SEISS, namely that HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) do not have access to the full set of 2019-20 self-assessment returns needed to verify their eligibility, still remain. The latest year for which HMRC have tax returns for all self-employed individuals is 2018-19.

The SEISS continues to be just one element of a substantial package of support for the self-employed which includes Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support, mortgage holidays, self-isolation support payments and other business support grants.

2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to add dentists to the shortage occupation list.

The independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) last reviewed whether Dental Practitioners should be included on the SOL in 2019, and did not recommend doing so.

Dentists are an eligible occupation to be sponsored under the Skilled Worker route, subject to the rules and requirements of the route being met.

The main benefits of an occupation being on the Shortage Occupation List (SOL) is a lower salary threshold and reduced visa fees. Dentists already receive these benefits through tradeable points and the Health and Care visa (which also exempts them from paying the Immigration Health Surcharge), so there would be little visible benefit in adding them to the SOL.

Following recommendations in their 2020 review the Government have agreed to review the SOL more regularly, the next review is expected to be in 2022. As with all SOL reviews, the MAC will launch a call for evidence and dental stakeholders will be able to provide their input to this process.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to include in the legislative proposals on housing announced in the Queen’s Speech reforms to provide freeholders on private and mixed tenure estates with (a) equivalent rights to leaseholders to challenge the reasonableness of estate rent charges and (b) rights to apply to the First-tier Tribunal to appoint a new manager to manage the provision of services covered by estate rent charges.

The Government is committed to promoting fairness and transparency for homeowners and ensuring that consumers are protected from abuse and poor service. Where people pay estate rent charges it is not appropriate that these homeowners have limited rights to challenge these costs.

That is why the Government intends to legislate to give freehold homeowners who pay estate rent charges the right to challenge their reasonableness and to go to the tribunal to appoint a new management company if necessary.

We will also consider the option of introducing a Right to Manage for residential freeholders once we have considered the Law Commission’s report and recommendations on changes to the Right to Manage for leaseholders.

The Government has brought forward legislation in the Leasehold Reform (Ground Rent) Bill to set ground rents on newly created leases to a genuine ‘peppercorn’ rate of only one peppercorn per year or effectively zero financial value. This will be the first part of seminal two-part legislation to implement reforms in this Parliament.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will list parish councils by (a) reserves held and (b) indebtedness.

This information is not held centrally.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury