Emma Reynolds Portrait

Emma Reynolds

Labour - Former Member for Wolverhampton North East

Emma Reynolds is not a member of any APPGs
6 Former APPG memberships
Best Brexit, Homelessness, Hormone Pregnancy Tests, Key Cities, Obesity, Sikhs
Committee on the Future Relationship with the European Union
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on the Future Relationship with the European Union
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Health and Social Care Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 31st Oct 2016
Shadow Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government
8th May 2015 - 14th Sep 2015
Shadow Minister (Housing)
7th Oct 2013 - 8th May 2015
Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
7th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2013
Foreign Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 2nd Nov 2010


Division Voting information

Emma Reynolds has voted in 1316 divisions, and 4 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Jun 2018 - National Policy Statement: Airports - View Vote Context
Emma Reynolds voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 94 Labour No votes vs 119 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 415 Noes - 119
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Emma Reynolds voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 56 Labour No votes vs 139 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 390
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Emma Reynolds voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 65 Labour Aye votes vs 153 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 397 Noes - 223
11 Sep 2015 - Assisted Dying (No. 2) Bill - View Vote Context
Emma Reynolds voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 73 Labour Aye votes vs 91 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 118 Noes - 330
View All Emma Reynolds Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all Emma Reynolds's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Emma Reynolds

7th May 2019
Emma Reynolds signed this EDM on Wednesday 8th May 2019

FUNDING FORMULA FOR EDUCATION HEALTH AND CARE PLANS

Tabled by: Toby Perkins (Labour - Chesterfield)
That this House notes that the Government's current formula for allocating financial resources to schools includes a requirement that schools themselves have to fund the first £6,000 of the support for the most disadvantaged Special Educational Needs pupils (SEND), those with Education Health and Care plans (EHCP), and that this …
55 signatures
(Most recent: 3 Sep 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 45
Independent: 4
Liberal Democrat: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Conservative: 1
Green Party: 1
The Independent Group for Change: 1
1st May 2019
Emma Reynolds signed this EDM on Tuesday 7th May 2019

ACCESS TO FREE-TO-USE CASH MACHINES

Tabled by: Lord Field of Birkenhead (Crossbench - Birkenhead)
That this House notes the recent risk of a reversal in the movement towards increasing the number of free-to-use cash machines; further notes that free-to-use cash machines are the biggest single aspect of free banking that most affects the poor; believes that the attack on this service should immediately cease; …
56 signatures
(Most recent: 17 Jun 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 30
Conservative: 9
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Independent: 4
Scottish National Party: 4
Crossbench: 2
Non-affiliated: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Emma Reynolds's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Emma Reynolds, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Emma Reynolds has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Emma Reynolds has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Emma Reynolds has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Emma Reynolds has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


477 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
12 Other Department Questions
3rd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment his Department has made of the (a) level of tariffs which UK businesses would operate in the event of the UK leaving the EU and negotiating a free trade deal with the EU equivalent to the Comprehensive Economic and Trade agreement between the EU and Canada and (b) costs of customs checks and rules of origin requirements for UK businesses in the event of the UK leaving the EU; and what the annual value to the UK economy is of the EU's trade agreements with third parties.

At the February European Council, the Government negotiated a new settlement, giving the United Kingdom a special status in a reformed European Union. The Government's position, as set out by the Prime Minister to the House on 22 February, is that the UK will be stronger, safer and better off remaining in a reformed EU.

The document “Alternatives to membership: possible models for the United Kingdom, outside the European Union”, published on 2 March, looks at the potential models for the UK’s relationship with the European Union, including negotiated bilateral agreements, such as the recent EU-Canada Free Trade Agreement. It concludes that such an agreement would bring significantly less advantageous terms for UK trade than those we currently enjoy, with particular issues for UK services losing access to the Single Market.

The estimated value to the UK of EU FTA negotiations that have already been concluded is around £ 2.5 billion.

3rd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how much funding UK universities have been allocated under (a) the EU's 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development, (b) Horizon 2020 and (c) the Erasmus programme; and what estimate of the future level of EU funding to UK universities his Department has made.

The UK received around €7 billion under the EU’s 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development (FP7) and was the second highest recipient amongst Member States. Of this, €4.97 billion was awarded to UK Secondary and Higher Education Establishments. The UK had the top four Secondary and Higher Education Establishments in terms of FP7 funding received between 2007-2013 (Cambridge, Oxford, University College London and Imperial).

Under the current Horizon 2020 programme (2014-2020), UK Secondary and Higher Education Establishments have been awarded €0.89 billion up to the October 2015 release of grant data.

Under the current Erasmus+ programme, provisional figures indicate that UK Higher Education Institutions received a total of €114 million in 2014 and 2015. Approximately 220,000 students have benefitted from the Erasmus Programme since it began.

The Department for Business, Innovation & Skills does not make estimates of future funding to UK participants in these programmes.

3rd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits for the UK economy of the completion of a EU internal energy market.

My Department assesses that the completion of the EU internal energy market would put downward pressure on energy bills; encourage efficient investment in the UK energy sector; and enhance energy security.

22nd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many officials of his Department are (a) responsible for external trade policy, (b) working on policy related to the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership and (c) worked on policy related to the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement.

There are 41 civil servants in my Department primarily working on trade policy. Of these 10 are primarily working on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership. The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement was one of a number of trade negotiations being handled by a team of 5 BIS officials. They are assisted by officials in other Government Departments, notably the Department for International Development and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, as well as by other officials within my Department for whom trade policy is not their primary responsibility.

15th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what the number of businesses was that traded goods internationally through export or import in 2014.

Data on the number of businesses in Great Britain engaging in international trade in goods can be found on the ONS website in the ‘Exporters and Importers in Great Britain, 2014’ release, published on 12 November 2015.

23rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many (a) foreign direct investment projects were developed in the UK which originated from other EU countries in (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15, (b) jobs were created by those projects and (c) jobs were safeguarded by those projects.

Below is a breakdown of all successful foreign direct investment projects from EU countries in 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 together with the estimated number of jobs created and safeguarded, as recorded by UK Trade & Investment.


Number of Inward FDI Projects originating from EU recorded by UKTI


Projects

New Jobs

Safeguarded jobs

2012-13

504

15,399

35,073

2013-14

564

20,432

22,805

2014-15

658

28,250

6,686

Source: UKTI FDI projects database.

13th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what the average (a) export and (b) import tariffs paid by the UK to countries with whom the EU has a Free Trade Agreement was in each of the last five years.

Estimating the average tariffs on UK exports and imports to and from all the countries with which the EU has free trade agreements in each of the last five years would involve a disproportionate cost.

13th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how much funding the UK was allocated from the (a) European Regional Development Fund, (b) European Social Funds, (c) European Agricultural Fund of Guarantee, (d) European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development, (e) European Territorial Cooperation, (f) Youth Employment Initiative and (g) European Maritime and Fisheries Fund in the period from 2010 to 2014.

The information requested for points a, b, d, e, f, and g is set out in the financing plans in the respective programmes for these funds which can be found on gov.uk, gov.scotland and gov.wales.

The information requested for point c can be found on the European Commission and Eur-lex websites.

13th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what estimate he has made of the benefits to UK businesses in the (a) retail, (b) automobile, (c) construction, (d) ICT, (e) financial services and (f) defence sectors of reduced tariff barriers arising from UK membership of the World Trade Organisation.

The Government has not made a specific assessment of the benefits to UK businesses in these sectors as a result of the UK’s membership of the WTO. But the benefits will be substantial as over the 20 years of the WTO average applied tariffs have been cut in half from 15 per cent in 1995 to less than 8 per cent today. And there are now 161 WTO Members comprising 98% of world trade, with the new (post-1995) members contributing 21% of this total. Further benefits are likely from negotiations currently underway: for example the Information Technology Agreement 2 (ITA2) should liberalise tariffs that affect around £12 billion of UK exports and imports.

13th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what estimate he has made of the benefit to the UK economy of the preferential trade agreements the EU has negotiated with countries outside the EU.

The cumulative impact of all concluded, on-going and potential trade negotiations currently being undertaken by the EU could boost UK GDP by over £ 20 billion in the long run.

13th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what estimate he has made of the benefits to the UK economy of (a) the absence of tariff barriers for intra-EU trade and (b) other aspects of the single market.

The EU provides the biggest single market in the world. EU countries trade twice as much with each other as they would without it. The absence of tariffs contributes to this. The single market also brings benefits for consumers. For example, between 2000 and 2006, the cost of making a 10-minute call in the EU fell by an average of 74%, and roaming charges will be abolished completely in 2017. As part of our agenda for EU reform, we want to go further and faster on economic competitiveness including liberalisation of the services sector, trade, and de-regulation.

19th Jun 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many civil servants are working on contingency planning in the event that the UK leaves the EU on 31 October 2019 without a negotiated deal; which Departments those civil servants are employed by; how many have been seconded to work on contingency planning in Departments which are not their principal employer; and how many civil servants were working on such plans in each month since January 2019.

Cabinet Office does not hold this information centrally.

14th Feb 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the European Parliamentary Elections Regulations 2004 as amended by the European Parliamentary Elections (Amendment) Regulations 2009 remain in force.

The European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 (“the 2018 Act”) repeals the underlying pieces of legislation providing for the holding of European Parliamentary elections.

As the UK will cease to be a member of the European Union on 29th March 2019, we will not be taking part in future European Parliamentary elections, including those scheduled to be held from 23rd to 26th May 2019.

The European Parliamentary Elections Etc. (Repeal, Revocation, Amendment and Saving Provisions) (United Kingdom and Gibraltar) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018 were made on 3rd December 2018 under powers in the 2018 Act. These Regulations make further provision as a result of the UK no longer participating in European Parliamentary elections and come into force on the day that the UK leaves the European Union. The European Parliamentary Elections Regulations 2004, as amended by the European Parliamentary (Amendment) Regulations 2009, will be revoked as a result of the provision made by the 2018 Act and by these Regulations.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jan 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many (a) violent crimes and (b) sexual offences were committed in Wolverhampton in each year since 2010.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Nov 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate the Government has made of the number of crimes which go unreported.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Jun 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has made an estimate of the number of non-UK EU citizens resident in the UK before 1 January 1973 who have indefinite leave to remain.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
31st Jan 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to answer Question 123288 asked on 17 January 2018.

I refer my Hon. Friend to the answer to PQ123288 which was given on 1st February 2018.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
31st Jan 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether a crown representative has been appointed to cover Capita.

Meryl Bushell is the current Crown Representative for Capita.

Information about Crown Representatives can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/strategic-suppliers

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
17th Jan 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the Government's policy is on awarding contracts to companies which have issued profit warnings.

The Government’s priority is to ensure the continued delivery of public services, and we have contingency plans in place to ensure this happens. We routinely stress-test contracts to ensure that if one party within a contract fails to deliver, the other parties involved will step in to complete the work.

The majority of public procurement is governed by Public Contracts Regulations. These stipulate that public procurers have to award contracts through fair and open competition, in line with principles of equal treatment, transparency and non-discrimination. Suppliers have to meet certain criteria to be able to bid for public contracts, including a minimum level of financial and economic standing proven through turnover, audited accounts or other financial measures.

Given that a large number of companies issue profit warnings from time to time, it is unrealistic to terminate all business with such a company as this would further undermine chances of company recovery

Once Carillion had made the profit warnings, we took steps to ensure that greater degrees of protection were built into the small number of specific contracts that were awarded after July last year.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
17th Jan 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Cabinet committees and sub-committees he (a) chairs and (b) attends.

The list of Cabinet Committees and Implementation Task Forces, including the membership and terms of reference, are regularly published on Gov.uk. An updated list was published on 1st February 2018. The list can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-cabinet-committees-system-and-list-of-cabinet-committees

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people have died as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning in Wolverhampton in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

5th Jul 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the remit and composition is of the Cabinet Office unit charged with examining the options and possibilities of negotiating the UK's exit from the EU; and if he will make a statement.

The Europe Unit will bring together officials and policy expertise from across the Cabinet Office, Treasury, Foreign Office and BIS. It will be based in the Cabinet Office and report to Cabinet on possible mechanisms for delivering the outcome of the referendum, advising on transitional issues and exploring objectively options for our future relationship with Europe and the rest of the world.


13th Oct 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people are employed by non-British EU companies in (a) the UK and (b) each region.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

13th Oct 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people are employed in (a) the UK and (b) each region by companies (i) with headquarters in the EU and (ii) owned in the EU.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

16th Jun 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what (a) national and (b) local match rates between the electoral register and government databases were used in the transition towards Individual Electoral Registration (i) overall and (ii) in each local authority and parliamentary constituency.

The Cabinet Office published results in November 2014 of the nationwide data matching process referred to as ‘confirmation’ between government records and local data with electoral registers during the transition to Individual Electoral Registration.

The report is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/using-data-matching-to-confirm-electors-in-great-britain

16th Jun 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the (a) national and (b) local match system used in the transition to Individual Electoral Registration.

The Cabinet Office published results in November 2014 of the nationwide data matching process referred to as ‘confirmation’ between government records and local data with electoral registers during the transition to Individual Electoral Registration.

The report is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/using-data-matching-to-confirm-electors-in-great-britain

16th Jun 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the effect on the number of people on the electoral register of the transition to Individual Electoral Registration.

The Electoral Commission published their analysis of the electoral registers used for the elections on 7 May 2015. The full report can be found at:

http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/190464/IER-June-report.pdf

16th Jun 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what consideration the Government has given to continuing to use the matching system between the electoral register and Government databases that was used in the transition towards Individual Electoral Registration.

The matching of electoral registers against Government and local authority data, referred to as ‘confirmation,’ was a one off exercise to help simplify the change to Individual Electoral Registration (IER). It resulted in 87% of existing electors being automatically transferred to the new registers under IER without needing to take any action. Data matching continues to form an important part of the system for voter registration, in verifying new applications, but also locally in identifying and verifying applications from eligible electors. We will keep under review the scope for data to further improve voter registration.

25th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to oblige banks and building societies to sign an agreement with the Post Office to enable customers to withdraw money from their bank accounts at their local post office.

The Government recognises the critical role that post offices play in communities and for small businesses across the UK. This is why the Government committed to safeguard the post office network and protect existing rural services. The overall number of post offices across the UK remains at its most stable in decades with over 11,600 branches thanks to significant Government investment of over £2 billion since 2010.

On 8th October 2019 the Post Office announced a new Banking Framework agreement with 28 UK banks to ensure that millions of their customers continue to have national, free access to everyday banking services. Signing up to this framework was a commercial decision for each bank to make, as banks and building societies have a commercial right to decide. ​ We are pleased that as of 25 October 2019 all 28 high street banks signed up in full. This will ensure that communities across the UK, in particular the elderly and vulnerable, have access to withdraw cash.

2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate she has made of the number of smart meters that have been replaced as a result of customers switching energy suppliers in the last 12 months; and if she will make a statement.

Smart meters continue to record energy consumption accurately when a consumer switches energy supplier, even when the new energy supplier is temporarily unable to operate the meter in smart mode. Smart meters are rarely replaced when a consumer switches energy supplier. Of the total number of smart meters installed in Great Britain as of the end of 2018, less than 0.4% were replaced in the preceding 12 months following a consumer switch.

Smart meters will give households the information to allow them to be more active consumers and more easily act upon poor service or expensive tariffs, and in time make switching suppliers easier and faster.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that researchers in the UK have access to future EU research funding framework programmes after the UK leaves the EU.

The UK has a long history of being an important collaborator with and contributor to EU Framework Programmes, including the current Research and Innovation Programme, Horizon 2020.

As we move beyond the current programme, the Government remains committed to creating mutually beneficial opportunities for collaboration with European and international partners. The UK has played a constructive role in the development of the next EU R&I Framework Programme, Horizon Europe, and it is our preference to associate to Horizon Europe if the conditions are right. The Programme must be fully open to third countries and represent value for money for the UK. As a responsible Government, we are also developing a credible and ambitious alternative UK offer.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
13th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the UK leaving the EU without a deal on the ability of UK-based (a) automotive and (b) aerospace companies to source parts from the EU 27 in a timely manner.

Both the UK and the EU share a strong commercial interest in preserving the integrated supply chains of the aerospace and automotive sectors, including those that support the Just in Time processes that ensure the UK's manufacturing plants remain competitive.

The UK has sought to work constructively with the EU to get the best deal for business. The Political Declaration sets out an ambitious plan for a new free trade area for goods, including no tariffs, with ambitious customs arrangements and deep regulatory cooperation. This will be the first such agreement between an advanced economy and the EU, and would ensure parts can be sourced from the EU in a timely manner. The only way to ensure that the UK's automotive and aerospace industries can remain competitive is to agree a deal that provides for tariff free trade and protected access to these vital supply chains.

BEIS Ministers and officials meet regularly with industry through the Automotive Council and the Aerospace Growth Partnership. Through this engagement we encourage companies to engage proactively with their supply chain to prepare for potential no deal scenarios. We are aware that companies in both sectors are stockpiling essential parts to try and minimise disruption in a no deal scenario.

21st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent (a) discussions and (b) meetings (i) he, (ii) Ministers of his Department and (iii) officials of his Department have had with trade unions representing employees of Jaguar Land Rover.

My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and I met with Unite the Union alongside MPs on 10 January to discuss Jaguar Land Rover. The Secretary of State also met with trade unions on 14 January as part of a discussion regarding Jaguar Land Rover and its importance to the local and national economy, alongside the company, local MPs and other representatives from the Midlands and the North West. I also met with Unite the Union and JLR CEO at the last Auto Council on 15 November. At each of these meetings, Departmental officials were also present.

The recent job losses announced by Jaguar Land Rover are concerning for the affected employees and we will do all we can to support them. We are working closely with the company to ensure that their plans to streamline the business can safeguard a bright future for them in the UK, including through the Jaguar Land Rover Development Partnership.

We are determined to ensure that the UK continues to be one of the most competitive locations in the world for automotive and other advanced manufacturing.

15th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to deal with the use of inaccurate classification of self-employment by companies.

The Government is committed to providing greater clarity for businesses and individuals on employment status. As Matthew Taylor identified in his review, this is a complex issue and is one of the major challenges for public policy.

We are considering how best to achieve change that works for all. We received over 160 detailed responses to the Employment Status Consultation. We are currently analysing the responses and will respond in due course.

10th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with Amazon on working conditions of Amazon employees.

My rt. hon. Friend the Prime Minister commissioned the Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices to consider modern working practices and whether they need to change to keep pace with modern business models. In our response to the review, we committed to firm action and future legislation where appropriate. We are currently analysing the responses and will respond in due course.

BEIS Ministers regularly engage with businesses in the the retail sector, including Amazon, to discuss a range of issues including quality of work.

10th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made an estimate of the number of people who will see a reduction in their fuel bills as a result of the price cap in the Wolverhampton North East constituency.

The Department collects tariff data on households based on the 14 geographical, Public Electricity Suppliers regions. As such the department cannot provide estimates at a lower, local level.

Parliament has passed legislation to introduce the energy price cap, protecting up to 11 million households on standard variable and default tariffs. Ofgem are consulting on a price cap, which will save some consumers up to £138.

27th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the total number of jobs in the UK in the supply chains of the (a) aerospace sector and (b) automotive sector.

Based on employment data and employment multipliers supplied by the Office for National Statistics we estimate the following number of direct jobs in the automotive and aerospace sectors themselves and additionally the number of indirect jobs in their respective UK supply chains in 2017.

We define supply chain jobs as those in other areas of the UK economy supported by the demand created by domestic purchases of goods and services made by the sector in question.

Direct jobs 2017 (‘000s)

Indirect jobs 2017 (‘000s)

Aerospace

121

153

Automotive

179

269

Sources: ONS Employee Jobs and Self-Employed Jobs, ONS Employment Multipliers

27th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has undertaken an impact assessment of the effect of the UK leaving the EU on WTO terms on the aerospace and automotive sectors.

The Government is undertaking a wide range of ongoing analysis in support of our EU exit negotiations and preparations. We continue to engage with businesses and industry bodies from all sectors of the economy, and all regions and nations of the UK, in order to inform our negotiations. However, it is not standard practice to provide a running commentary on ongoing analysis. In addition, ministers have a specific responsibility, which Parliament has endorsed, not to release information that would undermine our negotiating position.

9th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with representatives of Tata Steel on its announcement on 8 May 2018 that it plans to sell its Engineering Steels Service Centre in Wolverhampton.

Ministers and officials regularly engage with Tata to discuss a range of issues concerning the steel sector.

With regards to their announcement on the 8th May, Tata Steel have been clear that they will act as a responsible seller. The UK steel industry sits entirely within the private sector, and whilst the sale of its Engineering Steels Service Centre in Wolverhampton is a commercial decision for Tata, we will continue to work closely with them, the unions, and any new partners.

9th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with trade unions representing Tata Steel employees on Tata Steel's announcement on 8 May 2018 that it plans to sell its Engineering Steels Service Centre in Wolverhampton.

Ministers and officials regularly engage with trade unions to discuss a range of issues concerning the steel sector.

With regards to their announcement on the 8th May, Tata Steel have been clear that they will act as a responsible seller. The UK steel industry sits entirely within the private sector, and whilst the sale of its Engineering Steels Service Centre in Wolverhampton is a commercial decision for Tata, we will continue to work closely with them, the unions, and any new partners.

1st Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with companies inheriting contracts from Carillion on the extension of TUPE rights to Carillion employees.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 28th February 2018 to Question UIN 129511.

23rd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he expects the (a) Insolvency Service's investigation into the conduct of Carillion's directors and (b) Financial Reporting Council's investigation into the preparation of Carillion’s accounts to conclude; whether he has received any provisional conclusions; and if he will make a statement.

For the official receiver, the amount of time an investigation takes is dependent on the size and complexity of the business. As this is a large and complex case, it is not possible at this early stage to specify a timeframe. Should the official receiver find any evidence of director misconduct this would be referred to the Insolvency Service for further investigation. The Secretary of State has not received any provisional conclusions from the investigation, nor would he expect to do so from either the official receiver or the insolvency service. Investigations by the official receiver and the insolvency service are conducted separately from Ministers, as is the making of decisions arising from investigations on any possible prosecution or director’s disqualification.

For the Financial Reporting Council, the timing of the investigation depends on the size and complexity of the issues to be considered, but will be taken forward as quickly as possible. At the conclusion of an investigation, the matter may be referred to an independent tribunal which the FRC would convene for the purpose of hearing the case and determining final sanction.

23rd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with companies inheriting contracts from Carillion on the extension of TUPE rights to Carillion employees; and if he will make a statement.

Some elements of TUPE do not apply in liquidation, specifically the continuity of service to those employees who transfer to new employers.

Importing employers may well decide to offer terms to transferring employees which recognise existing employment rights; that is a matter for the importing employer, though the Government has the aspiration to ensure transferred employees are no worse off. The Official Receiver is doing all he can to facilitate this wherever possible.

17th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate the Government has made of the number of companies affected by the liquidation of Carillion; and what steps the Government plans to take to minimise job losses at those companies.

At this stage in the liquidation process it is far too soon for the Liquidator to have gathered in full details of the company’s debts and creditors. The Liquidation process for such a complex and interconnected group of companies will take some time. The Official Receiver and his Special Managers have access to the records of the company and will be analysing these as quickly as possible.

We have taken steps to minimise job losses by enacting robust contingency plans to mitigate the impact of Carillion’s insolvency on public services and the individuals employed by the company. PWC are acting as Special Manager to the Official Receiver to ensure that we can continue to provide public services until the liquidation is complete, this means people providing these services can continue to go to work and be confident that they will get paid.

We met with and sought assurance from major high street lenders that they will not penalise small businesses affected by Carillion’s liquidation. Lenders are contacting customers and, where appropriate, are putting in place emergency measures, including overdraft extensions, payment holidays and fee waivers to ensure those facing short term issues can be helped to stay on track.

Government undertook to fund for 48 hours the costs of Carillion continuing to deliver purely private contracts in order to give private sector contractors to determine whether they want to pay for continuation of services from Carillion in liquidation while they move their contracts to another firm.

Between 15 and 16 January all of the company’s private sector service customers have been contacted by the Official Receiver to determine their ongoing needs. Over 90% of these customers have indicated that they want Carillion to continue providing services in the interim until new suppliers can be found and will provide funding which enables the Official Receiver to retain the employees working on those contracts.

My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy chaired the first meeting on 18 January of a taskforce to advise on the impact on small businesses and employees affected by Carillion insolvency. It will act as a means for government to communicate to those affected by Carillion’s liquidation, assess wider economic impacts and consider how to ensure that employees are provided with the right support to maximise rapid re-employment.

Information is published online by the Insolvency Service for employees, creditors and suppliers affected and seeking advice. This can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/carillion-declares-insolvency-information-for-employees-creditors-and-suppliers.

17th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs at risk in Carillion's supply chain.

The nature of Carillion business means that it sub-contracts significant proportions of its work, with the potential for those sub-contractors to sub-contract out further elements. The complexity of the contracting structure is such that it is not possible for Government at this stage in the liquidation process to have an estimate of the number of jobs at risk in Carillion’s supply chain.

30th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which measures in the industrial strategy will help to reduce the rate of unemployment in the West Midlands.

The Government’s Industrial Strategy sets out a long term plan to boost the productivity and earning power of people throughout the UK. It also builds on previous reforms to allow local leaders to focus where they will have the greatest economic impact. We will agree Local Industrial Strategies that build on local strengths and deliver on economic opportunities. These will be long-term, evidence-based, and aligned to the national Industrial Strategy.

The Government is pleased to have agreed a further devolution package with the West Midlands: the detail of this deal demonstrates the Government’s commitment to mayoral devolution, the Midlands Engine and promoting local economic growth.

Key measures to support employment include:

  • Joint work to establish one of the first Skills Advisory Panels – a new partnership between the West Midlands Combined Authority, local employers, post-16 skills providers and central government which will bring together data and intelligence on local labour market demand and influence skills provision, including the implementation of T-level qualifications in the local area.

  • A career learning pilot testing new approaches to helping adults to upskill and reskill throughout their working lives.

    In March 2017 we announced a flagship £20million Midlands Skills Challenge to improve skills across the Midlands. This includes:

  • £11 million to provide additional Work Coaches in order to deliver targeted employment support to unemployed people across Birmingham, Solihull and Black Country, with the aim of supporting claimants furthest from the labour market and improve the employment rate in these areas.

  • And £2 million to offer English-language training to people in the Midlands, whose lack of ability to speak English is holding them back from accessing employment.

Finally, in the three months ending September 2017, compared to the same period in 2010, the unemployment rate in the West Midlands fell from 9.0% to 5.7%, a decrease of 3.3 percentage points, meaning 87,000 fewer people unemployed (Labour Force Survey, November 2017).

12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the Government's policy is on executive pay being approved by an annual vote of shareholders.

Remuneration policies of quoted companies must be put to a binding shareholder vote at least once every three years. A binding shareholder vote is required to approve any Directors’ remuneration that falls outside the scope of the approved remuneration policy.

The annual Directors Remuneration Report on implementation of the remuneration policy is subject to an advisory shareholder vote. If this vote is lost, a company must put a new remuneration policy to a binding shareholder vote within twelve months.

The Government has no current plans to change these existing shareholder voting provisions.

12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the Government plans to introduce the register on shareholder voting announced by the Prime Minister on 27 August 2017; and whether his Department has undertaken an impact assessment of the number of companies it expects to be placed on that register.

The Government’s response to the Corporate Governance Reform green paper consultation invited The Investment Association to implement its proposal to establish a public register of quoted companies encountering shareholder opposition of 20% or more to executive pay and other resolutions. The Investment Association is working to establish the register by the end of the year and the number of companies included will be confirmed at that time.

13th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government has plans to increase the national living wage for apprentices above £3.50 per hour.

The independent Low Pay Commission (LPC) review and recommend the National Minimum Wage rates each year, following extensive consultation and analysis. Their recommendations for 2018 will be provided to the Government in autumn, and Ministers will announce the rates, including the apprentice rate, to apply from April 2018 following that.

10th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he or his officials have had with UK businesses on the consequences on them of leaving the EU Customs Union.

My Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and his officials have on-going discussions with businesses operating in multiple sectors to understand their views on a range of issues following the referendum.

10th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of leaving the EU Customs Union on (a) businesses and (b) complex supply chains.

The Department is currently working closely with the Department for Exiting the EU to understand the impacts that withdrawal from the EU will have on businesses, consumers and other economic actors. As my Rt Hon Friend the Prime Minister has said we will work hard to get the best deal for Britain.

10th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the costs to UK businesses of being outside the common external tariff of the EU.

The Department is currently working closely with the Department for Exiting the EU to understand the impacts that withdrawal from the EU will have on businesses, consumers and other economic actors. As my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister has said we will work hard to get the best deal for Britain.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with Amazon on working conditions of Amazon employees.

My rt. hon. Friend the Prime Minister commissioned the Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices to consider modern working practices and whether they need to change to keep pace with modern business models. In our response to the review, we committed to firm action and future legislation where appropriate. We are currently analysing the responses and will respond in due course.

BEIS Ministers regularly engage with businesses in the the retail sector, including Amazon, to discuss a range of issues including quality of work.

4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department (a) allocates funding and (b) issues guidance to civic organisations on blue plaques.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to close the gender pay gap in sport; and if he will make a statement.

It is important that women and men are recognised and paid equally for doing the same work. I welcome the positive step that has been taken to ensure that all companies in Great Britain with more than 250 employees are required to report their gender pay gap to the Government Equalities Office.

We know there is some work to do to narrow the gender pay gap across the sport sector. Sport England’s workforce strategy for England, “Working in an Active Nation”, highlights the commitment to achieving higher gender diversity in leadership roles on boards in sport. Furthermore the UK Sport and Sport England Code for Sports Governance, which is mandatory and applies to any organisation seeking funding from Sport England or UK Sport, includes a target of at least 30% gender diversity on boards.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps the Government is taking to retain the free TV Licence for people over 75.

The government knows people across the country value television as a way to stay connected with the world and we that is why we have guaranteed the over 75 licence fee concession until June 2020. The BBC will take on responsibility for free licences for the over-75s from 2020 and it is right that it has consulted the public before making any decisions. We’ve been clear that we would want and expect it to continue with this important concession.

11th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the benefits to the West Midlands economy of Channel 4 relocating to Wolverhampton; what his policy is on the location of Channel 4; and if he will make a statement.

We received a number of submissions to the Channel 4 regional consultation from individuals and local authorities across the UK. No decisions have been taken. The government is working with Channel 4 on how it can best increase its regional impact, and we will set out next steps in due course.

23rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what plans the Government has to produce a strategy to better limit the maximum stakes for online gambling.

The Gambling (Licensing and Advertising Act) 2014 brought offshore online gambling operators within scope of the Gambling Commission’s regulatory regime for the first time.

Since then, the Commission has introduced a number of additional licence conditions in relation to online. These new requirements include providing easily accessible facilities for consumers to impose their own limits, which can include limits on deposit, spend and losses, and over different time durations.

In addition, a new multi-operator online self-exclusion scheme, which will allow individuals to simultaneously self exclude from all online gambling sites, will be introduced by the industry later this year.

We keep the regulation of online gambling under review and will not hesitate to take action if it is needed to protect people from gambling-related harm.

23rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to ensure that under-age people are not able to gamble online.

The protection of children from being harmed or exploited by gambling is one of the core objectives of the Gambling Act 2005.

Gambling Commission licence conditions ensure strict controls are in place to prevent children from accessing gambling online. Where there is a failure to prevent underage gambling, the Gambling Commission will take regulatory and/or criminal action.

Government will not hesitate to take action if it is needed to protect young people from gambling-related harm.

4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeships have been created in Wolverhampton North East constituency under the apprenticeship levy in each of the last 12 months.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of (a) the adequacy of support available to autistic children sitting exams for Ofqual regulated qualifications in (i) secondary schools and (ii) sixth form colleges and (b) whether autistic children are disadvantaged by the exams set for Ofqual regulated qualifications; and what discussions his Department has had with (A) Ofqual and (B) examination boards on designing exams that are better suited to the needs of autistic children.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

8th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education,how many apprenticeships have been created in each month since the introduction of the apprenticeship levy in Wolverhampton North East constituency.

The attached table provides figures for apprenticeship starts for each month since May 2017, when significant structural changes to the apprenticeship funding system were implemented following the introduction of the apprenticeship levy and apprenticeship service.

The profile of apprenticeship starts changed significantly both in the run-up to the introduction of the levy and subsequently. Care should be taken when comparing individual months between academic years as they are unlikely to provide a meaningful year-on-year trend. Numbers of reported starts are likely to change as the reforms to apprenticeship funding continue to bed in and employers engage with the new system.

8th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) primary and (b) secondary pupils received free school meals in Wolverhampton North East constituency in each year since 2010.

The number of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals (FSM) in England is published in the annual ‘Schools, pupils and their characteristics’ statistical release. This information can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2018.

Information for earlier years (from 2010 onwards) can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-school-and-pupil-numbers.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
8th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many further education colleges in the West Midlands region have closed due to insolvency in each year since 2010.

No further education college in the West Midlands region has closed due to insolvency since 2010 to 9 April 2019.

8th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many further education providers are operating in the West Midlands; and how such providers there were in each year since 2010.

The number of learners participating at further education (FE) providers is published in the FE data library, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/fe-data-library. The attached table provides the number of FE providers in the West Midlands region where learners have been participating in some form of FE provision from the 2010/11 academic year onwards. The attachment also includes the number of learners studying at general FE colleges in England and the West Midlands from the 2010/11 academic year onwards, broken down into age groups.

6th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to publish its response to the school exclusions review call for evidence; and what steps his Department plans to take in response to that call for evidence.

In March 2018, the Government launched an externally led review of exclusions practice, led by Edward Timpson CBE. The review is exploring how head teachers use exclusion, and why pupils with particular characteristics are more likely to be excluded from school.

The review has gathered substantial evidence, including over 900 submissions to the call for evidence. Edward Timpson has also chaired a series of roundtables and the review has met with over 100 organisations and individuals, including schools, local authorities, parents and children.

The review, along with the Government response, will be published in due course.

13th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much money his Department estimates is dormant in apprenticeship levy accounts.

Employers who pay the apprenticeship levy are able to create an apprenticeship service account to access levy funds, which will be held for 2 years after entering their account. We apply a 24-month expiry period on funds after they enter an account to encourage employers to plan and spend funds in good time. Any unspent funds from apprenticeship service accounts after the 24-month expiry period will be used to pay for apprenticeship training for non-levy paying employers. We do not therefore consider funds held in apprenticeships service accounts to be ‘dormant’.

Spending on the apprenticeship programme is demand-led. Employers choose which apprenticeships they offer and at what level, how many apprenticeships to offer and when to offer them in order to meet their current and future skills needs. We do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will need or want to use all the funds in their accounts. However, any unspent funds are used to support existing apprenticeship learners and levy-paying employers who spend more than the funds available in their accounts and to fund training with employers that do not pay the levy.

13th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeships have been created in Wolverhampton North East (a) in each of the twelve months before the introduction of the apprenticeship levy and (b) in each month since the levy was introduced.

The attached table shows the figures for apprenticeship starts for Wolverhampton North East constituency for each month by academic year from 2015/16 to 2018/19 (quarter 1 reported to date).

In May 2017, there were significant structural changes to the apprenticeship funding system, including the introduction of the apprenticeship levy and apprenticeship service. The profile of apprenticeship starts changed significantly, both in the run-up to the introduction of the levy and subsequently. Care should be taken when comparing individual months with previous years as they are unlikely to provide a meaningful year-on-year trend. Numbers of reported starts are likely to change as the reforms to apprenticeship funding continue to bed in and employers engage with the new system.

The information requested is not held centrally regarding the proportion of levy-paying firms that have taken on apprentices. However, the department holds information on the number of apprenticeship service accounts (ASAs) registered. As of 31 December 2018, there were 16,100 ASAs registered on the apprenticeship service.

Since the introduction of the levy, 268,500 levy-supported starts have been recorded for England. Levy-supported learners are those supported by levy-paying organisations using at least £1 of their own levy funds. For context, there have been 555,800 total starts for England since the levy (from quarter 4 of 2016/17 to quarter 1 of 2018/19).

In addition, in January 2018, we published that 91.7 percent of those who had PAYE schemes with apprenticeship levy declarations in England of over £150,000 had registered on the apprenticeship service.

13th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of apprenticeship levy-paying employers have hired apprentices.

The attached table shows the figures for apprenticeship starts for Wolverhampton North East constituency for each month by academic year from 2015/16 to 2018/19 (quarter 1 reported to date).

In May 2017, there were significant structural changes to the apprenticeship funding system, including the introduction of the apprenticeship levy and apprenticeship service. The profile of apprenticeship starts changed significantly, both in the run-up to the introduction of the levy and subsequently. Care should be taken when comparing individual months with previous years as they are unlikely to provide a meaningful year-on-year trend. Numbers of reported starts are likely to change as the reforms to apprenticeship funding continue to bed in and employers engage with the new system.

The information requested is not held centrally regarding the proportion of levy-paying firms that have taken on apprentices. However, the department holds information on the number of apprenticeship service accounts (ASAs) registered. As of 31 December 2018, there were 16,100 ASAs registered on the apprenticeship service.

Since the introduction of the levy, 268,500 levy-supported starts have been recorded for England. Levy-supported learners are those supported by levy-paying organisations using at least £1 of their own levy funds. For context, there have been 555,800 total starts for England since the levy (from quarter 4 of 2016/17 to quarter 1 of 2018/19).

In addition, in January 2018, we published that 91.7 percent of those who had PAYE schemes with apprenticeship levy declarations in England of over £150,000 had registered on the apprenticeship service.

9th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his Department's policy is on the collection of payments for (a) ordinary student loans and (b) student maintenance loans from recipients of universal credit; and if he will make a statement.

The repayment of student loans is governed by the Education (Student Loans) (Repayment) Regulations 2009 (as amended).

Borrowers, whether in receipt of universal credit or not, do not start making repayments to their student loans until they earn above the relevant repayment threshold. Once earning over the repayment threshold, the amount a borrower will repay each month is linked to their income, not to the amount borrowed or to the rate of interest.

Further information about repaying student loans can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/repaying-your-student-loan.

9th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many approved childcare providers currently offer 30 hours of free childcare a week in Wolverhampton North East constituency.

The information requested is not held centrally. Specifically, information is not held at constituency level.

On 28 June 2018, we published data which indicated that the number of childcare providers offering 30 hours free childcare in Wolverhampton was 80. This information can be found in Table 23LA of the ‘Education provision: children under 5 years of age, January 2018’ document: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/education-provision-children-under-5-years-of-age-january-2018.



Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
9th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many approved childcare providers were located in Wolverhampton North East constituency in each of the last seven years for which data are available.

This is a matter for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
23rd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of apprenticeships have been created in each month since the introduction of the apprenticeship levy in Wolverhampton North East Constituency.

The attached table in Annex A provides the figures for apprenticeship starts in Wolverhampton North East constituency for each month since changes were made to apprenticeship funding from May 2017, following the introduction of the levy.

15th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to publish a response to his Department's call for evidence on home education.

The call for evidence closed on 2 July 2018 and responses are still being analysed. A formal government response document will be published in due course.

10th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has carried out an assessment of the potential effect of the end of transitional funding on the number of maintained nursery schools in England.

Maintained nursery schools (MNS) make an important contribution to improving the lives of some of our most disadvantaged children. In recognition of the costs that MNS experience over and above other providers, we are providing supplementary funding - additional to funding received under the Early Years National Funding Formula (EYNFF), of around £60 million a year to enable local authorities to protect MNS pre-EYNFF funding levels at least until 2019-20.

Decisions about what happens after that will be taken as part of the next Spending Review and informed by research we are carrying out on the value that MNS offer.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeships have been funded by the apprenticeship levy in the Wolverhampton local authority area in the last three financial years; and how many apprenticeships in that area his Department estimates will be funded by the apprenticeship levy (a) 2017-18 and (b) 2018-19.

The apprenticeship levy did not come into effect until April 2017 and so there were no levy-supported apprenticeship starts before that date.

The table attached sets out the overall number of apprenticeship starts where the learner’s home postcode is in the Wolverhampton local authority (LA) area, and provides the number of these that were levy-supported since April 2017. Please note that 2016/17 figures for all apprenticeship starts are full year figures and the 2016/17 levy-supported starts represent just 2016/17 quarter 4; this means that these are not comparable as they represent different timeframes.

The apprenticeship levy is collected centrally by HM Treasury and future availability and location of apprenticeships is dependent on where employers choose to recruit or offer apprenticeship opportunities. We do not therefore hold data on future delivery in the Wolverhampton LA area.

23rd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate he has made of the number of apprentices employed by Carillion who are yet to find alternative apprenticeship provision.

The government’s priority is to minimise disruption to apprentices’ and is intent on finding new employers for the apprentices that affected by the liquidation of Carillion.

The remaining apprentices who are yet to be placed, fall into one of three cohorts.

There are approximately 125 apprentices actively engaged in the matching / interview process. There are approximately 180 apprentices who have now achieved their apprenticeship or have left during the transition to Construction Industry Training Board (CITB).

225 apprentices have received multiple communications, however they have chosen not to respond. They have been issued with a final letter, which states that if they do not engage, CITB will notify PwC that they are not seeking alternative provision or employment.

CITB have recently launched a targeted employer campaign, with an intent to secure employment placements for learners who we’ve been unable to yet match with employment during the process, due to their geographical area of learning. This has resulted in an increasing number of employer vacancies, which CITB are actively pursuing in order to place more apprentices.

On Monday 5 March, the Official Receiver published a web update on employment within the Carillion group, which can be found at: https:https://www.gov.uk/government/news/carillion-official-receivers-update--3.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number children of universal credit recipients in Wolverhampton North East who (a) will and (b) will not qualify for free school meals.

The Department for Education does not hold information on the specific qualifying benefit that determines free school meal eligibility for individual pupils. We do not hold future estimates broken down by benefit type or constituency.

The department publishes information on free school meal eligibility in the statistical first release: ‘Schools, pupils and their characteristics’. This is published at national and local authority level, and the latest data is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2017.

Under our proposed criteria for free school meals under Universal Credit, we estimate that by 2022 around 50,000 more children in England will benefit from a free school meal compared to the previous benefits system.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
12th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprentices are funded in the Wolverhampton local authority area through the apprenticeship levy; and how many apprenticeships in the Wolverhampton local authority area the Government expects will be funded by the apprenticeship levy, in financial year (a) 2017-18 and (b) 2018-19.

The number of apprenticeship starts is published as part of the further education and skills statistical first release. Apprenticeship starts broken down by geographical region and local authority are available in the further education data library:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/624428/apprenticeships-geography-data-tool-starts-v1.xlsm.

Currently, data on apprenticeship starts is only available reported to the end of April 2017, before the apprenticeship levy was introduced. The statistical first release will publish apprenticeship starts supported through the levy in the October release on 12 October 2017.

Apprenticeships are jobs and the volume and mix of apprenticeships will depend on the decisions employers make. The department has made estimates of the overall numbers of apprenticeships in future years but does not have breakdowns by local authorities.

Data on the number of accounts registered on the apprenticeship service and the number of commitments made have been published as part of the statistical first release collection:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/further-education-and-skills-statistical-first-release-sfr.

12th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her most recent estimate is of the number of primary school places required in Wolverhampton.

Local authorities are responsible for ensuring there are sufficient school places for pupils. The Department collects pupil forecasts and school capacities from each local authority through the annual school capacity survey (SCAP). This data is used to allocate capital funding to local authorities to help them provide sufficient school places where they are needed. The Department’s Pupil Place Planning team then work with local authorities to determine that those places are in fact being created.

The capacity and forecast data are published on an annual basis, giving local authority and regional totals, through the SCAP tables. From the latest published data giving the position at May 2016, Wolverhampton Local Authority had 24,296 places at primary schools and 22,172 pupils on roll at primary schools. Further information can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-capacity-academic-year-2015-to-2016.

The Department also publishes school place scorecards to show the challenges that local authorities are facing, together with the progress that they are making in providing sufficient good quality school places. The latest published scorecards show that an estimated 200 primary places are needed in Wolverhampton Local Authority to meet demand in 2018/19. This figure is based on demand in separate planning areas within the local authority. The scorecards, including full details of the calculation, can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-authority-school-places-scorecards-2016.

12th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans the Government has to expand the number of primary school places in Wolverhampton.

Local authorities are responsible for planning and securing sufficient school places in their area, and supporting them in doing so is one of this Government’s top priorities. Wolverhampton has received £19 million for new places between 2011 and 2017 and has been allocated a further £6 million for 2017 to 2020. In summer 2016, the City of Wolverhampton Council reported that they had firm plans in place to provide 555 primary school places by September 2018.

12th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprentices were from below average income households in (a) England, (b) West Midlands and (c) Wolverhampton in each of the last three years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

The department does not currently hold information which is specific to the breakdown of apprentices by their household income by region.

12th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many of the 200,000 new public sector apprenticeships announced by her Department on 20 January 2017 have been filled; and how many of those are based in the (a) West Midlands and (b) City of Wolverhampton.

Figures on the number of public sector apprenticeships are not available. Public sector bodies in scope of the public sector apprenticeships target are required annually to publish and send to the Department for Education their progress towards the target.

The first reports (covering the period 2017/18) will be due by 30 September 2018.

8th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of regulations on sprinklers in schools.

The Government is taking the impact from the tragic Grenfell Tower fire very seriously. Building owners across the public sector estate, including schools, have been contacted to ensure any risks are managed and dealt with appropriately and promptly.

All schools must have a mandatory Fire Risk Assessment and all new schools undergo an additional check while being designed. Where sprinklers are necessary to keep staff and students safe, or where they are required under a local authority planning policy, they are fitted. There is not and has never been a national requirement for sprinklers to be fitted in all new or existing schools.

All schools have to follow strict fire safety regulations designed to ensure they are as safe as possible and well prepared in the event of a fire. They must have robust plans to follow, conduct regular fire drills, and typically have multiple exit routes.

The Government has announced an independent review of building regulations and fire safety to be led by Dame Judith Hackitt. Alongside the rest of Government, the Department will take forward any findings from the public inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire and ensure any recommendations for schools are implemented.

6th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information her Department holds on (a) primary schools, (b) secondary schools and (c) further education colleges which are clad in flammable substances.

The Government is taking the impact from the tragic Grenfell Tower fire very seriously. Building owners across the public sector estate have been contacted to ensure any risks are managed and dealt with appropriately and promptly. As set out in our anouncement of 13 July, we have contacted all bodies responsible for fire safety – including in schools and FE colleges - instructing them to carry out checks to identify any buildings which may require further investigation.

Two schools to date – one a secondary school, one a primary special school - where Aluminium Composite Material (ACM) cladding has been identified and tested, have been alerted to the results. Five FE colleges have been identified as having ACM cladding – in one case, the building affected is shared with a university.

All these school and college buildings have been inspected by the Fire and Rescue Service - who confirmed appropriate measures are in place to mitigate the risks from potential fire. The buildings have now been declared safe for use. We are continuing to work closely with the schools concerned to support them and ensure all the necessary steps are taken to ensure the continued safety of the buildings.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate she has made of the number of nursery school places in Wolverhampton North East constituency.

Local authorities are required to report annually to elected council members on how they are meeting their duty to secure sufficient childcare and early education places, and to make this report available and accessible to parents. The Department does not hold local authority or constituency level estimates of the number of places in local authority maintained nursery schools. However, the number of pupils attending local authority maintained nurseries can be found in the statistical first release and underlying data published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2016

Local authority and regional tables: SFR20/2016 (Table 7b) indicates that 686 pupils were registered as attending local authority maintained nursery schools in Wolverhampton in 2016.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much the Government has spent on nursery education in Wolverhampton North East constituency in each of the last seven years; and how much it plans to spend on such education in that constituency in the financial year 2017-18.

Funding for the free early years entitlements is allocated on a local authority basis. The early years funding allocation for Wolverhampton local authority can be found below for the following financial years:

2013-14:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-2013-to-2014

2014-15:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-2014-to-2015

2015-16:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2015-to-2016

2016-17 (provisional allocation):

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2016-to-2017

2017-18 (indicative allocation):

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2017-to-2018

Prior to 2013-14, early years local authority funding allocations were not separately identified within the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG). Instead, they were part of the total DSG allocated to each local authority. Early years allocations prior to 2013-14 are not therefore available.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will estimate how much of the planned £55 million supplementary funding for maintained nurseries will be spent in (a) Wolverhampton and (b) Wolverhampton North East constituency; and what steps her Department is taking to support maintained nurseries in Wolverhampton.

Supplementary funding for maintained nursery schools is allocated on a local authority basis, as is the free early years entitlements funding within the Dedicated Schools Grant. Of the £55m supplementary funding, the indicative allocation for Wolverhampton local authority is £1.04m in 2017-18.

The supplementary funding will allow local authorities, including Wolverhampton, to maintain existing levels of nursery school funding. This extra funding will provide stability for nursery schools, which make a valuable contribution to improving the lives of some of our most disadvantaged children. We have recently completed a data assurance exercise that will ensure that local authorities receive the correct amount of supplementary funding.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the number of (a) nurseries and (b) nursery school places in Wolverhampton North East constituency that will offer 30 hours of free childcare from September 2017.

Local authorities are responsible for making an assessment about the number of 30 hours free childcare places that providers plan to offer in their areas. To support them to deliver 30 hours, we are investing £100 million to create almost 18,000 additional early years places for eligible children to help meet demand from working parents. This is backed by £1 billion extra revenue per year for the early years entitlements, including £300 million per year to increase the funding rates paid to nurseries, pre-schools and childminders that choose to deliver the offer. This means that Wolverhampton local authority will see an increase in their hourly funding rate to £4.68.

13th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the (a) gain and (b) loss of funding for each primary school in (i) Wolverhampton North East constituency and (ii) City of Wolverhampton local authority in (A) the first year, (B) two years and (C) five years after implementation of the new funding formula.

Our proposals for funding reform will mean that schools and local authorities will, for the first time, receive a consistent and fair share of the schools budget, so that they can give every child the opportunity to reach their full potential. We have been consulting on our proposals since December 2016 through an extensive 14 week consultation, including publishing detailed impact data for all schools in England.

Our proposals will target money towards pupils who face entrenched barriers to their education, such as those from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who live in areas of deprivation.

The percentage of pupils living in deprived areas (measured by IDACI) and pupils eligible for free school meals, in both the constituency and England, is shown in the table below.

Pupil characteristic

Wolverhampton North East

National average

IDACI A-F Primary

85%

45%

IDACI A-F Secondary

80%

43%

FSM Primary

27%

15%

FSM Secondary

25%

14%

As a result of our proposals, in the first year of the formula, Wolverhampton local authority would see an overall cash increase in schools funding of 0.8%. Illustrative allocations for the second year of the formula have been not been calculated, but by the time of full implementation of the formula, Wolverhampton schools would see cash gains of 2.4%.

For schools in Wolverhampton North East, the proposals would mean an overall cash increase of 1.1%, or £0.7 million.

85% of the primary schools in Wolverhampton local authority and 67% of the primary schools in Wolverhampton North East would gain funding as a result of our proposals.

Schools that are due to gain funding will do so quickly, with increases of up to 3% in per pupil funding in 2018-19 and a further 2.5% in 2019-20. No school will lose more than 1.5% per year or 3% overall per pupil as a result of our formula.

Illustrative allocations for all primary schools in Wolverhampton local authority in the first year of the formula and full implementation are shown in the attached table.

13th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate the Government's new schools funding formula has made of the level of deprivation in Wolverhampton North East constituency.

Our proposals for funding reform will mean that schools and local authorities will, for the first time, receive a consistent and fair share of the schools budget, so that they can give every child the opportunity to reach their full potential. We have been consulting on our proposals since December 2016 through an extensive 14 week consultation, including publishing detailed impact data for all schools in England.

Our proposals will target money towards pupils who face entrenched barriers to their education, such as those from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who live in areas of deprivation.

The percentage of pupils living in deprived areas (measured by IDACI) and pupils eligible for free school meals, in both the constituency and England, is shown in the table below.

Pupil characteristic

Wolverhampton North East

National average

IDACI A-F Primary

85%

45%

IDACI A-F Secondary

80%

43%

FSM Primary

27%

15%

FSM Secondary

25%

14%

As a result of our proposals, in the first year of the formula, Wolverhampton local authority would see an overall cash increase in schools funding of 0.8%. Illustrative allocations for the second year of the formula have been not been calculated, but by the time of full implementation of the formula, Wolverhampton schools would see cash gains of 2.4%.

For schools in Wolverhampton North East, the proposals would mean an overall cash increase of 1.1%, or £0.7 million.

85% of the primary schools in Wolverhampton local authority and 67% of the primary schools in Wolverhampton North East would gain funding as a result of our proposals.

Schools that are due to gain funding will do so quickly, with increases of up to 3% in per pupil funding in 2018-19 and a further 2.5% in 2019-20. No school will lose more than 1.5% per year or 3% overall per pupil as a result of our formula.

Illustrative allocations for all primary schools in Wolverhampton local authority in the first year of the formula and full implementation are shown in the attached table.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate he has made of the number of apprentices employed by Carillion who are yet to find alternative apprenticeship provision.

The government’s priority is to minimise disruption to apprentices’ and is intent on finding new employers for the apprentices that affected by the liquidation of Carillion.

The remaining apprentices who are yet to be placed, fall into one of three cohorts.

There are approximately 125 apprentices actively engaged in the matching / interview process. There are approximately 180 apprentices who have now achieved their apprenticeship or have left during the transition to Construction Industry Training Board (CITB).

225 apprentices have received multiple communications, however they have chosen not to respond. They have been issued with a final letter, which states that if they do not engage, CITB will notify PwC that they are not seeking alternative provision or employment.

CITB have recently launched a targeted employer campaign, with an intent to secure employment placements for learners who we’ve been unable to yet match with employment during the process, due to their geographical area of learning. This has resulted in an increasing number of employer vacancies, which CITB are actively pursuing in order to place more apprentices.

On Monday 5 March, the Official Receiver published a web update on employment within the Carillion group, which can be found at: https:https://www.gov.uk/government/news/carillion-official-receivers-update--3.

19th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate his Department has made of the financial resources required to meet WHO standards for fine particulate matter by 2030; and what assessment he has made of the steps taken by European cities such as Stockholm who have already met those those standards.

The Clean Air Strategy outlined a range of measures to meet our emissions reduction commitments to 2020 and 2030. Impact assessments will evaluate the costs and benefits to public health as these specific measures are introduced. Further analysis is ongoing to estimate what additional interventions would be needed to meet World Health Organisation air quality guideline levels of PM2.5 alongside associated costs, and this additional analysis will be published in due course.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to make it a mandatory requirement that local authorities employ animal welfare inspectors.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Brighton, Pavilion, Caroline Lucas, on 21 May 2019, PQ 254174.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the level of plastic particles in rivers.

The Government has set a target to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste within the lifetime of the 25 year Environment Plan (by 2042) and set aside £20 million for research and development managed through the Plastics Innovation Fund in March 2018. A further £10 million was committed in the 2018 Autumn Budget for continued/additional plastics research and development along with £10 million to pioneer innovative approaches to boosting recycling and reducing litter.

There has been substantive research reporting the presence and impacts of microplastics in the marine environment. However, little is known about their sources, release and impact on freshwaters and their transport to the marine environment. Defra has therefore commissioned evidence reviews to increase our understanding of these issues.

Defra is also working with the Environment Agency and the UK water industry to establish methods to detect, characterise and quantify microplastics entering wastewater treatment works, to evaluate the efficiency of treatment processes for their removal from domestic wastewaters and to assess their fate and biological effects in receiving rivers. In addition, Defra has commissioned the University of Plymouth to carry out research into textiles and tyres which are estimated to be significant sources of microplastics in the marine environment, and the Drinking Water Inspectorate has commissioned research on removal of microplastics by drinking water treatment processes.

The outcomes from these research projects will be used in the development of policy options to help mitigate the impact of microplastics in the aquatic environment.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government has a target to reduce the level of plastic particles in rivers.

The Government has set a target to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste within the lifetime of the 25 year Environment Plan (by 2042) and set aside £20 million for research and development managed through the Plastics Innovation Fund in March 2018. A further £10 million was committed in the 2018 Autumn Budget for continued/additional plastics research and development along with £10 million to pioneer innovative approaches to boosting recycling and reducing litter.

There has been substantive research reporting the presence and impacts of microplastics in the marine environment. However, little is known about their sources, release and impact on freshwaters and their transport to the marine environment. Defra has therefore commissioned evidence reviews to increase our understanding of these issues.

Defra is also working with the Environment Agency and the UK water industry to establish methods to detect, characterise and quantify microplastics entering wastewater treatment works, to evaluate the efficiency of treatment processes for their removal from domestic wastewaters and to assess their fate and biological effects in receiving rivers. In addition, Defra has commissioned the University of Plymouth to carry out research into textiles and tyres which are estimated to be significant sources of microplastics in the marine environment, and the Drinking Water Inspectorate has commissioned research on removal of microplastics by drinking water treatment processes.

The outcomes from these research projects will be used in the development of policy options to help mitigate the impact of microplastics in the aquatic environment.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
6th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he will publish his Department’s plans on how to implement EU Equine Passport Regulation – (EU) No. 2015/262; and whether his Department has developed alternative proposals for when the UK leaves the EU.

The EU Equine Passport Regulation, (EU) No. 2015/262, applies directly to the UK. Secondary legislation supplements and makes provision for its enforcement. Defra was responsible for introducing The Equine Identification (England) Regulations 2018, SI 2018 No. 761, which came into force on 1 October 2018.

Since then, the Equine Identification (England) (EU Exit) regulations 2018 (SI 2018 No. 1409) and The Equine (Records, Identification and Movement)(Amendment)(EU Exit) Regulations 2019 have been introduced in order to make the necessary technical changes to retained EU legislation so that equine records, movements and identification remain operable upon the UK leaving the EU.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Government plans to publish its summary of responses to its Consultation on changes to the identification of equines, published in Aril 2017.

Defra intends to publish a summary of responses to the consultation on changes to the identification of equines shortly.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which of her Department's projects have received funding under the European Agricultural Guarantee Fund 2007 to 2013; what the location is of each such project; and how much each such project received.

The European Agricultural Guarantee Fund (EAGF) is known as Pillar 1 of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), composed of direct payments to farmers and market measures. In the UK, from 2007 to 2013, expenditure under the EAGF totalled €23 billion, which is around £17 billion in sterling at current exchange rates. These payments were made to eligible farmers all over the UK.

Details of payments made since 2013 are available on the CAP payments website (http://cap-payments.defra.gov.uk/Default.aspx). This is managed by the UK Co-ordinating Body (UKCB) on behalf of the four agricultural paying agencies in the UK.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which of her Department's projects have received funding under the European Marine Fisheries Fund 2007 to 2013; what the location is of each such project; and how much each such project received.

Details of English projects which have received support under the European Fisheries Fund in the period 2007-13 are publicly available at: www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/448524/European_Transparency_Initiative.pdf.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
19th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, when the Government last updated its published technical notices on the UK leaving the EU without a negotiated agreement; and whether his Department has plans to publish further updated technical notices.

The Department for Exiting the European Union coordinated the initial publication of 106 Technical Notices between August and October 2018. Departments are responsible for their own Technical Notices and have continued to update them which included making changes following the agreement to extend the UK’s membership of the European Union until 31 October. Those changes took place on the 11 April 2019. The Government continues to prepare for all Brexit scenarios.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether under the Treaties of the European Union, the European Parliament must approve a withdrawal agreement between the UK and the EU; and on what date the last meeting of the European Parliament will be before elections to that Parliament.

As outlined in Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union, the Withdrawal Agreement shall be concluded by the Council on behalf of the EU after obtaining the consent of the European Parliament. The last sitting day of the European Parliament ahead of its elections is 18 April 2019.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether under the proposals agreed by the Cabinet at Chequers on 6 July the Government’s proposed backstop for Northern Ireland will be permanent or time limited.

The proposals agreed by the Cabinet at Chequers on 6 July for the UK's future relationship with the EU, and if agreed to in negotiations, would ensure that the backstop solution as part of the Withdrawal Agreement would not need to be brought into effect. It has always been the UK Government’s intention to address our commitments on the Irish border through the future relationship and these proposals show how we can do so.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
18th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) holds reports setting out the current economic relationship between the UK and other individual EU member states.

We are undertaking a comprehensive programme of work looking at the implications of UK withdrawal from the EU. The Department for Exiting the European Union is working with other Government departments to examine all areas of the UK economy, seeking input from a wide range of stakeholders. This includes extensive diplomatic engagement with EU Member States.

18th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether his Department has commissioned other government departments to produce reports of the current economic relationship between the UK and individual EU member states.

We are undertaking a comprehensive programme of work looking at the implications of UK withdrawal from the EU. The Department for Exiting the European Union is working with other Government departments to examine all areas of the UK economy, seeking input from a wide range of stakeholders. This includes extensive diplomatic engagement with EU Member States.

23rd Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, if he will establish formal arrangements for regular engagement with representatives from the West Midlands on the effect of the UK leaving the EU on that region's economy during his negotiations on leaving the EU.

We are determined to listen and talk to as many organisations, companies and institutions as possible in the West Midlands and throughout the UK.

DExEU Ministers have visited the West Midlands twice in the last four months to meet local businesses.

We will ensure that all views are reflected in the British Government's analysis of the priorities and opportunities for the UK as it exits the European Union.


Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
17th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 8.42 of the White Paper entitled The United Kingdom's exit from and new partnership with the European Union, Cm 9417, published in February 2017, if he will list all the EU agencies to be included in discussions with the EU and Member States on the UK's future status and arrangements with regard to those agencies.

As set out in the recent White Paper (The United Kingdom’s exit from and new partnership with the European Union), the Government will discuss with the EU and Member States our future status and arrangements with regard to EU agencies. It would not be appropriate to prejudge the outcome of the negotiations.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
30th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, when he plans to publish the total costs to the public purse of R (on the application of Miller and Dos Santos) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union in the (a) High Court and (b) Supreme Court.

The figures for the total costs associated with the case will be published in due course.





27th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what assessment he has made of the effect of World Trade Organisation rules on (a) reaching a new customs agreement, (b) making the UK an associate member of the customs union and (c) the UK remaining a signatory to some elements of the customs union, as set out by the Prime Minister in her speech at Lancaster House on 17 January 2017.

The Prime Minister has set out our intention to negotiate a new customs agreement with the EU. We have an open mind about the form of that agreement, but it is in both the UK and EU's interest to see tariff-free trade continue and for that cross-border trade to be as frictionless as possible. We will ensure that any future arrangements are fully compliant with our international commitments and obligations.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
27th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, if he will list the Cabinet sub-committees he regularly attends.

Information relating to the proceedings of Cabinet Committees, including when and how often they meet, is not disclosed as to do so could harm the frankness and candour of internal discussion. A full list of the Cabinet Committees and Implementation Task Forces, with their membership and terms of reference, can be found on the Cabinet Office's webpage:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-cabinet-committees-system-and-list-of-cabinet-committees

27th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to the Prime Minister's Answer of 25 January 2016 to Question 908364, Official Report, column 286, when he expects the Government's plan for the UK leaving the EU to be set out in a White Paper and published for the House.

As the Prime Minister said in the House on 1 February 2017, the Government will publish a White Paper on Thursday 2 February.

24th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to the Prime Minister's speech at Lancaster House on 17 January 2017, which EU member states (a) favour and (b) oppose guaranteeing the rights of EU citizens who are already living in the UK and the rights of British nationals in other EU member states.

We are not going to provide a running commentary. The Prime Minister has been clear that she wants to guarantee the status of EU citizens in the UK and UK citizens in the EU as soon as possible.

24th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what the rule of origin requirements would be for UK companies if the UK leaves the customs union.

The Prime Minister has set out our intention to negotiate a new customs agreement with the EU. We have an open mind about the form of that agreement, but it is in both the UK and EU's interest to see tariff-free trade continue and for that cross-border trade to be as frictionless as possible.

Whether or how preferential Rules of Origin will apply will depend on the outcome of negotiations; and we will be aiming to minimise the impact of any additional customs procedures on goods trade between the UK and EU.

24th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what estimate he has made of the potential cost to UK companies of (a) tariffs and (b) non-tariff barriers on exports if the UK leaves the customs union.

It is in both the UK and EU's interest to see tariff-free trade and for that cross-border trade to be as frictionless as possible. We will pursue a bold and ambitious trade agreement with the EU and also a new customs agreement. We have an open mind on the form of any customs agreement.


The government is conducting a broad range of analysis at the macroeconomic and sectoral level to understand the impact of leaving the EU on all aspects of the UK. But we are not going to publish any assessment of the impacts of potential courses of action that could undermine the UK’s negotiating position.

10th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what assessment his Department has made of the costs and benefits to the UK of leaving the EU Customs Union; and if he will make a statement.

We are confident that we will secure a successful outcome and deliver the best deal for Britain in the upcoming negotiations. The relationship we build with the EU will be bespoke to the UK. There are of course a number of different models for EU trade relations from which we can learn. We understand the advantages and disadvantages of those models, and are analysing closely the impact which adopting them would have on the UK economy and UK trade.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
21st Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what discussions he has had with other EU countries on the UK's future trading relationship with those countries; and if he will make a statement.

We are about to begin these negotiations and it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions in advance. At every step of these negotiations we will work to ensure the best possible outcome for the British people.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
21st Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what the Government's policy is on access to the European Economic Area; and if he will make a statement.

Our economy is fundamentally strong, and the UK is open to business and investment. The Government has been consulting, and will continue to consult, with a broad range of stakeholders and we will need to consider all factors carefully in implementing the decision of the British people. This is clearly a very important issue for UK business and we will want the strongest possible economic links with our European neighbours.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
21st Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how many trade negotiators are employed by his Department; how many such negotiators his Department plans to recruit; and what estimate his Department has made of the cost of those negotiations.

Britain has been at the forefront of the free trade-supporting countries in the EU for the last 40 years. The overall size and scope of the new department, including staffing and skill mix, are now under consideration. We will have the right resources in place so we can secure the best possible outcome for the UK as a whole.

21st Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what his policy is on recruiting non-UK nationals as trade negotiators; in which countries his Department has advertised the recruitment of such negotiators; and how many such negotiators have been recruited.

Britain has been at the forefront of the free trade-supporting countries in the EU for the last 40 years. The overall size and scope of the new department, including staffing and skill mix, are now under consideration. We will have the right resources in place so we can secure the best possible outcome for the UK as a whole.

21st Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, when he plans to start negotiations on a new trading relationship with the EU.

We need a UK approach and clear objectives for negotiations. It’s in everyone’s interests that we establish that before we trigger Article 50. The process for leaving the EU and determining our future relationship will clearly not be brief or straightforward, so we need to take time to think through our objectives and approach. We want to get the best deal for Britain, not the quickest one.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
31st Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the accuracy of recent reports by the International Rescue Committee of atrocities in South Cameroon and the displacement of 250,000 people in that region.

The UN have recorded that over 460,000 people have been displaced by recent violence in Cameroon’s Anglophone North-West and South-West regions and we are closely monitoring the situation. We have a humanitarian adviser based in Cameroon working with partners on humanitarian issues in the country and we are also funding a protection adviser in the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs working in the region on the Anglophone Crisis.

17th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when he plans to announce the 2019-20 Tradeshow Access Programme.

The Trade Access Programme (TAP) list of supported events for Q1 2019-20 (1 April 2019 – 30 June 2019) will be announced/published on Friday 21 December. The TAP list of supported events for Q2 - Q4 2019-20 (1 July 2019 - 31 March 2020) will be announced/published in the New Year.

5th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the public purse of Government support for UK companies seeking to take part in overseas exhibitions in the latest period for which information is available.

The Department for International Trade supports UK businesses seeking to take part in overseas exhibitions through a variety of programmes and events. The estimated expenditure for this activity in 2018/19 is £10.9m.

18th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) holds reports setting out the current economic relationship between the UK and other individual EU member states.

The Department for Exiting the European Union leads on the framing of our future economic relationship with the EU and its member states, and this department works closely on these issues, supporting their comprehensive programme of analytical work to inform negotiations.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many Mutual Recognition Agreements the UK currently has with third nations through EU membership; and whether it is his policy to seek to maintain those agreements after the UK leaves the EU.

The UK currently benefits from a wide range of agreements that have commitments on mutual recognition. The UK remains committed to pursuing free trade. That includes seeking to achieve continuity in our trade and investment relationships with third countries, including those covered by EU agreements with other countries, such as Mutual Recognition Agreements. We are actively exploring what may be possible with our trading partners on ways to achieve this.

17th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 27 January 2017 to Question 61491, which countries have expressed an interest in agreeing trade deals with the UK with whom a working group and dialogue on our future trading relationship have not been announced.

Ministers and officials in the Department for International Trade are working closely with counterparts across a wide range of markets in order to promote the UK as a great place to do business and with which to trade. In line with normal international practice, it would not be appropriate to routinely provide details of private diplomatic engagement with foreign governments.

Working groups are just one example of how we are engaging with our trading partners. Engagement ranges from informal contact through our network of Posts, discussions with embassies and High Commissions in London, to ministerial discussions and visits, and the Prime Minister’s 20 Trade Envoys.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which countries have expressed an interest in agreeing trade deals with the UK; and with which countries the Government has started discussions on future trade agreements other than those set out by the Prime Minister in her speech at Lancaster House on 17 January 2017.

I refer the hon Member to the answer I gave to the hon Member for North East Fife today, UIN: 60711.

21st Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many trade negotiators are employed by the Government.

You will be aware that my Rt Hon Friend the Prime Minister has created a new Department for International Trade, which is responsible for promoting British trade across the world and ensuring the UK takes advantage of the huge opportunities open to us. We are building up our trade policy capability and are working closely with other Government Departments including the Department for Exiting the European Union, DEXEU. ​The Department for International Trade has begun a process to recruit and train staff to work on the UK’s trade policy. We will adapt the resource devoted to trade policy in line with future demands.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent estimate he has made of the number of UK citizens aged over 17 who (a) hold and (b) do not hold a full or provisional UK driving licence.

There are more than 49 million people in Great Britain aged 17 or over who hold either a full or provisional driving licence. No estimate has been made of the number of people who do not hold a driving licence.

No figures are available for licence holders in Northern Ireland as driver licensing is a devolved matter.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether it is Government policy to support the safeguarding of land in the Solihull Metropolitan Borough Council area to allow for the possibility of a future second runway at Birmingham airport.

The Government’s final policy position on the safeguarding of land for potential future runways at airports will be set out in the Aviation Strategy White Paper, which is due for publication later this year. Until this time the Government’s position detailed within the Aviation Policy Framework of 2013 remains in place.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
9th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of legislating to make it illegal for taxis and private hire vehicles to turn away guide dogs.

Sections 168 and 170 of the Equality Act 2010 already require drivers of taxis and PHVs to accept passengers accompanied by assistance dogs without charging them extra.

The Government expects drivers to comply with the law and encourages local licensing authorities to take robust action against those unwilling to do so.

Drivers convicted of a relevant offence face fines of up to £1000.

21st Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of airport capacity outside the South East.

The Government established the independent Airports Commission, which assessed the capacity needs of the whole of the UK, before concluding that the country needs one additional runway in the South East by 2030 and noted that there would be a need for other airports to make more intensive use of their existing infrastructure.

The Department accepted the findings of the Airports Commission and is supportive of airports across the UK making best use of their existing runway capacity, so long as they address the economic and environmental impacts and proposed mitigations.

The Government is currently consulting on its Aviation Strategy green paper, ‘Aviation 2050; The future of UK aviation’.

21st Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of a second runway at Birmingham Airport on regional growth in the West Midlands.

No assessment has been made. In setting out what it will deliver over the next fifteen years to 2033, Birmingham Airport’s draft Master Plan makes clear it plans to make best use of its existing runway and does not foresee a need for a second runway for some considerable time to come.

6th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department plans to provide earmarked funding for The West Midlands Combined Authority to help it implement its local cycling and walking infrastructure plan.

The Department has provided West Midlands Combined Authority with dedicated transport planning support to enable the development of the city’s Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP).

The Department has also awarded the West Midlands Combined Authority £321.5m from the Transforming Cities Fund to improve and support new local transport links. It is for the City Region and Mayor to identify and prioritise investment for cycling and walking schemes, including from existing local highways funds.

29th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether Wolverhampton train station has been accredited under the Secure Stations Scheme.

Wolverhampton Station has a valid accreditation under the Secure Stations Scheme.

23rd Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much rail fares have increased in each year since 2010 for a peak time return ticket between (a) Wolverhampton and Birmingham New Street and (b) Wolverhampton and London Euston.

To provide context, we have provided figures for increases in rail fares since 2005. Since 2005, the fares for a peak time return ticket (an Anytime Day Return) between Wolverhampton and Birmingham New Street, set by the West Midlands Passenger Transport Executive, have risen as shown in the below table:

From Wolverhampton to Birmingham New Street

Anytime Day Return

Valid from

Valid until

Price

Increase

02/01/2005

11/06/2005

£5.35

12/06/2005

01/01/2006

£5.35

£0.00

02/01/2006

01/01/2007

£5.50

£0.15

02/01/2007

19/05/2007

£5.70

£0.20

20/05/2007

08/09/2007

£5.70

£0.00

09/09/2007

01/01/2008

£5.70

£0.00

02/01/2008

06/09/2008

£6.00

£0.30

07/09/2008

01/01/2009

£6.00

£0.00

02/01/2009

05/09/2009

£6.30

£0.30

06/09/2009

01/01/2010

£6.30

£0.00

02/01/2010

22/05/2010

£6.20

-£0.10

23/05/2010

04/09/2010

£6.20

£0.00

05/09/2010

01/01/2011

£6.20

£0.00

02/01/2011

03/09/2011

£6.60

£0.40

04/09/2011

01/01/2012

£6.60

£0.00

02/01/2012

19/05/2012

£7.00

£0.40

20/05/2012

01/09/2012

£7.00

£0.00

02/09/2012

01/01/2013

£7.00

£0.00

02/01/2013

07/09/2013

£7.20

£0.20

08/09/2013

01/01/2014

£7.20

£0.00

02/01/2014

06/09/2014

£7.40

£0.20

07/09/2014

01/01/2015

£7.40

£0.00

02/01/2015

16/05/2015

£7.50

£0.10

17/05/2015

05/09/2015

£7.50

£0.00

06/09/2015

01/01/2016

£7.50

£0.00

02/01/2016

03/09/2016

£7.50

£0.00

04/09/2016

01/01/2017

£7.50

£0.00

02/01/2017

01/01/2018

£7.60

£0.10

02/01/2018

19/05/2018

£7.80

£0.20

20/05/2018

01/01/2019

£7.80

£0.00

02/01/2019

£8.00

£0.20

Since 2005, the fares for a peak time return ticket (an Anytime Return) between Wolverhampton and London Euston, set by Virgin Trains West Coast, have risen as shown in the below table:

From Wolverhampton to London Euston

Anytime Return

Valid from

Valid until

Price

Increase

02/01/2005

01/01/2006

£106.00

02/01/2006

10/06/2006

£114.00

£8.00

11/06/2006

09/09/2006

£114.00

£0.00

10/09/2006

01/01/2007

£114.00

£0.00

02/01/2007

01/01/2008

£123.00

£9.00

02/01/2008

06/09/2008

£129.00

£6.00

07/09/2008

01/01/2009

£129.00

£0.00

02/01/2009

01/01/2010

£139.00

£10.00

02/01/2010

01/01/2011

£147.00

£8.00

02/01/2011

01/01/2012

£157.00

£10.00

02/01/2012

01/01/2013

£166.00

£9.00

02/01/2013

01/01/2014

£166.00

£0.00

02/01/2014

17/05/2014

£173.00

£7.00

18/05/2014

06/09/2014

£173.00

£0.00

07/09/2014

01/01/2015

£173.00

£0.00

02/01/2015

05/09/2015

£177.00

£4.00

06/09/2015

01/01/2016

£177.00

£0.00

02/01/2016

03/09/2016

£179.00

£2.00

04/09/2016

01/01/2017

£179.00

£0.00

02/01/2017

01/01/2019

£182.00

£3.00

02/01/2019

£184.00

£2.00

The figures show that over the five years between 2 January 2005 and 2 January 2010, the peak time return ticket between Wolverhampton and London Euston rose by 39%. By comparison, over nearly double the time period, in the nine years between 2 January 2010 and 2 January 2019, the peak time return ticket rose by only 25%.

31st Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the level of access for disabled and partially sighted people at Wolverhampton Railway Station.

The Inclusive Transport Strategy included a commitment to extend our Access for All programme (AfA) with an additional £300m of funding.

The department has asked the industry to nominate stations for the new funding by 16 November this year. Nominated stations will be selected based on their annual footfall, weighted by the incidence of disability in the area. We will also take into account local factors such as proximity to a hospital or the availability of third party funding for the project. We will also ensure that there is a fair geographical spread of projects across the country.

West Midland Train’s application to the AfA fund is going to come via the West Midlands Station’s Alliance. This is a unique arrangement where the Train Operating Company has come together with Network Rail and local government (in the form of the West Midlands Rail Executive) to improve the coordination between the various parties responsible for station assets. This includes better alignment of the incentives to invest in station enhancements.

31st Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding the Government makes available to (a) install step free access and (b) otherwise improve disabled access at train stations in England.

The Inclusive Transport Strategy included a commitment to extend our Access for All programme across rail Control Period 6 (2019 to 2024) with an additional £300m of funding from the public purse.

In addition, each of the franchised operators has around £100,000 to £600,000 to spend annually at stations to improve accessibility for disabled people at stations.

Also, upgrades carried out under major projects and planned renewals work must meet current accessibility standards.

31st Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many stations in England (a) do and (b) do not have step free access; and if he will make a statement.

Around 20% of stations in the UK have step free access to and between every platform, which accounts for approximately 75% of journeys.

We remain committed to continuing to invest in the accessibility of the railway and have made an additional £300m available for our Access for All programme during the next five year Control Period (2019-24).

Information on the facilities available at railway stations is collected and held by the Rail Delivery Group, rather than the Department.

Accessibility information about individual stations is published on the National Rail Enquiries website.

27th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what comparative assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of a (a) third runway at Heathrow airport and (b) second runway at Birmingham airport on the economy of (i) Wolverhampton and (ii) the West Midlands.

A Northwest Runway at Heathrow will improve the UK’s connectivity, with more frequent services to important global destinations benefitting passengers and freight-operators across the UK. While Heathrow expansion will help to secure the UK’s status as a global aviation hub, we will also see airports across the country continuing to develop their point-to-point networks.

This conclusion is supported by the analysis which shows that passenger numbers and international flights at airports outside of London are expected to increase by 80 per cent and 71 per cent respectively between 2016 and 2050 with a third runway at Heathrow.

Whilst the Department has not made an assessment of the effect on the local economy in Wolverhampton and the West Midlands, these areas are expected to benefit from the improvement in regional and global connectivity, which is expected to deliver up to £74 billion worth of benefits to passengers and the wider economy.

The Airports Commission found that whilst four out of London’s five main airports are expected to be full within the next ten years, airports outside the South East of England, such as Birmingham, have capacity to grow by increasing utilisation of their existing runway(s).

As the Secretary of State set out in his oral statement on 5 June, any new operational runway at Heathrow is still a number of years away. This is why Government supports airports beyond Heathrow making best use of their existing runways. However, we recognise that the development of airports can have positive and negative effects. We consider that any proposals should be judged on their individual merits by the relevant planning authority, taking careful account of all relevant considerations, particularly economic and environmental.

27th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether it is the Government's policy to support a second runway at Birmingham Airport; and if he will make a statement.

The Airports National Policy Statement sets out the need for additional airport capacity in the South East by 2030 and why Government believes that need is best met by a new Northwest runway at Heathrow Airport. Government will publish an Aviation Strategy Green Paper later this year in order to consult on a future framework for sustainable aviation growth across the UK beyond 2030.

As the Secretary of State set out in his oral statement on 5 June, any new operational runway at Heathrow is still a number of years away. This is why Government supports airports beyond Heathrow making best use of their existing runways. However, we recognise that the development of airports can have positive and negative effects. The Government considers that any proposals should be judged on their individual merits by the relevant planning authority, taking careful account of all relevant considerations, particularly economic and environmental.

29th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much funding from the public purse has been invested in (a) new road infrastructure in Wolverhampton and (b) improving existing road infrastructure in each of the last five years.

This government has made considerable investments on both local roads and the strategic road network (SRN) in the Wolverhampton area.

Highways England has carried out maintenance and improvements on the M54, including Junction 2 near Wolverhampton, totalling £8.9M in 2014/15, £13.9M in 2015/16 and £3.5M in 2016/17. In addition the M6 smart motorway scheme (2013 to 2016) between Junctions 10A and 13 has cost around £95M. Highways England is otherwise unable to attribute costs just to the Wolverhampton area.

The attached document shows that Wolverhampton City Council has received direct funding of £6.375M (see first table below) for road infrastructure and their share of funding from the West Midlands Integrated Transport Authority (£284.133M – second table plus third point), and is benefitting from various investments by the Black Country Local Enterprise Partnership (see point 4).

29th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what support his Department is giving to the West Midlands Combined Authority to improve rail and road links across the West Midlands.

The Department currently supports the West Midlands Combined Authority, and other industry partners in the West Midlands, to improve rail services in the area. For example, the current Franchise Agreement with London Midland requires the franchisee to work with industry partners, including Combined Authorities, in relation to the provision, maintenance and operation of smart ticketing. This gives passengers access to a wider range of products and tickets.

The Department is providing funding contribution to the West Midlands Combined Authority in respect of the construction of the new Bromsgrove station. This was completed in summer 2016 as part of a wider programme to extend electrification from Birmingham to Barnt Green to Bromsgrove.

More widely, the Department is working very closely with local stakeholders in the West Midlands in terms of how West Midlands Rail has been working with the Department to specify local rail services within the West Midlands region from October 2017, in line with the refranchising programme for the franchise. West Midlands Rail will be responsible for the management of local services when the new franchise commences.

The forthcoming franchise contains other initiatives such as the introduction of a West Midlands Railway brand and the creation of a separate Business Unit for the local and regional services in the West Midlands, whose management will be locally based.

The devolution agreement with the West Midlands Combined Authority at the end of 2015 devolved £36.5m per annum for 30 years which the West Midlands Combined Authority will control and invest to deliver projects to drive growth, in line with their strategic economic plan, giving the West Midlands Combined Authority powers and the freedom to prioritise transport schemes.

Highways England is also committed through the first Road Investment Strategy (2015/16 – 2019/20) to making improvements to the strategic roads across the Midlands area.

The Department has committed over £370m to major local authority schemes in the West Midlands Combined Authority area, subject to Business Cases, including tram and road schemes. Also, the 3 Local Enterprise Partnerships in the West Midlands Combined Authority area have been allocated over £780m in Local Growth Funding to support local projects that benefit the local area and economy, including a range of local road and rail projects. The Department has also just confirmed over £40m to the West Midlands Combined Authority for capital Highway works in 2017-18.

29th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment the Government has made of the effect of the (a) redevelopment of Wolverhampton Railway Station and (b) extension of the West Midlands Metro on passenger numbers using the new Wolverhampton interchange.

Centro developed the business case for the redevelopment of Wolverhampton railway station. The Department for Transport evaluated this business case and accepted it. In determining to grant statutory powers for the Metro extension to the railway station, a component of the Interchange project, the Secretary of State placed substantial weight on the promoters’ evidence of the important public benefits which the extension would realise. The evidence forecast an increase in annual patronage on Midland Metro of 5.4% in 2026 through improvement of interchange between the three modes of transport in the city: bus, rail and metro, and as a result of the increased connectivity that is currently lacking.

29th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much has been spent from the public purse on (a) bus services and (b) the West Midlands Metro in (i) Wolverhampton and (ii) the West Midlands Integrated Transport Authority, formerly Centro, during the period 2009-10 to the most recent financial year for which figures are available.

Total revenue spend on bus services is not available at Local Authority level.

The Department does not provide any revenue funding for the West Midlands Metro.

29th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent estimate the Government has made of the number of direct inter-city rail services which will run between London and Wolverhampton after the completion of High Speed 2.

It is too early to set the timetable which will operate when HS2 opens, as this should take into account up to date information on demand. The winning bidder for the West Coast Partnership will develop options for train services on the West Coast Main Line corridor, working with bodies including central and local Government, and industry to consider both HS2 and existing routes. This process will be open and consultative.

The Government’s aim is that all places with a direct London service retain a broadly comparable or better service after Phase One opens.

4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department engages enforcement agents.

Where a claimant is no longer in receipt of benefit, and all other recovery options have been exhausted, the Department for Work and Pensions may refer a debt to a Private Sector Debt Collection Agency.

In March 2015, Indesser, was appointed as the provider of cross-government debt services under a joint-venture with the Cabinet Office.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what impact assessment her Department has undertaken on the recent reform of pension credit; and if she will publish that impact assessment.

The change to the Pension Credit rules was legislated for in the Welfare Reform Act 2012. As part of the Parliamentary process, an Equality Impact Assessment published on the 9 November 2011, which included an assessment of the impacts of Universal Credit reforms on older couples, including mixed aged couples. This can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-credit-equality-impact-assessment

On 28 February 2019 we published an ad-hoc statistical release which provides analysis relating to mixed age couples estimated to be affected by the change in policy to be implemented on 15 May 2019. This can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mixed-age-couples-benefit-impacts-of-ending-access-to-pension-credit-and-pension-age-housing-benefit

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she has plans to update the training module on Fibromyalgia issued by her Department on 18 April 2018; and whether her Department has made an assessment of (a) the level of compliance with the training module by benefits assessors and (b) the effectiveness of the guidance in identifying suffers of Fibromyalgia.

The training module is due to be reviewed in April 2019 and Fibromyalgia UK will be invited to quality assure the document which they previously reviewed in March 2018. The Department’s Independent Audit Team conducts an audit of a statistically significant sample of the Centre for Health and Disability Assessment reports that includes Fibromyalgia cases. The role of Healthcare Professionals conducting assessments is to provide advice on the functional impact of a condition and not to diagnose or advise on treatment.

12th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of universal credit on levels of rent arrears.

I refer the hon Member to the reply to Question 181577 on 29 October.

6th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what his Department's policy is on the payment of bereavement benefits for unmarried partners with children.

Bereavement benefits are paid to a surviving spouse or civil partner; they can only be paid to those in legal unions. Therefore, they cannot be paid in respect of cohabitees, either with or without children. We are currently considering how to proceed following the recent Supreme Court judgement which ruled it incompatible with ECHR principles to provide that cohabitees with children are not entitled to Widowed Parent’s Allowance.

Cohabitees do have access to income-related benefits. They may also qualify for help with funeral costs from the Social Fund and may of course choose to provide security for their families by way of private pension or life insurance arrangements.

23rd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment her Department has made of the reasons why the level of unemployment in Wolverhampton North East constituency is more than twice the national average; and what steps her Department is taking to lower the rate of unemployment in that constituency.

The Office for National Statistics estimate between July 2017 to June 2018, with 95% confidence, that the unemployment rate in Wolverhampton North East was between 5.7% and 13.1%, with a central estimate of 9.4%.

Employment in the West Midlands is up by 78,000 on the year and 307,000 since 2010, to 2.78 million.

This Government’s Industrial Strategy sets out how we will build a Britain fit for the future – and help businesses create better, higher-paying jobs with investment in the skills, industries and infrastructure of the future.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
23rd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in Wolverhampton North East constituency are in receipt of universal credit.

The latest available information on the number of people on Universal Credit by parliamentary constituency is published and can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much money her Department has spent to date on the development of the pensions dashboard.

Aside from the usual staff running costs, the costs to the Department to date for undertaking the pension dashboard feasibility study are around £100k. This covers the period from October 2017 when the Department assumed policy responsibility from HM Treasury, to end of August 2018 when I published the written statement.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether it is the Government's policy to continue the roll-out the Pensions Dashboard; and if she will make a statement.

On Tuesday 4 September 2018, I published a written statement providing an update on pensions including the pensions dashboard. This can be found here: : https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-statement/Commons/2018-09-04/HCWS933/

We will shortly report on the findings of the Feasibility Study, and will engage with industry, consumer groups and other stakeholders to agree timelines for delivery.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether wind chill factor is taken into account in the calculation of cold weather payments.

The current Cold Weather Payment service is supported by measurements of air temperature and wind chill is not taken into account.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
26th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of trends in the level of fuel poverty in (a) Wolverhampton local authority area and (b) Wolverhampton North East constituency; how many Cold Weather Payments have been issued to people in each of those areas; and how many people have benefitted from the Warm Home Discount Scheme in each of those areas.

The table below provided by Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy shows the number and proportion of households living in fuel poverty in Wolverhampton Local Authority area and Wolverhampton North East constituency for the latest data available (2015).

Fuel Poor Households

Percent Fuel Poor

Wolverhampton Local Authority area

15,200

14.6%

Wolverhampton North East constituency

5,400

14.6%

Household figures have been rounded to the nearest 100.

The Cold Weather Payment scheme is administered at weather station level rather than any other standard GB geography such as constituency level. The coverage area for each weather station is determined by the Met Office which assesses the most appropriate weather station for each postcode area. Cold weather payments are triggered when the average temperature recorded at the weather station has been recorded as, or is forecast to be, 0oC or below over seven consecutive days, during the Cold Weather season (November to March).

The Wolverhampton local authority area covers all or part of the following postcode areas: WV1-4, WV6, WV8-14. The constituency of Wolverhampton North East covers all or part of the following postcode areas: WV 1-4, WV 7-9, WV 10-13.

All of the above postcode areas are covered by the Coleshill weather station. Qualifying individuals living in this area will have received a payment in respect of a seven-day period of Cold Weather from 24th February – 2nd March 2018. No other payments have been triggered in the Coleshill weather station area in the current Cold Weather season.

Coleshill weather station covers the following postcode areas: B1-21, B23-38, B40, B42-50, B60-80, B90-98, CV1-12, CV21-23, CV31-35, CV37, CV47, DY1-14, LE10, WS1-15, WV1-16. We estimate that 289,000 payments were made in this area as a whole in respect of the trigger on 24th February. We are not able to break this figure down to a lower level.

Notes

  1. The number of payments given here is an estimate as information on the exact number of payments made is not readily available. These figures are produced by determining the volume of eligible recipients in each weather station area at the start of the winter season and using these figures throughout the winter to estimate payments and expenditure based on the actual triggers recorded.

  1. The number of payments made is not necessarily the total number of individuals benefitting from a Cold Weather Payment. Any individuals making a joint claim for one of the qualifying benefits, such as a couple living together, will receive one payment between them rather than one payment each.

  1. Estimates of Cold Weather Payments are published weekly during the Cold Weather season. The latest published estimates can be found at the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/cold-weather-payment-statistics-2017-to-2018

The Department for Work and Pensions and Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy do not hold data on Warm Home Discount recipients at Local Authority or Parliamentary Constituency level.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
23rd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment her Department has made of the consequences of the deficit in the Carillion pension scheme for pension holders; and if she will make a statement.

Carillion is the sponsoring employer for 13 separate defined benefit schemes which it acquired as it expanded. Most, or all of the schemes, will enter a Pension Protection Fund (PPF) assessment period during which the PPF will be testing to see if a scheme can secure at least PPF level benefits for its members without further support. If it can, a scheme will buy members’ annuities to pay for their pensions. If not, a scheme will transfer into the PPF with a consequential effect on members’ benefits; In general, those over scheme pension age at the date of insolvency get compensation equal to 100 per cent of their pension initially, while members below that age at the date of insolvency get compensation equal to 90 per cent of their accrued pension, subject to an overall cap.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the change in the level of unemployment in Wolverhampton North East constituency in the last 12 months; and what assessment she made of the reasons for the number of people unemployed in that constituency being higher than the national average.

Since the 2010 election, the Office for National Statistics’ (ONS) Labour Force Survey data shows that the level and rate of unemployment has fallen in every region and country of the UK.

Estimates of the unemployment rate (age 16+) for Parliamentary Constituency Areas (PCA), and the UK as a whole, are available based upon the ONS’ Annual Population Survey data. However, the PCA unemployment rate estimates are based on small sample of survey respondents and are therefore subject to a high degree of statistical uncertainty.

The ONS estimate that the unemployment rate in Wolverhampton North East for October 2015 to September 2016 was 9.7%. For the latest period (October 2016 to September 2017) the ONS estimate the unemployment rate was 9.0%. This compares to the period October 2009 to September 2010 when the estimate was an unemployment rate of 16.9%.

Estimates of unemployment differ in different areas of the country due to the effects of sample variability; the demographics of the local area and local labour market conditions.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effect of changes in financial support for disabled people under universal credit on living standards of that group.

The core design of Universal Credit for claimants with health conditions and disabilities has remained as intended since its introduction in the Welfare Reform Act 2012, and the impacts were analysed then.

DWP continue to evaluate the policy as it is delivered. The Universal Credit Evaluation is a comprehensive and multi-dimensional programme of analysis designed to assess economic, social and behavioural impacts of the Universal Credit experience. Research and analysis is conducted to provide continuous tracking and inform the evaluation and the expansion of Universal Credit, focusing specifically on the effects of Universal Credit on all claimants’ behaviours and outcomes.

We have always said that there will be transitional protection for those with existing premiums who move over to Universal Credit as part of the managed migration process, whose overall Universal Credit entitlement would be less than under the old system, provided that their circumstances remain the same.

Claimants who ‘naturally’ move to Universal Credit will do so because they have had a change of circumstances. In such cases claimants will continue to have their new welfare support entitlement calculated based on the rules of their new benefit.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
1st Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what progress has been made on the roll out of universal credit in Wolverhampton North East.

The Department rolled out Universal Credit for Wolverhampton Jobcentre Plus in December 2017. To ensure safe and secure delivery of Universal Credit to larger Jobcentre Plus offices, the Department rolls out to 50% of the postcodes at the announced go live date, with the remaining postcodes rolled out approximately three months later. In Wolverhampton’s case this will happen later this month.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
31st Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment her Department has made of the level of child poverty in Wolverhampton North East constituency using the four measures of poverty under the Welfare Reform and Work Act 2016.

This Government is committed to action that improves long-term outcomes for children and families by focusing on tackling the root causes of poverty and disadvantage. The four ‘Life Chances’ measures introduced through the Welfare Reform and Work Act 2016, which replaced the income based targets set out in the Child Poverty Act 2010, are designed to drive action and measure progress in the areas that we know can make the biggest difference - parental worklessness and children’s educational achievement.

The measures are based on official statistics produced by the Office for National Statistics on the proportion of children in workless households and the proportion of children in long-term workless households; and on Department for Education statistics on the educational attainment at Key Stage 4 of all pupils, and of disadvantaged pupils.

Although these statistics do not all provide data for individual constituencies, local authority-level data is available for the measure of all children in workless households and for both the educational attainment measures.

In 2016, 21.4 per cent of children were in workless households in Wolverhampton local authority. This compares to 27.2 per cent in 2010.

Source:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peoplenotinwork/unemployment/bulletins/worklesshouseholdsforregionsacrosstheuk/2016

In 2017, pupils sat reformed GCSEs in English language, English literature and maths for the first time, graded on a 9 to 1 scale. 35.6 per cent of all pupils and 22.8 per cent of disadvantaged pupils in the Wolverhampton local authority area achieved 9-5 in English and maths.

GCSE outcomes by constituency are available for all pupils but not broken down by disadvantaged pupils. In 2017, 28.3 per cent of all pupils in the Wolverhampton North East constituency achieved 9-5 in English and maths.

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/revised-gcse-and-equivalent-results-in-england-2016-to-2017

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
31st Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in Wolverhampton North East constituency have applied for advance payments of universal credit.

This information is not available.

However, the latest internal data from November 2017 suggests that 68% of new claims to Universal Credit full service received a new claim advance or benefit transfer advance. This proportion has increased since data was last published in July 2017, which showed that around 50% received a new claim advance or benefit transfer advance.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
13th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people in Wolverhampton who will (a) receive universal credit, (b) qualify for an advanced payment of that benefit and (c) qualify for the maximum advance payment allowed of that benefit in its first year of roll-out.

Forecasts for Universal Credit below national level are not available.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what extra resources his Department plans to provide to Wolverhampton Molineux House Jobcentre Plus to enable it better to support people claiming universal credit.

I refer the Member to the answer I gave in response to PQ 107132 on 26 October 2017.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment his Department has made of whether Wolverhampton Molineux House Jobcentre Plus requires extra staff to deal with the roll-out of universal credit.

I refer the Member to the answer I gave in response to PQ 107132 on 26 October 2017.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people in Wolverhampton North East constituency who will qualify for universal credit after the roll-out is complete.

We do not hold this information as we do not break it down by area.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
22nd Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what progress the Government has made in reducing long-term unemployment in areas of high unemployment in the last 12 months.

According to the Office for National Statistics’ Labour Force Survey, long-term unemployment has fallen nationally by 86,000 (17.5%) over the past 12 months. Equivalent figures are not available below national level due to the limitations of the sample size of the ONS survey.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
20th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will make an assessment of the reasons for long-term unemployment in Wolverhampton North East constituency.

According to the Office for National Statistics, long-term unemployment has fallen nationally by 384,000 since 2010. Equivalent figures are not available for Wolverhampton North East due to the limitations of the sample size of the ONS survey. As such it is difficult to make an assessment of the specific reasons for long-term unemployment within the constituency.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
20th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much his Department has spent on tackling long-term unemployment in Wolverhampton North East constituency in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
11th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to reduce youth unemployment in areas with high levels of youth unemployment.

Since 2010 the youth claimant count has fallen in all regions, and only 5.7% of the youth population are unemployed and not in full-time education, a rate that is near record low. We are investing further in an intensive support regime for young people, equipping them with vital skills to not only find a job, but build capability to sustain work.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 18 January 2016 to Question 22115, why information on the number and value of cold weather payments has not been (a) collected and (b) made available for each constituency in each year since their introduction.

We have provided the data at constituency level in the Social Fund Annual Report since 2011/12. Prior to this the information was only collected, and then published annually, at Met Office Weather Station level. To go back and recalculate the figures based on each constituency since the scheme began could only be provided at disproportionate cost.



20th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 18 January 2016 to Question 22115, whether information on the number and value of cold weather payments is kept by local authority area; what data his Department keeps on cold weather payments; and what steps his Department has taken to keep Parliament updated about cold weather payments.

Data relating to Cold Weather Payments is not recorded or stored by local authority area. Each UK postcode is linked to a weather station, so local authority areas could be split between 2 or more weather stations. The data is recorded and stored based on the weather stations and their linked postcodes.

My department publishes weekly estimates of the number of CWP payments made and estimated expenditure, these figures can be found here: (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/cold-weather-payment-statistics-2015-to-2016).

Full details of the number of triggers, the number of payments and the expenditure for every weather station for the whole Cold Weather Payment season is published annually in The Social Fund Annual Report.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many cold weather payments have been made in each constituency in each year since their introduction; and what the total value of such payments has been.

Information on cold weather payments by constituencies is not available.

13th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, which of his Department's projects have received funding under the European Social Fund 2007 to 2013; what the location is of each such project; and how much each such project received.


A detailed breakdown of all projects funded under the ESF 2007-13 programme, including location and how much each project received can be found on GOV.UK by clicking here.

The page provides a number of links – including a summary document showing funding for each CFO by region. Further down the page there are links which provide more detailed information by region, including specific detail on the funding of DWP projects.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
4th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending provision of genetic testing to all people diagnosed with breast cancer.

The NHS Long Term Plan sets out the ambition to extend the use of molecular diagnostics and, over the next 10 years, to routinely offer genomic testing to all people with cancer for whom it would be of clinical benefit.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to replicate European Health Insurance Card reciprocal arrangements after the UK leaves the EU.

The Government has proposed to all European Union Member States that when we leave, we should maintain the existing healthcare arrangements including the European Healthcare Insurance Card (EHIC) Scheme until 31 December 2020, with the aim of minimising disruption to healthcare provision for United Kingdom nationals and EU citizens. This is subject to negotiations, which are ongoing.

In the event that we cannot reach an agreement with EU Member States, EHICs may no longer be valid after exit day. It is not possible for the UK Government to guarantee access unilaterally to healthcare abroad, as this depends on decisions by Member States.

The Government has always advised UK nationals to take out comprehensive travel insurance when going overseas, both to EU and non-EU destinations. This will remain our advice in all circumstances.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that UK participation in European Reference Networks continues after the UK leaves the EU.

The United Kingdom will be leaving the European Union on 31 October whatever the circumstances. We would prefer to leave with a deal and we will work in an energetic and determined way to get that better deal. The details of this partnership, including participation in the European Reference Networks, will be a matter for negotiation with the EU after we leave. We are preparing for that negotiation and will work with a wide range of partners to ensure a successful outcome for UK business and citizens.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU without a deal on the regulatory processes for new medicines for rare conditions.

The Medicines and Healthcare products regulatory Agency (MHRA), as with all of Government has been working hard to ensure that the United Kingdom is fully prepared for European Union exit under any circumstance. The potential effect that the UK leaving the EU without a deal will have on the regulatory processes for new medicines for rare conditions is being mitigated with clear guidance and close engagement with industry to ensure plans are relevant and fit for purpose.

Following a public consultation last year, the MHRA has legislated to ensure a smooth transition to national provisions for human medicines, including those for rare diseases. Indeed, for medicines for rare diseases the UK will offer incentives, some fees will be waived, with others fully or partially refunded, to encourage the development and marketing of such medicines.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the capacity requirements for the Medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency after the UK leaves the EU.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency has assessed the capacity that will be required in both a deal and a ‘no deal’ European Union exit scenario. This is based on scrutiny of resource and careful assessment of the Agency’s ability to support the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

Any gaps in resource have been identified by the agency, and sufficiently addressed. In the case of a ‘no deal’ scenario, the Agency has developed and is prepared to implement a new IT system that will sufficiently support industry to continue to operate in a smooth transition. The Agency continues to engage industry to ensure any concerns are addressed and that appropriate transparency is maintained.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children's hospices have closed in England in each year since 2010; and in which regions of England were those hospices located.

Information on the number of hospices which have closed in England since 2010 is not held.

There are currently around 223 registered independent hospices, and a very small number of public hospices run internally by National Health Service trusts. Around a quarter of these are children’s hospices. The vast majority of hospices are primarily charity-funded but receive some statutory funding from clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) and the Government for providing local services. CCGs are responsible for determining the level of NHS-funded hospice care locally and they are responsible for ensuring that the services they commission meet the needs of their local population.

As part of the NHS Long Term Plan, NHS England committed to increase its investment in children’s palliative care over the next five years by match funding CCGs who commit to increase their investment in local children’s palliative and end of life care services.

Subject to CCGs increasing investment, NHS England will match this by up to £7 million a year by 2023/24. This increase is in addition to the Children’s Hospice Grant, which provides an annual contribution of £11 million. NHS England is currently establishing financial reporting systems to monitor the baseline investment of CCG in children’s palliative and end of life care services. This will enable match funding payments to be made to CCGs where the investments are increased above the investment baseline in the previous year. As baselining will be ongoing through 2019/20, and therefore match funding will not be available in this year, NHS England will be increasing the children’s hospice grant to £12 million for this period.

13th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the correlation between falling rates of vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella and the increased incidence of those conditions.

There has been an increase in cases of measles since the end of 2017 with close to 1,000 cases reported in 2018. However, the majority of these cases (628/966, 65%) are in individuals aged less than one year old and over 15 years i.e. those not in recently vaccinated age cohorts. Data is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/measles-mumps-and-rubella-laboratory-confirmed-cases-in-england-2018

An increase in mumps activity was observed in England in the first quarter (Q1) of 2019 with 795 laboratory confirmed mumps infections. Almost half (352/795, 44%) of the cases in Q1 were in unvaccinated individuals. This data can be viewed at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/804024/hpr1819_mmr2.pdf

The World Health Organization confirmed that the United Kingdom had eliminated rubella in 2015. Between 2013-18 there were only 10 laboratory confirmed cases in England. This data can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/rubella-confirmed-cases/rubella-notifications-and-confirmed-cases-by-oral-fluid-testing-in-england-2013-to-2014-by-quarter

Nearly all these cases have been in individuals born abroad and were not eligible to receive rubella containing vaccine in United Kingdom.

13th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of trends in the rate of suicide among men in Wolverhampton; and what steps he is taking to improve mental health services in the West Midlands.

The latest update on suicide prevention from the health scrutiny panel at City of Wolverhampton Council (June 2019), shows that 66 deaths were registered as suicides for the period of 2015-17 and 54 of these (82%) were male.

In ‘Making Wolverhampton a Suicide Safer Community: Wolverhampton Suicide Prevention Strategy 2016–2020’, City of Wolverhampton Council has set the following aims to reduce suicides:

- provide a multi-agency approach to suicide prevention across Wolverhampton;

- raise awareness of suicide, compelling organisations and the community to take positive action;

- upskill workforces through information and knowledge enabling them to better understand and respond to poor mental wellbeing and suicide ideation;

- influence services and policies so that suicide prevention is robustly considered and embedded in routine business; and

- provide a coordinated suicide support offer which can be accessed by services and communities.

6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure each hospital diabetes team includes a mental health professional.

It is for individual clinical commissioning groups to commission treatment and services for people with diabetes and they are best placed to identify what is needed in their local areas.

On 21 March 2018 NHS England and NHS Improvement along with the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health published ‘The Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) Pathway for People with Long-term Physical Health Conditions and Medically Unexplained Symptoms’ which is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/improving-access-to-psychological-therapies-long-term-conditions-pathway.pdf

IAPT services provide evidence based treatments for people with anxiety and depression and the services are co-located in existing primary and secondary care physical health pathways. IAPT services will target the needs of people with depression and anxiety disorders who also have long term conditions such as diabetes.

In addition, a project working group has been established involving NHS England, Diabetes UK and other stakeholders which aims to develop a care pathway which, when adopted locally, would help improve access to emotional and psychological support for people with diabetes.

23rd Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many EEA nationals from countries other than the UK were employed in the NHS in each year since 2015.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS) workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups, but not staff working in primary care, local authorities or other providers.

The following table shows the headcount figures for all HCHS staff in England who have specified an European Economic Area (EEA) nationality as at 30 September for each of the years specified.

2015

2016

2017

2018

HCHS staff who have specified an EEA nationality

371

401

432

467

HCHS staff who have specified an EU27 nationality

52,808

59,796

61,974

63,484


Source: National Health Service HCHS quarterly workforce statistics, NHS Digital

20th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what statistics his Department holds of the number of vacancies for (a) nursing staff and (b) doctors in the NHS in England.

Since April 2017, NHS Improvement has collected vacancy rates of medical and nursing staff from individual National Health Service providers and publish them as part of their Quarterly performance of the NHS provider sector report.

The latest NHS Improvement estimate is that in England, there are 41,722 whole time equivalent nursing vacancies, of which approximately 80% are being filled by a combination of bank and agency staff, as at 30 June 2018.

NHS Improvement also estimated that in England there are 11,576 whole time equivalent doctor vacancies, of which approximately 85% are being filled by a combination of bank and agency staff, as at 30 June 2018.

However, the bank and agency staff are not purely covering the vacancy gap. The temporary staff will also be used to backfill for sickness, maternity and secondments. We are committed to ensuring nursing remains an attractive career so the NHS builds on the record number of nurses currently on wards.

We have put in place several actions to increase nursing workforce supply, covering improving staff retention, return to practice, overseas recruitment, expanding nursing associates, improving sickness absence and review of language controls.

20th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of the abolition of student bursaries on the number of people applying to become nursing students.

The latest Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) data from October 2018 shows that demand for nursing courses remains strong, with applications exceeding available places in 2018. The number of acceptances to nursing and midwifery courses in 2018 is consistent with earlier years, at approximately 22,000.

Final UCAS data will be published in December 2018.

The Department is working with relevant bodies across health and education to monitor the effects of the healthcare funding reforms.

We have been working with Health Education England and the university sector to ensure students continued to apply for courses this year. In September 2018 Health Education England launched a campaign to improve the perception of nursing to encourage applications to relevant undergraduate courses for UCAS applications in 2019.

The Department has also put in place significant interventions to boost the supply of nurses, ranging from training more nurses, offering new routes into the profession, enhancing reward packages to make nursing more attractive and improve retention, and encouraging those that have left to return to nursing.

22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much money the NHS has spent on mental health services in the West Midlands in each year since 2010.

The following tables show expenditure on mental health, including learning disabilities. NHS England does not hold information on mental health spend prior to 2013/14.

West Midlands specialised commissioning hub expenditure on mental health services (includes learning disabilities)

Year

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

Expenditure £ million

156.8

162.6

161.4

156.7

155.3

Notes:

  1. The specialised commissioning spend is contracted expenditure for the West Midlands specialised commissioning hub and as such will include expenditure for some service users who reside outside of the West Midlands. The figures also include learning disability spend.

  1. The figures for West Midlands Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) Mental Health spend will relate to West Midlands residents/patients and include spend on learning disabilities and dementia.

West Midlands CCG expenditure on mental health services for West Midlands residents and patients including spend on learning disabilities and dementia

Total mental health spend

Organisation

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

£ million

£ million

£ million

£ million

£ million

NHS Wolverhampton CCG

35.3

32.9

41.6

46.6

46.5

NHS Dudley CCG

38.8

48.6

45.9

48.3

50.9

NHS Walsall CCG

54.5

44.3

64.3

62.1

61.0

NHS Sandwell and West Birmingham CCG

71.7

83.5

95.6

102.6

96.5

NHS Solihull CCG

28.61

46.0

50.6

43.1

44.0

NHS Birmingham and CrossCity CCG

105.8

124.9

134.8

141.5

149.0

NHS Birmingham South and Central CCG

39.7

50.0

64.2

68.0

65.9

NHS Warwickshire North CCG

23.5

23.1

34.9

36.4

34.8

NHS Coventry and Rugby CCG

83.2

83.0

92.7

99.0

101.3

NHS South Warwickshire CCG

35.6

43.6

49.4

51.0

49.9

NHS Herefordshire CCG

33.7

36.9

36.8

38.0

39.1

NHS South Worcestershire CCG

40.5

41.4

44.0

46.2

39.7

NHS Wyre Forest CCG

19.5

15.8

18.2

19.3

17.0

NHS Redditch and Bromsgrove CCG

27.0

22.3

25.4

26.7

23.5

Total

637.3

696.2

798.4

828.9

819.1

Note:

Figures for CCG expenditure for 2015/16 and 2016/17 are slightly higher than those published in the online dashboard as they are outturn expenditure, whereas the online dashboard excludes non-recurrent spending in order to help make the figures more comparable over time. The financial values have been consolidated through the use of National Programme of Care (NPoC) codes and are taken from NHS England’s annual CCG expenditure exercise. This exercise uses Provider Aggregate Contract Monitoring (ACM) as the basis for the data; where this data is incomplete hubs will apportion / estimate any missing values.

22nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Oral Statement of 2 May 2018 on Breast Cancer Screening, Official Report, column 315, what estimate his Department has made of the number of women in Wolverhampton who were not sent an invitation to a final routine breast cancer screening as a result of the computer algorithm failure.

Analysis of the data on the number of women affected was completed by the end of May. My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State has provided this information in a Written Ministerial Statement, HCWS731, published today.

23rd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has conducted an impact assessment of its decision to change NHS funding for postgraduate nursing courses in England.

In July 2016 the Government published a revised economic impact assessment alongside the response to its consultation: Reforming healthcare education funding: creating a sustainable future workforce.

A revised version of the original Equality Analysis, published in February 2018 to accompany the reforms to pre-registration postgraduate healthcare funding, can be found with the aforementioned documents at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/changing-how-healthcare-education-is-funded

Following implementation of the policy, the Department will look for suitable opportunities, including through existing stakeholder forums, to monitor developments.

In order to meet the growing need to increase the future supply of registered nurses, additional clinical placement funding was announced by the Department in August and October 2017. This will enable around 5,000 more nursing students to enter training each year from September 2018; an historic 25% increase.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
22nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many nursing students there were in each year since 2010.

The table below shows the number of nursing students in training in any year of a nursing degree between 2010/11 and 2016/17.

Academic year

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Number of nursing students

52,836

51,713

52,811

No data

50,139

51,386

52,606

Notes:

- Information prior to 2013 was sourced using the Department’s Financial Information Management System. Data collected after 2013 is sourced using the Health Education England EDCOM (Education Commissioning) reports.

- Data for the 2013/14 academic years are not available due to commissioning moving from the Department to Health Education England.

- Student numbers are recorded as of March in each academic year.

- Data for 2017/18 are not yet available.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
22nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many applications to study nursing were received in each year since 2010.

The Department is not responsible for collecting data on the number of applications to study nursing degree courses.

The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service publishes data on the number of applications to full-time undergraduate courses.

Further information and links to 2017 and 2018 application cycle data are available at:

https://www.ucas.com/corporate/data-and-analysis

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
22nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of taking steps to open a fast-track one-stop clinic for cluster headache patients in the West Midlands.

No assessment has been made and there are no plans to make such an assessment. Decisions on local service provision are a matter for local commissioners.

14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether the Social Care Funding Reform Impact Assessment of 3 February 2015 is the most recent impact assessment on social care funding reform.

The most recent impact assessment on social care funding reform is the Social Care Funding Reform Impact Assessment of 3 February 2015.

16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the provision of adult social care in Wolverhampton.

To improve the quality of adult social care, the Government has introduced a tough system of Care Quality Commission (CQC) ratings, new qualifications for care workers and new standards to ensure that everyone receives the highest quality support.

The CQC thoroughly inspects each service and if they found poor quality in any area including Wolverhampton has powers to close those that do not improve and take tough action against owners. This inspection regime is playing a key role in driving up the quality of care. As of July 2017 the CQC rates 79% of adult social care services as good or outstanding.

The Care Act 2014 placed a duty on local authorities in England to promote a diverse, sustainable, high quality market of care and support providers for people in their local area to meet those needs. The Department has published statutory guidance to support local authorities in their market shaping duties.

16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent discussions he has had with Wolverhampton City Council on the provision of health and social care.

The Department has had no recent discussions specifically with Wolverhampton City Council on the provision of health and social care.

The West Midlands Combined Authority, which includes Wolverhampton, has had discussions with the Government on a range of issues including health and social care.

Wolverhampton City Council should be involved in discussion around the provision of health and social care as part of the wider Black Country Sustainability and Transformation Partnership (STP). NHS England holds regular discussions with all STP leaders.

16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how (a) many delayed transfers of care occurred in Wolverhampton and (b) much Wolverhampton City Council has been fined for those delayed transfers in the last 12 months.

The total number of delayed transfers of care in Wolverhampton between October 2016 and September 2017 was 10,176 days (not individual cases).

Data regarding any fines imposed by NHS England that may have been incurred by Wolverhampton City Council are not held centrally. The Department does not have the power to fine councils for delayed transfer of care performance.

16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of any funding gap for social care in Wolverhampton in (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19, (c) 2019-20 and (d) 2020-21 on the basis of the current local sustainability and transformation plan.

The Department does not collect this information.

We have taken several steps to help secure a strong and sustainable social care system, including the Budget announcement of an extra £2 billion in funding. Taken together, Government funding decisions since 2015 will give councils access to £9.25 billion more dedicated funding for social care over the next three years.

Adult social care is a locally delivered system and it is up to local authorities to plan how best to use their available funding to provide services for their residents based on knowledge of local need.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what data his Department holds on breastfeeding.

Data on breastfeeding in the United Kingdom is recorded in the Maternity Services Data Set which collects and reports data from providers of maternity services, including breastfeeding initiation. Data on breastfeeding status at six to eight weeks is reported through the Children and Young People’s Health Services Data Set. In addition, Public Health England presents data on factors related to conception, pregnancy and delivery, including breastfeeding profiles in their Fingertips site; these indicators show performance against a range of indicators describing demographic, breastfeeding behaviours and health outcome data for mothers and their children.

These datasets can be accessed via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/breastfeeding-statistics

14th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, which maternity units in England have attained Baby Friendly Initiative accreditation.

This information is publicly available at the following link:

https://unicefbfi.secure.force.com/Events/Awards

A list of all United Kingdom maternity hospitals, health visiting services and universities at various stages of Baby Friendly accreditation are displayed.

14th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when his Department plans to commission the next Infant Feeding Survey.

There are at present no plans to commission any further Infant Feeding Surveys.

14th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what financial support the NHS (a) provides to peer support breast-feeding and (b) has provided to such groups in each of the last seven years.

NHS England holds no record of any financial support which will have been offered to fund peer-supported breast feeding. If the National Health Service does provide such schemes they would be within a local clinical commissioning group, rather than held centrally.

8th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of regulations on sprinklers in hospitals.

Health Technical Memorandum (HTM) 05-02: Firecode Guidance in support of functional provisions (fire safety in the design of healthcare premises) provides guidance on the minimum standards of fire safety expected in healthcare premises to comply with Part B of Schedule 1 of the Building Regulations 2010, including the use of automatic fire suppression where necessary.

The guidance will be reviewed following the publication of the results of the Independent Review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety, which is being led by Dame Judith Hackitt in response to the Grenfell Tower incident.

6th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what information his Department holds on (a) hospitals, (b) GP surgeries and (c) walk in centres which are (i) clad in flammable substances and (ii) fitted with sprinklers.

As part of the Government’s Building Safety Programme to identify buildings of concern following the Grenfell Tower incident, actions have been implemented across National Health Service trusts to assess the risks of similar issues and to ensure that the NHS estate is safe. All NHS trusts have now reviewed their estate, and where cladding similar to that used at Grenfell Tower has been identified, it has been tested by the Building Research Establishment (BRE). Where the cladding has failed the BRE testing, mitigation action has been implemented by relevant trusts. NHS Improvement is monitoring these trusts on behalf of the Department.

Fire safety checks of NHS facilities, including hospitals, are regularly undertaken in line with legislation and guidance. Each hospital also has a tailored fire safety plan, which includes assessment of the provision of fire safety precautions. Such precautions may include the use of sprinklers.

NHS England has advised that it does not hold data on general practitioner (GP) practices in relation to physical infrastructure. However, the GP contract specifies a number of requirements that contractors must meet in respect of the premises used for the provision of services, such as meeting Statutory Standards on Fire Precautions and having adequate procedures in place to ensure the continuing safety of practice premises and the suitability of those premises for delivering primary medical services.

As walk in centres could be located in either NHS trusts or GP-operated premises, separate data about them is not available.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing mandatory echocardiogram screening to identify young people aged between 18 and 35 years old at risk of cardiac arrest; and what steps his Department has taken to improve diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities in young people.

In 2015 the UK National Screening Committee (UK NSC) reviewed the evidence for screening for major causes of sudden cardiac death in young people between the ages of 12 to 39 and recommended that screening should not be offered.

The UK NSC will review the evidence again in 2018/19 or earlier if any new peer reviewed evidence emerges in the meantime.

23rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if the Government will produce a strategy to provide NHS support for problem gamblers who wish to receive anonymous treatment.

There are no plans to do so. There are a range of services available to problem gamblers, details of which can be found on the NHS Choices website at:

www.nhs.uk/Livewell/addiction/Pages/gamblingaddiction.aspx

9th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 25 October 2016 to Question HL2227, how his Department monitors clinical commissioning groups on waiting times for cataracts surgery.

The Department uses the National Health Service performance data published on a monthly basis by NHS England in respect of waiting times for consultant-led referral to treatment waiting times to monitor compliance with waiting times targets for treatment. Referral to treatment data are collected by 18 specialties and are not condition or procedure specific. Cataract surgery is included in the ophthalmology specialty. This information is published at both provider and commissioner level and is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/rtt-waiting-times/

8th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how his Department monitors compliance with government targets on waiting times for treatment.

The Department uses the National Health Service performance data published on a monthly basis by NHS England to monitor compliance with waiting times targets for treatment. This information is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/

Maintaining waiting time performance is a key objective in the Government’s Mandate to NHS England. Both NHS England and NHS Improvement are providing support and challenge to NHS commissioners and providers to reduce waiting times for hospital treatment.

8th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what statistics (a) his Department, (b) NHS trusts and (c) clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) hold on referrals to treatment by (i) NHS trusts and (ii) CCGs.

Official statistics are published by NHS England on a monthly basis in respect of waiting times for consultant-led referral to treatment waiting times. These statistics provide the length of time from referral through to elective treatment for 18 high volume specialties. This information is published at both provider and commissioner level. Further information can be found at this link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/rtt-waiting-times/

9th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the level of cervical screening uptake is in Wolverhampton Clinical Commissioning Group; what steps his Department is taking to increase cervical screening uptake among women in Wolverhampton; and if he will make a statement.

Cervical screening data is provided at local authority level and is published by Public Health England (PHE).

The percentage of women in the resident population of Wolverhampton who are eligible for cervical screening who were screened adequately within the previous 3.5 years or 5.5 years according to age (3.5 years for women aged 25-49 and 5.5 years for women aged 50-64) on 31 March is 68.1%.

Cervical screening is commissioned by NHS England and is based upon a national service specification developed by PHE. NHS England closely monitors the coverage rates for cervical screening in all age groups and is committed to improving coverage and reducing variation between all age groups. In Wolverhampton, NHS England is working with local sexual health services to improve access for women who wish to access the cervical screening programme outside of general practice. PHE and NHS England are also working with general practices with lowest levels of uptake to understand barriers and mechanisms for improvement.

The human papillomavirus (HPV) adolescent vaccination programme for girls is well established in the United Kingdom and is expected to have a significant impact on reducing cervical cancer. Since the start of the programme in 2008, more than 8.5 million doses of the HPV vaccine have been given in the UK, with close to 90% of eligible teenagers vaccinated.

9th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how long patients in Wolverhampton waited on average to start treatment following diagnosis for (a) lung cancer, (b) breast cancer, (c) cervical cancer, (d) ovarian cancer, (e) prostate cancer, (f) testicular cancer, (g) pancreatic cancer, (h) head and neck cancers, (i) leukaemia, (j) bowel cancer, (k) kidney cancer, (l) colon cancer, (m) GIST cancers, (n) stomach cancer, (o) liver cancer, (p) melanoma, (q) non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and (r) myeloma in each year since 1997; what the average (i) one, (ii) five and (iii) 10 year age-standardised net survival rate for each of those cancers was in each year since 1997; and what proportion of people with each of those cancers was diagnosed at stage (A) 1, (B) 2, (C) 3 and (D) 4 in each year since 1997.

Data are not available in the format requested.

Data is published by NHS England on the proportion of patients who received treatment within 62 days of referral by provider for six tumour types: breast, lower gastrointestinal, lung, other, skin, and urological (excluding testicular). These data can be found at:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/cancer-waiting-times/monthly-prov-cwt/

Staging data is published by the National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service for 13 tumour types: bladder, breast, oesophagus, stomach, colorectal, pancreas, kidney, lung, melanoma, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, ovarian, uterine, and prostate. These data can be found at:

http://www.ncin.org.uk/publications/survival_by_stage

Data on one and five year survival rates for 16 tumour types are provided in Table 1. These data are not published at provider level.

9th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what costs have been (a) incurred and (b) committed for future periods for the development and management of the sustainability and transformation plan process for Wolverhampton Clinical Commissioning Group.

Wolverhampton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is part of the Black Country Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP). The majority of work to date on the STP has been managed through existing staff resources of partner organisations, with a small element of external support being funded from management resources.

Partner organisations are contributing to support multiple programmes and work streams set out in the plan, and staff are working on the STP in addition to their other management roles. As a result, the total cost of developing the STP to date is not held centrally. Plans are currently being drafted outlining the resources and financial commitment needed by the CCG for the development and management of the Black Country STP for the forthcoming financial year.

21st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many delayed transfer days in England were recorded in the NHS in each year since 2010; and what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect on the number of delayed transfer days of the introduction of the cap on social care costs in each year between 2020 and 2026.

The Department published an Impact Assessment of the cap on care costs system alongside a consultation on draft regulations and guidance in February 2015. This estimated that the numbers of people who would receive financial support as a result of the introduction of the cap and extensions to the means test from 2016 to 2026 would have been as follows:

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

2025/26

Additional people supported

23,000

24,000

28,000

38,000

53,000

64,000

71,000

74,000

78,000

81,000

Number reaching the cap

0

0

19,000

37,000

74,000

101,000

115,000

121,000

128,000

132,000

The Government remains committed to the implementation of the cap on care costs in 2020. This will offer financial protection and peace of mind to people who need care and support. In the meantime, means-tested financial support remains available for those who cannot afford to pay for care to meet their eligible needs.

The capital limits, which determine how much capital a person may hold whilst receiving means-tested financial support towards their social care, will remain at their current levels for the financial year 2016/17.

The Department plans to introduce the appeals system for adult social care in April 2020, alongside of the implementation of the cap on care costs.

Due to concerns around the potential impact, Ministers also decided to delay the implementation of Section 18(3) of the Care Act 2014 until 2020 in line with the timetable for implementing funding reform. This will allow the Department enough time to research the likely impact of these reforms on the market and develop effective mitigations.

Information on the number of delayed transfers of care is published by NHS England on a monthly basis and is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/delayed-transfers-of-care/delayed-transfers-of-care-data-2015-16/

- see the delayed days by responsible organisation spreadsheet.

We do not have centrally held figures regarding the numbers of people who will enter the social care system in future, any impact that the cap on care costs might have on delayed transfers of care, or the numbers of people who might have asked local authorities to arrange their care under s18(3) of the Care Act 2014.

21st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether his Department plans to (a) introduce the appeals system set out in Section 72 of the Care Act 2014 and (b) revise the current care capital limits.

The Department published an Impact Assessment of the cap on care costs system alongside a consultation on draft regulations and guidance in February 2015. This estimated that the numbers of people who would receive financial support as a result of the introduction of the cap and extensions to the means test from 2016 to 2026 would have been as follows:

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

2025/26

Additional people supported

23,000

24,000

28,000

38,000

53,000

64,000

71,000

74,000

78,000

81,000

Number reaching the cap

0

0

19,000

37,000

74,000

101,000

115,000

121,000

128,000

132,000

The Government remains committed to the implementation of the cap on care costs in 2020. This will offer financial protection and peace of mind to people who need care and support. In the meantime, means-tested financial support remains available for those who cannot afford to pay for care to meet their eligible needs.

The capital limits, which determine how much capital a person may hold whilst receiving means-tested financial support towards their social care, will remain at their current levels for the financial year 2016/17.

The Department plans to introduce the appeals system for adult social care in April 2020, alongside of the implementation of the cap on care costs.

Due to concerns around the potential impact, Ministers also decided to delay the implementation of Section 18(3) of the Care Act 2014 until 2020 in line with the timetable for implementing funding reform. This will allow the Department enough time to research the likely impact of these reforms on the market and develop effective mitigations.

Information on the number of delayed transfers of care is published by NHS England on a monthly basis and is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/delayed-transfers-of-care/delayed-transfers-of-care-data-2015-16/

- see the delayed days by responsible organisation spreadsheet.

We do not have centrally held figures regarding the numbers of people who will enter the social care system in future, any impact that the cap on care costs might have on delayed transfers of care, or the numbers of people who might have asked local authorities to arrange their care under s18(3) of the Care Act 2014.

21st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people in each year between 2015 and 2026 who will (a) enter the social care system, (b) be affected by the cap on care costs being delayed from April 2016 until April 2020, (c) be affected by the increase in the ceiling of the means test being delayed until April 2020 and (d) be affected by the delay until April 2020 of the full introduction of the duty on local authorities under Section 18(3) of the Care Act 2014 to meet the eligible needs of self-funders in care homes; and if he will make a statement.

The Department published an Impact Assessment of the cap on care costs system alongside a consultation on draft regulations and guidance in February 2015. This estimated that the numbers of people who would receive financial support as a result of the introduction of the cap and extensions to the means test from 2016 to 2026 would have been as follows:

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

2025/26

Additional people supported

23,000

24,000

28,000

38,000

53,000

64,000

71,000

74,000

78,000

81,000

Number reaching the cap

0

0

19,000

37,000

74,000

101,000

115,000

121,000

128,000

132,000

The Government remains committed to the implementation of the cap on care costs in 2020. This will offer financial protection and peace of mind to people who need care and support. In the meantime, means-tested financial support remains available for those who cannot afford to pay for care to meet their eligible needs.

The capital limits, which determine how much capital a person may hold whilst receiving means-tested financial support towards their social care, will remain at their current levels for the financial year 2016/17.

The Department plans to introduce the appeals system for adult social care in April 2020, alongside of the implementation of the cap on care costs.

Due to concerns around the potential impact, Ministers also decided to delay the implementation of Section 18(3) of the Care Act 2014 until 2020 in line with the timetable for implementing funding reform. This will allow the Department enough time to research the likely impact of these reforms on the market and develop effective mitigations.

Information on the number of delayed transfers of care is published by NHS England on a monthly basis and is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/delayed-transfers-of-care/delayed-transfers-of-care-data-2015-16/

- see the delayed days by responsible organisation spreadsheet.

We do not have centrally held figures regarding the numbers of people who will enter the social care system in future, any impact that the cap on care costs might have on delayed transfers of care, or the numbers of people who might have asked local authorities to arrange their care under s18(3) of the Care Act 2014.

1st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2016 to Question 23396, for what reasons the Sexual Health Forum was discontinued; and what Public Health England's future plans are for stakeholder engagement with sexual health organisations.

The Sexual Health and HIV Forum played a useful role in aiding the transition to new commissioning arrangements and locally based decision making. These changes have taken place, the Forum was not considered to be the best use of resources either for Departmental or stakeholder organisations. Departmental officials continue to meet regularly with a range of stakeholders on a more focussed range of issues. Public Health England is still considering plans for future stakeholder engagement.

1st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2016 to Questions 23930, how many responses Public Health England has received to the review of sexual health, reproductive health and HIV commissioning services since the 8 February 2016 closing date; for what reasons his Department's consultation on sexual health, reproductive health and HIV commissioning services lasted for 3 weeks; and whether any assessment has been made of the effect of the length of the consultation period on the responses received to that review.

Public Health England (PHE), supported by the Association of Directors of Public Health undertook a review of Sexual Health, Reproductive Health and HIV Commissioning services; the survey was first published on the 19 January 2016 and closed formally on 8 February 2016.

To date, PHE has received 113 responses to the survey. Two of these responses were received after 8 February closing date.

This survey does not form part of any formal consultation. The length of the survey period was chosen to fit within the timeframes for analysis and publication for the survey findings.

Response rates were continually reviewed during the survey period. The deadline was extended and reminders sent in order to increase response rates. The last response was received on 10 February.

No assessment has been made of the impact of the survey period length but the response rate is considered to be high.

1st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answers of 14 January 2016 to Questions 21812, 21778, 21813, 21814 and 21816, which organisations his Department has met to discuss whether local authorities are meeting their mandatory requirements for the commissioning of sexual health services.

Departmental officials have met and discussed this issue with the Local Government Association, the English HIV and Sexual Health Commissioners Group, the British Association for Sexual Health and HIV and the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare.

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what provision there is for people with perinatal mental health issues living in clinical commissioning group areas where there is no specialist community perinatal mental health team.

This Government is committed to improving access to perinatal mental health services for women during pregnancy and in the first postnatal year. In January 2016 the Government set out that an additional £290 million will be made available over the next five years to 2020/21, over and above the money identified in the Spring Budget, to invest in perinatal mental health services. This is funded from within the Department’s overall Spending Review settlement and means that in total from 2015/16 to 2020/21 £365 million will be invested in perinatal mental health services.

We are aware that there is unacceptable variation in the levels of access to high quality, NICE-recommended specialist perinatal mental health care for women across England. A 2014 census identified that 40% of women in England have no access to specialist perinatal mental health services and that is why we have confirmed this additional investment. The funding should enable significant progress towards closing this gap and will help to enable women across the country to access evidence-based specialist support, in the community or through inpatient mother and baby services, closer to their home, when they need it. It is anticipated that, by 2020/21, around 30,000 more women should be able to access appropriate specialist support.


This new funding, together with the recommendations of the forthcoming report of the independent Mental Health Taskforce, will enable NHS England to work with partners to design a longer-term transformation programme to build capacity and capability in specialist perinatal mental health services over the next five years. This will include setting detailed plans for how the additional investment will be targeted over the period to 2020/21 and setting clear outcome measures and metrics to monitor the impact of the funding on perinatal mental health provision.

In 2015/16 work is already underway to lay the foundations for this longer-term work programme through targeted funding of activities to build capacity in specialist services. This will include, for example, a £1 million investment in strengthening clinical networks across the country. It is also expected to include the provision of national and regional benchmarking data and analytical support to regions, and work to develop clinical leadership capacity. Work will also continue to support the development of specialist mother and baby units in the regions identified as most in need of new services.

To ensure the workforce are available and appropriately trained, NHS England is working closely with Health Education England and key stakeholders to better understand the future workforce commissioning requirements and how it is best to meet multi professional education and training needs.

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans his Department has to ensure that clinical commissioning groups (a) improve access to, (b) provide training to health professionals on and (c) increase the number of healthcare professionals working in perinatal mental health.

This Government is committed to improving access to perinatal mental health services for women during pregnancy and in the first postnatal year. In January 2016 the Government set out that an additional £290 million will be made available over the next five years to 2020/21, over and above the money identified in the Spring Budget, to invest in perinatal mental health services. This is funded from within the Department’s overall Spending Review settlement and means that in total from 2015/16 to 2020/21 £365 million will be invested in perinatal mental health services.

We are aware that there is unacceptable variation in the levels of access to high quality, NICE-recommended specialist perinatal mental health care for women across England. A 2014 census identified that 40% of women in England have no access to specialist perinatal mental health services and that is why we have confirmed this additional investment. The funding should enable significant progress towards closing this gap and will help to enable women across the country to access evidence-based specialist support, in the community or through inpatient mother and baby services, closer to their home, when they need it. It is anticipated that, by 2020/21, around 30,000 more women should be able to access appropriate specialist support.


This new funding, together with the recommendations of the forthcoming report of the independent Mental Health Taskforce, will enable NHS England to work with partners to design a longer-term transformation programme to build capacity and capability in specialist perinatal mental health services over the next five years. This will include setting detailed plans for how the additional investment will be targeted over the period to 2020/21 and setting clear outcome measures and metrics to monitor the impact of the funding on perinatal mental health provision.

In 2015/16 work is already underway to lay the foundations for this longer-term work programme through targeted funding of activities to build capacity in specialist services. This will include, for example, a £1 million investment in strengthening clinical networks across the country. It is also expected to include the provision of national and regional benchmarking data and analytical support to regions, and work to develop clinical leadership capacity. Work will also continue to support the development of specialist mother and baby units in the regions identified as most in need of new services.

To ensure the workforce are available and appropriately trained, NHS England is working closely with Health Education England and key stakeholders to better understand the future workforce commissioning requirements and how it is best to meet multi professional education and training needs.

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to the announcement by the Prime Minister on enhancing mental health services on 11 January 2016, what the basis is for the figure of £290 million to be invested in perinatal mental health care; how that funding will be allocated; and how the efficacy of that funding will be measured.

This Government is committed to improving access to perinatal mental health services for women during pregnancy and in the first postnatal year. In January 2016 the Government set out that an additional £290 million will be made available over the next five years to 2020/21, over and above the money identified in the Spring Budget, to invest in perinatal mental health services. This is funded from within the Department’s overall Spending Review settlement and means that in total from 2015/16 to 2020/21 £365 million will be invested in perinatal mental health services.

We are aware that there is unacceptable variation in the levels of access to high quality, NICE-recommended specialist perinatal mental health care for women across England. A 2014 census identified that 40% of women in England have no access to specialist perinatal mental health services and that is why we have confirmed this additional investment. The funding should enable significant progress towards closing this gap and will help to enable women across the country to access evidence-based specialist support, in the community or through inpatient mother and baby services, closer to their home, when they need it. It is anticipated that, by 2020/21, around 30,000 more women should be able to access appropriate specialist support.


This new funding, together with the recommendations of the forthcoming report of the independent Mental Health Taskforce, will enable NHS England to work with partners to design a longer-term transformation programme to build capacity and capability in specialist perinatal mental health services over the next five years. This will include setting detailed plans for how the additional investment will be targeted over the period to 2020/21 and setting clear outcome measures and metrics to monitor the impact of the funding on perinatal mental health provision.

In 2015/16 work is already underway to lay the foundations for this longer-term work programme through targeted funding of activities to build capacity in specialist services. This will include, for example, a £1 million investment in strengthening clinical networks across the country. It is also expected to include the provision of national and regional benchmarking data and analytical support to regions, and work to develop clinical leadership capacity. Work will also continue to support the development of specialist mother and baby units in the regions identified as most in need of new services.

To ensure the workforce are available and appropriately trained, NHS England is working closely with Health Education England and key stakeholders to better understand the future workforce commissioning requirements and how it is best to meet multi professional education and training needs.

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans his Department has to improve the identification and treatment of perinatal mental health issues; and how this will be monitored.

This Government is committed to improving access to perinatal mental health services for women during pregnancy and in the first postnatal year. In January 2016 the Government set out that an additional £290 million will be made available over the next five years to 2020/21, over and above the money identified in the Spring Budget, to invest in perinatal mental health services. This is funded from within the Department’s overall Spending Review settlement and means that in total from 2015/16 to 2020/21 £365 million will be invested in perinatal mental health services.

We are aware that there is unacceptable variation in the levels of access to high quality, NICE-recommended specialist perinatal mental health care for women across England. A 2014 census identified that 40% of women in England have no access to specialist perinatal mental health services and that is why we have confirmed this additional investment. The funding should enable significant progress towards closing this gap and will help to enable women across the country to access evidence-based specialist support, in the community or through inpatient mother and baby services, closer to their home, when they need it. It is anticipated that, by 2020/21, around 30,000 more women should be able to access appropriate specialist support.


This new funding, together with the recommendations of the forthcoming report of the independent Mental Health Taskforce, will enable NHS England to work with partners to design a longer-term transformation programme to build capacity and capability in specialist perinatal mental health services over the next five years. This will include setting detailed plans for how the additional investment will be targeted over the period to 2020/21 and setting clear outcome measures and metrics to monitor the impact of the funding on perinatal mental health provision.

In 2015/16 work is already underway to lay the foundations for this longer-term work programme through targeted funding of activities to build capacity in specialist services. This will include, for example, a £1 million investment in strengthening clinical networks across the country. It is also expected to include the provision of national and regional benchmarking data and analytical support to regions, and work to develop clinical leadership capacity. Work will also continue to support the development of specialist mother and baby units in the regions identified as most in need of new services.

To ensure the workforce are available and appropriately trained, NHS England is working closely with Health Education England and key stakeholders to better understand the future workforce commissioning requirements and how it is best to meet multi professional education and training needs.

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department has taken to increase access to specialist community perinatal mental health care.

This Government is committed to improving access to perinatal mental health services for women during pregnancy and in the first postnatal year. In January 2016 the Government set out that an additional £290 million will be made available over the next five years to 2020/21, over and above the money identified in the Spring Budget, to invest in perinatal mental health services. This is funded from within the Department’s overall Spending Review settlement and means that in total from 2015/16 to 2020/21 £365 million will be invested in perinatal mental health services.

We are aware that there is unacceptable variation in the levels of access to high quality, NICE-recommended specialist perinatal mental health care for women across England. A 2014 census identified that 40% of women in England have no access to specialist perinatal mental health services and that is why we have confirmed this additional investment. The funding should enable significant progress towards closing this gap and will help to enable women across the country to access evidence-based specialist support, in the community or through inpatient mother and baby services, closer to their home, when they need it. It is anticipated that, by 2020/21, around 30,000 more women should be able to access appropriate specialist support.


This new funding, together with the recommendations of the forthcoming report of the independent Mental Health Taskforce, will enable NHS England to work with partners to design a longer-term transformation programme to build capacity and capability in specialist perinatal mental health services over the next five years. This will include setting detailed plans for how the additional investment will be targeted over the period to 2020/21 and setting clear outcome measures and metrics to monitor the impact of the funding on perinatal mental health provision.

In 2015/16 work is already underway to lay the foundations for this longer-term work programme through targeted funding of activities to build capacity in specialist services. This will include, for example, a £1 million investment in strengthening clinical networks across the country. It is also expected to include the provision of national and regional benchmarking data and analytical support to regions, and work to develop clinical leadership capacity. Work will also continue to support the development of specialist mother and baby units in the regions identified as most in need of new services.

To ensure the workforce are available and appropriately trained, NHS England is working closely with Health Education England and key stakeholders to better understand the future workforce commissioning requirements and how it is best to meet multi professional education and training needs.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much his Department spent on medical nutrition in end of life care in each of the last five years; and what estimate he has made of such spending in each of the next five years.

Information on annual National Health Service spend on medically assisted nutrition in end of life care is not held centrally.


It is for clinicians with responsibility for the care of people at the end of life to ensure their patients receive care and treatment appropriate to their needs. Similarly, local commissioners are responsible for ensuring the services they commission meet the needs of their local populations.


In 2014 we set out five priorities for care of the dying person which should underpin the care being delivered to all dying people. Alongside the priorities, we set out the duties and responsibilities for all staff with responsibility for looking after dying people and implementation guidance for all providers and commissioners of care. The priorities for care state that an individual plan of care, which includes food and drink, symptom control and psychological, social and spiritual support, is agreed, co-ordinated and delivered with compassion.


In December 2015, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence published guidance on the care of dying adults in the last days of life, including guidance on medical nutrition and hydration. Clinicians and commissioners should have regard to this guidance when making decisions about care for people at the end of life.







12th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if his Department will mandate that nutrition is written into all national care pathways for long-term conditions.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has developed a range of care pathways covering the management of long term conditions, such as diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which are based on its best practice guidance for management of these diseases. Where appropriate to the management of a condition, nutritional assessment and advice are included. In addition to this, there are specific care pathways covering nutrition support in adults and maternal and child nutrition which can be found at the following links:


http://pathways.nice.org.uk/pathways/nutrition-support-in-adults


http://pathways.nice.org.uk/pathways/maternal-and-child-nutrition


NICE is the independent body responsible for developing best practice guidance for the National Health Service and its guidance is based on a thorough assessment of the available evidence and is developed through wide consultation with stakeholders. NICE has issued guidance on a broad range of medical conditions, treatments and interventions and periodically reviews and updates its guidance to ensure that it reflects new evidence and other developments.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps (a) his Department and (b) NHS England is taking to ensure that patients who cannot consume food in the normal way are receiving the correct treatment through tube and sip feeds.

Information on annual National Health Service spend on medically assisted nutrition in end of life care is not held centrally.


It is for clinicians with responsibility for the care of people at the end of life to ensure their patients receive care and treatment appropriate to their needs. Similarly, local commissioners are responsible for ensuring the services they commission meet the needs of their local populations.


In 2014 we set out five priorities for care of the dying person which should underpin the care being delivered to all dying people. Alongside the priorities, we set out the duties and responsibilities for all staff with responsibility for looking after dying people and implementation guidance for all providers and commissioners of care. The priorities for care state that an individual plan of care, which includes food and drink, symptom control and psychological, social and spiritual support, is agreed, co-ordinated and delivered with compassion.


In December 2015, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence published guidance on the care of dying adults in the last days of life, including guidance on medical nutrition and hydration. Clinicians and commissioners should have regard to this guidance when making decisions about care for people at the end of life.







12th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans his Department has to ensure that medical nutrition is integrated into end of life care pathways in clinical commissioning groups.

Information on annual National Health Service spend on medically assisted nutrition in end of life care is not held centrally.


It is for clinicians with responsibility for the care of people at the end of life to ensure their patients receive care and treatment appropriate to their needs. Similarly, local commissioners are responsible for ensuring the services they commission meet the needs of their local populations.


In 2014 we set out five priorities for care of the dying person which should underpin the care being delivered to all dying people. Alongside the priorities, we set out the duties and responsibilities for all staff with responsibility for looking after dying people and implementation guidance for all providers and commissioners of care. The priorities for care state that an individual plan of care, which includes food and drink, symptom control and psychological, social and spiritual support, is agreed, co-ordinated and delivered with compassion.


In December 2015, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence published guidance on the care of dying adults in the last days of life, including guidance on medical nutrition and hydration. Clinicians and commissioners should have regard to this guidance when making decisions about care for people at the end of life.







11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will bring forward proposals to require local authorities to conduct a needs assessment of local sexual health and contraceptive services before issuing tenders.

The Department’s Framework for Sexual Health Promotion in England (2013) sets out our ambitions and objectives to improve sexual health for all people. It takes account of the commissioning arrangements from 2013 including the new role for local authorities (LAs) as commissioners of most sexual health services. Later this month Public Health England (PHE) will undertake a survey of local commissioning arrangements for sexual health. It has also produced sexual health and reproductive health profiles to help LAs and others monitor the sexual and reproductive health of their populations and the performance of local public health related systems.


It is for LAs to decide on what research and evidence they need to inform their tenders for sexual health and reproductive health services in line with procurement requirements and good practice. In 2014 PHE published Making it Work, a guide to commissioning for sexual health across the whole system, to improve the sexual health of both individuals and the wider public.


We have made no formal assessment of the effect on sexual health services of reductions in the Public Health Grant to LAs for 2015/16, although PHE continues to monitor relevant outcomes data for every LA in England. Decisions on local public health spending are a matter for LAs. They are mandated by legislation to commission open access sexual health services that meet the needs of their local population. Officials meet regularly with sexual health organisations who would raise any concerns if LAs were not meeting their mandatory requirements for sexual health services.


The Framework for Sexual Health Improvement includes as a priority reducing unwanted pregnancies and highlights the need to increase access to long acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods and emergency contraception for women of all ages. We have no plans to evaluate the effect on general practitioner surgeries of LA commissioning of LARCs.


11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what forecast he has made of the return on spending on preventative sexual and reproductive health spending in each of the next five years.

We have no plans to produce forecasts on the return on investment of spending on sexual health prevention services. Investment to prevent sexually transmitted infections, (including HIV) and unplanned pregnancies offers benefits to individuals, local economies, the National Health Service and wider society. Our Framework for Sexual Health Improvements includes the evidence and information to support local authorities to commission effective services.

11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how his Department plans to monitor progress against the targets in its Framework for Sexual Health Improvement in England.

The Department’s Framework for Sexual Health Promotion in England (2013) sets out our ambitions and objectives to improve sexual health for all people. It takes account of the commissioning arrangements from 2013 including the new role for local authorities (LAs) as commissioners of most sexual health services. Later this month Public Health England (PHE) will undertake a survey of local commissioning arrangements for sexual health. It has also produced sexual health and reproductive health profiles to help LAs and others monitor the sexual and reproductive health of their populations and the performance of local public health related systems.


It is for LAs to decide on what research and evidence they need to inform their tenders for sexual health and reproductive health services in line with procurement requirements and good practice. In 2014 PHE published Making it Work, a guide to commissioning for sexual health across the whole system, to improve the sexual health of both individuals and the wider public.


We have made no formal assessment of the effect on sexual health services of reductions in the Public Health Grant to LAs for 2015/16, although PHE continues to monitor relevant outcomes data for every LA in England. Decisions on local public health spending are a matter for LAs. They are mandated by legislation to commission open access sexual health services that meet the needs of their local population. Officials meet regularly with sexual health organisations who would raise any concerns if LAs were not meeting their mandatory requirements for sexual health services.


The Framework for Sexual Health Improvement includes as a priority reducing unwanted pregnancies and highlights the need to increase access to long acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods and emergency contraception for women of all ages. We have no plans to evaluate the effect on general practitioner surgeries of LA commissioning of LARCs.


11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment has been undertaken of the effect on sexual and reproductive health services of reductions in the Public Health Grant to local authorities for 2015-16 and the measures in the Spending Review and Autumn Statement 2015 relating to the public health system.

The Department’s Framework for Sexual Health Promotion in England (2013) sets out our ambitions and objectives to improve sexual health for all people. It takes account of the commissioning arrangements from 2013 including the new role for local authorities (LAs) as commissioners of most sexual health services. Later this month Public Health England (PHE) will undertake a survey of local commissioning arrangements for sexual health. It has also produced sexual health and reproductive health profiles to help LAs and others monitor the sexual and reproductive health of their populations and the performance of local public health related systems.


It is for LAs to decide on what research and evidence they need to inform their tenders for sexual health and reproductive health services in line with procurement requirements and good practice. In 2014 PHE published Making it Work, a guide to commissioning for sexual health across the whole system, to improve the sexual health of both individuals and the wider public.


We have made no formal assessment of the effect on sexual health services of reductions in the Public Health Grant to LAs for 2015/16, although PHE continues to monitor relevant outcomes data for every LA in England. Decisions on local public health spending are a matter for LAs. They are mandated by legislation to commission open access sexual health services that meet the needs of their local population. Officials meet regularly with sexual health organisations who would raise any concerns if LAs were not meeting their mandatory requirements for sexual health services.


The Framework for Sexual Health Improvement includes as a priority reducing unwanted pregnancies and highlights the need to increase access to long acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods and emergency contraception for women of all ages. We have no plans to evaluate the effect on general practitioner surgeries of LA commissioning of LARCs.


11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what evaluation he (a) has made or (b) plans to make of the effect of local authority commissioning of long acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) in primary care on the number of GP surgeries offering LARC fitting and removal.

The Department’s Framework for Sexual Health Promotion in England (2013) sets out our ambitions and objectives to improve sexual health for all people. It takes account of the commissioning arrangements from 2013 including the new role for local authorities (LAs) as commissioners of most sexual health services. Later this month Public Health England (PHE) will undertake a survey of local commissioning arrangements for sexual health. It has also produced sexual health and reproductive health profiles to help LAs and others monitor the sexual and reproductive health of their populations and the performance of local public health related systems.


It is for LAs to decide on what research and evidence they need to inform their tenders for sexual health and reproductive health services in line with procurement requirements and good practice. In 2014 PHE published Making it Work, a guide to commissioning for sexual health across the whole system, to improve the sexual health of both individuals and the wider public.


We have made no formal assessment of the effect on sexual health services of reductions in the Public Health Grant to LAs for 2015/16, although PHE continues to monitor relevant outcomes data for every LA in England. Decisions on local public health spending are a matter for LAs. They are mandated by legislation to commission open access sexual health services that meet the needs of their local population. Officials meet regularly with sexual health organisations who would raise any concerns if LAs were not meeting their mandatory requirements for sexual health services.


The Framework for Sexual Health Improvement includes as a priority reducing unwanted pregnancies and highlights the need to increase access to long acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods and emergency contraception for women of all ages. We have no plans to evaluate the effect on general practitioner surgeries of LA commissioning of LARCs.


11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if his Department will publish an accountability structure of the responsibilities regarding sexual and reproductive health for each government department and arm's length body.

The Department is responsible for overall policy on sexual health in England. We work collaboratively with all relevant arm’s length bodies on issues linked to sexual health and we also maintain good working relationships with other government departments on issues relating to sexual health. Accountability structures for each organisation are already in the public domain.

11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what system of monitoring is in place to ensure that local authorities meet their duty to commission open access, confidential services for sexually transmitted infections and contraception.

The Department’s Framework for Sexual Health Promotion in England (2013) sets out our ambitions and objectives to improve sexual health for all people. It takes account of the commissioning arrangements from 2013 including the new role for local authorities (LAs) as commissioners of most sexual health services. Later this month Public Health England (PHE) will undertake a survey of local commissioning arrangements for sexual health. It has also produced sexual health and reproductive health profiles to help LAs and others monitor the sexual and reproductive health of their populations and the performance of local public health related systems.


It is for LAs to decide on what research and evidence they need to inform their tenders for sexual health and reproductive health services in line with procurement requirements and good practice. In 2014 PHE published Making it Work, a guide to commissioning for sexual health across the whole system, to improve the sexual health of both individuals and the wider public.


We have made no formal assessment of the effect on sexual health services of reductions in the Public Health Grant to LAs for 2015/16, although PHE continues to monitor relevant outcomes data for every LA in England. Decisions on local public health spending are a matter for LAs. They are mandated by legislation to commission open access sexual health services that meet the needs of their local population. Officials meet regularly with sexual health organisations who would raise any concerns if LAs were not meeting their mandatory requirements for sexual health services.


The Framework for Sexual Health Improvement includes as a priority reducing unwanted pregnancies and highlights the need to increase access to long acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods and emergency contraception for women of all ages. We have no plans to evaluate the effect on general practitioner surgeries of LA commissioning of LARCs.


5th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether those who have suffered the loss of a child at birth under the current litigation regime will still be able to claim compensation under a fixed recoverable costs regime.

The Department is currently preparing to go out to public consultation on the introduction of Fixed Recoverable Costs (FRC) for clinical negligence claims.


We can confirm there are no plans to limit the amount of damages awarded for clinical negligence claims and so parties will still be able to claim compensation under a FRC regime.

5th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps are being taken to ensure that all NHS trusts are (a) identifying patient safety incidents, (b) conducting full investigations to identify the causes of such incidents and (c) implementing measures to prevent recurring such incidents.

Currently, NHS England has a leadership role for patient safety in the National Health Service and supports providers to identify, understand and manage risks that might affect the safety of patients. The primary source for identifying risks is the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS). The NRLS operates as a database and holds over 1.4 million locally reported patient safety incidents. These are reviewed to help address the identified issues or risks in the NHS. NHS England alerts NHS trusts of emerging patient safety risks via the National Patient Safety Alerting System – a three-stage alerting process which ensures the timely sharing of relevant safety information. The system also encourages information sharing between organisations so that examples of best practice can be widely adopted.

NHS trusts are expected to review their own patient safety incidents. The revised Serious Incident Framework published in March 2015 has sought to simplify the incident management process and ensure that serious incidents are identified correctly, investigated thoroughly and, most importantly, learned from to prevent the likelihood of similar incidents happening again.

The NHS standard contract also stipulates that providers must consider and respond to the recommendations arising from any audit, Serious Incident report or Patient Safety Incident report.

26th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of how long it would take on average for a nurse to pay off a student loan.

No estimate has been made as this will vary between individuals and is dependent upon a number of factors. Currently student loans are paid back over a maximum 30 year period and repayment is contingent on earnings. Graduates do not begin to pay back their loans until the April after they graduate, and then only 9% of their earnings over £21,000 per year.


If their income drops below £21,000 for any reason (part-time working, career break) their repayments cease.

26th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of student nurses had already studied for a degree before training as a nurse in each of the last five years; and what estimate he has made of the number of new student nurses who have studied for a degree likely to start training as a nurse in each of the next five years.


The information about the proportion of student nurses that had already studied for a degree before training as a nurse is not collected by the Department. Statistical information can be obtained from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.



The Government does not have estimates of the number of student nurses who have studied for a degree and likely to start training. However we intend to make an exemption so that student nurses midwives and allied health professionals who already have a degree can access loans.


26th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate the Government has made of the number of training places for nurses required by the NHS in each of the next five years.


Health Education England (HEE) was established and has been mandated by the Government to provide national leadership on education, training and workforce development in the National Health Service. As one of the arm’s length bodies to help improve the quality of care delivered to patients, it ensures that the future workforce is available in the right numbers with the right skills, values and competencies to meet patient needs today and tomorrow.


HEE operate an annual comprehensive planning process to ensure their investments meet the future needs of the population. This process determines the education commissioning volumes for the following financial year and are published in the Workforce Plan for England.


The current workforce plan for England for 2015-16 published in December 2014 can be found at the following link:


http://hee.nhs.uk/work-programmes/workforce-planning/


HEE will publish its next annual National Workforce Plan for England by the end of December 2015.

26th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment the Government has made of the potential effect on student numbers of abolishing grants and maintenance allowances and introducing student loans and tuition fees for nurses' training places; and what assessment the Government has made of the effect on students from poorer backgrounds of abolishing grants and maintenance allowances and introducing student loans and tuition fees for such training places.

The Government assessment undertaken to date is that nursing is consistently one of the most popular courses on the University Central Administration Service (fifth), with 57,000 applicants for around 20,000 nursing places in 2014. Midwifery and Allied Health Professional courses receive higher than average applications as well.


A maximum £9,000 tuition fee for other subjects at higher education institutions was introduced in 2012. Between 2012 and 2014 the number of English domiciled applicants to enter full-time undergraduate courses in the United Kingdom increased by 7.5% (from 454,000 in 2012 to 487,870 in 2014). Figures for 2015 cycle will be released in mid-December and early indicators suggest that there will be further increase in 2015.


Students from the most disadvantaged areas in England were 72% more likely to apply to higher education in 2015 than 2006.




26th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many nurses' training places were available in each region in each year since 2009; how many (a) agency nurses and (b) nurses from outside the UK were used by the NHS in each year since 2009; and what the cost to the NHS was of both such categories of nurses in each of those years.


Non-medical training numbers are collected as part of the quarterly multi professional education and training budget monitoring returns that are submitted to the Department by Health Education England (HEE). Prior to the establishment of HEE in 2013/14 these were submitted to the Department by the Strategic Health Authority (SHA) as part of their quarterly Financial Information Management Systems (FIMS) monitoring returns. The table below shows the number of nurse training places available in each SHA from 2009/10 to 2012/13.


2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

NHS North East

1,095

1,045

1,000

992

NHS North West

3,630

3,358

3,082

3,066

NHS Yorkshire and Humber

2,299

2,278

1,848

1,805

NHS East Midlands

1,735

1,660

1,462

1,430

NHS West Midlands

2,597

2,557

2,102

2,102

NHS East of England

1,889

1,717

1,536

1,494

NHS London

3,992

3,695

3,401

3,088

NHS South East Coast

1,335

1,281

1,169

1,123

NHS South Central

1,175

1,237

1,108

1,153

NHS South West

1,590

1499

1,361

1,293

Total planned

21,337

20,327

18,069

17,546

Source: SHA quarterly FIMS monitoring returns

The following table details the information collected by HEE in relation to available nurse training places from 2013/14 to 2015/16, broken down by Local Education and Training Boards (LETB).


The disaggregated data for 2013/14 is not held within the format requested. The published national workforce plan for 2013/14 stated that there would be 18,009 training commissions available for nursing.


LETB Region

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

North East


1,105

1,089

North West


3,415

3,322

Yorkshire and Humber


2,010

2,059

West Midlands


2,157

2,192

East Midlands


1,613

1,661

East of England


1,783

2,015

North West London


820

917

North, Central and East London


1,201

1,280

South London


1,138

1,171

Kent, Surrey and Sussex


1,126

1,209

Thames Valley


768

795

Wessex


941

1,011

South West


1,368

1,432

Total

18,009

19,445

20,153


Source: Multi-professional education and training budget monitoring returns


The Department does not collect data centrally on the number of agency nurses working in the NHS. This information may be held locally at Trust level.


The Department started to collect financial data from NHS trusts and foundation trusts in respect of net temporary and agency staffing costs specifically from 2013/14. Available data on spending nationally on all agency staff in England is set out in the table below. We are not able to separately identify total spending with agencies on nurses from centrally held data.


Total cost to the NHS of temporary staff in 2013/14 and 2014/15



2013/14 £000s

2014/15 £000s

Total NHS Providers

2,605,378

3,355,723

Source: Department of Health Annual Report and Accounts 2014/15



The Department does not hold information on the total cost to the NHS of nurses from outside of the United Kingdom working in the service. The information provided in the table below shows the number of declared non-British nurses working in the NHS in England dating back to 2009. Non-British nursing numbers working in the NHS in England covers hospital and community health services in the NHS but not primary care.



2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Non-British

40,034

41,642

40,911

40,030

40,330

43,258

Proportion of non-British nurses as % of the nursing workforce

14.4%

14.3%

13.8%

13.3%

13.0%

13.5%


Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre.

23rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, for what reasons the sexual health component of the proposed public health funding formula does not use indicators relating to sexually transmitted infection rates.

The publication Public health grant: proposed target allocation formula for 2016/17, an engagement of behalf of the Advisory Committee on Resource Allocation (ACRA) proposed a component for sexual health treatment services using data derived from rates of sexually transmitted infections diagnosed in 2013. ACRA is currently considering the responses before providing its final advice to Ministers.

23rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what weighting has been applied (a) to the sparsity indicator within the children's 0 to 5 services component relative to that for other components and (b) to address complex need within that component.

In the publication Public health grant: proposed target allocation formula for 2016/17, an engagement of behalf of the Advisory Committee on Resource Allocation (ACRA), ACRA proposed that there should be a sparsity adjustment to take account of the longer travel times to home visits by health visitors.


The proposed sparsity adjustment is an index ranging between the values of 1.05 and 0.98 across local authorities, with an England average value of 1.00. The need weighted population for the 0-5 services component for each local authority is multiplied by this index to give the need and sparsity weighted populations.


ACRA proposed in the engagement that the relative need weight per head for 0-5 children’s services should be based on the proportion of children in low income households. ACRA proposed that the weight per head should be four times higher for children in low income households than for other children. No further adjustment is prosed by ACRA.


The engagement closed on 6 November and ACRA is currently considering the responses before providing its final advice to Ministers.


23rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the potential proportion of local authorities which will experience (a) any reduction in their allocation and (b) a reduction of 20 per cent or more in their allocation as a result of the new proposed public health funding formula.

On 8 October 2015, the Department published Public health grant: proposed target allocation formula for 2016/17, an engagement of behalf of the Advisory Committee on Resource Allocation (ACRA), a technical consultation to inform ACRA’s recommendations to Ministers on target shares of the local authority public health grant.


ACRA is currently considering the responses before providing its final advice to ministers. Actual allocations for 2016-17 will be determined separately and will be announced in due course.





23rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether the new proposed public health funding formula will be linked to an assessment of deprivation and greatest need in order to determine the allocation that different local authority areas receive; and what steps his Department is taking otherwise to ensure that areas of greatest need are not disproportionately affected by overall reductions in public health allocations.

On 8 October 2015, the Department published Public health grant: proposed target allocation formula for 2016/17, an engagement of behalf of the Advisory Committee on Resource Allocation (ACRA), a technical consultation to inform ACRA’s recommendations to Ministers on target shares of the local authority public health grant.


ACRA is currently considering the responses before providing its final advice to ministers. Actual allocations for 2016-17 will be determined separately and will be announced in due course.





16th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of information maintained by the NHS to enable his Department to assess the reasons why women choose to have a BRCA1/2 test.

NHS England does hold data on the individual reasons patients may have for seeking referral for a BRCA1/2 test. A new clinical commissioning policy to guide and expand access to BRCA testing was published by NHS England in July 2015. This policy is intended to provide greater clarity and equity for patients across England wishing to consider testing by providing consistent criteria for referral, where a referral is made by a specialist clinic.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish data on molecular genetic test activity rates in 2012-13 and each subsequent year.

Data on molecular genetic testing for 2012-13 and subsequent years are not currently held centrally. The UK Genetic Testing Network (UKGTN) is working to publish data on molecular testing activity in collaboration with the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) and NHS England. UKGTN is also working with the devolved administrations to ensure that they are legally able to share these data with the HSCIC.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will require a UK Genetics Testing Network to audit Clinical Commissioning Policy: Genetic Testing for BRCA1/2 Mutations, published by NHS England in 2014.

NHS England published a new Clinical Commissioning Policy on Genetic Testing for BRCA1/2 mutations in July 2015, based on updated guidelines issued by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Subject to the need to appropriately handle patient identifiable data, NHS England would be willing to work with the UK Genetic Testing Network (UKGTN) to consider and monitor changes in uptake of BRCA testing following the publication of the 2015 Clinical Commissioning Policy.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to the HM Treasury's press release, Chancellor announces £4.5 billion of measures to bring down debt, published 4 June 2015, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on the £200 million savings in public health budgets in 2015-16.

Department of Health officials have been in discussion with officials in the Department for Communities and Local Government. We will shortly publish a consultation on how best to implement these savings in ways that minimise any disruption to services.

15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to HM Treasury's press release, Chancellor announces £4.5 billion of measures to bring down debt, published on 4 June 2015, what discussions he has had with local authorities about the savings expected from his Department in 2015-16.

We will shortly publish a consultation on how best to implement these savings in ways that minimise impact on services.

15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to HM Treasury's press release, Chancellor announces £4.5 billion of measures to bring down debt, published on 4 June 2015, what assessment he has made of the effects on (a) frontline and (b) other public health services of the savings expected from his Department in 2015-16.

We will shortly publish a consultation on how best to implement these savings in ways that minimise impact on services.

15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to by HM Treasury's press release, Chancellor announces £4.5 billion of measures to bring down debt, published on 4 June 2015, how he plans to achieve the £200 million savings expected from his Department in 2015-16.

We will shortly publish a consultation on how best to implement these savings in ways that minimise impact on services.

15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to HM Treasury's press release, Chancellor announces £4.5 billion of measures to bring down debt, published on 4 June 2015, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of existing contracts on the deliverability of the savings expected from his Department in 2015-16.

We will shortly publish a consultation on how best to implement these savings in ways that minimise impact on services.

1st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what estimate his Department has made of the number of detainees abroad who hold a British National (Overseas) passport who have been provided with consular assistance in each year since 2010.

​Since 2010 the FCO have responded to 139 requests for assistance from British Nationals (Overseas) who were arrested or detained. As of September 2019 the FCO is providing ongoing assistance to 45 British Nationals (Overseas) who remain in detention.

Category

New Detention Cases

2010

15

2011

17

2012

13

2013

14

2014

20

2015

10

2016

15

2017

15

2018

10

2019

10

Grand total

139

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
8th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many UK detainees are awaiting trial in India; and how many have been in detention for (a) longer than six months (b) longer than one year and (c) longer than two years.

​I can confirm that as of November 2018, we were aware of 44 British Nationals in detention in India, of which 19 individuals were yet to be sentenced. The period of detention prior to sentencing varies from a few days to more than two years.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent assessment his Department has made of (a) human rights in Bahrain, (b) standards in Bahrain's prisons and (c) Bahrain's compliance with the United Nations Charter of Human Rights; and if he will make a statement.

Bahrain is a Human Rights Priority Country and as such is included our 2017 Annual Human Rights Report. The UK enjoys a close relationship with the Government of Bahrain which allows us to speak honestly about a range of issues, including human rights. Where we have concerns on specific issues, including prison conditions, we raise these with the Bahraini authorities. We encourage those with concerns about treatment in detention to report these to the relevant human rights oversight bodies. We encourage the Government of Bahrain to deliver on its international and domestic human rights commitments.

30th Sep 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on access to cash of NoteMachine's plans to convert approximately 3,000 of its 7,000 free-to-use machines to pay-to-use; and if she will make a statement.

The Government recognises that widespread free access to cash remains important to the day-to-day lives of many consumers in the UK. However, it is not appropriate for the Government to comment on individual contracts relating to ATM charges.

The Government is engaging, and will continue to engage, with the regulators and industry on this important topic. The Government-established Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) is closely monitoring developments in ATM provision. The PSR regulates LINK, the scheme which runs the UK’s ATM network, and has used its powers to hold LINK to account over LINK’s commitments to preserve the broad geographic spread of the ATM network.

LINK has put in place specific arrangements to protect free-to-use ATMs more than 1 kilometre away from the next nearest free-to-use ATM and has also enhanced its Financial Inclusion Programme. More recently, LINK has committed to protecting free access to cash on high streets – where there is a cluster of five or more retailers – that don’t have a free-to-use ATM or a Post Office counter within 1 kilometre.

UK Finance has also launched a Community Access to Cash Initiative, offering grants to local communities to improve cash access.

In addition, the Government has invested heavily in maintaining a stable network of Post Office branches, with investment of around £2 billion since 2010. Currently, 99% of personal customers and 95% of small business customers can carry out their everyday banking locally at one of the Post Office’s 11,500 branches.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Jun 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much money his Department allocated the consolidated fund to the (a) Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, (b) Cabinet Office, (c) Ministry of Defence, (d) Department for Education, (e) Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, (f) Foreign and Commonwealth Office, (g) Department of Health and Social Care, (h) Home Office, (i) Ministry of Justice, (j) Department for Transport, (k) HM Treasury, (l) Department for Exiting the European Union, and (m) Department for International Trade for contingency planning for leaving the EU without an agreement in each month since January 2019.

As set out in my Written Ministerial Statement to the House of 18 December 2018, departments were allocated over £2bn of funding for 19/20 to prepare for all EU Exit scenarios. A full breakdown can be found in the statement, (https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-statement/Commons/2018-12-18/HCWS1205/). Additional funding has been provided for the Single Intelligence Account (£13.95m); the Home Office (£5.45m); the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (£5.6m) and Department for Transport (£6m) since that announcement.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many free to use ATMs are located in Wolverhampton North East Constituency; and how many free to use ATMs there were in that constituency in (a) 2010 and (b) 2015.

The Government does not hold this information. Information on ATM numbers by Parliamentary Constituency for recent periods is publicly available on the LINK website. Data on the total stock of ATMs in the UK and how this has changed each year since 1998 – including the split between free-to-use and pay-to-use ATMs – is also available online. Furthermore, LINK publish monthly data on their Financial Inclusion Programme, and the numbers of free-to-use ATMs 1 kilometre or further from the next nearest free-to-use ATM.

The Government-established Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) continues to monitor developments in ATM provision, and has used its powers to hold LINK to account over its commitments to preserve the broad geographic spread of the ATM network.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department engages enforcement agents.

Officers of HMRC act as Enforcement Agents in relation to HMRC debts. HMRC does not make use of private sector enforcement agents.

23rd Oct 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what fiscal steps his Department is taking to reduce unemployment in constituencies with high levels of unemployment.

Our economic plan, reducing the deficit whilst investing in infrastructure and supporting businesses to grow, has delivered growth in the economy, growth in employment and growth in wages. The unemployment rate currently stands at 4.0%, down from 8% in 2010 and the lowest rate since the 1970s. The jobs recovery has benefitted the whole of the UK, and more than 70% of the increase to employment since 2010 has been outside of London.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
18th Dec 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) holds reports setting out the current economic relationship between the UK and other individual EU member states.

We are undertaking a comprehensive programme of analytical work to inform negotiations.

The Government is seeking input from a wide range of businesses and industry bodies.

Our department works closely with the Department for Exiting the European Union to ensure that they are informed of our understanding of these issues.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
7th Dec 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many properties in Wolverhampton North East sold for over £1 million in 2016.

In 2016 fewer than 30 residential properties in the Wolverhampton North East constituency sold for over £1 million.

30th Nov 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what fiscal steps his Department is taking to reduce unemployment in constituencies with high levels of unemployment.

In 2010 we inherited the UK’s largest deficit since the second world war at 9.9% of GDP. We set out a clear framework to restore confidence in the economy and reduce the deficit which has fallen by three quarters. At just 4.3% our unemployment rate is at its lowest in over 40 years and down from 8.0% in 2010. The economy is now operating with near record high employment and more than 70% of the increase to employment since 2010 has been outside of London.

The government is proud of this record but not complacent. That is why we have introduced new targeted employment support to help young people, people with disabilities and the long-term unemployed this year. We are also committed to building strong city regions led by elected mayors. Devolution deals have given a number of areas greater involvement in the provision of localised and targeted employment support.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
30th Nov 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many properties sold in 2016 in Wolverhampton were below the stamp duty threshold.

In 2016, there were 3,600 property transactions in the Wolverhampton Local Authority which were below the stamp duty land tax threshold.

27th Nov 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment his Department has made of the reasons why the level of unemployment in Wolverhampton North East constituency is more than twice the national average; and what steps his Department is taking to lower the rate of unemployment in Wolverhampton North East constituency.

The unemployment rate in Wolverhampton North East is less than half it was in 2010. At 7.1%, it is down from 12.1% a year ago and 16.4% in 2010. There are 5,100 more people in work in Wolverhampton North East than in 2010.

Jobcentre staff are doing an effective job helping people into work and 90% of Jobseekers end their claim within a year. We are proud of this record but not complacent. That is why we are currently introducing targeted support for young people, people with disabilities and the long-term unemployed.

Reforming the welfare system is key to helping people into work. Under the last Labour Government, some benefit claimants lost £1 for every £1 they earned meaning it didn’t pay to work and people were left trapped on benefits. Under the new system, people benefit from every extra hour worked, so work really pays and people have the opportunity to become more financially secure and develop skills to access greater opportunities.

Only by securing a strong economy can we create the jobs people need to be financially secure. That’s why we’ve kept public spending under control while acting to boost productivity over the long-term by increasing the National Productivity Investment Fund by £8 billion. As part of locally specific support for the West Midlands, we are providing up to £4.7m for a trial in the region to help boost the prospects of disadvantaged individuals getting jobs and progress the careers of those on low incomes.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
10th Nov 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans his Department has to increase Government funding for adult social care.

At Spring Budget 2017 we gave councils an additional £2 billion to fund adult social care. As a result, local government will be able to increase spending on social care in real terms this year and in each of the next two years of the Parliament.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
4th Jul 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people in (a) Wolverhampton and (b) Wolverhampton North East constituency qualified for (i) working tax credits and (ii) child tax credits in each financial year from 2009-10.

The number of families in receipt of child and working tax credit in (a) Wolverhampton and (b) Wolverhampton North East constituency is published by HMRC and is available on the GOV website

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/personal-tax-credits-statistics. The results have been reproduced in the table below.

Families in receipt of tax credits from 2009-10 to 2015-16 (in 000’s)

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

Working tax credit

Wolverhampton

2.5

2.8

2.8

2.7

2.6

2.5

2.5

Wolverhampton North East constituency

0.8

0.9

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.8

Child tax credit

Wolverhampton

18.5

18.6

17.0

12.7

12.7

12.9

13.2

Wolverhampton North East constituency

6.8

7.2

6.5

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.9

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
27th Feb 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has carried out an impact assessment on the effect of the UK leaving the EU on the West Midlands regional economy.

The government has provided a guarantee for all European Structural and Investment Fund projects signed before the UK’s departure from the European Union. Officials are beginning the longer-term work of considering how best to support our regions following the UK’s departure from the European Union.

The government will publish a Midlands Engine Strategy shortly. This will set out plans to address productivity barriers across the region. The Midlands will also benefit from £392 million of Local Growth Fund allocations.

23rd Feb 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what meetings he has had with (a) business, (b) local government and (c) trade union representatives (i) in and (ii) from the West Midlands to discuss the effect of the UK leaving the EU on the regional economy.

Treasury Ministers meet with a wide variety of organisations as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis. The government will publish a Midlands Engine Strategy shortly. This will set out plans to address productivity barriers across the region. The Midlands will also benefit from £392 million of Local Growth Fund allocations. The government has provided a guarantee for all European Structural and Investment Fund projects signed before the UK’s departure from the European Union. Officials are beginning the longer-term work of considering how best to support our regions following the UK’s departure from the European Union.

17th Feb 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph 8.44 of the White Paper, entitled The United Kingdom's exit from and new partnership with the European Union, Cm9417, published in February 2017, (a) how many and (b) what proportion of customs declarations in the UK were submitted electronically in each of the last three years.

In 2014, 66,585,140 declarations were submitted, of which 99% were submitted electronically.

In 2015, 77,493,171 declarations were submitted, of which 99% were submitted electronically.

In 2016, 55,234,357 declarations were submitted, of which 99% were submitted electronically.

17th Feb 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph 8.44 of the White Paper, entitled The United Kingdom's exit from and new partnership with the European Union, Cm9417, published in February 2017, what the average time taken was for customs declarations submitted (a) electronically and (b) non-electronically in the UK to be cleared in each of the last three years.

The average time taken to process electronic customs declarations is defined in the contract with the service supplier. This states that 95% should be processed in 5 seconds and 99.9% in 20 seconds. These targets have been achieved for each of the last three years.

Non-electronic customs declarations are input by HM Revenue and Customs to the electronic system. Once these customs declarations are on the electronic system, the above clearance times are achieved.

10th Oct 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the potential effect of leaving the EU Customs Union on UK GDP.

The relationship we build with the EU will be bespoke to the UK. There are of course a number of different models for EU trade relations from which we can learn. We understand the advantages and disadvantages of those models, and are analysing closely the impact which adopting them would have on the UK economy and UK trade. However, the UK and its economy are utterly unique so the deal we secure will be unique too.

21st Mar 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that have been created by foreign direct investment from other EU countries in each region and constituent part of the UK in each of the last five years.

UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) have reported on the number of jobs associated with foreign direct investment projects in UK regions in the ‘Foreign Direct Investment projects by UK Region (2010/11 to 2014/15)’ report. This can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/foreign-direct-investment-projects-by-ukti-regions-201011-to-201415/foreign-direct-investment-projects-by-uk-region-201011-to-201415

3rd Mar 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits for the UK economy of the completion of a EU single market in services.

The Treasury will publish a comprehensive analysis of our membership of a reformed EU and the alternatives, including the long-term economic costs and benefits of EU membership and the risks associated with an exit before 23 June.

15th Dec 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the amount of direct private sector receipts from the EU was in 2014; and what the expected amount of direct private sector receipts from the EU is for 2015.

Neither the EU Commission nor HM Treasury publish a definitive figure for UK private sector receipts in isolation from total UK receipts. Private sector receipts may, however, be estimated by subtracting the OBR’s estimates for receipts to the UK public sector from total UK receipts published by the EU Commission. For all years up to 2013, this estimate has been detailed in the Technical Annex of HM Treasury’s European Finances White Paper, as shown in the table below. The below figure for 2014 can be estimated using the same methodology as in the White Paper.


The OBR do not publish a forecast of private sector receipts. As the EU Commission have not yet published total UK receipts for 2015, we are unable to provide an expected figure for private sector receipts in 2015.



£bn

Receipts

Public sector receipts

Private sector receipts

2013

5.36

4.00

1.36

2012

5.62

4.17

1.45

2011

5.70

4.13

1.57

2010

5.78

4.77

1.02


The figure for total receipts is taken from Page 16, Table 3B of HM Treasury’s European Union Finances 2015, accessible at this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/483344/EU_finances_2015_final_web_09122015.pdf. The original data is from the European Commission’s Financial Report 2014 (available at this link: http://ec.europa.eu/budget/financialreport/2014/foreword/index_en.html), expressed in euros, and has been converted to sterling using the annual average exchange rate for that year.


The figure for public sector receipts is taken from Page 14, Table 3A of HM Treasury’s European Union Finances 2015, accessible at this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/483344/EU_finances_2015_final_web_09122015.pdf.


13th Oct 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on foreign direct investment of the UK leaving the EU.

As the Chancellor of the Exchequer, my right hon. Friend the Member for Tatton (Mr Osborne) has noted, the best outcome for the UK economy is that we achieve major economic reform of the EU. The Prime Minister is focused on success: he believes he can and will succeed in reforming and renegotiating our relationship with the EU, and campaigning to keep the UK in the EU on that basis.


The Confederation of British Industry and British Chambers of Commerce have both come out to say they support the reform agenda the Prime Minister is seeking to deliver.

13th Oct 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much funding the UK has been allocated from the (a) European Regional Development Fund, (b) European Social Funds, (c) European Agricultural Fund of Guarantee, (d) European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development, (e) European Territorial Cooperation, (f) Youth Employment Initiative and (g) European Maritime and Fisheries Fund for the period from 2014 to 2020; and what information his Department holds on how much funding has been allocated from each fund in each region.

Information regarding the UK’s allocation from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), European Social Fund (ESF), and European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD), including how these will be divided across England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales for the period 2014-2020, is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2010-to-2015-government-policy-european-funds/2010-to-2015-government-policy-european-funds.

Information regarding the UK’s allocation from the European Agricultural Guarantee Fund (EAGF), including how this will be divided across England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales for the period 2014-2020, is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-cap-allocations-announced.

Information regarding the UK’s allocation from the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund, including how this will be divided across England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales for the period 2014-2020, is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/european-fisheries-fund-allocated-to-promote-growth-across-the-uk;

Information regarding the UK’s share from European Territorial Cooperation, including the regions in which the funds will be spent, is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/european-territorial-cooperation-programmes

Information regarding the UK’s share from the Youth Employment Initiative, including the regions in which the funds will be spent, is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/170-million-to-help-young-people-find-jobs

25th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to answer Question 596 tabled on 15 October 2019 by the hon. Member for Wolverhampton North East.

The response to question UIN 596 was answered on the 5th November 2019.

25th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the number of (a) Belgian, (b) Dutch (c) French, (d) German, (e) Italian and (f) Luxembourg nationals who were granted indefinite leave to remain prior to the accession of the UK to the EEC on 1 January 1973.

Statistics of settlement grants in the United Kingdom for non Commonwealth nationals before 1973 are published in table se 06 ‘Grants of settlement to Commonwealth citizens and foreign nationals’) available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-june-2019/list-of-tables#settlement.

A breakdown of specific nationalities within this historical data is not available.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
25th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the immigration status of EU27 nationals resident in the UK will be in the event that the UK leaves the EU if they were given indefinite leave to remain by the UK Government before either (a) the UK joined the EEC or (b) their country of origin joined the EEC/EC/EU.

EU citizens who already hold indefinite leave to remain, regardless of when this was granted, can continue to rely on this status once the UK has left the European Union. They do not need to apply for status under the EU Settlement Scheme, but they may do so if they wish as, in line with the draft Withdrawal Agreement with the EU reached on 17 October 2019.

Relevant guidance for EU citizens is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/settled-status-eu-citizens-families/if-you-have-permanent-residence-or-indefinite-leave-to-remain.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) knives were found in and (b) offences involving knives occurred in or in the vicinity of (a) secondary schools and sixth form colleges and (b) primary schools in the West Midlands in each year since 2010.

Our schools should be safe and disciplined environments for both pupils and teachers and no young person should feel the need to bring a weapon to school.

That’s why we are taking action across Government to tackle the scourge of knife crime with a focus on early intervention.

The Home Office does not hold information on the number of knives recovered the in the vicinity of school or sixth from college premises.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
24th Oct 2019
To ask the secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to continue to allocate money to the Government's Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of people hold a UK passport; and what her estimate is of the number and proportion of UK citizens who do not hold a passport.

Her Majesty’s Passport Office does not hold information on the number of UK citizens without a valid passport. However, I can confirm that there were 51,372,413 valid British passports as of 22 September 2019.

14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many burglaries were recorded as having been committed in (a) Wolverhampton and (b) the area covered by West Midlands Police in each year since 2010; and how many of those burglaries involved a violent assault.

The Home Office collects data on the number of burglaries recorded by the police in England and Wales and these data are published quarterly. It is not possible to separately identify the number of burglaries that involved a violent assault in the information that we hold centrally. However, data is available on the number of aggravated burglary offences. These includes burglaries in which an offender is in possession of any firearm or imitation firearm, other weapon or explosive at the time of committing the offence.

Data for West Midlands Police Force Area and for Wolverhampton Community Safety Partnership (CSP) area can be found in open data tables here back to the financial year 2002/03:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

Information on the number of assaults against disabled people recorded by the police is not held centrally.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many assaults against disabled people were recorded in (a) Wolverhampton and (b) the area covered by West Midlands Police in each year since 2010.

The Home Office collects data on the number of burglaries recorded by the police in England and Wales and these data are published quarterly. It is not possible to separately identify the number of burglaries that involved a violent assault in the information that we hold centrally. However, data is available on the number of aggravated burglary offences. These includes burglaries in which an offender is in possession of any firearm or imitation firearm, other weapon or explosive at the time of committing the offence.

Data for West Midlands Police Force Area and for Wolverhampton Community Safety Partnership (CSP) area can be found in open data tables here back to the financial year 2002/03:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

Information on the number of assaults against disabled people recorded by the police is not held centrally.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
1st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the potential merits of allowing British National (Overseas) passport holders to live and work in the UK; and if she will make a statement.

The UK continues to support the one country, two systems model underpinned by the Sino-British Joint Declaration. The immigration status of BN(O)s is part of this agreement; there is no right to work or live in the UK under the BN(O) passport.

I refer the Hon Lady to the answers given by my Rt. Hon Friend, the Foreign Secretary, when responding to an urgent question on 26 September 2019.

13th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what statistics his Department holds on car thefts; and whether those statistics are broken down by (a) police force area and (b) parliamentary constituency.

The Home Office holds data on the number and outcomes of the offences ‘Aggravated vehicle taking’ and ‘Theft or unauthorised taking of motor vehicle’, recorded by the police in England and Wales. The data are available by Police Force Area (PFA) and Community Safety Partnership (CSP) and can be found in the Police Recorded Crime and Outcomes open data tables, published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

It is not possible to distinguish within the data which crimes were specifically related to theft of cars rather than other types of vehicles.

4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many hate crimes were recorded in (a) the West Midlands police area and (b) Wolverhampton in 2018; and how many of those cases resulted in a (i) prosecution and (ii) conviction.

The Home Office collects and publishes statistics on the number of hate crimes recorded by the police by Police Force Area only. Information for West Midlands Police for 2017/18 can be found in Table 2.01 of the Hate Crime appendix tables available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hate-crime-england-and-wales-2017-to-2018. Data for 2018/19 are due to be published later this year.

Information on prosecutions and convictions is the responsibility of the Ministry of Justice.

8th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of abolishing the charge for phone calls to the 101 non emergency number.

The Home Office is reviewing charges for the 101 non-emergency telephone number.

While it may not be an option for everyone, the public can also report non-emergency crimes online via forces’ websites, free of charge.

The Home Office is supporting the digital transformation of policing through programmes such as the Digital Policing Portfolio (DPP), led by the NPCC. Within the DPP, the Digital Public Contact programme aims to provide appropriate digital channels for the public to report and track crime online, facilitating greater public-police interaction in real time.

8th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government plans to abolish the 15 pence charge for 101 calls to the emergency services.

The Home Office is reviewing charges for the 101 non-emergency telephone number.

While it may not be an option for everyone, the public can also report non-emergency crimes online via forces’ websites, free of charge.

The Home Office is supporting the digital transformation of policing through programmes such as the Digital Policing Portfolio (DPP), led by the NPCC. Within the DPP, the Digital Public Contact programme aims to provide appropriate digital channels for the public to report and track crime online, facilitating greater public-police interaction in real time.

8th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much money West Midlands Police has spent on gun licence applications in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally by the Home Office.

We will be looking at the overall costs to the police of their firearms licensing functions when we next review firearms licensing fees in 2020.

21st Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on police numbers in the West Midlands of the UK leaving the EU without a deal; and what estimate he has made of the proportion of West Midlands Police officers that will be deployed to other forces under police Mutual Aid arrangements.

It is entirely responsible and appropriate that we prepare for every eventuality and we will continue to work closely with all of our operational partners, including the police, on contingency planning to ensure the safety and security of our citizens.

Decisions on arrangements for police use and deployment of resources are operational matters for policing and are the responsibility of Chief Constables and not the Home Office.

6th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when his Department plans to announce the final details of the Windrush compensation scheme.

The Government has committed to putting into place the Windrush com-pensation scheme and is grateful to those who responded to the public consultation that closed on 16 November.

As the Home Secretary announced on 8 February, we are considering the outcome of the consultation exercise and will respond as soon as possible with further details, including who is eligible to apply for compensation and how they can access the scheme.

6th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate his Department has made of the length of time it will take to fully compensate everyone eligible under the Windrush compensation scheme.

The Government has committed to putting into place the Windrush compensation scheme and is grateful to those who responded to the public consultation that closed on 16 November.

As the Home Secretary announced on 8 February, we are considering the outcome of the consultation exercise and will respond as soon as possible with further details, including when the scheme will be open for claims and for how long.

6th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when his Department plans to announce the final results of the Windrush lessons learned review.

The Home Secretary is absolutely determined to learn from and right the wrongs of the past, and he looks forward to receiving the lessons learned report when the review concludes. He will consider the recommendations from the review carefully and announce appropriate action.

23rd Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans his Department has to make specialist support and accommodation for trafficked children available under the National Referral Mechanism.

Independent Child Trafficking Advocates (ICTAs) are a source of specialist support for trafficked children. In July 2018, the Government announced that it would roll out the service to eligible children in one third of local authorities in England and Wales by April 2019.

The Government is committed to rolling ICTAs out nationally. Section 48 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, which makes provisions for ICTAs, is being considered in the Independent Review of the Modern Slavery Act, led by Frank Field MP, Maria Miller MP, and Baroness Butler-Sloss. The Government will carefully consider any recommendations about ICTAs which come out of the Review ahead of any national rollout.

Local authorities play a pivotal role in the safeguarding of all children in their care, regardless of their backgrounds or experiences. It is absolutely right that local authorities continue to make decisions about the placement and welfare of children, which includes ensuring they have access to suitable accommodation. To support this, in addition to the national rollout of ICTAs, we have revised statutory guidance on the care of unaccompanied children and child victims of modern slavery and funded 1,000 additional training places for foster carers and support workers.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
17th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what definition of torture his Department uses to assess asylum claims.

We have a proud history of granting protection to those who need it. All asylum claims lodged in the UK are carefully considered on their individual merits. Where someone has a well-founded fear of persecution or serious harm they are offered protection and not expected to return to their country.

We have published detailed Home Office guidance for caseworkers on how to assess asylum claims, which includes guidance on what amounts to persecution, defined as a serious violation of basic human rights in the Refugee or Person in Need of International Protection (Qualification) Regulations 2006. http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2006/2525/contents/made
There is no single definition of torture used to assess asylum claims as caseworkers must consider whether a person faces persecution or serious harm on return to their country of origin.

Before guidance is published, we consult with key partners, including UNHCR, to ensure it reflects our obligations under the Refugee Convention. The guidance is also reviewed regularly to ensure it takes account of developments in refugee caselaw. The guidance is available on gov.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/considering-asylum-claims-and-assessing-credibility-instruction

17th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of Government guidelines for processing asylum applications from victims of torture.

We have a proud history of granting protection to those who need it. All asylum claims lodged in the UK are carefully considered on their individual merits. Where someone has a well-founded fear of persecution or serious harm they are offered protection and not expected to return to their country.

We have published detailed Home Office guidance for caseworkers on how to assess asylum claims, which includes guidance on what amounts to persecution, defined as a serious violation of basic human rights in the Refugee or Person in Need of International Protection (Qualification) Regulations 2006. http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2006/2525/contents/made
There is no single definition of torture used to assess asylum claims as caseworkers must consider whether a person faces persecution or serious harm on return to their country of origin.

Before guidance is published, we consult with key partners, including UNHCR, to ensure it reflects our obligations under the Refugee Convention. The guidance is also reviewed regularly to ensure it takes account of developments in refugee caselaw. The guidance is available on gov.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/considering-asylum-claims-and-assessing-credibility-instruction

17th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum applications were made by victims of torture in each of the last eight years.

The Home Office does not record the information in such a way that allows us to report on how many asylum applications were made by victims of torture in each of the eight last years.

The Home Office does publish data which provides the total number of asylum applications for main applicants, by country of nationality, broken down by year. This can be found in tab as_01 at volume 1 of the quarterly Immigration Statistics release:https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-september-2018/list-of-tables

All officials making decisions on asylum claims receive a dedicated five-week foundation training programme which includes specific sections on torture and medical reports and ensure alleged victims of torture are assessed fairly and sensitively.

17th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment his Department has made of trends in the level of domestic violence against women and girls.

The most recent Crime Survey of England and Wales shows that the number of women experiencing domestic abuse in the last year is the lowest since the survey began. Police recorded domestic abuse crimes have increased by over 60% in the last three years, demonstrating increased victim confidence to report and better police recording of these crimes.

We are using the Office for National Statistics domestic abuse statistical bulletin and the 3,200 responses to the domestic abuse consultation to develop an ambitious package of action to transform the Government’s response to domestic abuse, which will include the publication of the draft Domestic Abuse Bill in this session.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
9th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the pension liabilities of West Midlands Police; what plans he has to provide West Midlands police with additional funding to meet that liability; and if he will make a statement.

We are assessing the implications of changes to the public service pensions discount rate on all forces, including West Midlands Police. The Budget made clear that part of these costs will be met from the Treasury Reserve in 2019/20. As the Chancellor set out in his speech, the Home Secretary will review police spending power ahead of the provisional police funding settlement for 2019/20 to be published next month.

22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of robberies of shops recorded by her Department involved the use of a weapon, in each year since 2010.

The Home Office collects data on the number of crimes recorded by the police in England and Wales but it is not possible to separately identify assaults against shopkeepers or robberies of shops from the data centrally held.

Statistics on all assaults and of robberies of business property are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The latest figures, which contain time series from April 2002 to June 2018, can be accessed here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

The Home Office’s Commercial Victimisation Survey provides estimates of the volume of crime experienced by business premises including in the Wholesale and Retail sector. The survey is able to estimate the number of assaults and threats and the number of robberies experienced by businesses in that sector but the sample size is not large enough to provide separate estimates of the number of assaults against shopkeepers or the proportion of robberies in which a weapon has been used. The latest results from the CVS can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/crime-against-businesses-findings-from-the-2017-commercial-victimisation-survey

22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many assaults against shop keepers were recorded by her Department in each year since 2010.

The Home Office collects data on the number of crimes recorded by the police in England and Wales but it is not possible to separately identify assaults against shopkeepers or robberies of shops from the data centrally held.

Statistics on all assaults and of robberies of business property are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The latest figures, which contain time series from April 2002 to June 2018, can be accessed here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

The Home Office’s Commercial Victimisation Survey provides estimates of the volume of crime experienced by business premises including in the Wholesale and Retail sector. The survey is able to estimate the number of assaults and threats and the number of robberies experienced by businesses in that sector but the sample size is not large enough to provide separate estimates of the number of assaults against shopkeepers or the proportion of robberies in which a weapon has been used. The latest results from the CVS can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/crime-against-businesses-findings-from-the-2017-commercial-victimisation-survey

22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much revenue his Department has collected from speed cameras in the West Midlands Police force area in each year since 2010.

The information requested is not held centrally. The deployment of speed cameras is an operational matter for West Midlands Police in conjunction with the local authority. Data on fines and penalties paid in respect of speeding offences is not broken down between speed cameras and other forms of enforcement activity.

22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many operational speed cameras there were in the West Midlands Police force area in each year since 2010.

The information requested is not held centrally. The deployment of speed cameras is an operational matter for West Midlands Police in conjunction with the local authority. Data on fines and penalties paid in respect of speeding offences is not broken down between speed cameras and other forms of enforcement activity.

10th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment his Department has made of recent trends in the level of reported incidents of stalking and harassment in (a) Wolverhampton and (b) the area covered by the West Midlands Police.

The Home Office publishes police recorded crime open data, which contains stalking and harassment offences. Trends in recorded stalking and harassment in Wolverhampton and the West Midlands can be found in Community Safety Partnership and Police Force Area level open data. The most recent recorded crime open data tables can be found in the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

5th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Home Office plans write to all non-UK EU citizens resident in the UK since before 1 January 1973 to confirm that they hold settled status in the UK.

We have launched a targeted communications campaign to maximise awareness and reassure EU citizens of our commitment to protect their rights and entitlements.

This includes encouraging such citizens to apply under the EU settlement scheme when it opens and alerting those who may have previously acquired indefinite leave to remain, including those resident in the UK before 1973, to exchange it for the new settled status.

22nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment he has made of trends in the level of violent crime in the West Midlands; and if he will make a statement.

On 9 April 2018, the Government published the Serious Violence Strategy to set out the action it is taking to address serious violence, and in particular the recent increases in knife crime, gun crime and homicide.

We have reviewed the evidence and the strategy sets out the trends and drivers of serious violence. The evidence shows that homicide, knife crime and gun crime have increased since 2014 across virtually all police force areas in England and Wales, including the West Midlands. The increases have been accompanied by a shift towards younger victims and perpetrators. The analysis in the Serious Violence Strategy shows that changes in the drugs market is a major factor in the recent increases.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the 12 per cent rise in recorded hate crimes in the West Midlands in the last year, and if he will make a statement.

It is for Police and Crime Commissioners, with their Chief Constables, to consider hate crime trends for their local areas.

In England and Wales, the most recently published statistics on police recorded hate crime, for 2016/17, showed that there were 80,393 offences recorded by the police in which one or more hate crime strands were deemed to be a motivating factor. This was an increase of 29% compared with the 62,518 hate crimes recorded in 2015/16.

The 29% increase is thought to reflect both a genuine rise in hate crime around the time of the EU Referendum and Westminster Bridge terrorist attack alongside improved identification of hate crime by the police, willingness of victims to come forward and an overall improvement in how police now record crime.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he has made an assessment of trends in the level of cyber crime in the West Midlands; and if he will make a statement.

The Home Office collects information from police forces on the number of police recorded offences that have been committed (in full or in part) online. These data will mostly comprise cyber-enabled offences. The latest data for England and Wales for the year to December 2017 are published at the link below:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesexperimentaltables (Table E4)

These are experimental statistics and are only published at national (England and Wales) level while the Home Office works with forces to improve the data quality.

The Home Office collects additional police data on fraud and cybercrime via the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB). These data include both cyber-dependent and cyber-enabled offences. The latest data for England and Wales for the year to December 2017 are published at the link below:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables (Table A5)

Breakdowns of these data by both police force area and offence type are not held at the Home Office.

The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. This is why the National Cyber Security Strategy 2016-2021 is supported by £1.9billion of transformational investment. We are continuing to invest in cyber capabilities within law enforcement at the national, regional and local levels, to ensure that law enforcement have the capabilities in place to go after the most sophisticated criminals. In particular, we will be supporting the national policing initiative to ensure that that every police force has a specialist Cyber Crime Unit. It is crucial that at the local level we provide an effective law enforcement response, support victims and give targeted prevention messages.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
9th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to respond to Question 140712, on Right of Abode: EU Nationals, tabled by the hon. Member for Wolverhampton North East on 2 May 2018.

The response for UIN 140712 was provided on the 9th May 2018.

8th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to respond to Question 136000, tabled by the hon. Member of Wolverhampton North East, on 16 April 2018.

The response for UIN 136000 was answered on the 11th September 2018.

2nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether non-UK EU nationals who were resident in the UK before 1973 have a legal right to abode in the UK that is separate from their rights as EU citizens under the Treaties of the European Union.

The right of abode is a statutory right which is held by British citizens and Commonwealth citizens who had right of abode immediately before 1 January 1983 and have not ceased to be Commonwealth citizens at any time.

EU citizens who were present and settled in the UK on 1 January 1973 were deemed to have indefinite leave to remain, by virtue of section 1(2) of the Immigration Act 1971. As long as they have continued to reside in the UK and have not had their indefinite leave revoked, they will have retained that settled status.

16th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 15 January 2018 to Question 121792, on Immigrants: Commonwealth, if she will publish the number of Commonwealth citizens legally residing in the UK who have been (a) deported and (b) detained in error by her Department in each of the last five years.

The Department has been carrying out a review of all cases of Caribbean Commonwealth nationality, born before 1 January 1973, who have been removed and/or detained by the Home Office since 2002 (when the Casework Information Database (CID) was available across the immigration system) and sought to identify any individuals where there was an indication in the record that the individual could have been in the UK before 1973.

The Home Secretary wrote to the Chair of the Home Affairs Select Committee on 21st August to provide an update on this work. A copy of this letter has been deposited in the House Library.

This work is ongoing and the Home Secretary has committed to regularly updating the Home Affairs Select Committee on progress.

20th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment her Department has made of the appropriate level of funding for West Midlands Police.

In 2017, I spoke to every force in England and Wales about the changing demands they face, and how these can best be managed, including the Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) for West Midlands. Following this engagement, I announced the police funding settlement for 2018/19 which will see an additional £450m invested in the policing system, around £270m direct to PCCs. The West Midlands PCC chose to use increased precept flexibility, which will provide around £9.5m additional funding for West Midlands Police in 2018/19.

20th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions she has had with the (a) Police and Crime Commissioner for the West Midlands and (b) Chief Constable of West Midlands Police on the police grant for the West Midlands.

In 2017, I spoke to every force in England and Wales about the changing demands they face, and how these can best be managed, including the Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) for West Midlands. Following this engagement, I announced the police funding settlement for 2018/19 which will see an additional £450m invested in the policing system, around £270m direct to PCCs. The West Midlands PCC chose to use increased precept flexibility, which will provide around £9.5m additional funding for West Midlands Police in 2018/19.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for Tier 2 visas for junior doctors were declined in the past 12 months.

The information you have requested is not included in statistics published by the Home Office.

Information on the total number of Tier 2 refusals can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-july-to-september-2017/list-of-tables#visas

9th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Commonwealth citizens legally residing in the UK have been (a) deported and (b) detained in error by her Department in each of the last five years; and what her Department's policy is on issuing apologies to those detained in error.

Providing the information requested would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

All complaints to Immigration Enforcement are investigated. An apology will be offered where it is found that an error has been made.

12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate the Government has made of the number of non-UK EU citizens who will qualify for settled status by March 2019.

The Home Office has not made any direct estimates of the numbers of EU citizens who will qualify for settled status.

However we know that the estimated population of non-UK EU citizens resident in UK was a) 3.5m by Country of Birth (3.1m excluding Irish born); and b) 3.6m by Nationality (3.2m excluding Irish nationals), in the year ending 2016.*

*ONS, Population of the United Kingdom by Country of Birth and Nationality. Released: 24 August 2017, next release: 23 August 2018.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the cost of administering the system for applications for settled status.

The Home Office constantly reviews its capabilities in order to deliver the Government’s agenda. With negotiations now underway, we continue to assess how our priorities will impact on the workforce and capabilities required.

Operational units across the Home Office actively monitor workflows to ensure sufficient resources are in place to meet demand and will continue to do so throughout negotiations and as the UK leaves the EU. Any resultant changes to resource requirements will be factored into strategic planning.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department holds on the number of people who have been (a) arrested and (b) charged in Wolverhampton on terrorism-related offences.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons arrested and charged for a terrorism-related offences in Great Britain. From these data, we cannot identify the location of where arrests for terrorism-related offences occurred.

The data that the Home Office does hold can be found in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical bulletins, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
14th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department holds on the number of British citizens who have left the UK to join ISIS and who have (a) returned home and (b) been prevented from returning home.

Approximately 850 UK linked individuals of national security concern have travelled to engage with the Syrian conflict. We estimate that just under half have returned and approximately 15% are now dead. This number includes all those of national security concern, not just those affiliated with Daesh.

Everyone who returns from taking part in the conflict in Syria or Iraq must expect to be investigated by the police to determine if they have committed criminal offences, and to ensure that they do not pose a threat to our national security.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
14th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for EU nationals to apply for special status.

All qualifying EU citizens and their family members will be given adequate time to apply for the new settled status. A grace period of blanket permission will last from EU exit day for a fixed period of time, which we will specify in due course, but which we expect to be up to two years.

The Government intends to introduce a voluntary scheme to enable eligible EU citizens and their family members to apply for this status before the UK leaves the EU, if they wish to do so. We will publish further details regarding the timetable in due course but we intend to launch in 2018.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
7th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many instances of gun-related crime have been recorded in Wolverhampton in each year since 2010.

Data on firearms offences at the police force area level can be found in Table 3.12 in the Office for National Statistics publication ‘Focus on violent crime and sexual offences’, available here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/appendixtablesfocusonviolentcrimeandsexualoffences

7th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many instances of knife-related crime have been recorded in (a) Wolverhampton and (b) the area covered by West Midlands Police in each month since 2015; and how many of those instances involved the use of machetes.

Data on knife offences at the police force area level can be found in the Home Office Knife Crime Open Data Tables, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

7th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police community support officers have been recruited to cover Wolverhampton in each year since 2010.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of police community support officers (PCSOs) who join the police workforce, as standard direct recruits, by police force area level only.

These data are published in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. The latest figures, published in July, are for the year to 31 March 2017.

Data on the number of PCSOs who joined West Midlands police for the years 2006/07 to 2016/17 can be found in the Police workforce: Joiners Open Data Tables, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-open-data-tables

7th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many suspects have been granted police bail by each police force in each month since 2015.

The Home Office does not currently hold the information requested.

7th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department holds on the number of people who have been stopped and searched in (a) the area covered by West Midlands Police authority, (b) the City of Wolverhampton and (c) Wolverhampton North East constituency in each of the last seven years.

The Home Office collects and publishes statistics on the number of stop and searches, conducted by each police force in England and Wales. The Home Office collects these data at police force area level only and does not hold this information at consistency level.

Data on stop and searches are broken down by the reason for the search and the ethnicity of the person being searched. These data are published in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletins, and data for the year ending March 2016 can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2016

22nd Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, (a) what the budget was and (b) how many firefighters were employed by West Midlands Fire Service in each of the last seven years.

The West Midlands fire and rescue service’s annual operational expenditure to 2015-16 and budget for 2016-17, also available at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing

The number of full time equivalent firefighters for West Midlands fire and rescue service at 31 March for each year are as follows, also available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fire-statistics-data-tables

22nd Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has discussed the stay put policy in relation to fires in tower blocks with West Midlands Fire Service since the fire at Grenfell Tower.

We have not discussed the Stay Put policy with West Midlands Fire Service. However, online guidance is available on the principle of stay put and how to ensure the fire safety measures in place in a purpose built block of flats are robust enough to support it, at www.local.gov.uk/fire-safety-purpose-built-flats.

11th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times the UK has requested information (a) under the Prüm convention DNA sharing, (b) relating to the European Arrest Warrant about criminal records, (c) from the EU Passenger Name Record sharing scheme, (d) from a Europol Joint Investigation Team, (e) under the Schengen Information System, (f) from Europol's HAVEN project to combat sexual abuse and trafficking and (g) from other EU member states about stadium bans and previous offenders at football matches.

The United Kingdom is not yet connected to any other country for the sharing of DNA under the Prüm Council Decisions.

The UK shares criminal record information with Member States via the European Criminal Records Information System (ECRIS). In 2015, the UK made 105,164 requests for overseas criminal record checks to other EU Member States, compared to 8,536 in 2010, an increase of over 1100%.

European legislation is currently under consideration that would require EU Member States to process Passenger Name Records (PNR) on scheduled aviation flights. The proposed legislation would require the data to be analysed by a central Passenger Information Unit and all relevant and necessary PNR to be shared with the Passenger Information Units of other Member States in compliance with data protection obligations. Receiving PNR before travel allows law enforcement authorities to plan and respond proactively to threats. PNR plays a vital role in intelligence-led operations, post-incident investigations and judicial proceedings.

Joint investigation teams are Member State led processes. Europol staff may participate in a supporting capacity.

According to the EU’s Justice and Home Affairs IT Agency (eu-LISA), the UK had the following numbers of alerts active (that is, broadcast to Member States and not subsequently revoked) on 17 February 2014:

People wanted by the UK on a European Arrest Warrant (EAW) 231

Missing adults 6,121

Missing children 2,589

Wanted for judicial purposes (e.g. Witnesses to be traced) 1,884

Discreet alerts 10,438 Discreet alerts (national security) 478

Europol’s Project HAVEN – Halting Europeans Abusing Victims in Every Nation- is part of Europol’s work under Focal Point Twins. The UK participates in and exchanges information under Europol’s Focal Point Twins and the aim is to support Member States and third countries to prevent or combat the activities of criminal networks involved in the sexual exploitation of children. Operations in the UK to counter organised crime relating to Child Sexual Exploitation have been supported by Europol, and the UK exchanges information on crimes of this nature with and through Europol via our Liaison Bureau, rather than through Project HAVEN.

Between April 2014 and the end of December 2015,UK Football Policing Unit within the Home Office, the national football information point, requested information from other EU member states about stadium bans on 101 occasions. No figures are held on individual offenders with football bans.

20th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2016 to Question 20287, when she plans to give a substantive answer to that question.

I refer the Honourable Member to the response I gave on 17 March 2016.

15th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many removals from the UK under the Dublin Regulation there were in each year since 2005; and what information the Government holds on the number of such removals from other EU countries in each of those years.

The number of people transferred under the Dublin Convention and the later Dublin II and Dublin III Regulations, is shown in the following table:

Year of Return

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total

1890

1670

1170

1280

1,030

1150

980

740

800

520

530

11760

The UK Government does not centrally hold the number of Dublin removals from other EU countries as the data is collected by Eurostat and is available at:

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/data/database

The figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change.

This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols.

All figures have been rounded to the nearest 10.

25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent estimate he has made of the number of empty homes in (a) the West Midlands region, (b) City of Wolverhampton local authority area and (c) Wolverhampton North East constituency in each year since 2010; and what steps he is taking the reduce the number of empty homes.

The most recent estimate of the number of long-term empty homes shows that at October 2018 there were 10,084 homes that had been empty for more than six months in the West Midlands Metropolitan County, and 1,401 that had been empty for more than six months in the City of Wolverhampton. Statistics on vacant dwellings in England and in each local authority district, from which regional totals may be calculated, are published in the Department's live table 615 which is available at the link below. This table shows the annual total numbers of empty homes, those vacant for longer than six months and also vacant properties in the local authority, housing association and other public sector tenures. Statistics on vacant dwellings at parliamentary constituency level are not centrally collected


Local authorities are equipped with powers and have strong incentives to tackle empty homes. Since 1 April 2019, via the Rating (Property in Common Occupation) and Council Tax (Empty Dwellings) Act 2018, local authorities have the discretion to increase the maximum level of premium charged on properties that have been empty for more than two years from 50 per cent to 100 per cent extra council tax. Through the New Homes Bonus, local authorities earn the same financial reward for bringing an empty home back into use as building a new one. In certain circumstances, local authorities can apply for an Empty Dwelling Management Order (EDMO) to temporarily take over the management of a property that has been empty for more than two years in order to bring it back into use.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-dwelling-stock-including-vacants

25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the Government provides ring-fenced funding to local authorities to spend on supporting women's refuges.

MHCLG does not currently provide ring-fenced funding to local authorities to spend on supporting women's refuges. Through the local government settlement, funding is provided to local authorities which they can spend on local domestic abuse services in line with their local priorities.

Since 2014 the Department has additionally invested £55.5 million in services to support victims of domestic abuse, including refuges.

MHCLG has recently consulted on a new statutory duty which would require local authorities to assess the need for and commission support for victims and their children in safe accommodation.

The consultation closed on 2 August. We are currently analysing the responses to the consultation on support within safe accommodation and will be publishing a full government response in due course.

25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number of women's refuges operating in England in each year since 2010.

The Department does not hold centrally the number of women's refuges operating in England in each year since 2010.

MHCLG has recently consulted on a new statutory duty which would require local authorities to robustly assess the need for and commission support for victims and their children in safe accommodation.

The consultation closed on 2 August. We are currently analysing the responses to the consultation on support within safe accommodation and will be publishing a full government response in due course.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of homes purchased using the Help to Buy equity loan scheme in Wolverhampton North East constituency in each year since that policy was introduced.

Data on Help to Buy: Equity Loan is not available by constituency but is published by local authority.

For Wolverhampton, total completions from April 2013 to December 2018 were 1,116.

Further detail is in Table 1 of the official quarterly statistics to end December 2018 (Wolverhampton is at line 138):

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/help-to-buy-equity-loan-scheme-statistics-april-2013-to-31-december-2018

Totals by year for Wolverhampton were:

2013 - 99

2014 - 196

2015 - 188

2016 - 218

2017 - 203

2018 - 212

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department holds records on the number of public toilets in (a) England and (b) Wolverhampton.

The Department does not hold data on the number of public toilets in England. Whilst the provision of public toilets is a matter for local authorities, we encourage councils to keep these important amenities open. At Budget 2018 the Chancellor announced a 100 per cent business rates relief for public lavatories in England, and the Government will introduce legislation as soon as Parliamentary time allows. In addition the Department recently launched a consultation proposing changes to Building Regulations to create more Changing Places toilets for severely disabled people.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1st Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many times the rough sleeping and homelessness reduction taskforce has met in 2018; what the current membership is of the taskforce; and how many changes to have membership have taken place since the announcement of the taskforce; and if he will make a statement.

The Rough Sleeping and Homelessness Taskforce met for the first time on 7 March 2018 and has met regularly since. Membership of Government Taskforce’s can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-cabinet-committees-system-and-list-of-cabinet-committees. There have been no formal changes of membership, although attendance varies in response to Ministerial availability and appointments.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
15th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the total central government grant to City of Wolverhampton Council has been in each year since 2010.

The totals of each local authority’s source of finance, including grants from central government, are reported in their General Fund Revenue Account outturn and capital account outturn returns to MHCLG.

These can be found for the years requested via following the links to individual local authority data from www.gov.uk/government/collections/local-authority-capital-expenditure-receipts-and-financing (‘RS revenue outturn summary’ data table) and from www.gov.uk/government/collections/local-authority-capital-expenditure-receipts-and-financing (Table 'B. Resources used to finance capital expenditure' in the ‘COR4’ data table).

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
20th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of changes to the local government grant to City of Wolverhampton Council on that Council's ability to carry out its statutory duties.

The 2018-19 local government finance settlement confirms that Wolverhampton will have access to £221.4 million in Core Spending Power - an increase of 1.8 per cent from 2017-18. Wolverhampton has core spending power per dwelling of £2,029 compared to an average for Metropolitan Districts of £1,786. Wolverhampton is also part of the West Midlands Combined Authority and is a 100 per cent business rates retention pilot, enabling the authority to benefit from an increased share of business rates growth across the pilot area.

As part of my on going engagement with local government, I recently met with representatives of Wolverhampton Council to discuss the local government finance settlement and related matters.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
20th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the local government grant given to City of Wolverhampton Council was in each of the last seven years.

Wolverhampton City Council will have available £876.7 million in Core Spending Power between 2016/17 to 2019/20.


Information on Wolverhampton’s Revenue Support Grant funding can be found on line at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to increase house building in the West Midlands Combined Authority area.

Over 1,111,000 additional homes have been delivered in England since April 2010, with 217,350 net additional dwellings in 2016-17, up 15 per cent on 2015-16 and 50 per cent on 2009-10.

But the Prime Minister has been clear – this should be a country that works for everyone. This means building more of the right homes, in the right places, and ensuring the housing market works for all parts of our community.

So at Autumn Budget 2017, we announced further reforms to tackle our broken housing market, including Planning reforms to ensure more land is available for housing and maximise the potential of our cities and towns to build new homes whilst protecting the Green Belt; more than £15 billion of new financial support over the next five years, taking total financial support to at least £44 billion to 2022/2023, and expanding the Homes and Communities Agency to become Homes England, bringing together money, expertise, planning and compulsory purchase powers.

We also agreed a second Devolution Deal with the West Midlands, which included support for a new Mayoral Housing Delivery Team, and are continuing work on a Housing Deal to increase the supply of land and housing delivery across the West Midlands.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many homes were (a) started and (b) completed in Wolverhampton in each year since 2010.

Estimates of house building, new build dwellings starts and completions for England and in each local authority district, to June quarter 2017, are shown in Live Table 253a at the following link.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-house-building

Data for the September quarter 2017 is scheduled for publication on the 19 December 2017.

These only cover new build dwellings and should be regarded as a leading indicator of overall housing supply. The Department also publishes an annual release entitled ‘Housing supply: net additional dwellings, England’, which is the primary and most comprehensive measure of housing supply.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
30th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many houses have been sold under right to buy in each year since 2010 in (a) England, (b) the West Midlands, (c) the City of Wolverhampton local authority area and (d) Wolverhampton North East Constituency.

The Government publishes quarterly Right to Buy sales by local authorities in Table 691 (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-social-housing-sales). The data is not broken down at a constituency level.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
30th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many homes for social rent have been built in (a) England, (b) the West Midlands, (c) City of Wolverhampton local authority area and (d) Wolverhampton North East constituency in each year since 2010.

Figures on the numbers of homes built for social rent by local authority are available in live table 1006C. https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-affordable-housing-supply

Figures are not available at constituency level.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
8th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of (a) building regulations concerning fire safety and (b) fire safety guidance for commercial and domestic planning applications used by fire services and local authorities' planning departments.

The Government will consider these issues in light of the Independent Review on Building Regulations and Fire Safety, the findings of the Public Inquiry and ongoing work to review building safety.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
8th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what plans his Department has to require sprinklers to be installed inside all tower blocks, including in privately-owned tower blocks in (a) Wolverhampton and (b) England.

The Government will consider this issue in light of the Independent Review on Building Regulations and Fire Safety, the findings of the Public Inquiry and on going work to review building safety.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
8th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether his Department plans to publish new advice and regulations on the installation of mandatory fire alarms in communal areas of public housing.

The Government will consider these issues in light of the Independent Review on Building Regulations and Fire Safety, the findings of the Public Inquiry and on going work to review building safety.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
7th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many prosecutions have been brought for breach of fire safety building regulations in each of the last seven years.

Prosecutions for breaches of the Building Regulations, including regulations on fire safety, are brought by local authorities. The Department for Communities and Local Government does not collect information on such prosecutions.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
6th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what information his Department holds on the number of university premises, including student accommodation, which are clad in flammable substances.

On 5 September 2017, we published consolidated advice for building owners following large-scale testing, which includes the relevant data, and can be viewed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/building-safety-programme-update-and-consolidated-advice-for-building-owners-following-large-scale-testing

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
22nd Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what information his Department holds on tower blocks in Wolverhampton which are clad in flammable substances.

We have not been informed of any high rise residential buildings in Wolverhampton where combustible material has been identified by the Building Research Establishment’s (BRE) testing programme. However, NHS Improvement did confirm on Tuesday 18 July that a cladding sample from an in-patient unit at New Cross Hospital, part of the Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust, had been screened as not being of limited combustibility in the test being carried out at BRE.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
13th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to paragraph 5.5 of Spring Budget 2017, what estimate his Department has made of how much of the additional £2 billion of social care funding will be allocated to (a) Wolverhampton and (b) the West Midlands Combined Authority area.

The Department published the allocations for the distribution of the additional funding for adult social care announced at the Spring Budget 2017 online on 9 March, together with an Explanatory Note concerning distribution - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-allocations-of-the-additional-funding-for-adult-social-care.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
13th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate his Department has made of the level of future demand for social care in Wolverhampton; and what estimate his Department has made of the financial cost of that care.

This Government recognises that adult social care is a key priority which provides vital services to millions of people across the country.

It is for local authorities to allocate spending for services, including adult social care, according to local demand.

However, we recognise the importance of supporting these services and have listened to representations from local authorities and care providers. In addition to the package announced at the 2015 Spending Review and the 2017-18 Local Government Finance Settlement, the Government has now provided a further £2 billion to local authorities for adult social care over the next three years, of which Wolverhampton will receive over £12 million.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
15th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what UK projects received funding under the European Regional Development Fund 2007-2013; what the location of each such project was; and what the amount received in funding was for each such project.

In the 2007-13 programmes, the grant recipients of the European Regional Development Fund generally had to deliver the projects across the region covered by that programme; location details for those grant recipients have been provided and are shown in the attached table.

13th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, which of his Department's projects have received funding under the European Regional Development Fund 2007 to 2013; what the location is of each such project; and how much each such project received.

The information requested is in the attached table.

16th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what impact assessment the Government has carried out on the Cities and Local Government Devolution Bill; and if he will place a copy of that assessment in the Library.

The Cities and Local Government Devolution Bill is an enabling measure providing for the transfer of existing powers from one public body to another through secondary legislation. Accordingly, an impact assessment is not necessary or appropriate at this point.

16th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what proportion of households in England were owner-occupied in each year since 2010.

This information is published in the English Housing Survey 2013 to 2014: headline report. Please refer to Annex Table 1.1. in the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/english-housing-survey-2013-to-2014-headline-report

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Chancellor of the Exchequer's speech on 14 May 2015, whether devolution of certain powers and resources to city-regions is contingent on cities accepting a mayoral model of governance.

Government will consider any, and all, proposals for devolution of powers from cities, counties and towns that can demonstrate they have put in place strong and accountable governance arrangements. The most ambitious deals will devolve powers to directly elected metro mayors.

15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2015 to Question 1049, if he will publish the (a) dates and (b) attendees of meetings held between (i) Ministers and (ii) officials from his Department and (A) banks and (B) other financial institutions on the extension of the right-to-buy scheme to encompass housing association properties.

Officials have met with a number of housing associations on an individual basis and further meetings are planned.

Details of Ministers’ meetings and those of the Permanent Secretary with external organisations are published on-line here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dclg-ministerial-data


https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dclg-permanent-secretary-data- 2014#history

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2015 to Question 1051, if he will publish the (a) dates and (b) attendees of meetings held between (i) Ministers and (ii) officials from his Department and housing associations on the extension of the right-to-buy to encompass housing association properties.

Officials have met with a number of housing associations on an individual basis and further meetings are planned.

Details of Ministers’ meetings and those of the Permanent Secretary with external organisations are published on-line here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dclg-ministerial-data


https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dclg-permanent-secretary-data- 2014#history

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what discussions his Department has had with local authorities regarding the effect on their business plans of the sale of high-value homes.

We are holding a series of meetings and discussions with local authorities to seek their views including the potential impact of the sale of high value council homes on their Housing Revenue Account business plans.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on local authorities business plans of the sale of high-value council homes.

We are holding a series of meetings and discussions with local authorities to seek their views including the potential impact of the sale of high value council homes on their Housing Revenue Account business plans.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, on how many affordable homes was (a) work started, (b) work completed and (c) provisions made for in each year for which figures are available.

Statistics on affordable housing starts funded by the Homes and Communities Agency and the Greater London Authority between 2009/10 and 2014/15 are published by the Department in Live Table 1012 which is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-affordable-housing-supply .


Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 10 June 2015 to Question 1256, how much of the £230 million savings came from (a) receipts from public land, (b) reducing contingencies in capital budgets and (c) the European Regional Development Programme; and from which budgets and programmes contingency savings were made in (i) capital budgets and (ii) the European Regional Development Programme.

As part of the Main Estimates process the Department (and other Government Departments) will shortly be publishing a full breakdown of its 2015/16 budgets, with an accompanying Explanatory Memorandum to be submitted to the CLG Select Committee.

The £230 million savings are broken down as follows:

- £75 million of resource contingency reductions (including contingency on the European Regional Development Programme);

- £100 million from the over achievement of capital receipts from the sale of public land to support housing development; and

- £55 million of capital contingency reductions.


The savings do not impact materially on any existing commitments or delivery targets.

15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 8 June 2015 to Question 1052, if the Government will make an estimate of the average value of high-value council homes.

Through the Local Government Transparency Code we require all councils to be more transparent about the value of their social housing stock.

The Department will outline our proposals for the Housing Bill when it is published.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 8 June 2015 to Question 1079, if the Government will make an estimate of the vacancy rates of high-value council homes.

Through the Local Government Transparency Code we require all councils to be more transparent about the value of their social housing stock.

The Department will outline our proposals for the Housing Bill when it is published.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what guidance his Department has issued to local authorities on the Supreme Court judgement of 13 May 2015 on Kanu v. London Borough of Southwark.

We welcomed the judgement in Kanu v London Borough of Southwark.

We maintain a constant dialogue with local authorities on matters that could affect them and their ability to help vulnerable people.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what discussions his Department has had with local authorities on the Supreme Court judgement of 13 May 2015 on Kanu v. London Borough of Southwark.

We welcomed the judgement in Kanu v London Borough of Southwark.

We maintain a constant dialogue with local authorities on matters that could affect them and their ability to help vulnerable people.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the consequences for his Department's policies of the Supreme Court judgement of 13 May 2015 on Kanu v. London Borough of Southwark.

We welcomed the judgement in Kanu v London Borough of Southwark.

We maintain a constant dialogue with local authorities on matters that could affect them and their ability to help vulnerable people.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
5th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, if he will publish the financial modelling and analysis carried out by his Department on the extension of the right to buy policy to housing associations.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 8 June, PQ 1059.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
5th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effect of the extension of the right to buy on the financial viability of housing associations.

Details will be set out in the impact assessment when the Bill is published.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
5th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate his Department has made of the number of housing association tenants who will take up the right to buy in each of the next five years.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 8 June , PQ 1059.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
5th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what plans his Department has to consult representatives and bodies within the housing sector on the proposed extension of the right to buy policy before the publication of legislative proposals on that policy.

Ministers and senior officials in my Department are engaging on an ongoing basis with the housing sector, banks and other financial institutions in relation to key policy issues.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to the statement by HM Treasury of 4 June 2015, how he intends to achieve the £230 million savings expected from his Department in 2015-16.

The majority of DCLG's savings have already been delivered through the over achievement of receipts from the sale of public land to support housing development. We have also found savings from reducing contingencies in our capital budgets and our European Regional Development Programme. Our savings do not impact any existing commitments or delivery targets.

4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the value of council homes classified by his Department as high value is by number of bedrooms in each English region.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 8 June, PQ 1079.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the value of council homes in the most expensive third of all properties of their type in their area is by number of bedrooms in each English region.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 8 June, PQ 1079.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the Exchequer of extending the right to buy policy to housing association tenants.

The development of the policy is ongoing, and details will be set out in the impact assessment when the Housing Bill is published.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment has been made of the effect of the proposed extension of the right to buy policy on the future building capacity of housing associations.

The development of the policy is ongoing, and details will be set out in the impact assessment when the Housing Bill is published.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment has been made of the effect of the proposed extension of the right to buy policy on the credit ratings of housing associations.

The development of the policy is ongoing, and details will be set out in the impact assessment when the Housing Bill is published.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effect of homelessness of the extension of right to buy to housing association tenants.

The development of the policy is ongoing, and details will be set out in the impact assessment when the Housing Bill is published.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what legal advice his Department has received about the compulsory sale of housing association properties; and if he will place that advice in the Library.

The Government, as any legal client, is entitled to privacy in its consultation with legal advisers. This is especially the case during the policy formulation process. The Government’s legal analysis surrounding the extension of the right to buy for housing association tenants will be explained when its legislative proposals are brought before the House.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what discussions his Department has had with housing associations on the expansion of right to buy.

Ministers and senior officials in my Department are engaging on an ongoing basis with the housing sector, banks and other financial institutions in relation to key policy issues.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what discussions his Department has had with banks and other financial institutions about extension of the right to buy to encompass housing association properties.

Ministers and senior officials in my Department are engaging on an ongoing basis with the housing sector, banks and other financial institutions in relation to key policy issues.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many homes for social rent were built in each of the last 30 years.

Statistics on total additional new build housing provided for social rent in England, since 1991-92, are published in the Department’s live table 1009, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-affordable-housing-supply

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effect of the sale of high-value local authority housing on the cost to the public purse of housing benefit.

Through the Local Government Transparency Code we require all councils to be more transparent about the value of their social housing stock.

The Department has not made an estimate of the number of the most expensive third of local authority properties that will become vacant each year.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how his Department defines a high-value council house; and how many such homes became vacant in each English region in each of the last five years.

Through the Local Government Transparency Code we require all councils to be more transparent about the value of their social housing stock.

The Department has not made an estimate of the number of the most expensive third of local authority properties that will become vacant each year.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many local authority properties in each English region are among the most expensive third of all properties of that type in their area; and how many such homes become vacant each year by English region.

Through the Local Government Transparency Code we require all councils to be more transparent about the value of their social housing stock.

The Department has not made an estimate of the number of the most expensive third of local authority properties that will become vacant each year.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the average value is of high-value council houses.

Through the Local Government Transparency Code we require all councils to be more transparent about the value of their social housing stock.

The Department has not made an estimate of the number of the most expensive third of local authority properties that will become vacant each year.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the average value is of local authority properties which are among the most expensive third of all properties of that type in their area.

Through the Local Government Transparency Code we require all councils to be more transparent about the value of their social housing stock.

The Department has not made an estimate of the number of the most expensive third of local authority properties that will become vacant each year.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effect of the extension of the right to buy to housing association tenants on housing benefit.

The development of the policy is ongoing, and details will be set out in the impact assessment when the Housing Bill is published.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what impact assessment his Department has made of extending the right to buy scheme; and if he will place that assessment in the Library.

The development of the policy is ongoing, and details will be set out in the impact assessment when the Housing Bill is published.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what impact assessment his Department has made of the proposed expansion of right to buy to housing association properties; and if he will place that assessment in the Library.

The development of the policy is ongoing, and details will be set out in the impact assessment when the Housing Bill is published.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effect of the extension of right to buy on the availability of affordable housing.

The development of the policy is ongoing, and details will be set out in the impact assessment when the Housing Bill is published.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to answer Question 220919, tabled on 15 January 2015 by the hon. Member for Wolverhampton North East.

Questions 220918, 220919, 220920 and 220921 were answered today, 24 February 2015.

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to answer Question 220918, tabled on 15 January 2015 by the hon. Member for Wolverhampton North East.

Questions 220918, 220919, 220920 and 220921 were answered today, 24 February 2015.

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to answer Question 220921, tabled on 15 January 2015 by the hon. Member for Wolverhampton North East.

Questions 220918, 220919, 220920 and 220921 were answered today, 24 February 2015.

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to provide a substantive answer to Question 220920, tabled on 15 January 2015 by the hon. Member for Wolverhampton North East.

Questions 220918, 220919, 220920 and 220921 were answered today, 24 February 2015.

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to provide a substantive answer to Question 220922, tabled on 15 January 2015 by the hon. Member for Wolverhampton North East.

Question UIN 220922 was answered on 5 February 2015.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether his Department undertook an impact assessment of changes to section 106 requirements for sites of 10 units or less.

The Department for Communities and Local Government carried out a public consultation in March 2014 to invite views and local evidence on proposed changes to national policy on section 106 affordable housing and tariff contributions. All evidence submitted was carefully considered.

As a consequence of the consultation, we amended our proposals to introduce a lower threshold of 5 units for rural areas, as outlined in my Written Ministerial Statement of 28 November 2014, Official Report, Column 55WS. Rural exception sites are also exempted.

I can confirm that we have also undertaken an Equality Impact Assessment, which I will arrange to be placed in the Library of the House. We do not consider our reforms will have a negative impact on discrimination, fostering good relations or advancing equality of opportunity.

We estimate that the policy will save, on average, £15,000 in Section 106 housing contributions per new dwelling in England—some councils are charging up to £145,000 on single dwellings. Further savings will be made from scaling back Section 106 tariffs, which may add additional charges of more than £15,000 per dwelling, over and above any housing contributions. Taken together, these reforms will deliver six-figure savings for small-scale developers in some parts of the country.

We do not believe that our reforms will have any significant adverse effect on our affordable housing programme. We have so far delivered 217,000 new affordable homes since 2010, and are bringing in £19.5 billion of public and private in affordable housing over the current Spending Review period. In the next Parliament, we are on track to deliver a further 275,000 new affordable homes, backed up by £38 billion of public and private investment.

The Home Builders Federation has confirmed that these changes will provide a boost to small and medium builders, stating: “This exemption would offer small and medium-sized developers a shot in the arm. The time and expense of negotiating Section 106 affordable housing contributions on small sites, and the subsequent payments, can threaten the viability of small developments and act as another barrier to the entry and growth of smaller firms”

Similarly, the Federation of Master Builders has said: “The new ten unit threshold for affordable housing contributions is a sensible and proportionate approach to help alleviate the pressure on SME house builders who have been squeezed out of the housing market in recent years. This is important because without a viable SME house building sector we won’t be able to build the number of new homes that are needed to address the housing crisis”.

We also listened to representations from the hon. (Labour) Member for Bassetlaw (John Mann) who has campaigned vigorously against such levies. Indeed, I would observe that under the majority of the last Labour Government, the national threshold (as stated in PPG3) was actually 15 units.

Loading stealth taxes on new housing just makes housing less affordable and cuts house building. Unrealistic Section 106 charges result in no development, no regeneration and no community benefits: reducing them can result in more housing and more affordable housing. Our reforms will help unblock small stalled sites and provide a boost to self-builders and small house builders.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether his Department undertook an impact assessment of the introduction of the financial credit for vacant buildings.

The Department for Communities and Local Government carried out a public consultation in March 2014 to invite views and local evidence on proposed changes to national policy on the issue of Section 106 tariffs being imposed on empty buildings being brought back into use. All evidence submitted was carefully considered. The new policy was outlined in my Written Ministerial Statement of 28 November 2014, Official Report, Column 55WS. The purpose of the credit is to provide an incentive that will help regenerate empty and redundant buildings.

I can confirm that we have also undertaken an Equality Impact Assessment, which I will arrange to be placed in the Library. We do not consider our reforms will have a negative impact on discrimination, fostering good relations or advancing equality of opportunity.

We do not believe that our reforms will have any significant adverse effect on our affordable housing programme. We have so far delivered 217,000 new affordable homes since 2010, and are bringing in £19.5 billion of public and private in affordable housing over the current Spending Review period. In the next Parliament, we are on track to deliver a further 275,000 new affordable homes, backed up by £38 billion of public and private investment.

Planning guidance is kept under review and is updated as required, and we are open to representations on any practical areas where further assistance is needed to help facilitate the implementation of new policy.

I would note:

· The policy changes are aimed at providing a clear incentive for brownfield regeneration, whilst supporting the Government’s policies of protecting the Green Belt and increasing housing supply.

· The relief is intended to reflect the often higher costs of conversion and refurbishment and bringing an existing building back into use. Our reforms will help increase development and regeneration, providing more homes at no cost to the taxpayer.

· Such re-use of existing buildings has a limited impact on local infrastructure; however, any increase in floor space would still be liable for Section 106 tariffs.

· The Government had already amended regulations for the Community Infrastructure Levy which extend an existing credit for vacant buildings being brought back into use from the levy. This applies either where buildings are brought back into the same use, or for a change of use provided they have not been “abandoned” and have been in use for at least six months in the last three years. In either case the levy is only charged on any increase in floor space. Our Section 106 reforms mirror those Community Infrastructure Levy reforms: this is a consistent, joined-up approach.

Our new policy was endorsed in the consultation by the likes of the Federation of Small Businesses, the Home Builders Federation, the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the British Property Federation. They said that the proposed policy would encourage the refurbishment and regeneration of brownfield sites and bring vacant buildings back into use, especially given the higher costs of building on previously developed land.

It is crazy to be putting stealth taxes on empty and redundant buildings being brought back into productive use, as it hinders regeneration and discourages new housing being created from conversions. I would note to the rt. hon. Member for Dulwich and West Norwood that one of the reasons why London house prices are so high is all the levies and charges placed on them. If the state puts heavy taxes on new housing, prices will rise and supply will fall; conversely, our reforms will help lower housing costs and increase housing supply.

Reflecting commitments made in the Coalition Agreement, getting empty and redundant buildings back into use is a key priority for this Government. Under the Coalition Government, the number of empty homes in England has so far fallen to a 10 year low. Our reforms will further support the conversion of empty buildings, and so deliver an economic, social and environmental benefit to society.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on future supply of affordable housing of the introduction of the financial credit for vacant buildings.

The Department for Communities and Local Government carried out a public consultation in March 2014 to invite views and local evidence on proposed changes to national policy on the issue of Section 106 tariffs being imposed on empty buildings being brought back into use. All evidence submitted was carefully considered. The new policy was outlined in my Written Ministerial Statement of 28 November 2014, Official Report, Column 55WS. The purpose of the credit is to provide an incentive that will help regenerate empty and redundant buildings.

I can confirm that we have also undertaken an Equality Impact Assessment, which I will arrange to be placed in the Library. We do not consider our reforms will have a negative impact on discrimination, fostering good relations or advancing equality of opportunity.

We do not believe that our reforms will have any significant adverse effect on our affordable housing programme. We have so far delivered 217,000 new affordable homes since 2010, and are bringing in £19.5 billion of public and private in affordable housing over the current Spending Review period. In the next Parliament, we are on track to deliver a further 275,000 new affordable homes, backed up by £38 billion of public and private investment.

Planning guidance is kept under review and is updated as required, and we are open to representations on any practical areas where further assistance is needed to help facilitate the implementation of new policy.

I would note:

· The policy changes are aimed at providing a clear incentive for brownfield regeneration, whilst supporting the Government’s policies of protecting the Green Belt and increasing housing supply.

· The relief is intended to reflect the often higher costs of conversion and refurbishment and bringing an existing building back into use. Our reforms will help increase development and regeneration, providing more homes at no cost to the taxpayer.

· Such re-use of existing buildings has a limited impact on local infrastructure; however, any increase in floor space would still be liable for Section 106 tariffs.

· The Government had already amended regulations for the Community Infrastructure Levy which extend an existing credit for vacant buildings being brought back into use from the levy. This applies either where buildings are brought back into the same use, or for a change of use provided they have not been “abandoned” and have been in use for at least six months in the last three years. In either case the levy is only charged on any increase in floor space. Our Section 106 reforms mirror those Community Infrastructure Levy reforms: this is a consistent, joined-up approach.

Our new policy was endorsed in the consultation by the likes of the Federation of Small Businesses, the Home Builders Federation, the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the British Property Federation. They said that the proposed policy would encourage the refurbishment and regeneration of brownfield sites and bring vacant buildings back into use, especially given the higher costs of building on previously developed land.

It is crazy to be putting stealth taxes on empty and redundant buildings being brought back into productive use, as it hinders regeneration and discourages new housing being created from conversions. I would note to the rt. hon. Member for Dulwich and West Norwood that one of the reasons why London house prices are so high is all the levies and charges placed on them. If the state puts heavy taxes on new housing, prices will rise and supply will fall; conversely, our reforms will help lower housing costs and increase housing supply.

Reflecting commitments made in the Coalition Agreement, getting empty and redundant buildings back into use is a key priority for this Government. Under the Coalition Government, the number of empty homes in England has so far fallen to a 10 year low. Our reforms will further support the conversion of empty buildings, and so deliver an economic, social and environmental benefit to society.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on future supply of affordable housing of changes introduced to section 106 requirements for sites of 10 units or less.

The Department for Communities and Local Government carried out a public consultation in March 2014 to invite views and local evidence on proposed changes to national policy on section 106 affordable housing and tariff contributions. All evidence submitted was carefully considered.

As a consequence of the consultation, we amended our proposals to introduce a lower threshold of 5 units for rural areas, as outlined in my Written Ministerial Statement of 28 November 2014, Official Report, Column 55WS. Rural exception sites are also exempted.

I can confirm that we have also undertaken an Equality Impact Assessment, which I will arrange to be placed in the Library of the House. We do not consider our reforms will have a negative impact on discrimination, fostering good relations or advancing equality of opportunity.

We estimate that the policy will save, on average, £15,000 in Section 106 housing contributions per new dwelling in England—some councils are charging up to £145,000 on single dwellings. Further savings will be made from scaling back Section 106 tariffs, which may add additional charges of more than £15,000 per dwelling, over and above any housing contributions. Taken together, these reforms will deliver six-figure savings for small-scale developers in some parts of the country.

We do not believe that our reforms will have any significant adverse effect on our affordable housing programme. We have so far delivered 217,000 new affordable homes since 2010, and are bringing in £19.5 billion of public and private in affordable housing over the current Spending Review period. In the next Parliament, we are on track to deliver a further 275,000 new affordable homes, backed up by £38 billion of public and private investment.

The Home Builders Federation has confirmed that these changes will provide a boost to small and medium builders, stating: “This exemption would offer small and medium-sized developers a shot in the arm. The time and expense of negotiating Section 106 affordable housing contributions on small sites, and the subsequent payments, can threaten the viability of small developments and act as another barrier to the entry and growth of smaller firms”

Similarly, the Federation of Master Builders has said: “The new ten unit threshold for affordable housing contributions is a sensible and proportionate approach to help alleviate the pressure on SME house builders who have been squeezed out of the housing market in recent years. This is important because without a viable SME house building sector we won’t be able to build the number of new homes that are needed to address the housing crisis”.

We also listened to representations from the hon. (Labour) Member for Bassetlaw (John Mann) who has campaigned vigorously against such levies. Indeed, I would observe that under the majority of the last Labour Government, the national threshold (as stated in PPG3) was actually 15 units.

Loading stealth taxes on new housing just makes housing less affordable and cuts house building. Unrealistic Section 106 charges result in no development, no regeneration and no community benefits: reducing them can result in more housing and more affordable housing. Our reforms will help unblock small stalled sites and provide a boost to self-builders and small house builders.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on future supply of affordable housing in rural areas of changes introduced to section 106 requirements for sites of 10 units or less.

The Department for Communities and Local Government carried out a public consultation in March 2014 to invite views and local evidence on proposed changes to national policy on section 106 affordable housing and tariff contributions. All evidence submitted was carefully considered.

As a consequence of the consultation, we amended our proposals to introduce a lower threshold of 5 units for rural areas, as outlined in my Written Ministerial Statement of 28 November 2014, Official Report, Column 55WS. Rural exception sites are also exempted.

I can confirm that we have also undertaken an Equality Impact Assessment, which I will arrange to be placed in the Library of the House. We do not consider our reforms will have a negative impact on discrimination, fostering good relations or advancing equality of opportunity.

We estimate that the policy will save, on average, £15,000 in Section 106 housing contributions per new dwelling in England—some councils are charging up to £145,000 on single dwellings. Further savings will be made from scaling back Section 106 tariffs, which may add additional charges of more than £15,000 per dwelling, over and above any housing contributions. Taken together, these reforms will deliver six-figure savings for small-scale developers in some parts of the country.

We do not believe that our reforms will have any significant adverse effect on our affordable housing programme. We have so far delivered 217,000 new affordable homes since 2010, and are bringing in £19.5 billion of public and private in affordable housing over the current Spending Review period. In the next Parliament, we are on track to deliver a further 275,000 new affordable homes, backed up by £38 billion of public and private investment.

The Home Builders Federation has confirmed that these changes will provide a boost to small and medium builders, stating: “This exemption would offer small and medium-sized developers a shot in the arm. The time and expense of negotiating Section 106 affordable housing contributions on small sites, and the subsequent payments, can threaten the viability of small developments and act as another barrier to the entry and growth of smaller firms”

Similarly, the Federation of Master Builders has said: “The new ten unit threshold for affordable housing contributions is a sensible and proportionate approach to help alleviate the pressure on SME house builders who have been squeezed out of the housing market in recent years. This is important because without a viable SME house building sector we won’t be able to build the number of new homes that are needed to address the housing crisis”.

We also listened to representations from the hon. (Labour) Member for Bassetlaw (John Mann) who has campaigned vigorously against such levies. Indeed, I would observe that under the majority of the last Labour Government, the national threshold (as stated in PPG3) was actually 15 units.

Loading stealth taxes on new housing just makes housing less affordable and cuts house building. Unrealistic Section 106 charges result in no development, no regeneration and no community benefits: reducing them can result in more housing and more affordable housing. Our reforms will help unblock small stalled sites and provide a boost to self-builders and small house builders.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
19th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, if he will make an assessment of the effect on the delivery of affordable housing of his Department's policy on section 106 affordable housing exemptions for small sites.

The Department for Communities and Local Government carried out a public consultation in March 2014 to invite views and local evidence on proposed changes to national policy on section 106 affordable housing and tariff contributions. All evidence submitted was carefully considered.

As a consequence of the consultation, we amended our proposals to introduce a lower threshold of 5 units for rural areas, as outlined in my Written Ministerial Statement of 28 November 2014, Official Report, Column 55WS. Rural exception sites are also exempted.

I can confirm that we have also undertaken an Equality Impact Assessment, which I will arrange to be placed in the Library of the House. We do not consider our reforms will have a negative impact on discrimination, fostering good relations or advancing equality of opportunity.

We estimate that the policy will save, on average, £15,000 in Section 106 housing contributions per new dwelling in England—some councils are charging up to £145,000 on single dwellings. Further savings will be made from scaling back Section 106 tariffs, which may add additional charges of more than £15,000 per dwelling, over and above any housing contributions. Taken together, these reforms will deliver six-figure savings for small-scale developers in some parts of the country.

We do not believe that our reforms will have any significant adverse effect on our affordable housing programme. We have so far delivered 217,000 new affordable homes since 2010, and are bringing in £19.5 billion of public and private in affordable housing over the current Spending Review period. In the next Parliament, we are on track to deliver a further 275,000 new affordable homes, backed up by £38 billion of public and private investment.

The Home Builders Federation has confirmed that these changes will provide a boost to small and medium builders, stating: “This exemption would offer small and medium-sized developers a shot in the arm. The time and expense of negotiating Section 106 affordable housing contributions on small sites, and the subsequent payments, can threaten the viability of small developments and act as another barrier to the entry and growth of smaller firms”

Similarly, the Federation of Master Builders has said: “The new ten unit threshold for affordable housing contributions is a sensible and proportionate approach to help alleviate the pressure on SME house builders who have been squeezed out of the housing market in recent years. This is important because without a viable SME house building sector we won’t be able to build the number of new homes that are needed to address the housing crisis”.

We also listened to representations from the hon. (Labour) Member for Bassetlaw (John Mann) who has campaigned vigorously against such levies. Indeed, I would observe that under the majority of the last Labour Government, the national threshold (as stated in PPG3) was actually 15 units.

Loading stealth taxes on new housing just makes housing less affordable and cuts house building. Unrealistic Section 106 charges result in no development, no regeneration and no community benefits: reducing them can result in more housing and more affordable housing. Our reforms will help unblock small stalled sites and provide a boost to self-builders and small house builders.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to answer Question 217219, tabled on 4 December 2014 by the hon. Member for Wolverhampton North East.

Question UIN 217219 and 217220 were answered on 23 January 2015.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to answer Question 217185, tabled on 4 December 2014 by the hon. Member for Wolverhampton North East.

Question 217185 was answered on 17 March 2015.
Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to answer Question 217220, tabled on 4 December 2014 by the hon. Member for Wolverhampton North East.

Question UIN 217219 and 217220 were answered on 23 January 2015.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to answer Question 217181, tabled on 4 December 2014 by the hon. Member for Wolverhampton North East.

Question 217181 was answered on 23 February 2015.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many community groups have exercised the Community Right to Build.

A key priority for the Coalition Government has been to give communities greater control over shaping the development of their area. The Localism Act 2011 created new powers for communities to write their own neighbourhood plans and to gain planning permission for community-led development through Neighbourhood Development Orders and Community Right to Build Orders.

Nearly 1,400 communities, covering six million people, are now engaged at different stages of the neighbourhood planning process, giv