Tim Loughton

Conservative - East Worthing and Shoreham

Home Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Home Affairs Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Home Affairs Committee
3rd Nov 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th May 2010 - 6th Sep 2012
Shadow Minister (Children)
1st Jul 2003 - 6th May 2010
Draft Mental Health Bill (Joint Committee)
20th Jul 2004 - 11th Jul 2005
Shadow Spokesperson (Health)
1st Jul 2001 - 1st Jul 2003
Environmental Audit Committee
12th Nov 1997 - 5th Nov 2001
Shadow Spokesperson (Environment, Transport and the Regions)
1st Jul 2000 - 1st Jul 2001


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 22nd September 2021
09:00
Home Affairs Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: The work of the Home Office
22 Sep 2021, 9 a.m.
At 9.30am: Oral evidence
Matthew Rycroft CBE - Permanent Secretary at Home Office
Tricia Hayes CB - Second Permanent Secretary at Home Office
View calendar
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Information Commissioner (Remuneration)
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 359 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 2
Speeches
Monday 13th September 2021
Covid-19 Vaccinations: 12 to 15-year-olds

May I come back to the issue of parental consent and, in doing so, declare my entry in the Register …

Written Answers
Friday 17th September 2021
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Listed Buildings
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the (a) properties classified …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Thursday 15th July 2021
Tibet and Xinjiang (Reciprocal Access) Bill 2021-22
A Bill to require the Secretary of State to report annually on restrictions on access by UK nationals to Tibet …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 23rd August 2021
1. Employment and earnings
Payments from the Sun, the News Building, 1 London Bridge Street, London SE1 9GF:
EDM signed
Monday 23rd May 2016
INDEPENDENT ADVOCATES FOR TRAFFICKED CHILDREN
That this House notes the independent evaluation of the Child Trafficking Advocates pilot project, provided by Barnados and funded by …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Tim Loughton has voted in 276 divisions, and 19 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Mar 2021 - Coronavirus - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 35 Conservative No votes vs 305 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 484 Noes - 76
22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 29 Conservative Aye votes vs 318 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 300 Noes - 318
22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 297
9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 303
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative No votes vs 319 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 308
30 Dec 2020 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 328 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 335 Noes - 212
1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
4 Nov 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 516 Noes - 38
4 Nov 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 330 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 333 Noes - 264
19 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 328 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 330 Noes - 262
19 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative No votes vs 324 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 327 Noes - 264
19 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 326 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 328 Noes - 264
13 Oct 2020 - Public Health: Coronavirus Regulations - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 82
30 Jun 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 332 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 252 Noes - 332
30 Jun 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 331 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 255 Noes - 332
23 Jun 2020 - Independent Complaints and Grievance Scheme - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 45 Conservative Aye votes vs 235 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 243 Noes - 238
17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
2 Jun 2020 - Proceedings during the Pandemic - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative Aye votes vs 240 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 185 Noes - 242
10 Mar 2020 - Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill - View Vote Context
Tim Loughton voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 301 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 306
View All Tim Loughton Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Dominic Raab (Conservative)
Foreign Secretary and First Secretary of State
(11 debate interactions)
Gavin Williamson (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Education
(11 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(10 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(31 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(18 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(18 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Tim Loughton's debates

East Worthing and Shoreham Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest East Worthing and Shoreham signature proportion
Petition Debates Contributed

The Home Secretary said what happened to victims of child sexual exploitation gangs was “one of the biggest stains on our country’s conscience.” Last year local authorities identified 18,700 suspected victims of child sexual exploitation. We want an independent public inquiry into Grooming Gangs.

The Government is refusing to release official research on the characteristics of grooming gangs, claiming it is not in the “public interest”.

We, the British public, demand the release of the official research on grooming gangs undertaken by the Government in full.

In light of the recent outbreak and lock down, those on maternity leave should be given 3 extra months paid leave, at least. This time is for bonding and social engaging with other parents and babies through baby groups which are vital for development and now everything has been cancelled.


Latest EDMs signed by Tim Loughton

23rd May 2016
Tim Loughton signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 23rd May 2016

INDEPENDENT ADVOCATES FOR TRAFFICKED CHILDREN

Tabled by: Fiona Mactaggart (Labour - Slough)
That this House notes the independent evaluation of the Child Trafficking Advocates pilot project, provided by Barnados and funded by the Home Office, which concluded that advocates assisted in keeping trafficked children safely visible once they started working with them, made relationships of trust and credibility with the children and …
66 signatures
(Most recent: 13 Oct 2016)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 26
Labour: 22
Independent: 5
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Conservative: 3
Liberal Democrat: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
The Independent Group for Change: 1
Green Party: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
View All Tim Loughton's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Tim Loughton, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Tim Loughton

Tim Loughton has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

11 Bills introduced by Tim Loughton


To make provision about the registration of marriage; to make provision for the extension of civil partnerships to couples not of the same sex; to make provision for a report on the registration of pregnancy loss; to make provision about the investigation of still-births; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Tuesday 26th March 2019 and was enacted into law.


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 and make provision in connection with financial settlements following divorce


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 19th December 2018
(Read Debate)

A Bill to amend the Civil Partnership Act 2004 to provide that opposite sex couples may enter a civil partnership; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 13th January 2017
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to report annually on restrictions on access by UK nationals to Tibet and Xinjiang in comparison with other regions of China; to make provision to deny persons involved in imposing such restrictions permission to enter the UK; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Thursday 15th July 2021
Next Event - 2nd Reading (Commons)
Friday 18th March 2022

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to report annually on restrictions on access by UK nationals to Tibet in comparison with other regions of China; to make provision to deny persons involved in imposing such restrictions permission to enter the UK; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Monday 6th July 2020

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to report annually on restrictions on access by UK nationals to Tibet in comparison with other regions of China; to make provision to deny persons involved in imposing such restrictions permission to enter the UK; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 23rd July 2019
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

A bill to establish a Rail Ombudsman to scrutinise performance and complaints and represent the interests of passengers; to make provision for the Ombudsman to levy fines on train operating companies for late running and cancellation of trains and about the use of such fines; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 20th December 2016
(Read Debate)

A Bill To amend the Civil Partnership Act 2004 to provide that opposite sex couples mayenter into a civil partnership; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 21st October 2015

A Bill to amend the Civil Partnership Act 2004 to provide that opposite sex couples may enter into a civil partnership; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 3rd September 2014

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Births and Deaths Registration Act 1953 to provide that parents may register the death of a child stillborn before the threshold of 24 weeks gestation.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 14th January 2014

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Children (Performances) Regulations 1968 to streamline opportunities for children to take part in performances; to reduce unnecessary regulation; to clarify when a licence is required; to strengthen the emphasis on protecting children; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 9th January 2013

Tim Loughton has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


160 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

The Cabinet Office is advised on the management of designated heritage assets in its portfolio by Historic England’s Government Historic Estate Unit. Further details can be found here: https://historicengland.org.uk/services-skills/our-planning-services/advice-for-government-historic-estates/

The Cabinet Office does not collect or collate data on the value (property value) or income data for these assets.



Julia Lopez
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
19th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to respond to correspondence and repeat correspondence sent to Lord Frost on matters raised by businesses in the East Worthing and Shoreham constituency related to trade with EU countries sent on 28 January 2021, 5 February 2021, 9 February 2021, 11 February 2021, 25 March 2021 and 31 March 2021.

I apologise for the delay in responding to the important points my Hon. friend has raised on behalf of his constituents. We recognise the great importance of the effective and timely handling of correspondence.

The letter received on 5 February 2021 has been passed to the Department for International trade, as the Department best placed to provide a helpful response.

Lord Frost has now responded to the letter dated 25 March, and Lord Agnew has responded to letters dated 22 January, 26 January, 9 February and 11 February.

Lord Agnew will be responding to the remaining letters, dated 22 January and 31 March. I would like to reassure my Hon. friend that responses are in progress and will be issued as soon as possible.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many deaths there were from seasonal flu in each month of the last three years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which member of the Cabinet has responsibility for representing the needs of babies and young children in discussions on the response to the covid-19 outbreak.

This issue cuts across multiple departmental responsibilities, as is the case for many complex concerns, and therefore engages various Ministers including in DfE, DHSC and DWP.

Details of Ministerial responsibilities can be found on GOV.UK.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to publish the report of the Inter-Ministerial Working Group on Early Years formerly chaired by the Rt hon Member for South Northamptonshire.

The previous Leader of the House, Andrea Leadsom, laid out the recommendations of the Inter-Ministerial Working Group on Early Years on 16 July 2019. This Government is fully committed to supporting working families, and their children. Relevant Secretaries of State will take into account the work of the Inter-Ministerial Working Group on Early Years as the government moves forward with this agenda.

Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is advised on the management of designated heritage assets in its portfolio by Historic England’s Government Historic Estate Unit. Further details can be found here:

https://historicengland.org.uk/services-skills/our-planning-services/advice-for-government-historic-estates/.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy does not collect or collate data on the value or income data for these assets.

Amanda Solloway
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of rent increases at Burlington House on (a) STEM skills, (b) scientific research and (c) international scientific collaboration.

The Government appreciates the great work of the UK’s many great Learned Societies, including those located at Burlington House. They have made vast contributions to their respective fields over their long histories, and are vital to the networking, visibility, and overall health of the disciplines they represent.

We recognise the proposed rent increases do introduce a challenge to their current level of operations. Learned Societies are independent of government and will be best placed to make decisions on how they can best move forward and adapt to changing circumstances. We hope they will continue to make the contributions that they do to STEM skills, Scientific Research, and International Collaboration. I am aware that the Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government, along with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, are exploring whether there is a solution that can deliver value for taxpayers and help the Learned Societies to remain at New Burlington House.

Amanda Solloway
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department plans to take to ensure employees are not forced to go into workplaces that are not covid-compliant.

The Government has provided extensive guidance for businesses and employers on how to conduct a Covid-19 risk assessment and the steps that should be taken to make the working environment Covid-secure for employees or volunteers that cannot work from home.

Under existing health and safety laws, employers have a duty to protect the health, safety and welfare of their employees and other people who might be affected by their business. Employers must do whatever is reasonably practicable to achieve this.

If workers think their employer is exposing them to risks or is not carrying out their legal duties with regards to health and safety, they can report this to their local authority or the Health and Safety Executive who can take a range of actions.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

‘Heritage asset’ is a broad term used in planning policy. The Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is responsible for the statutory heritage protection system, including the designation of Listed Buildings, Scheduled Monuments and Protected Wreck Sites. Details of these assets can be found online in the National Heritage List for England, hosted by Historic England on behalf of the Secretary of State.

The circa 400,000 Listed Buildings, Scheduled Monuments and Protected Wreck Sites in England or UK territorial waters adjacent to England have intrinsic value to our cultural heritage. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) does not collect or collate data on the value (property value) or income data for these sites.

DCMS and its arms length bodies produce data on the economic impact of the heritage sector; this is published within DCMS Sectors Economic Estimates and Historic England's Heritage Economic Estimate Indicators. DCMS’s Culture and Heritage Capital Programme is looking to develop broader measures of value for heritage assets.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when he plans to announce the results of the tender for management of the UK Youth Parliament; and what budget has been allocated.

Following a grant competition in March 2021, the UK Youth Parliament grant for 2021/22 was awarded to the British Youth Council. This decision was communicated to the British Youth Council on 6 April 2021, and the total grant budget allocated by DCMS was £233,300.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the Government's policy on the management of heritage assets located beyond UK Territorial Waters but within the UK Marine Area includes the collation of detailed archaeological information derived from site surveys in addition to the monitoring of vessel movements in those waters; and if he will make a statement.

The Government monitors vessel movements in relation to selected heritage assets in the UK Marine Area if there is good reason for doing so. In addition, Historic England - Government's statutory adviser on the historic environment - maintains a National Record of the Historic Environment. Through the implementation of its Heritage Information Access Strategy, Historic England is in the process of building on this by creating a National Marine Heritage Record that will collate details of heritage assets located in the region between Mean High Water and the 200 nautical mile sea limit.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the assistance provided to the Government by the marine archaeology community in formulating a strategy for management of significant heritage assets within the UK Marine Area; and if he will meet with representatives of that community to discuss further improvements to that strategy.

No such formal assessment has been made, however the advice provided over a number of years by the marine archaeology community, generally and in relation to specific wreck sites, has been invaluable to decision making and understanding these sites. There are no plans at this time to meet with representatives of the marine archaeology community.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department plans to take to ensure that some of the income raised by The Crown Estate from seabed licensing is returned to the marine environment to further the management of significant heritage assets located within the UK Marine Area and in particular for the sites of (i) the Galloper wreck, (ii) HMS Victory (1744) and (iii) HMS Gloucester (1654).

The Department has no current plans. Her Majesty The Queen surrenders the revenue from The Crown Estate (which she owns as reigning Monarch) to the Government. As a result, over the last ten years, The Crown Estate has returned a total of £2.9 billion to the Exchequer. The Crown Estate revenues are not hypothecated and have been invested in vital public services such as the NHS, transport, schools and defence, which benefit the UK as a whole.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the same principles of heritage management will be applied to significant heritage assets located beyond UK Territorial Waters but within the UK Marine Area as are applied to such assets located within UK Territorial Waters.

The policies relating to heritage assets that are set out in the UK Marine Policy Statement apply equally to those located in UK Territorial Waters and those located beyond UK Territorial Waters but within the UK Marine Area. These policies inform delivery of the Marine Management Organisation’s responsibilities - including the development of Marine Plans and the determination of applications for marine licences. The Marine Management Organisation routinely consults Historic England.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, for what reason the Government does not provide full funding for the investigation of historically significant shipwrecks in the UK Marine Area; and how much funding has been provided by the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands for that purpose in each of the last three years.

I indicated to my honourable friend in my response to his letter of 8th February that my officials have discussed the Galloper wreck site with their counterparts at the Ministry of Defence and Historic England. Consequently, the Government is monitoring the site and understands that vessel traffic monitoring occurs as part of conventional site security.

I am also content that steps have been taken to facilitate management of the site through the action taken by Galloper Wind Farm Ltd to engage with other maritime authorities - including the Royal Navy, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency and the Marine Management Organisation.

Though Historic England has no remit to impose requirements on future development proposals relating to the Galloper wreck site, the Marine Management Organisation routinely consults it on applications for marine licences. DCMS are not routinely part of such discussions, however Historic England do provide information and advice on request.

Regarding the guidance published by DCMS and the Ministry of Defence in 2014 on how existing policies and legislation apply to historic military wreck sites (‘Protection and Management of Historic Military Wrecks outside UK Territorial Waters’), I can confirm that this remains in place. I can also confirm that DCMS would give due consideration to any proposals by developers or other parties to undertake detailed investigations of the Galloper site. However, Government funding to undertake these investigations would need to be considered alongside other priorities.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what requirements Historic England sets for developers on funding the (a) reporting and (b) assessment of (i) wrecks discovered at the Galloper Offshore Wind Farm site and (ii) other historically significant wrecks; and what assessment he has made of the potential risks to historical assets on that site from unregulated salvage attempts.

I indicated to my honourable friend in my response to his letter of 8th February that my officials have discussed the Galloper wreck site with their counterparts at the Ministry of Defence and Historic England. Consequently, the Government is monitoring the site and understands that vessel traffic monitoring occurs as part of conventional site security.

I am also content that steps have been taken to facilitate management of the site through the action taken by Galloper Wind Farm Ltd to engage with other maritime authorities - including the Royal Navy, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency and the Marine Management Organisation.

Though Historic England has no remit to impose requirements on future development proposals relating to the Galloper wreck site, the Marine Management Organisation routinely consults it on applications for marine licences. DCMS are not routinely part of such discussions, however Historic England do provide information and advice on request.

Regarding the guidance published by DCMS and the Ministry of Defence in 2014 on how existing policies and legislation apply to historic military wreck sites (‘Protection and Management of Historic Military Wrecks outside UK Territorial Waters’), I can confirm that this remains in place. I can also confirm that DCMS would give due consideration to any proposals by developers or other parties to undertake detailed investigations of the Galloper site. However, Government funding to undertake these investigations would need to be considered alongside other priorities.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to his Department's Guidance on how existing policies and legislation apply to historic military wreck sites, published with the Ministry of Defence in April 2014, whether it remains the Government policy to ensure historic military wrecks are offered appropriate protection and management.

I indicated to my honourable friend in my response to his letter of 8th February that my officials have discussed the Galloper wreck site with their counterparts at the Ministry of Defence and Historic England. Consequently, the Government is monitoring the site and understands that vessel traffic monitoring occurs as part of conventional site security.

I am also content that steps have been taken to facilitate management of the site through the action taken by Galloper Wind Farm Ltd to engage with other maritime authorities - including the Royal Navy, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency and the Marine Management Organisation.

Though Historic England has no remit to impose requirements on future development proposals relating to the Galloper wreck site, the Marine Management Organisation routinely consults it on applications for marine licences. DCMS are not routinely part of such discussions, however Historic England do provide information and advice on request.

Regarding the guidance published by DCMS and the Ministry of Defence in 2014 on how existing policies and legislation apply to historic military wreck sites (‘Protection and Management of Historic Military Wrecks outside UK Territorial Waters’), I can confirm that this remains in place. I can also confirm that DCMS would give due consideration to any proposals by developers or other parties to undertake detailed investigations of the Galloper site. However, Government funding to undertake these investigations would need to be considered alongside other priorities.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what (a) steps his Department is taking, (b) discussions he has had with (i) Cabinet colleagues and (ii) Historic England on arranging the (A) investigation, (B) protection and (c) management of Galloper wreck site in the UK Marine Area as an international important heritage asset.

I indicated to my honourable friend in my response to his letter of 8th February that my officials have discussed the Galloper wreck site with their counterparts at the Ministry of Defence and Historic England. Consequently, the Government is monitoring the site and understands that vessel traffic monitoring occurs as part of conventional site security.

I am also content that steps have been taken to facilitate management of the site through the action taken by Galloper Wind Farm Ltd to engage with other maritime authorities - including the Royal Navy, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency and the Marine Management Organisation.

Though Historic England has no remit to impose requirements on future development proposals relating to the Galloper wreck site, the Marine Management Organisation routinely consults it on applications for marine licences. DCMS are not routinely part of such discussions, however Historic England do provide information and advice on request.

Regarding the guidance published by DCMS and the Ministry of Defence in 2014 on how existing policies and legislation apply to historic military wreck sites (‘Protection and Management of Historic Military Wrecks outside UK Territorial Waters’), I can confirm that this remains in place. I can also confirm that DCMS would give due consideration to any proposals by developers or other parties to undertake detailed investigations of the Galloper site. However, Government funding to undertake these investigations would need to be considered alongside other priorities.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment the Government has made of the risk of children being exposed to inappropriate content on streaming services in the event that the age ratings applied by those companies do not reflect the British Board of Film Classification’s standards.

The British Board of Film Classification’s (BBFC) age ratings are currently used by a number of video on demand providers and, although adoption is voluntary, we welcome their use. We were particularly pleased to see Netflix announce on 1 December 2020 that they have become the first platform to achieve complete coverage of their content under the BBFC’s ratings. We will continue to engage with industry to encourage platforms to use age ratings, and will keep the evidence for legislation in this area under review.

The video sharing platform regime, for which Ofcom is the regulator, came into force on 1 November 2020. UK-established video sharing platforms must now take appropriate measures to protect the public, including minors, from illegal and harmful material. Video sharing platforms are not currently mandated to adopt BBFC ratings, nor is it expected that they will be mandated to do so under Ofcom’s regulatory regime for video sharing platforms. In order to comply with the video sharing platform regime, age assurance measures may be adopted by video sharing platforms along with other measures such as age ratings and parental controls. Age assurance measures comprise a broad range of technical measures which can be used by a service to establish the age of their users. Under the video sharing platform regime, services must take into account freedom of expression and should consider what measures are most appropriate and proportionate prior to introducing them.

Ofcom and the BBFC have a strong collaborative relationship when working on audience protection issues. The BBFC is engaging actively with both Ofcom and video sharing platforms to share their expertise on emerging technologies and the applicability of content ratings.

Protecting children is at the heart of our online harms agenda, and wider government priorities. Where sites host user-generated content or facilitate online user interaction such as video and image sharing, commenting and live streaming, then that content will be subject to the new duty of care. The government is working at pace to prepare online safety legislation, which will be ready this year.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment was made of the (a) public value benefit and (b) value to the public purse when the Old Royal Naval College was transferred to the Greenwich Foundation in 1997.

Old Royal Naval College (formally called The Greenwich Foundation for the Old Royal Naval College) was established as a charity to conserve the Baroque buildings and grounds for present and future generations and to provide opportunities for wide and diverse audiences to enjoy and share its significance.

The Dame Jennifer Jenkins Report, completed in 1996, was the main assessment undertaken when the Royal Navy had vacated the site and discussions about its future took place. This report considered the public value benefit of transforming the site into a commercial space that allows visitors to experience and enjoy the historic assets located on the site, such as the Painted Hall and Chapel. The report concluded that the creation of a Trust to manage the site would bring considerable scope to enhance public enjoyment and understanding of the site, as well as the opportunity to generate independent commercial income which would be used for the benefit of the site.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the cultural and heritage contribution of the Societies of Burlington House; and if he will make a statement.

Government recognises the value of Learned Societies and the cultural and heritage contributions of their collections which are housed at New Burlington House.

Government is working with the Learned Societies to enable them to remain at the site. The current rent agreement was put in place following a legal decision by the High Court in 2005 and subsequent arbitration in 2015. The Learned Societies agreed to the current rent agreements which allow them to pay discounted rents over the next 80 years.

Both DCMS and MHCLG understand the societies’ position and are working closely together to explore whether there is a solution that can deliver public value and help the Society to remain in situ at New Burlington House

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 November 2020 to Question 114761, if he will release ownership of the original manuscript of the work of Lord Alfred Douglas entitled In Excelsis, written during his time in jail and held in the Public Records Office to the estate of the late Lord Alfred Douglas.

The notebook which contains “In Excelsis” was issued by the Governor of Wormwood Scrubs prison to Lord Alfred Douglas while he was in custody there in 1924. As such the notebook was then, and is now, property of the Crown. As a Public Record in line with the provisions of the Public Records Act 1958, it is permanently preserved as a public record at The National Archives and it would not be appropriate to de-accession it.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will release the original manuscript of the work of Lord Alfred Douglas entitled In Excelsis, written during his time in jail and held in the Public Records Office.

The original text of ‘In Excelsis’ by Lord Alfred Douglas (file reference EXT 11/75) has been available to the general public for viewing under supervision at The National Archives since 27 November 1997.

The National Archives’ reading room service is currently suspended, in line with the new national restrictions in England, although it continues to provide access to its collections and a range of services online.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions officials in his Department have had with organisers of commercial metal-detecting rallies in relation to (a) public safety and (b) protection of archaeology as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Guidance for both individual metal detectorists and organisers of events operating during the covid-19 lockdown was published on the gov.uk page Guidance on searching for archaeological finds in England during COVID-19 on 9 July 2020. The guidance points organisers to directions on operating inside and outside events and also advises organisers and finders what to do if they discover a new archaeological site. The page also directs finders and organisers to the National Council for Metal Detecting guidance on best practice when detecting.

Rallies and club events are legally permitted and take place on private property with the landowner’s consent, The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport does not currently monitor or record activities at these events.

Responsibility for reporting possible treasure finds and arranging for an export licence lies with the finder and owner of the cultural object. Guidance on reporting treasure and applying for an export licence during the present situation is included on the gov.uk pages Guidance on searching for archaeological finds in England during COVID-19 and Export art, antiques and cultural goods: special rules. Anyone not reporting a potential treasure find or not obtaining an export licence where necessary can be subject to legal sanctions.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what guidance his Department has issued to organisers of commercial metal-detecting rallies in relation to the protection of in-situ archaeology as social distancing rules are relaxed as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Guidance for both individual metal detectorists and organisers of events operating during the covid-19 lockdown was published on the gov.uk page Guidance on searching for archaeological finds in England during COVID-19 on 9 July 2020. The guidance points organisers to directions on operating inside and outside events and also advises organisers and finders what to do if they discover a new archaeological site. The page also directs finders and organisers to the National Council for Metal Detecting guidance on best practice when detecting.

Rallies and club events are legally permitted and take place on private property with the landowner’s consent, The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport does not currently monitor or record activities at these events.

Responsibility for reporting possible treasure finds and arranging for an export licence lies with the finder and owner of the cultural object. Guidance on reporting treasure and applying for an export licence during the present situation is included on the gov.uk pages Guidance on searching for archaeological finds in England during COVID-19 and Export art, antiques and cultural goods: special rules. Anyone not reporting a potential treasure find or not obtaining an export licence where necessary can be subject to legal sanctions.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what in-situ (a) hoards and (b) other archaeological finds found on metal-detecting rallies and club events have been excavated without archaeological support in 2020; what assessment his Department has made of the level of loss to knowledge of those excavations.

Guidance for both individual metal detectorists and organisers of events operating during the covid-19 lockdown was published on the gov.uk page Guidance on searching for archaeological finds in England during COVID-19 on 9 July 2020. The guidance points organisers to directions on operating inside and outside events and also advises organisers and finders what to do if they discover a new archaeological site. The page also directs finders and organisers to the National Council for Metal Detecting guidance on best practice when detecting.

Rallies and club events are legally permitted and take place on private property with the landowner’s consent, The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport does not currently monitor or record activities at these events.

Responsibility for reporting possible treasure finds and arranging for an export licence lies with the finder and owner of the cultural object. Guidance on reporting treasure and applying for an export licence during the present situation is included on the gov.uk pages Guidance on searching for archaeological finds in England during COVID-19 and Export art, antiques and cultural goods: special rules. Anyone not reporting a potential treasure find or not obtaining an export licence where necessary can be subject to legal sanctions.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what requirements are placed on organisers of commercial rallies to (a) report Treasure, (b) follow best practice, (c) ensure that in-situ archaeology is protected and (d) ensure that archaeological finds made on their events are lawfully exported.

Guidance for both individual metal detectorists and organisers of events operating during the covid-19 lockdown was published on the gov.uk page Guidance on searching for archaeological finds in England during COVID-19 on 9 July 2020. The guidance points organisers to directions on operating inside and outside events and also advises organisers and finders what to do if they discover a new archaeological site. The page also directs finders and organisers to the National Council for Metal Detecting guidance on best practice when detecting.

Rallies and club events are legally permitted and take place on private property with the landowner’s consent, The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport does not currently monitor or record activities at these events.

Responsibility for reporting possible treasure finds and arranging for an export licence lies with the finder and owner of the cultural object. Guidance on reporting treasure and applying for an export licence during the present situation is included on the gov.uk pages Guidance on searching for archaeological finds in England during COVID-19 and Export art, antiques and cultural goods: special rules. Anyone not reporting a potential treasure find or not obtaining an export licence where necessary can be subject to legal sanctions.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many youth workers contracted by the NCS programme have been furloughed.

By April 2020, an estimated 64.6 full-time equivalent youth workers contracted by the NCS network have been furloughed. This figure is based on self-reported data from NCS Providers to the NCS Trust.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what adjustment his Department has made to the grant allocated to NCS Trust as a result of the cancellation of summer programmes this year following the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department is working closely with the NCS Trust, the Government Arms’ Length Body commissioned to deliver the programme, to develop an alternative offer for this summer. The details of the alternative summer programme, and its financial implications, are being developed at pace between DCMS,the NCS Trust and their supplier network.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding has been allocated to NCS in each year since its inception; how much funding was budgeted for in 2020; and if he will also publish that figure as spend per participant.

The table below shows the funding provided by Government to the National Citizen Service since the programme started in 2011. Please note that the NCS programme was sponsored by the Cabinet Office from inception until 2016/17.

Year

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Total grant funding (£M)

21

62

84

117

155

181

186

189

176

As per the Main Estimates the total funding envelope for NCS Trust in 2020/21 (including depreciation) is £177.8m. A delegated budget to the NCS Trust will be agreed following a review of funding requirements for the 2020 Summer programme.


The spend per participant was £1,764 for financial year 2018/19, as noted in the 2018/19 NCS Annual Report. The 2019/2020 NCS Annual Report will include a best estimate unit cost and will be published in Q4 2020. The 2020/2021 Annual Report will be published after the end of the financial year.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the cost effectiveness of the (a) National Citizen Service and (b) NCS Trust.

The most recent publicly available figure from the NCS 2016 evaluation report show that for every £1 of taxpayer money spent on the 2016 summer programme, £1.79 is provided back to society by the NCS programme in terms of the economic benefit. For the 2016 Autumn programme for every £1 spend, £2.21 is provided back in terms of the economic benefits. The economic benefits relate to the identified impact the NCS programme has in respect to volunteering and leadership.

The NCS Trust is the Royal Chartered Arms-Length Body overseeing and implementing the programme, in line with the NCS Act 2017. The NCS Trust’s budget is reviewed and approved by DCMS on an annual basis in line with Managing Public Money standards. The National Audit Office audits the NCS Trust’s accounts each year.

Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he has taken to reduce the leaving package of the departing Chief Executive of the NCS Trust; and what provisions he has instituted for limits on remuneration of remaining employees.

Earlier this month we were made aware of an unacceptable exit package proposed for the outgoing NCS Chief Executive.

We have taken swift action on this issue, and are investigating wider issues around governance. We have made clear that every element of the outgoing Chief Executive’s departure must comply with HM Treasury guidance on Managing Public Money.

A new CEO has joined the NCS Trust this week and we are clear that we expect the organisation going forward to be completely focussed on helping level up the country with strong opportunities for young people from all backgrounds.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what his policy is on the restitution of antiquities from national museums to their country of origin.

Our 15 national museums hold world-class collections in trust for the nation that are seen in their global context by over 40 million visitors each year. Decisions relating to museum collections are a matter for the trustees of each museum, who operate independently of government. UK law prevents some national museums from removing items from their collections. The two exceptions to this are human remains, under 1000 years old, and cultural property spoliated during the Nazi era.

We are committed to supporting our museums in dealing confidently with all aspects of restitution. Our national development agency for museums, Arts Council England, which is sponsored by my department, is currently working to refresh existing sector guidelines on restitution for UK museums.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress the Government has made on its review of youth work; and if he will make a statement.

In July 2019 my department commenced a review of the statutory guidance which sets out the statutory duty placed on Local Authorities to provide local youth services. Since July 2019 officials have held roundtables with the youth sector, consultations with young people, and ran a public call for evidence, which closed in December 2019. DCMS officials are currently reviewing responses to inform the next stage of the review.

This government has announced it will be investing £500 million over five years through the Youth Investment Fund to increase the availability of youth services. The fund will be used to build new youth centres across the country, refurbish existing youth facilities, provide mobile facilities for harder to reach areas, and invest in the youth work profession and frontline services. Government is also funding up to £7 million through the Youth Accelerator Fund that will expand existing successful projects delivering positive activities, and address urgent needs in the youth sector by delivering extra sessions in youth clubs.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

The Department does not have properties classified as heritage assets.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many adoptions have taken place in each of the last 10 years.

The department does not hold information on the number of all children in England who are adopted. However, we hold information on children who have been adopted from care.

The latest information on children looked after in England is contained in the ‘Children looked after in England’ statistical release, which is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoptions.

Figures for the numbers of children looked after who were adopted are available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/bc87ab18-fc58-4c83-a12b-f65dbedbba9b.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to make it a requirement for private tutors to undergo safeguarding checks and be subject to the DBS requirements applicable to directly employed teachers; and if he will make a statement.

Nothing is more important than the safety of children, which is why private tutors are already eligible to receive basic Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) certificates, which parents and carers should ask to see to assure themselves of a tutor’s suitability. In addition to asking to see a private tutor’s basic DBS certificate, parents and carers might also consider what other information may be available to help them assess a tutor’s suitability to work with their children. It is recommended that parents confirm a tutor’s identity. Testimonials from parents and/or pupils themselves will help provide reassurance about the tutor’s teaching ability and about the way in which they interact with the pupil.

Parents and carers should also look to ensure that the home tutoring takes place in a room in the home that allows the parent access to enable them to supervise.

The Government is exploring ways to allow self employed people, including tutors, to access enhanced criminal records checks.

On 21 October 2020, the Department published ‘Keeping children safe during community activities, after-school clubs and tuition: non-statutory guidance for providers running out-of-school settings’. This guidance is for organisations or individuals who provide community activities, tuition or after school clubs for children, also known as out of school settings (OOSS) providers, as well as their staff and volunteers.

The guidance aims to help providers of OOSS understand best practice for creating a safe environment for children in their care and give parents and carers confidence that their child is in a safe activity or teaching environment. The guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/keeping-children-safe-in-out-of-school-settings-code-of-practice.

Alongside this, the Department has also published accompanying guidance for parents and carers to help support them when choosing OOSS providers for their children, including positive signs and red flags to look out for. This can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-for-parents-and-carers-on-safeguarding-children-in-out-of-school-settings.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to announce guidance for schools wanting to restore educational residential trips from the summer 2021 term.

Schools are advised against all educational visits at this time. The Department is working on advice for schools on the planning and booking of residential trips when it is safe to do so and in line with the Government’s roadmap to recovery, as set out in: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-response-spring-2021/covid-19-response-spring-2021. The advice will be published shortly.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to respond to the urgent letters from the hon. Member for East Worthing and Shoreham of 10 December 2020 and 26 January 2021, on declined reimbursement costs for a local primary school.

I can confirm that a response has been sent to my hon. Friend, the Member for East Worthing and Shoreham.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what was the cost of the free school meal vouchers issued over the summer holiday; and what was the value of those vouchers not redeemed.

Our national voucher scheme launched on 31 March. Edenred, the supplier, has reported that over £380 million worth of voucher codes had been redeemed into supermarket eGift cards by families, as of 19 August, and over 20,350 schools had placed orders for the scheme as of 28 July. This covers both term time and holiday provision. Schools also had the option to order via local voucher schemes and claim costs back through the exceptional costs fund. The free school meal (FSM) voucher scheme has now closed. Schools and their kitchens are open, so normal FSM provision has resumed, enabling children to have a nutritious healthy meal at school. We do not hold data relating to the value of vouchers that have not been redeemed and such a figure would still be subject to change. The expiry date on an eGift card varies depending on the retailer (the shortest term being 12 months).

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to replace the Residential Care Leadership Board; and for what reasons that Board was abolished.

The Residential Care Leadership Board is no longer being convened because the board’s remit of responding to recommendations made in Sir Martin Narey’s 2016 Review of Residential Children’s Care, has been successfully completed. The department is taking steps to ensure that we draw on sectoral expertise through a range of different forums to address current issues affecting the sector, not least in our response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

The government has committed to undertaking a bold, broad and independently led care review. This will launch as soon as possible and will support improvements in the children’s social care system.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many adoptions have (a) been completed and (b) broken down in each year since 2010.

The department does not hold information on the number of all children in England who are adopted.

The latest figures on the number of children in England who have been adopted from care are published in table H1 of the statistical release, entitled ’National tables: Children Looked after in England including adoptions 2018-19’, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2018-to-2019. Figures for the reporting year ending 31 March 2020 will be published later this year.

The department does not collect information on adoptions that were disrupted. National figures on numbers of children who started to be looked after, and who had a previous permanence arrangement, including adoption orders, are available in table C1 of the above release. However, these figures were collected for the first time in 2014 and should be treated with caution. The information is based on self-declaration and, for several children, the previous permanence arrangement is not known.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the barriers to increasing the number of adoptions.

The department assess and address barriers to increasing adoption numbers on a regular basis. One barrier has been in recruiting the right adopters for the children waiting. To address this, the government is investing £1 million in adopter recruitment during the 2020-21 financial year, with a focus on generating an increase in people of all backgrounds coming forward to adopt children who wait the longest. This includes funding the cross-sector national recruitment campaign, #YouCanAdopt. Launched in September 2020, a key aspect of this campaign is its inclusivity. It aims to break down perceived barriers to adoption, encouraging more adopters of diverse backgrounds to step forward.

The COVID-19 outbreak has introduced new challenges for adoption. Early in the outbreak, we introduced regulatory flexibilities to ensure adoption processes could continue despite the lockdown restrictions and some of these changes remain in place. For example, this includes the flexibility relating to health assessments for prospective adopters. This allows agencies to proceed to stage 2 of the assessment process without a health check, as long as those checks are completed before the end of that stage. Where new challenges have arisen with the announcement of a second lockdown, further regulatory changes have been introduced. This includes exemptions to allow adoption introductions to continue during the new lockdown, alleviating delays for children moving to their new loving homes.

The COVID-19 outbreak has also introduced barriers in progressing adoption cases through the courts. However, adoption is included in the list of priorities for the courts, which have been encouraged to make use of hybrid courts (a combination of virtual and physical hearings) to progress cases where possible. The department continues to work closely with the Ministry of Justice, the judiciary, The Association of Directors for Children’s Services and Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service on these issues.

We know that some prospective adopters have concerns about what support will be available to them. The core Adoption Support Fund (ASF) has provided £177 million since 2015 to help pay for essential therapeutic services for over 62,000 adoptive and eligible special guardianship families. The All-Party Parliamentary Group for Adoption and Permanence published a report in July 2019, and our own independent evaluations of the Fund have concluded that the ASF was having a positive transformative effect on the lives of children and families.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which (a) schools and (b) higher education establishments (i) host a Confucius Institute and (ii) are in receipt of funds from the Chinese Government.

Higher education establishments are independent, autonomous organisations and the government does not collect data of this sort. A number of UK higher education providers host and publicise their Confucius Institutes and are responsible for ensuring their partnerships are managed appropriately with the right due diligence in place.

The government does not collect data on which education establishments host a Confucius institute.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons the results of Reception Baseline Assessments will not be shared with the school attended by the pupil until that child is about to leave primary school.

The Department has always been clear that the reception baseline assessment (RBA) is not a diagnostic assessment and should not be used to track or group individual children or hold early years settings to account. Data gathered from the assessment will only be used to create a baseline for school-level progress measures and will not be shared with schools, teachers, or parents. However, teachers will receive a series of short, narrative statements on how each child did at that time, which can be used to inform teaching.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of children with Education Health Care Plans (a) were attending primary school in the latest period for which data is available before reception, Year 1 and Year 6 classes were reopened and (b) are attending primary school presently.

The latest data on the attendance of children with an education, health and care (EHC) plan in educational establishments since 23 March was published on Tuesday 9 June and covers data up to Thursday 4 June. The data is available at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings.

The data is collected from individual education establishments and the published figures include estimates for non-response.

An estimate of the number of children with EHC plans who have a parent designated as a critical worker has not been made.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of children with Education, Health and Care plans who have a parent designated as a key worker.

The latest data on the attendance of children with an education, health and care (EHC) plan in educational establishments since 23 March was published on Tuesday 9 June and covers data up to Thursday 4 June. The data is available at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings.

The data is collected from individual education establishments and the published figures include estimates for non-response.

An estimate of the number of children with EHC plans who have a parent designated as a critical worker has not been made.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the equality implications of his Department's proposals on unregulated provision for children in care and care leavers for (a) disabled children and (b) children from black and minority ethnic communities; and whether his Department has plans to publish an equality impact assessment of those proposals.

As part of the current consultation on reforms to unregulated provision for children in care and care leavers the department is considering equality implications of the proposals. An equality impact assessment will be published as part of the government’s response to the consultation.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, who the members of the working group on draft quality standards for unregulated supported accommodation for children in care and leaving care are.

As part of the public consultation on reforms to unregulated provision for children in care and care leavers, a task and finish group has been established. It is chaired by Sir Alan Wood and has been asked to:

1. Support the development and drafting of new national standards for semi-independent provision for children in care;

2. Further develop our evidence regarding the use of these placements for U16s; and

3. Advise on what should be taken account of when considering the implementation of the results of the consultation.

Those asked to attend the group represent some of those directly involved in the delivery of the proposed reforms – including providers, commissioners and inspectors as well as those who advocate for young people. This includes representatives from:

  • Association of Directors of Children’s Services
  • Independent Children’s Home Association
  • Association of Chief Police Officers
  • National Youth Advocacy Service
  • Ofsted
  • Commissioning Alliance
  • Partners in Practice Local Authorities
  • Local Government Association
  • Providers of unregulated accommodation

Throughout the consultation we are seeking the views of as many people as possible who are affected by the proposed reforms. This group is one way of achieving that. We are continuing to work with children and young people, local authorities, social workers and providers to seek their views and discuss the proposals.

The consultation is open until 8 April 2020 and we welcome responses from anyone who wishes to contribute. The task and finish group’s work, including supporting development of new minimum standards, will be informed by consultation responses and it will report after the consultation has closed.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many families with a household income of (a) £50,000 to £70,000, (b) £70,001 to £90,000, (c) £90,001 to £110,00,0 (d) £110,001 to £130,000, (e) £130,001 to £150,000 claim childcare benefits.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many women over the age of 60 have taken up apprenticeships in the last five years.

The number of women aged 60 and over that have started an apprenticeship from the 2014/15 academic year onwards is shown in the table below:

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Female, 60+ apprenticeship starts

1,690

1,780

1,900

980

980

Notes:

1) Volumes are rounded to the nearest ten.

2) The data source is the Individualised Learner Record (ILR).

3) Age is calculated based upon age at start of the apprenticeship programme.

4) Numbers are counted for the full, final academic years from August to July.

5) Apprenticeship starts include all funded and unfunded learners reported on the ILR.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

Defra is advised on the management of designated heritage assets in its portfolio by Historic England’s Government Historic Estate Unit. Further details can be found here:

https://historicengland.org.uk/services-skills/our-planning-services/advice-for-government-historic-estates

Defra does not collect or collate data on the property value or income data for these assets.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether companies with a record of criminal activity will be eligible to receive compensation under a future funding package for the fishing industry.

Details of eligibility criteria for the fisheries support scheme will be announced in the coming weeks. Defra will ensure that necessary checks and procedures are in place to minimise the risk of fraud. Seafood firms and individuals convicted of fraud in the context of fisheries funding schemes have previously been ineligible to access other financial support made available to the sector.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many prosecutions there have been of dog owners for sheep worrying in each of the last five years.

My Department takes the issue of livestock worrying very seriously, recognising both the distress this can cause farmers and animals, as well as the financial implications.

According to the National Sheep Association’s annual survey 94.85% of respondents had experienced sheep worrying by dogs on their farm, and SheepWatch UK estimate that 15,000 sheep are killed each year in dog worrying incidents.

Data on prosecutions relating to the offence of livestock worrying (which includes sheep worrying) are consolidated in the Criminal Justice Statistics Quarterly (England and Wales) under the broader category ‘other offences related to dogs’. We do not hold separate data on this.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of compost contaminated by the weed killer aminopyralid on the safety of fruit and vegetables for consumption; and whether his Department has issued guidance on the effects of that weed killer.

Products containing aminopyralid are used to control weeds in cereals, oilseed rape and grassland. Before these products were authorised, risks to consumers were fully assessed by the UK regulator, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). HSE concluded that there were no concerns for consumers.

Aminopyralid does not break down rapidly in compost produced from treated plants or manure from animals that have grazed treated grassland. There is thus potential for residues to affect susceptible plants and so requirements are in place to ensure that contaminated materials do not go for use by gardeners and others. These arrangements are kept under review to ensure that they remain effective.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the timeframe is for a decision to be made on the Sussex Near Shore Trawling Byelaw proposal approved by the Sussex IFCA to restrict trawling close to the Sussex shore.

The Secretary of State has not yet received this byelaw, given that all non-emergency IFCA byelaws are subject to a quality assurance process, undertaken by the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) on behalf of Defra, prior to being sent to the Secretary of State for confirmation. The MMO aims to return comments to IFCAs within 45 working days of submission. In respect of the Sussex IFCA Nearshore Trawling Byelaw, the MMO deadline for quality assurance is 17 June to respond to Sussex IFCA. The Secretary of State will consider the Sussex Nearshore Trawling Byelaw when the MMO’s quality assurance process is completed.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the number of livestock lost to dog attacks in each of the last five years; and what measures he is considering to tackle that matter.

Attacks on livestock by dogs are unacceptable and Defra works with the relevant stakeholders to find ways to prevent them. This includes advice to owners to keep their dogs under effective control. In 2018 we wrote to all police forces and local authorities to explain the powers and initiatives available to help tackle irresponsible dog ownership, including attacks on livestock.

Details on the number of cases of dogs attacking livestock that have been reported to the police would be held by each separate police force and are not collated centrally. No data are collected centrally on the number of livestock lost. The attached table provides the numbers of prosecutions and convictions in each of the last five years for England and Wales for which figures are available.

Numbers of people prosecuted/convicted for allowing a dog to worry livestock under s1 of Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953

Values

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Prosecuted

47

47

37

25

23

Convicted

40

35

28

20

21

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the cost of requiring VI-1 import forms on all EU wines imported into the UK; and if he will make a statement.

As inspections for imported wine are undertaken on a risk-based percentage, regardless of origin or import certification, no specific assessment has been made regarding additional costs of controls, although it is expected to be nil or negligible.

In 2019, the UK was the second-largest global wine importer by value and volume. Leaving the EU provides the opportunity for the UK to establish an independent wine regime tailored to its growing and vibrant domestic production while building further on the UK’s current position as a global hub for the international trading of wine.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when her Department plans to bring forward legislative proposals to amend Schedule 2 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 to remove the Greenland White Fronted goose as a shootable species.

The Government intends to prohibit the hunting of Greenland white-fronted goose by removing the species from schedule 2 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. The legislation will be laid by the spring.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many meetings her Department has had with representatives of the People's Republic of China since 12 January 2021; what was discussed at each of those meetings; and if she will make a statement.

Neither Ministerial colleagues nor officials in London have met with the Chinese administration during this time.

Through the UK’s diplomatic missions in China, there is regular engagement with Chinese government counterparts to support UK trade interests.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

As part of the Government’s Transparency Agency information about Department for Transport properties is published on the data.gov.uk website:

https://data.gov.uk/dataset/epimstransparency

Information on the properties classified as heritage assets, value of those properties and income derived from those properties can only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency is taking to clear the backlog for learner drivers wanting to take their driving test following the covid-19 outbreak.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) has put in place a number of measures to increase practical driving tests. These include offering overtime and annual leave buy back to examiners, asking all those qualified to conduct tests, but who do not do so as part of their current day job, to return to conducting tests, and conducting out of hours testing (such as on public holidays). The DVSA has also started a recruitment campaign to increase the number of examiners. The aim is to increase testing capacity and reduce the backlog as quickly as possible, whilst maintaining a COVID-secure service for customers and examiners.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the UK-France reciprocal agreement on driving licences will be agreed.

The Government is making every effort to reach a swift understanding with France regarding long-term licence exchange arrangements for UK nationals resident in France, and vice-versa. UK nationals who became resident in France before 1 January 2021 can continue to use their valid UK licences until 31 December 2021. The French authorities have confirmed that a valid UK licence will continue to be exchanged in this period, until a reciprocal agreement is reached between the United Kingdom and France.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending the period of the theory test certificate in response to the suspension of theory and practical driving tests as a result of the covid-19 lockdown.

The maximum duration of two years between passing the theory test and a subsequent practical test is in place for road safety reasons; to ensure that a candidate’s knowledge is current. This validity period is set in legislation and the Government has no current plans to lay further legislation to extend it.

It is important that road safety knowledge and hazard perception skills are up to date at the critical point that they drive unsupervised for the first time. Those with theory test certificates expiring may have taken their test in early 2019. Since then, their lessons and practice sessions will have been significantly curtailed during recent lockdowns and it is likely that their knowledge base will have diminished. Research suggests that this would be particularly harmful for hazard perception skills, a key factor in road safety.

Ensuring new drivers have current relevant knowledge and skills is a vital part of the training of new drivers, who are disproportionality represented in casualty statistics. Taking all this into consideration, the decision has been made not to extend theory test certificates and learners will need to pass another theory test if their certificate expires.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the estimated total cost is of the recently announced preferred route for the A27 Arundel bypass; and what the expected timescale is to completion.

The total cost for delivery of the A27 Arundel Bypass preferred route (Grey, Option 5BV1), which was announced on 15 October 2020, will be between £320 and £455 million, as set out at the further public consultation in 2019. This figure is subject to the development of the scheme through detailed design and ongoing commercial discussions.

Construction will commence in 2023/24 and will take approximately 36 months.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many qualified archaeologists are being deployed on survey and excavation work relating to High Speed Two construction.

The number of archaeologists required and consequently deployed will vary as the HS2 project moves forward. HS2 Ltd has estimated that they will need the skills of over 1,000 archaeologists and associated specialisms for the entire HS2 archaeology programme.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he next plans to report on proposals for upgrading the A27 between Worthing and Shoreham.

The second Road Investment Strategy will confirm the Government’s plans for the Strategic Road Network. We expect this to be published before the start of the second Road Period on 1 April 2020.

7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by her Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

DWP is advised on the management of designated heritage assets in its portfolio by Historic England’s Government Historic Estate Unit. Further details can be found here:

https://historicengland.org.uk/services-skills/our-planning-services/advice-for-government-historic-estates/

DWP does not collect or collate data on the value (property value) or income data for these assets.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many women between 60 and 66 years old are in (a) full-time employment, (b) part-time employment, (c) receipt of in-work benefits and (d) receipt of Jobseeker's Allowance.

For parts a) and b) the latest information is contained in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Women in employment

Full-time

Part-time

60-66

505,000

675,000

Source: Labour Force Survey, Jul-Sep 2019

For part c), table 2 shows the number of women aged 60-65 and over 65 who are claiming Universal Credit and are in employment (figures for the specific age group 60-66 are not available within Stat-Xplore).

Table 2: Women claiming Universal Credit and in employment, October 2019

In employment

60-65

16,676

Over 65

57

Source: DWP Stat-Xplore

For part d), table 3 shows the number of women aged 60-65 who are claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance (figures for the specific age group 60-66 are not available within Stat-Xplore).

Table 3: Women claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance, May 2019

60-65

10,703

Source: DWP Stat-Xplore

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

The Department has, since 2018, owned a number of properties adjacent to the Barts Royal London Hospital Site, which are vacant or being vacated and held for redevelopment as a life science cluster. Of these, three properties are classified as heritage assets detailed in the following table along with the most recent estimate of the value of those properties where available and any annual income derived from those properties:

Heritage status

Asset

Book Value

Income

Listed

34 Mount Terrace, London E1

£620,000

NIL

Within a conservation area

Former Outpatients Department, Stepney Way, E1

Part of larger plot - not individually valued

NIL

Within a conservation area

Ambrose King Centre, Turner Street, E1

Part of larger plot - not individually valued

£251,875 per year

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many full time equivalent health visitors have been employed in each of the last 10 years, by local authority and health authority area.

The information is not held in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the vacancy rate is for dermatologists within the NHS.

The Department does not hold the data requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the proportion of GP visits that are related to skin conditions.

The data requested is not collected centrally.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the guidance entitled Supporting pregnant women using maternity services during the coronavirus pandemic: actions for NHS providers in enabling parents’ full access together to their baby in neonatal units.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have worked closely with trusts to adopt the actions set out in the guidance and to remove barriers which prevent parental presence in neonatal units. The guidance is clear that parents of babies in neonatal critical care are partners in care and should not be considered to be visitors.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of giving same sex couples the same rights as heterosexual couples to access IVF treatment.

In England, decisions about local fertility services are determined by clinical commissioning groups, taking account of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s (NICE) fertility guidelines.

The NICE guidelines were updated in 2013 to include provision for same sex female couples, who have demonstrated their clinical infertility. The criteria in the guidelines were developed as a way of achieving equivalence between opposite-sex and same-sex couples in establishing clinical infertility and accessing National Health Service fertility treatment services. The guidelines are now due for review and the Department has started discussions with NICE about plans for such a review.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment has been made of the potential merits of making mercaptamine hydrochloride eye drops available through the NHS.

Current clinical commissioning policy is that mercaptamine hydrochloride eye drops are not recommended to be available as a treatment option through routine commissioning for corneal cystine deposits, following the prioritisation process undertaken by NHS England and NHS Improvement in July 2020. However, NHS England and NHS Improvement have determined that there is sufficient clinical evidence to consider commissioning mercaptamine hydrochloride eye drops. This treatment will therefore be considered at the Clinical Priorities Advisory Group prioritisation meeting in May 2021, along with a number of other treatments being considered for funding.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how the £79m Government funding to support children and young people’s mental health is planned to be spent; and when local Clinical Commissioning Groups and councils are planned to be able to access that funding.

This funding will allow an additional 22,500 children and young people to access community mental health services and an additional 2,000 children and young people to able to access eating disorder services compared to what was planned as part of the NHS Long Term Plan, and will accelerate the roll-out of mental health support teams in schools so that we reach our target of 20-25% coverage a year earlier than planned.

The funding is being made available to support the 2021/22 National Health Service operational planning and contracting round which is ongoing. Through this process, local systems will work with their partner organisations, including clinical commissioning groups and local authorities, to agree their mental health finance planning for financial year 2021/22.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress the Government has made on national standards to provide psychological support to parents of babies in neonatal care, set out in his Department's Toolkit for high-quality neonatal services and British Association of Perinatal Medicine service standards for hospitals providing neonatal care.

‘Implementing the Recommendations of the Neonatal Critical Care Transformation Review’ sets out an action for Local Maternity Systems (LMS) and Neonatal Operational Delivery Networks (NODN) to work together to profile the provision in local providers by reviewing the extent to which providers are integrating families into care, which should also include information on and access to emotional wellbeing and psychological support and the provision of resources and accommodation. NHS England and NHS Improvement asked LMS and NODNs to develop action plans to address any gaps.

The NHS Long Term Plan committed to enhance the experience of families with a child in neonatal critical care. From 2021/22, care coordinators will work with families within each of the clinical neonatal networks to support families to become more involved in the care of their baby.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of nurses working in the NHS in (a) August 2019 and (b) March 2021 (i) as full time equivalents and (ii) in total.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS) workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups, excluding staff working in primary care, local authorities or other providers.

As at August 2019 there were 287,458 full time equivalent (FTE) nurse and health visitors working in the HCHS workforce, 322,810 headcount.

Data for March 2021 is not yet available. In November 2020, the latest period for which data for FTE and headcount is available, there were 307,227 FTE nurse and health visitors working in the National Health Service, or 343,240 headcount.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many nurses have been recruited to the NHS since August 2019.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), but not staff working in primary care, local authorities or other providers.

The number of nurses and health visitors joining hospitals and CCGs between August 2019 and November 2020 was 50,904. This is based on headcount.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's press release, £79 million to boost mental health support for children and young people, published on 5 March 2021, what proportion of that funding will be allocated to fund community mental health support for children aged under three years old.

No funding has been specifically allocated to this age group.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the Pregnancy Loss Review Group last met; and when they plan to publish their report.

The Pregnancy Loss Review Advisory Panel last met on 24 October 2018. The report is expected to be published in 2021.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many yellow card notifications have been recorded by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority for each of the covid-19 vaccines currently in use by (a) type and (b) level of seriousness.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency will publish details of all suspected reactions reported in association with available COVID-19 vaccines shortly, including narrative assessment of the data and any issues identified on our website.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the correspondence from the hon. Member for East Worthing and Shoreham of 17 August 2020 on resuscitation in hospital.

We are working to provide all Members and external correspondents with accurate answers to their correspondence, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s letter will be answered as soon as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the maintenance of the public health grant in the Spending Review 2020, whether that maintenance is valued in (a) real or (b) cash terms.

Local authority public health grant allocations for 2021-22 will be subject to a detailed financial planning exercise and finalised in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that measures to limit the transmission of covid-19 in hospitals does not lead to the separation of mothers and babies.

Measures to limit the transmission of COVID-19 in hospitals should not lead to unnecessary separation of mother and babies.

The Department expects clinicians to provide care in keeping with clinical guidelines. Guidance on COVID-19 infection in pregnancy published by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the Royal College of Midwives states that women and their healthy babies should be kept together in the immediate postpartum period if they do not otherwise require maternal critical care or neonatal care. Women with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 should be supported to remain together with their baby and to practice skin-to-skin/kangaroo care, if the newborn does not require additional medical care.

Guidance produced by the British Association of Perinatal Medicine sets out that a mother and her newborn should have unrestricted contact when admission to a neonatal unit is unavoidable.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to increase access to specialist children and young people’s mental health provision, specifically for children in the first two years of life as part of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Our ambition in the NHS Long Term Plan is to create a comprehensive offer for 0-25 year olds that reaches across mental health services for children, young people and adults.

Through the Plan we are increasing mental health funding by at least an additional £2.3 billion a year by 2023/24. This will see an additional 345,000 children and young people, and 370,000 adults, accessing specialist mental health care if they need it.

In addition, the Rt hon. Member for South Northamptonshire (Andrea Leadsom MP) is leading a new review, commissioned by the Prime Minister, into improving health outcomes of babies and young children. The review will consider the barriers that impact on early-years development, including social and emotional factors and early childhood experiences.

She is expected to submit her findings and policy recommendations from the first phase of the Review into Early Years Health in January 2021. This will contribute to the Government’s vision for excellence in early-years health.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department collects data on access to specialist children and young people’s mental health provision disaggregated by users’ ages; and what steps he has taken to ensure equality of access for children of different ages.

This information is collected by NHS Digital via the mental health services dataset. However, data cannot be provided in the format requested until an agreed methodology is in place based on recent changes to the way the data is collected.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many more children aged 0-2 are accessing specialist children and young people’s mental health provision as at 25 November 2020 than were accessing such services at the time when the NHS Long Term Plan was published in January 2019.

The information is not available in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress he has made on publishing the report on registration of pre-24 week stillbirths as legislated for in the Civil Partnerships, Marriages and Deaths (Registration etc) Act 2019.

‘The Independent Pregnancy Loss Review: Care and support when baby loss occurs before 24 weeks gestation’ was commissioned by the Department. The purpose of the review is to consider the impact on families of the current threshold of 24 weeks gestation before being able to formally register a miscarriage if they so wish, and whether it would be beneficial to look at legislative options to amend existing primary legislation to allow parents to register a miscarriage if they wish to do so.

Good progress has been made on the review, but work was delayed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Work has resumed and the review now plans to report to the Secretary of State for Health in the new year.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many full time equivalent health visitors there have been in each of the last 10 years.

Responsibility for commissioning of health visiting services transferred to local authorities in October 2015. Local authorities are best placed to respond to the needs of their local population through commissioning National Health Service trusts and private sector organisations to provide health visiting services.

There is no single source that counts health visitors across the whole public sector.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS) workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups, but not staff working in primary care, general practitioner surgeries, local authorities or other providers.

The following table shows the number of HCHS health visitors as at September each year since 2010 and July 2020, the latest available data, full time equivalent (FTE).

HCHS health visitors, FTE

September 2010

7,849

September 2011

7,802

September 2012

7,687

September 2013

8,304

September 2014

9,162

September 2015

10,236

September 2016

9,521

September 2017

8,497

September 2018

7,884

September 2019

7,063

July 2020

6,644

Source: NHS Workforce Statistics

NHS Digital also collects and publishes data on staff, including health visitors, in some English independent sector healthcare organisations. These statistics do not represent the entire independent sector workforce as only 59 organisations provided data for September 2019.

The following table shows the number of FTE independent sector health visitors as at September each year since 2015 to 2019, this is the latest available data.

Independent sector health visitors, FTE

September 2015

957

September 2016

1,132

September 2017

1,240

September 2018

1,085

September 2019

1,147

Source: NHS Digital. Independent Healthcare Provider Workforce Statistics

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many health visitors have been reassigned to covid-19 responsibilities; and what plans he has to assign health visitors to the covid-19 vaccination programme.

Public Health England does not collect health visitor redeployment data, decisions regarding deployment is locally determined.

Supporting babies and families has been a priority for local authorities, National Health Service community services and community restoration. Health visiting services have remained in contact with families during the pandemic and will continue to provide interventions and support through a mixture of face to face and virtual contacts prioritising very young babies and vulnerable families.

NHS England and NHS Improvement lead on the implementation of the COVID-19 vaccination programme. This information is not held centrally as it is a local commissioning decision.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what representations he has received from charitable residential care homes on difficulties they have experienced whilst insuring their voluntary trustees for public liability in the event of a communicable disease, such as covid-19.

We are aware that the adult social care insurance market is changing in response to the pandemic and recognise that some care providers may encounter difficulties as their policies come up for renewal. We have heard from a small number of charities working in the care sector about challenges with insurance and possible implications for their trustees. We continue to work closely with insurance representatives and care providers to better understand the breadth and severity of such issues, and whether there is any action the Government should take.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many stillbirths occurred in the NHS in (a) each of the last 5 years and (b) since 23 March 2020.

This information is not held centrally.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of (a) children and (b) children on child in need or child protection plans have received (i) remote and (ii) face to face contact with a health visitor for (A) antenatal, (B) new birth visit, (C) six to eight week review, (D) 12 month development review and (E) two and a half year review purposes, since 23 March 2020.

Health visitor service delivery metrics are collected and published on a quarterly basis by Public Health England. The latest figures relate to October to December 2019, the statistics relate to all children resident in a local area, characteristics of the child such as if they are on child in need or child protection plans are not recorded. Annual data for 2019/20 will be published in February 2021. The delivery metrics are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/health-visitor-service-delivery-metrics-2019-to-2020

No timescales for national data collection from local areas for 2020/21 activity have been established. Virtual contacts will be counted as valid, mandated service delivery for data for 2020/21 during the period of the pandemic response.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what most recent estimate he has made of social worker vacancy rates for each local authority in England.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance has been issued to local authorities on the redeployment of health visitors during the covid-19 outbreak; and whether Public Heath England has taken steps to (a) scrutinise and (b) challenge local decisions on redeployment.

The ‘COVID-19 Prioritisation within Community Health Services’ guidance was published on 19 March and provides advice to National Health Service organisations and to local authorities on the provision of community services at this time.

Decisions regarding redeployment of staff during COVID-19 are for health organisations and local authorities.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many local areas in England have less than 60 per cent of the pre-covid-19 number of health visitors available to work their normal roles.

The department does not hold the data requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data his Department holds on the (a) number of health visitors redeployed from their roles during the covid-19 outbreak, (b) proportion of qualified health visitors that have been redeployed in each area and (c) size of the caseloads held by health visitors following the redeployment of their colleagues.

The department does not hold the data requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to provide support to (a) health visiting, (b) children’s services, (c) CAMHS and (d) perinatal mental health services for the potential increase in demand for services as a result of (i) missed appointments, (ii) the development of additional needs, (iii) the potential increase in births as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

On 18 April, the Government announced a further £1.6 billion to be made available to provide essential services and support to those who need it most.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have been working with local government to modify and prioritise community health services. This has been compiled in line with clinical advice, with community health services prioritising service delivery so that the most urgent needs continue to be met. Health visiting services are continuing to deliver the healthy child programme predominantly via virtual methods, with health visitors encouraged to identify children that require a home visit.

Mental health services are working around the clock to support people with mental health issues through the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. Providers are seeking to maximise the use of digital and virtual channels to keep supporting existing and new service users.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which NHS hospital trusts do not currently have a designated doctor for child deaths in post.

The Department does not hold the information requested.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which hospital trusts do not have a designated doctor for looked-after children.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) psychiatrists and (b) trained mental health nurses have rejoined the NHS in each of the last two years.

The Department does not hold the information requested.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress has been made on the review of the registration of pre-24 week stillbirths as legislated in the Civil Partnerships, Marriages and Deaths (Registration etc) Act 2019; and if he will make a statement.

Work on the Pregnancy Loss Review is ongoing and we expect to publish a report in 2020.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of children receive their two to two-and-a-half year check from health visitors as part of the Health Child Programme; and what steps he is taking to extend the coverage of that programme.

The Healthy Child Programme is a universal offer for all children in England. The latest data, for the financial year 2018/19, shows that 77.6% (521,528) of children aged two to two-and-a-half years received their Universal Health Visitor Review. These data are available to view at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/child-and-maternal-health-statistics#health-visitor-service-delivery-metrics

Local authorities commission and monitor the provision of the Healthy Child Programme based on local population needs.

Public Health England is undertaking a systematic review and refresh of the Healthy Child Programme in England. The refresh will ensure that the future approach is both universal in reach and personalised in response to those families needing extra support. It is proposed that the programme will extend coverage from the pre-conception period until age 24 years.

The five mandated Universal Health Visitor Reviews (antenatal, new birth visit, six to eight week review, one-year review and two to two-and-a half year review) will remain a core element of the Healthy Child Programme.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

The FCDO is advised on the management of designated heritage assets in its portfolio by Historic England's Government Historic Estate Unit. Further details can be found here: https://historicengland.org.uk/services-skills/our-planning-services/advice-for-government-historic-estates/. The FCDO does not collect or collate data on the value (property value) or income data for these assets.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when the EU plans to publish its review into the Palestinian authority school curriculum; and if he will make a statement.

We expect the final report to be completed in the near future. We remain in close contact with our European partners and continue to press for completion and publication of the review as soon as possible. We will review the findings carefully before deciding on any next steps.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what requests for access have been made by British Embassy and Consular officials in China to (a) Tibet and (b) Tibetans held in confinement; which of those requests for access were permitted; and if he will make a statement.

British diplomats last visited the Tibet Autonomous Region in July 2019, following a request for access by our Embassy in Beijing. We periodically request access to the Tibet Autonomous Region, but did not do so in 2020 due to the COVID pandemic and related reasons. A British Ambassador has not visited Tibet since 2017. Our Ambassador is the UK representative to the whole of China and we believe it is important she is able to visit all parts of the country. We have not requested access to Tibetans in detention. Our consular access is limited to British nationals. However, we continue to express our concerns about the human rights situation in the Tibet Autonomous Region with the Chinese authorities, and call on them to uphold the rights of all citizens guaranteed in international law and China's own constitution.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations his Department has made to the Government of Azerbaijan in respect of the treatment and continued detention of Armenian prisoners of war and civilians captured during the recent conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh; and if he will make a statement.

The UK Government is deeply concerned by all allegations that prisoners of war have been subjected to cruel, degrading or inhuman treatment. During my recent visits to Armenia and Azerbaijan, I urged both parties to ensure thorough investigations into all allegations, and welcomed those Azerbaijani investigations already underway. I also underlined the importance of returning all prisoners of war and urged both parties to work closely with the ICRC to expedite the returns where relevant. I also encouraged both sides to abide by the 10 November trilateral peace deal and settle all outstanding matters through talks under the auspices of the OSCE Minsk Group. The UK Government welcomes the most recent exchange of prisoners of war on 10 February.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the announcement by the Prime Minister at the G7 leaders' meeting on 19 February 2021, whether the donation of the UK’s surplus covid-19 vaccine doses to COVAX will result in the UK spending more than 0.5 per cent of GNI as Official Development Assistance in 2021.

As noted, the Prime Minister announced on 19 February that the majority of any surplus COVID-19 vaccines would be shared with the COVAX international vaccine procurement pool. We cannot yet say when we will have a surplus, including because of uncertainty over how many doses will be needed to deal with new variants or to administer boosters. Funding mechanisms, including the implications for our commitment to spend 0.5% of GNI as Official Development Assistance in 2021, will be set out in more detail if and when a surplus has been identified.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

HM Treasury is advised on the management of designated heritage assets in its portfolio by Historic England’s Government Historic Estate Unit. Further details can be found here:

https://historicengland.org.uk/services-skills/our-planning-services/advice-for-government-historic-estates/

HM Treasury does not collect or collate data on the value (property value) or income data for these assets.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish a list of the organisations that have received funding from the Sugar Tax Levy; and what steps he is taking to promote applications for funding from that Levy.

Revenue from the Soft Drinks Industry Levy is not formally linked to any specific spending, nor do we take applications for funding. Departmental spend to tackle obesity and promote children’s health is allocated through Spending Reviews.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend the hospitality, retail and leisure grants to the wholesale food and drink sector.

The Government recognises that this is a very challenging time for businesses in a wide variety of sectors. Small businesses occupying properties for retail, hospitality or leisure purposes are likely to be particularly affected by COVID-19 due to their reliance on customer footfall, and the fact that they are less likely than larger businesses to have sufficient cash reserves to meet their high fixed property-related costs. The Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF) is intended to help small businesses in this situation.

Local Authorities (LAs) can choose to make discretionary grants to businesses in supply chains, like the wholesale food and drink sector, if they feel there is a particular local economic need. The Government has allocated up to an additional £617 million to LAs to enable them to give discretionary grants. While food and drink wholesalers are not one of the priority groups which Government has asked LAs to focus on, LAs may choose to make payments to businesses outside of these priority groups if they feel there is a local economic need to do so, so long as the business was trading on 11th March, and has not received any other cash grant funded by central Government (with the exception of grants from the SEISS).

Small businesses which are not eligible for business grants should still be able to benefit from other elements of the Government’s unprecedented package of support. The Business Support website provides further information about how businesses can access the support that has been made available, who is eligible, when the schemes open and how to apply - https://www.gov.uk/business-coronavirus-support-finder.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend the application of business rates relief to food and drink wholesalers.

The Government has provided enhanced support through business rates relief to businesses occupying properties used for retail, hospitality and leisure given the direct and acute impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on those sectors.

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government has published guidance for local authorities on eligible properties. As set out in the guidance, support is targeted at premises that are wholly or mainly being used as shops, restaurants, cafes, drinking establishments, cinemas and live music venues; for assembly and leisure; or as hotels, guest and boarding premises, and self-catering accommodation. It is for local authorities to determine eligibility for reliefs, having regard to guidance issued by the Government.

A range of further measures to support all businesses, including those not eligible for the business rates holiday, such as wholesalers, has also been made available.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what recent discussions he has had with his Swiss counterpart on equivalence between UK and Swiss financial markets and products after the transition period.

The UK and Switzerland have a strong and established relationship on financial services, with a large volume of cross-border financial services trade.

To ensure continuity in our relationship, the government has converted all equivalence decisions that the European Union currently has with Switzerland (with the exception of Central Clearing Counterparties equivalence), into UK domestic law. This means that they will continue to apply when the transition period ends.

The ability for HM Treasury to make equivalence decisions becomes active from the end of the Transition Period. After this time, HM Treasury will be able to grant equivalence to non-EEA jurisdictions. The UK is committed to maintaining an outcomes-based model of equivalence which recognises that a combination of different rules and supervisory practices may be used to achieve the same levels of resilient, market integrity, consumer protection, and financial stability.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much money is invested in Child Trust Funds which will be eligible to be accessed by their beneficial holder from September 2020.

HMRC has published the number of CTF and contributions in the following publications for the years requested. The following links provide the last edition of these publications.

Link to “Child Trust Fund Statistical Report” – https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/255886/statistical-report.pdf

Link to “Child Trust Funds: detailed distributional analysis” - https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/255881/dda.pdf

HMRC does not have records of, nor have they made any estimations of, CTF accounts where the child or their parents is unaware of which firm is maintaining the account. CTF providers are required in legislation to send out regular statements to the contact for the account. However, although the primary relationship is between the account provider and the child’s parents, if they don’t know which provider is managing their child’s account, they can use the following online form to track the account.

https://www.gov.uk/child-trust-funds

HMRC estimates the market value of all Child Trust Funds (as at 2015-16), which will start to be eligible to be accessed by their beneficial holder from September 2020, to be £7,450 m. This estimate used the latest complete Child Trust Fund information available to HMRC – relating to 2015-16. This may not necessarily be reflective of the market value the accounts when they reach maturity.

A complete list of authorised Child Trust Fund Providers is held at the following webpage: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/list-of-authorised-child-trust-fund-providers/child-trust-fund-account-providers

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many Child Trust Funds remain unlinked with the current details of the beneficial owner.

HMRC has published the number of CTF and contributions in the following publications for the years requested. The following links provide the last edition of these publications.

Link to “Child Trust Fund Statistical Report” – https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/255886/statistical-report.pdf

Link to “Child Trust Funds: detailed distributional analysis” - https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/255881/dda.pdf

HMRC does not have records of, nor have they made any estimations of, CTF accounts where the child or their parents is unaware of which firm is maintaining the account. CTF providers are required in legislation to send out regular statements to the contact for the account. However, although the primary relationship is between the account provider and the child’s parents, if they don’t know which provider is managing their child’s account, they can use the following online form to track the account.

https://www.gov.uk/child-trust-funds

HMRC estimates the market value of all Child Trust Funds (as at 2015-16), which will start to be eligible to be accessed by their beneficial holder from September 2020, to be £7,450 m. This estimate used the latest complete Child Trust Fund information available to HMRC – relating to 2015-16. This may not necessarily be reflective of the market value the accounts when they reach maturity.

A complete list of authorised Child Trust Fund Providers is held at the following webpage: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/list-of-authorised-child-trust-fund-providers/child-trust-fund-account-providers

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much was contributed to Child Trust Funds from parents and relatives; and to how many accounts.

HMRC has published the number of CTF and contributions in the following publications for the years requested. The following links provide the last edition of these publications.

Link to “Child Trust Fund Statistical Report” – https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/255886/statistical-report.pdf

Link to “Child Trust Funds: detailed distributional analysis” - https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/255881/dda.pdf

HMRC does not have records of, nor have they made any estimations of, CTF accounts where the child or their parents is unaware of which firm is maintaining the account. CTF providers are required in legislation to send out regular statements to the contact for the account. However, although the primary relationship is between the account provider and the child’s parents, if they don’t know which provider is managing their child’s account, they can use the following online form to track the account.

https://www.gov.uk/child-trust-funds

HMRC estimates the market value of all Child Trust Funds (as at 2015-16), which will start to be eligible to be accessed by their beneficial holder from September 2020, to be £7,450 m. This estimate used the latest complete Child Trust Fund information available to HMRC – relating to 2015-16. This may not necessarily be reflective of the market value the accounts when they reach maturity.

A complete list of authorised Child Trust Fund Providers is held at the following webpage: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/list-of-authorised-child-trust-fund-providers/child-trust-fund-account-providers

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many Child Trust Fund accounts were taken out between their introduction in September 2002 and their replacement by junior ISA's in January 2011; and how much was invested in them from public funds.

HMRC has published the number of CTF and contributions in the following publications for the years requested. The following links provide the last edition of these publications.

Link to “Child Trust Fund Statistical Report” – https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/255886/statistical-report.pdf

Link to “Child Trust Funds: detailed distributional analysis” - https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/255881/dda.pdf

HMRC does not have records of, nor have they made any estimations of, CTF accounts where the child or their parents is unaware of which firm is maintaining the account. CTF providers are required in legislation to send out regular statements to the contact for the account. However, although the primary relationship is between the account provider and the child’s parents, if they don’t know which provider is managing their child’s account, they can use the following online form to track the account.

https://www.gov.uk/child-trust-funds

HMRC estimates the market value of all Child Trust Funds (as at 2015-16), which will start to be eligible to be accessed by their beneficial holder from September 2020, to be £7,450 m. This estimate used the latest complete Child Trust Fund information available to HMRC – relating to 2015-16. This may not necessarily be reflective of the market value the accounts when they reach maturity.

A complete list of authorised Child Trust Fund Providers is held at the following webpage: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/list-of-authorised-child-trust-fund-providers/child-trust-fund-account-providers

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by her Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

The Home Office does not have any properties that are classified as heritage assets.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many illegal migrants have been (a) successfully returned to EU countries and (b) booked on to planes to return to EU countries but where the place has not been taken up, in 2020 to date; and what the cost was in each case.

The Home Office publishes data on returns in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’.

Data on the number of returns and by nationality to EU Member States are published in table Det_D01 of the returns detailed datasets. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending June 2020.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Providing the information requested on the number of those where removal did not proceed and the costs in each case would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the nationality is of illegal migrants returned to EU countries in (a) 2019 and (b) 2020 to date.

The Home Office publishes data on returns in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’.

Data on the number of returns and by nationality to EU Member States are published in table Det_D01 of the returns detailed datasets. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending June 2020.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Providing the information requested on the number of those where removal did not proceed and the costs in each case would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance the Government has issued to registrars on the consistency of charges for performing civil partnership proceedings; and if she will make a statement.

The fee for a statutory civil partnership formation is set in line with the fee for a statutory marriage ceremony, and is prescribed in the Registration of Births, Deaths, Marriages and Civil Partnerships (Fees) Regulations 2016.

Local authorities are required to offer a statutory civil partnership, where this fee will apply.

Local authorities may otherwise charge an additional fee for the civil partnership registrar’s attendance on approved premises. Guidance issued to local authorities sets out this additional fee should cover the cost of providing the service.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
23rd Mar 2020
What discussions she has had with the Independent Office for Police Conduct on recent reports into the handling of Operation Midland.

The failings of the Metropolitan Police Service in Operation Midland had devastating consequences for those falsely accused and also risked damaging the confidence of the public.

That is why the Home Secretary requested, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services conduct an inspection of the Metropolitan Police Service to ensure lessons have been learned.

We will continue to seek assurances from the Metropolitan Police that policy and practice is being changed so the failures are not repeated.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what basis Sussex Police has instituted a mandatory requirement for anyone applying for the grant or renewal of a shotgun, firearm or explosives certificate from 1 January 2020 onwards to have their medical declaration information verified by their GP confirming that they do not suffer from any relevant medical conditions; and what guidance her Department has published on that requirement.

The police are responsible for assessing the suitability of those applying for the grant or renewal of firearm, shotgun and some explosives licences, to ensure that they do not pose a danger to public safety. Consideration of an applicant’s medical suitability is part of the assessment.

The Government consulted last year on the introduction of new statutory guidance to the police on their firearms licensing functions. The consultation included proposals for revised medical arrangements to ensure a more consistent approach in which forces do not grant a licence without sight of medical information from the applicant’s GP. We will publish the statutory guidance in due course following consideration of the responses to the consultation.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish proposals for continuing the family reunification scheme after the transition period; and if she will make a statement.

At the end of the Transition Period, the UK will no longer be bound by the Dublin Regulation. Any Dublin family reunion cases, which have entered the system prior to completion day will continue to be processed.

The Government provides a safe and legal route to bring families together through its refugee family reunion policy under the Immigration Rules. This allows a partner and children under 18 of those granted protection in the UK to join them here, if they formed part of the family unit before the sponsor fled their country. This will not change at the end of the Transition Period.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of disabled recreational target shooters that have given up their licence since the introduction of restrictions on the use of firearms.

Statistics on the number of firearm and shotgun certificates on issue are published annually but they do not identify whether a certificate holder is disabled or where a certificate is voluntarily given up by the holder.

Firearms controls in this country are among the toughest in the world. They are kept under review and strengthened whenever necessary to protect the public from the misuse of firearms. For example, the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 recently banned the manufacture and sale of rapid-firing rifles, owing to the serious threat they present should they fall into the hands of criminals or terrorists. Possession of such rifles will be banned following a surrender and compensation scheme later this year.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

A list of the properties classified as heritage assets by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) has been placed in the Library of the House. There is a wide range of heritage assets, other than properties, including below ground archaeology, memorials, walls and milestones which have not been included in this list.

The MOD does not record the economic value of heritage assets. The annual income provided by these properties is not held centrally by the MOD.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government is advised on the management of designated heritage assets in its portfolio by Historic England’s Government Historic Estate Unit. Further details can be found here: https://historicengland.org.uk/services-skills/our-planning-services/advice-for-government-historic-estates/


The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government does not collect or collate data on the value (property value) or income data for these assets.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will list all the correspondence and communication he or his officials have had with the officers of the Learned Societies at Burlington House since June 2020.

Ministers and officials are in frequent contact with the Learned Societies.

The Learned societies pay discounted rent on new Burlington House, currently 30% of the market rate, in line with the agreement they reached with the then Government in 2006. The current arrangement would not see them pay market rent until 2085, however the Government is sympathetic to their position and is working with them to find a solution.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the terms of agreement were between his Department and the Societies for the drawing of a new lease for Burlington House in 2018.

A lease was agreed in 2005 by the then Government and the Learned Societies. The terms of the 2005 lease remained unchanged in the 2018 lease renewal.

Details of the 2005 lease, can be obtained from the Land Registry.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment was made of the (a) public value benefit and (b) value to the public purse when Somerset House was transferred from HM Government to the Somerset House Trust in 1997.

The information requested is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of rent increases at Burlington House on (a) scientific research and (b) culture and heritage.

Five Learned Societies are tenants of New Burlington House, owned by the Department. Following a High Court settlement, all parties agreed in 2005 that rent would increase to market levels over a period of 80 years. The rent is at a limited rate to reflect the fact that the land is being used for cultural and educational purposes. The Department and the Learned Societies agreed in 2019 that the market rental value of the land was £50 per square foot but the Learned Societies are currently paying only £15.35 per square foot.

The rents charged are in accordance with the Learned Societies’ leases. The rents are calculated annually by way of a valuation that is based on evidenced market transactions and have followed growth of market rent since 2005. Rents can therefore rise and fall. The Department does not currently hold a forecast of rental projections from 2005. Rents based on the current lease are updated each year following valuation.

The Department is sympathetic to the Societies’ position and is exploring whether there is a solution that can deliver value for taxpayers and help the Learned Societies to remain at New Burlington House and an assessment of value will be made as part of an agreement. The Department has been discussing options with the Learned Societies and DCMS given their responsibility for policy in regards to culture, museums and heritage.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the difference for his Department's rental projections for the Burlington House Societies (a) as forecast in 2005 and (b) latest figures available; and if he will make a statement.

Five Learned Societies are tenants of New Burlington House, owned by the Department. Following a High Court settlement, all parties agreed in 2005 that rent would increase to market levels over a period of 80 years. The rent is at a limited rate to reflect the fact that the land is being used for cultural and educational purposes. The Department and the Learned Societies agreed in 2019 that the market rental value of the land was £50 per square foot but the Learned Societies are currently paying only £15.35 per square foot.

The rents charged are in accordance with the Learned Societies’ leases. The rents are calculated annually by way of a valuation that is based on evidenced market transactions and have followed growth of market rent since 2005. Rents can therefore rise and fall. The Department does not currently hold a forecast of rental projections from 2005. Rents based on the current lease are updated each year following valuation.

The Department is sympathetic to the Societies’ position and is exploring whether there is a solution that can deliver value for taxpayers and help the Learned Societies to remain at New Burlington House and an assessment of value will be made as part of an agreement. The Department has been discussing options with the Learned Societies and DCMS given their responsibility for policy in regards to culture, museums and heritage.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department has made an assessment of the future options for New Burlington House; and if he will make a statement.

Five Learned Societies are tenants of New Burlington House, owned by the Department. Following a High Court settlement, all parties agreed in 2005 that rent would increase to market levels over a period of 80 years. The rent is at a limited rate to reflect the fact that the land is being used for cultural and educational purposes. The Department and the Learned Societies agreed in 2019 that the market rental value of the land was £50 per square foot but the Learned Societies are currently paying only £15.35 per square foot.

The rents charged are in accordance with the Learned Societies’ leases. The rents are calculated annually by way of a valuation that is based on evidenced market transactions and have followed growth of market rent since 2005. Rents can therefore rise and fall. The Department does not currently hold a forecast of rental projections from 2005. Rents based on the current lease are updated each year following valuation.

The Department is sympathetic to the Societies’ position and is exploring whether there is a solution that can deliver value for taxpayers and help the Learned Societies to remain at New Burlington House and an assessment of value will be made as part of an agreement. The Department has been discussing options with the Learned Societies and DCMS given their responsibility for policy in regards to culture, museums and heritage.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment was made of the (a) public value benefit and (b) value to the public purse in his Department's plans for the New Burlington House apartments.

Five Learned Societies are tenants of New Burlington House, owned by the Department. Following a High Court settlement, all parties agreed in 2005 that rent would increase to market levels over a period of 80 years. The rent is at a limited rate to reflect the fact that the land is being used for cultural and educational purposes. The Department and the Learned Societies agreed in 2019 that the market rental value of the land was £50 per square foot but the Learned Societies are currently paying only £15.35 per square foot.

The rents charged are in accordance with the Learned Societies’ leases. The rents are calculated annually by way of a valuation that is based on evidenced market transactions and have followed growth of market rent since 2005. Rents can therefore rise and fall. The Department does not currently hold a forecast of rental projections from 2005. Rents based on the current lease are updated each year following valuation.

The Department is sympathetic to the Societies’ position and is exploring whether there is a solution that can deliver value for taxpayers and help the Learned Societies to remain at New Burlington House and an assessment of value will be made as part of an agreement. The Department has been discussing options with the Learned Societies and DCMS given their responsibility for policy in regards to culture, museums and heritage.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Guide for the Disposal of Surplus Land, published by the Cabinet Office in 2017, whether the principle of (a) best value or (b) best consideration has been applied to the management of New Burlington House.

MHCLG holds the freehold for New Burlington House (NBH) in Piccadilly. We have 5 Learned Societies who occupy NBH and have been our tenants for over 100 years. The current lease which was agreed with the Learned Societies was put in place in 2005 and grants the Learned Societies an 80 year term lease. The Guide for the Disposal of Surplus Land has therefore not been applied in the management of NBH as the government has no plans to dispose of NBH.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he has plans to reassess the deadline of 1 April 2021 for obtaining an electrical installation condition report in light of the January 2021 covid-19 lockdown restrictions.

Many landlords and agents take their responsibility seriously and already make sure electrical installations are safe. Even before these regulations came into force, landlords were legally required to make sure that their properties are free of serious electrical hazards. These regulations therefore require all landlords to do what good landlords already do — make sure the electrical installations in their rented properties are safe. However, landlord and agent groups have reported to us that there are still large numbers of rented properties with potentially dangerous electrical installations. This highlights just how important the regulations are, as poorly maintained electrical installations and electrical faults can cause deaths or injury and tenants are spending more, if not all, of their time in the home.

In order to allow landlords time to comply with the regulations they have been phased in. We have published guidance, for landlords, tenants and local authorities in the context of Covid-19 which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-and-renting-guidance-for-landlords-tenants-and-local-authorities.

The regulations are clear on the issue of compliance. A landlord will not be in breach of the duty to comply with a remedial notice if the landlord can show they have taken all reasonable steps to comply. We have also advised local authorities that we expect them to take a pragmatic and common-sense approach to enforcement of these regulations, and other standards in the private rented sector, and that the level of any penalty should be set taking into account likely harm and culpability.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that local authorities are able to fund and deliver short respite breaks for disabled children and their families.

We recognise the pressures that the pandemic has placed on local authority finances, and are monitoring this closely through monthly financial returns. We are providing local authorities with an unprecedented package of support, including £4.6 billion of unringfenced grants. Local councils can use this funding to respond to pressures in their local area, including for respite services for disabled children and their families.

15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the level of importance of archaeological surveys ahead of developments in his proposals to streamline the planning system.

The Government is committed to the protection of the historic environment. Heritage considerations, including the need for archaeological surveys, will continue to be taken into account in bringing forward any planning reforms.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing a £200 fee cap for landlords producing leasehold packs.

The Government is clear that allowing freeholders and managing agents to continue to charge sellers what they like, and take as long as they like, to provide essential leasehold information is not acceptable. Setting a £200+VAT maximum charge and a 15 working day turn around time will speed up transactions.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what progress he has made on enabling local authorities to issue fines for (a) inconsiderate driving and (b) pavement parking.

These are important issues about which the Hon Member should contact the Department for Transport for further information.

8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

The MoJ is advised on the management of designated heritage assets in its portfolio by Historic England’s Government Historic Estate Unit.

Further details can be found here:

https://historicengland.org.uk/services-skills/our-planning-services/advice-for-government-historic-estates/

The MoJ does not collect or collate data on the property value.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to publish his response to the consultation on Coronial investigations of stillbirths, which closed on 18 June 2019; and if he will make a statement.

Further consideration of the responses to the consultation on Coronial investigations of stillbirths has been delayed during the Covid-19 pandemic, but we hope to publish the response to the consultation as soon as possible.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress he has made on enabling coroners to investigate stillbirths; and when he plans to publish the outcome of the public consultation entitled, Consultation on coronial investigations of stillbirths, that closed in June 2019.

The Lord Chancellor advised in the House of Commons on 9 June that the Government is working to publish our report later this summer. I will be happy to meet you with my colleague at the Department of Health and Social Care to update you on progress with this work.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many child sexual abuse criminal cases have had their court dates postponed since the beginning of the covid-19 lockdown period.

Magistrates’ and Crown Court figures relating to child sexual abuse adjournments are not collated, however cases with serious safeguarding implications are being prioritised for listing by the independent judiciary. Figures on vacated trials in the first and second quarters of 2020 are due for publication as part of the National Statistics on criminal courts in June and September 2020 respectively.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether she has plans to undertake a review of the terms of the Legitimacy Act 1976 in relation to the registration of children born to parents who subsequently engage in a (a) marriage and (b) civil partnership.

The Family Law Reform Act 1987 greatly reduced the practical significance in English law of the concept of legitimacy, so that children born outside marriage are not stigmatised. The Government therefore has no plans to review the law on legitimacy at this time.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

The Northern Ireland Office publishes details of heritage assets held by the Department in the Annual Report and Accounts. From the 20-21 Annual Report and Accounts:

(a) The properties classified as heritage assets held by the Department comprise of Hillsborough Castle and its surrounding estate;

(b) The most recent valuation is £70.4m, consisting of £64.6m for the buildings and £5.8m for the land;

(c) The Department derives no annual income from the Castle.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

The Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland has no properties classified as heritage assets.

Alister Jack
Secretary of State for Scotland
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, if he will publish the (a) properties classified as heritage assets by his Department, (b) most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) annual income derived from those properties.

The Office of the Secretary of State for Wales does not own any properties.

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales