Scott Mann Portrait

Scott Mann

Conservative - North Cornwall

Assistant Whip

(since September 2021)

There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 313 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 321 Noes - 220
Speeches
Tuesday 19th January 2021
UK Musicians: EU Visa Arrangements

I am sure that my hon. Friend would agree that our world-leading artists and musicians are not just important to …

Written Answers
Wednesday 21st April 2021
Coronavirus: Vaccination
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether people in receipt of pension credit will receive …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Tuesday 10th July 2018
Bathing Waters Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
Tweets
Monday 26th July 2021
20:32
MP Financial Interests
Monday 12th July 2021
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: Adrian Johnson
Address of donor: private
Amount of donation, or nature and value if donation in kind: …
EDM signed
Friday 20th December 2019
Big Ben chiming on the day of Brexit
That this House notes the ongoing refurbishment works on the Elizabeth Tower and the fact that during this period Big …
Supported Legislation
Monday 25th February 2019
Plastic Pollution Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Scott Mann has voted in 313 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Scott Mann Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(6 debate interactions)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(6 debate interactions)
George Eustice (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
View all Scott Mann's debates

North Cornwall Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest North Cornwall signature proportion
Scott Mann has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Scott Mann

19th December 2019
Scott Mann signed this EDM on Friday 20th December 2019

Big Ben chiming on the day of Brexit

Tabled by: Mark Francois (Conservative - Rayleigh and Wickford)
That this House notes the ongoing refurbishment works on the Elizabeth Tower and the fact that during this period Big Ben currently only chimes for Remembrance Sunday and New Year's Eve; further notes that the United Kingdom will now leave the European Union at 11.00pm GMT on 31 January 2020; …
53 signatures
(Most recent: 7 Jan 2020)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 48
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
2nd July 2019
Scott Mann signed this EDM on Wednesday 24th July 2019

SUPPORTING NEWS ON LOCAL COMMERCIAL RADIO

Tabled by: Steve McCabe (Labour - Birmingham, Selly Oak)
That this House recognises the important role of commercial radio as a trusted source of news, information and entertainment for a diverse range of audiences across the UK; understands that radio now operates in a highly competitive digital audio market that includes streaming services which threaten the future viability of …
29 signatures
(Most recent: 4 Sep 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 10
Scottish National Party: 7
Liberal Democrat: 5
Conservative: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Independent: 1
View All Scott Mann's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Scott Mann, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Scott Mann has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Scott Mann has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Scott Mann


A Bill to amend Part VI of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984, and the Local Authorities’ Traffic Orders (Procedure) (England and Wales) Regulations 1996, to make provision about the powers and duties of parish and town councils in relation to applying for speed limit orders; to provide for the conduct of local referendums to determine whether such applications should be made; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 5th February 2016

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to give the Environment Agency additional powers to control and reduce discharge from combined sewer overflows; to make other provision about bathing water quality and clean beach initiatives; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 10th July 2018
(Read Debate)

74 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what progress his Department has made on increasing involvement of small and medium sizes businesses in government procurement.

Further to my answer to Oral Questions 1, 7, 13 and 17 on the 27th February 2020 (Official Report, Vol. 672, Col. 448-449), we have already introduced measures aimed at tackling barriers faced by SMEs, including ensuring that opportunities are advertised and that departments consider using contract lots to encourage SMEs to bid for government contracts.


More small suppliers than ever are looking to bid for Government business and last financial year, we spent almost £2bn more with SMEs - a total of £14.2bn, which is the highest spend ever.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for this Department's policies of the recommendation of the SAP Industry Forum’s April 2020 SAP 11 Technologies Report that biopropane should be modelled as fuel choice for heat in both new and existing buildings.

The Department has commenced work on the development of the next version of the Standard Assessment Procedure, SAP 11. It will consider the SAP Industry Forum’s Report on the likely mainstream technologies for consideration in the mid-2020s as part of this. The Department has also commissioned a wider scoping project to advise more broadly on what SAP 11 will need to model and how it should do this. This project will further help to inform the development of SAP11 and is due to report back in February.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
10th Nov 2020
What plans his Department has to transform post offices into community hubs.

Post Offices are very much at the heart of their communities, often operating alongside other key community services such as libraries or pubs. Postmasters and the Post Office will continue to work with their communities to meet their needs.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to reduce barriers to the adoption of (a) biopropane and (b) other new low carbon fuels for use in heating in off-gas grid buildings.

The Government recognises?that biofuels, such as bioLPG and bioliquid alternatives to heating oil, may play a role in future off-gas grid decarbonisation. In 2018 BEIS ran an extensive programme of engagement with industry and consumers, to seek views on how industry, government and consumers could work together to phase out the installation of high carbon fossil fuels from homes and businesses off the gas grid. We will be consulting on proposals for this in due course.

The Clean Heat Grant Scheme, which will run from April 2022 to March 2024, aims to provide targeted support for proven and ready to deploy low-carbon heating technologies that demonstrate value for money and carbon cost-effectiveness. This will follow the existing Renewable Heat Incentive scheme. We are also expecting to publish the Clean Heat Grant consultation response and a Heat and Buildings Strategy, which will further expand on the Government’s strategic direction, in due course.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to support the Post Office during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government views the services provided by the Post Office as essential and that is why, on 23 March, the Government designated 'key worker' status to Postmasters and their staff, allowing their children to remain in school. This has meant that subject to social distancing guidelines, Post Office has sought to keep as many branches opens as possible during the Covid-19 outbreak. To support postmasters through this period, Post Office has provided income top ups to many thousands of branches in April, May and June.

This support backs Postmasters for their dedication and hard work in keeping their Post Office open and ensures that some of the country's most vulnerable people can continue to benefit from the essential services the Post Office provides.

BEIS continues to work with Post Office to ensure as many branches can remain open as possible and particularly that communities’ access to essential services is protected during this challenging time.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department has taken to help support people claim back their deposits from tour operators if in the event that overseas travel plans are affected by the covid-19 pandemic.

Package travel agencies are required to comply with The Package Travel and Linked Travel Arrangements Regulations 2018, which protect consumers who have bought package holidays. Consumers are entitled to a refund?if forced to cancel a package holiday due to unavoidable and extraordinary circumstances, which should be issued?within 14 days, depending on the nature of the contract in place. Further information on the rights and responsibilities of consumers and businesses was published on 30 April by the Competition and Markets Authority. If the CMA finds evidence that companies are failing to comply with the law, the CMA will take appropriate enforcement action, which could include taking a firm to court if it does not address its concerns.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with the Post Office on their 100 day strategy for growth.

The CEO of Post Office Limited regularly meet with BEIS Ministers, through scheduled monthly meetings with the Minister for Small Business, Consumers and Labour Markets as well as through wider Shareholder Meetings.

These meetings are held to discuss a range of matters including the development of the business’s new strategy under CEO Nick Read.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to require large companies to pay smaller firms on time.

The Government is committed to delivering on our manifesto commitment to clamp down on late payment and strengthen the powers of the Small Business Commissioner (SBC) to support small businesses who are least able to cover financial shortfalls and find temporary finance more difficult and more expensive to obtain.

Legislation already exists under the Late Payment of Commercial Debts (Interest) Act 1998, which sets out that payment terms between two businesses should not exceed 60 days, unless they are fair to both parties.

Suppliers can also claim statutory interest, and debt recovery costs, on invoices not paid within the agreed period or (if no period is agreed) within 30 days. It also establishes maximum 30 day payment terms for transactions with public authorities.

We will shortly be consulting on the merits of extending the powers of the Office of the Small Business Commissioner to intervene and advocate for small businesses, with less than 50 employees, in payment disputes with a larger business (50 or more employees).

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when the Department plans to publish guidance on the safe reopening of tennis clubs at the end of the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown.

Sport and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health, and are a vital weapon against coronavirus. As the Prime Minister said on 23 November that national restrictions will end on Wednesday 2 December and that grassroots sport can resume in all tiers. This is providing social distancing remains in place, although there will be some restrictions on highest-risk activity in tier three areas.

In tier one areas indoor sports can take place within the rule of six. This will mean four people from different households could play doubles tennis. Group activities such as training sessions and exercise classes can take place in larger numbers, provided that people are in separate groups (up to 6 people) which do not mix.

In tier two areas, indoor sport can take place within households, and people can take part in group activity like exercise classes as long as there is no mixing between households. People can play certain sports which do not involve close proximity or physical contact against one person from another household, such as a singles tennis match.

In tier three areas, indoor sport will be restricted to within your household only, and there should be no group activity such as exercise classes.

Further guidance has been published today on gov.uk (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-grassroots-sports-guidance-for-the-public-and-sport-providers)

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when her Department plans to publish on the safe reopening of archery clubs at the end of the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown.

Sport and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health, and are a vital weapon against coronavirus. As the Prime Minister said on 23 November that national restrictions will end on Wednesday 2 December and that grassroots sport can resume in all tiers. This is providing social distancing remains in place, although there will be some restrictions on highest-risk activity in tier three areas.

In tier one areas indoor sports can take place within the rule of six. This will mean four people from different households could play doubles tennis. Group activities such as training sessions and exercise classes can take place in larger numbers, provided that people are in separate groups (up to 6 people) which do not mix.

In tier two areas, indoor sport can take place within households, and people can take part in group activity like exercise classes as long as there is no mixing between households. People can play certain sports which do not involve close proximity or physical contact against one person from another household, such as a singles tennis match.

In tier three areas, indoor sport will be restricted to within your household only, and there should be no group activity such as exercise classes.

Further guidance has been published today on gov.uk (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-grassroots-sports-guidance-for-the-public-and-sport-providers)

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when his Department plans to publish guidance on the safe reopening of golf clubs at the end of the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown.

Sport and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health, and are a vital weapon against coronavirus. As the Prime Minister said on 23 November that national restrictions will end on Wednesday 2 December and that grassroots sport can resume in all tiers. This is providing social distancing remains in place, although there will be some restrictions on highest-risk activity in tier three areas.

In tier one areas indoor sports can take place within the rule of six. This will mean four people from different households could play doubles tennis. Group activities such as training sessions and exercise classes can take place in larger numbers, provided that people are in separate groups (up to 6 people) which do not mix.

In tier two areas, indoor sport can take place within households, and people can take part in group activity like exercise classes as long as there is no mixing between households. People can play certain sports which do not involve close proximity or physical contact against one person from another household, such as a singles tennis match.

In tier three areas, indoor sport will be restricted to within your household only, and there should be no group activity such as exercise classes.

Further guidance has been published today on gov.uk (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-grassroots-sports-guidance-for-the-public-and-sport-providers)

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions he has had with the BBC on the effect of reduced funding on regional programming.

The Government recognises the vital role that regional news and local current affairs play in bringing communities together and reflecting experiences across the UK. The BBC’s proposed cuts to English regional television were debated in the chamber on 22 June 2020, where the government set out its support for regional broadcasting and its concern about the BBC’s decision.

The BBC is editorially and operationally independent of government, and regional programming is a matter for the BBC. The BBC’s Royal Charter requires the BBC to represent, reflect and serve audiences, taking into account the needs of diverse communities of all the UK nations and regions. Under the new regulatory system introduced by the government in 2017, the BBC Board must ensure the BBC complies with its Charter duties, and Ofcom was established as the BBC regulator to ensure the BBC is robustly held to account.

Ofcom is aware of the changes to the BBC’s regional news and current affairs, and has said it will require the BBC to set out how the proposed cuts are consistent with the delivery of the BBC’s public purposes.

The government has no plans to reopen the BBC Charter or conduct a public consultation on this issue. The Charter will next be considered at the mid-term review. This is the appropriate milestone to consider whether the current regulatory arrangements for the BBC are working effectively. The Charter specifies that the review must take place between 2022 and 2024.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department has taken to support the BBC in the production of regional and local (a) television and (b) radio programming.

The Government recognises the vital role that regional news and local current affairs play in bringing communities together and reflecting experiences across the UK. The BBC’s proposed cuts to English regional television were debated in the chamber on 22 June 2020, where the government set out its support for regional broadcasting and its concern about the BBC’s decision.

The BBC is editorially and operationally independent of government, and regional programming is a matter for the BBC. The BBC’s Royal Charter requires the BBC to represent, reflect and serve audiences, taking into account the needs of diverse communities of all the UK nations and regions. Under the new regulatory system introduced by the government in 2017, the BBC Board must ensure the BBC complies with its Charter duties, and Ofcom was established as the BBC regulator to ensure the BBC is robustly held to account.

Ofcom is aware of the changes to the BBC’s regional news and current affairs, and has said it will require the BBC to set out how the proposed cuts are consistent with the delivery of the BBC’s public purposes.

The government has no plans to reopen the BBC Charter or conduct a public consultation on this issue. The Charter will next be considered at the mid-term review. This is the appropriate milestone to consider whether the current regulatory arrangements for the BBC are working effectively. The Charter specifies that the review must take place between 2022 and 2024.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussion he has had with the BBC on the effect of proposed changes to local and regional programming on the quality of that output.

The Government recognises the vital role that regional news and local current affairs play in bringing communities together and reflecting experiences across the UK. The BBC’s proposed cuts to English regional television were debated in the chamber on 22 June 2020, where the government set out its support for regional broadcasting and its concern about the BBC’s decision.

The BBC is editorially and operationally independent of government, and regional programming is a matter for the BBC. The BBC’s Royal Charter requires the BBC to represent, reflect and serve audiences, taking into account the needs of diverse communities of all the UK nations and regions. Under the new regulatory system introduced by the government in 2017, the BBC Board must ensure the BBC complies with its Charter duties, and Ofcom was established as the BBC regulator to ensure the BBC is robustly held to account.

Ofcom is aware of the changes to the BBC’s regional news and current affairs, and has said it will require the BBC to set out how the proposed cuts are consistent with the delivery of the BBC’s public purposes.

The government has no plans to reopen the BBC Charter or conduct a public consultation on this issue. The Charter will next be considered at the mid-term review. This is the appropriate milestone to consider whether the current regulatory arrangements for the BBC are working effectively. The Charter specifies that the review must take place between 2022 and 2024.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of including in the Royal Charter for the continuance of the BBC more emphasis on the need to provide local radio and television programming.

The Government recognises the vital role that regional news and local current affairs play in bringing communities together and reflecting experiences across the UK. The BBC’s proposed cuts to English regional television were debated in the chamber on 22 June 2020, where the government set out its support for regional broadcasting and its concern about the BBC’s decision.

The BBC is editorially and operationally independent of government, and regional programming is a matter for the BBC. The BBC’s Royal Charter requires the BBC to represent, reflect and serve audiences, taking into account the needs of diverse communities of all the UK nations and regions. Under the new regulatory system introduced by the government in 2017, the BBC Board must ensure the BBC complies with its Charter duties, and Ofcom was established as the BBC regulator to ensure the BBC is robustly held to account.

Ofcom is aware of the changes to the BBC’s regional news and current affairs, and has said it will require the BBC to set out how the proposed cuts are consistent with the delivery of the BBC’s public purposes.

The government has no plans to reopen the BBC Charter or conduct a public consultation on this issue. The Charter will next be considered at the mid-term review. This is the appropriate milestone to consider whether the current regulatory arrangements for the BBC are working effectively. The Charter specifies that the review must take place between 2022 and 2024.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to support regional and local news coverage.

Local and regional news coverage provides a vital service - providing information about local public affairs, holding local decision-makers to account, and providing a forum for community discussion.

Public service broadcasters, including the BBC, and national and local commercial radio stations, have requirements to produce regional and local news. The BBC’s Royal Charter requires the BBC to represent, reflect and serve audiences, taking into account the needs of diverse communities of all the UK nations and regions. Under the new regulatory system introduced by the Government in 2017, the BBC Board must ensure the BBC complies with its Charter duties, and Ofcom was established as the BBC regulator to ensure the BBC is robustly held to account.

The Government’s manifesto also recognises the indispensable role of the local and regional press, committing to “support local and regional newspapers, as vital pillars of communities and local democracy”. It has been an absolute priority to ensure we do all we can as a Government to support local news outlets during the Covid-19 crisis as well as supporting commercial and community radio. This included taking the decision to bring forward the commencement of zero-rating of VAT on e-newspapers to May 2020 and working with Arqiva, the UK’s TV and radio transmission provider, to provide six months discount charges which has benefited local commercial radio stations .

The Government also took steps to ensure local media could operate during the Covid 19 lockdown period. Journalists and other key media ancillary staff were designated as ‘key workers’ for the purposes of access to childcare and educational places. The Government also issued guidance to local authorities on the importance of newspaper delivery; took steps to ensure the use of ‘keyword blocklisting’ technology is not inadvertently damaging news publishers’ online advertising revenues for Covid-19 related stories by ad-blocking coronavirus-related terms; and implemented a significant public information campaign, using local and national press and commercial radio extend the reach of these campaigns.


28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to support the creation of local radio and television content.

Local and regional news coverage provides a vital service - providing information about local public affairs, holding local decision-makers to account, and providing a forum for community discussion.

Public service broadcasters, including the BBC, and national and local commercial radio stations, have requirements to produce regional and local news. The BBC’s Royal Charter requires the BBC to represent, reflect and serve audiences, taking into account the needs of diverse communities of all the UK nations and regions. Under the new regulatory system introduced by the Government in 2017, the BBC Board must ensure the BBC complies with its Charter duties, and Ofcom was established as the BBC regulator to ensure the BBC is robustly held to account.

The Government’s manifesto also recognises the indispensable role of the local and regional press, committing to “support local and regional newspapers, as vital pillars of communities and local democracy”. It has been an absolute priority to ensure we do all we can as a Government to support local news outlets during the Covid-19 crisis as well as supporting commercial and community radio. This included taking the decision to bring forward the commencement of zero-rating of VAT on e-newspapers to May 2020 and working with Arqiva, the UK’s TV and radio transmission provider, to provide six months discount charges which has benefited local commercial radio stations .

The Government also took steps to ensure local media could operate during the Covid 19 lockdown period. Journalists and other key media ancillary staff were designated as ‘key workers’ for the purposes of access to childcare and educational places. The Government also issued guidance to local authorities on the importance of newspaper delivery; took steps to ensure the use of ‘keyword blocklisting’ technology is not inadvertently damaging news publishers’ online advertising revenues for Covid-19 related stories by ad-blocking coronavirus-related terms; and implemented a significant public information campaign, using local and national press and commercial radio extend the reach of these campaigns.


28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions he has had with the BBC on holding a public consultation on its proposals to revise regional television and radio production.

The Government recognises the vital role that regional news and local current affairs play in bringing communities together and reflecting experiences across the UK. The BBC’s proposed cuts to English regional television were debated in the chamber on 22 June 2020, where the government set out its support for regional broadcasting and its concern about the BBC’s decision.

The BBC is editorially and operationally independent of government, and regional programming is a matter for the BBC. The BBC’s Royal Charter requires the BBC to represent, reflect and serve audiences, taking into account the needs of diverse communities of all the UK nations and regions. Under the new regulatory system introduced by the government in 2017, the BBC Board must ensure the BBC complies with its Charter duties, and Ofcom was established as the BBC regulator to ensure the BBC is robustly held to account.

Ofcom is aware of the changes to the BBC’s regional news and current affairs, and has said it will require the BBC to set out how the proposed cuts are consistent with the delivery of the BBC’s public purposes.

The government has no plans to reopen the BBC Charter or conduct a public consultation on this issue. The Charter will next be considered at the mid-term review. This is the appropriate milestone to consider whether the current regulatory arrangements for the BBC are working effectively. The Charter specifies that the review must take place between 2022 and 2024.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of arranging with the Independent Community News Network and the Publish Interest News Foundation for a portion of public health campaign spending to be disbursed across the independent media sector.

The government recognises the vital role of independent newspapers in supporting communities by ensuring the provision of reliable, high-quality information throughout the current pandemic. Safeguarding the UK’s news media so that they are able to continue to provide this is a key priority for the government and we are in regular dialogue with a range of stakeholders, including publishers, the Independent Community News Network and the Public Interest News Foundation to ensure that our response to the challenges they are facing is as effective and wide reaching as it can be.

The government will continue to consider all possible options in the interests of promoting and sustaining high-quality news journalism. Never have the activities of journalists been more popular and critical; providing quality news to all, including those self-isolating, and binding communities together, a fundamental function of our modern day democracy.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will meet with the (a) Independent Community News Network and (b) Publish Interest News Foundation to discuss the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the independent news media sector.

I met with the Independent Community News Network and the Public Interest News Foundation on 6 May to discuss Government support for the independent news publishing sector in light of the impacts of Covid-19. This meeting included a discussion on the effects of the Covid-19 outbreak on the independent news media sector, the Government's public information awareness campaign, and the ways in which the independent sector may be used to reach underserved audiences. I continue to engage with the

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to extend the range of 4G signals out to sea to increase communications with fishing vessels.

The Government announced on 9 March that it had signed the deal with the Mobile Network Operators to deliver the Shared Rural Network programme, which will see them collectively increase 4G coverage throughout the United Kingdom to 95% by end-2025. The Shared Rural Network is a programme to improve 4G coverage across the landmass of the UK, rather than offshore. As a result of the Shared Rural Network, it is possible that offshore coverage may be improved near ports or ferry routes, or adjacent to coastal population centres. This is not guaranteed, however, because exact deployment plans will be managed by the Mobile Network Operators themselves, in order for them to best deliver the coverage outcomes for the programme. Furthermore, the current 4G spectrum licenses issued by Ofcom to the Mobile Network Operators limit 4G coverage to the UK and the UK Territorial Sea (up to 12 nautical miles).

At the World Radiocommunication Conference in 2019, the UK signed an international treaty ensuring global coordination of radio spectrum frequencies. These regulations are of great importance to the international maritime community because they help minimise the likelihood of interference and allow for the unconditional operation of critical nautical safety communications. However, these regulations also impose certain measures to limit interference between countries and can therefore impact on 4G offshore coverage potential for fishing vessels.

DCMS supports improvements in maritime communications and is currently monitoring developments in alternative communications technologies that could provide better connectivity to fishing vessels, where coverage from land based systems is limited. Some vessels may already have these technologies installed for safety related requirements.

DCMS also recognises the importance of the maritime sector for the UK economy and is aware of its dependence on suitable maritime communications services. We will continue to work closely with Ofcom and other government departments to ensure the interests of this sector in telecoms are adequately considered.

19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the UK's bluefin tuna quota as a result of the EU–UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement, if he will take steps to increase that quota as part of a scientific UK catch and release program.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement reached with the EU secures the UK a share of the EU’s current bluefin tuna allocation. Any further increases to the UK’s quota would need to be secured via negotiations in the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT).

In addition to national quotas held by its contracting parties, ICCAT makes a small, separate ‘Research Mortality Allowance’ quota available for specific research purposes that meet strict criteria. RMA supports the delivery of the multiyear ‘Thunnus UK’ tuna tagging programme led by Cefas and the University of Exeter. The UK will be applying for continued access to the RMA to continue this work in 2021.

No decisions have yet been taken on how to use the UK’s new national quota. Stakeholders will be consulted on potential options in due course.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to support the recreational fishing sector in respect of negotiations on the UK's future relationship with the EU.

The UK will become an independent coastal state at the end of 2020 and will no longer be bound by the EU’s common fisheries policy or its outdated and unfair method for sharing fishing opportunities.

The Government’s position in negotiations on a future relationship with the EU on fish is reasonable and straightforward and seeks to secure the best outcome for all UK fishers, including the recreational sector. The UK wants a simple, separate fisheries framework agreement which reflects our rights under international law and which provides for annual negotiations over access and fishing opportunities based on the scientific principle of zonal attachment.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to research published by the University of Lincoln in August 2020 that concludes reward-based training methods are more effective and carry less risk to the animal’s wellbeing to electric shocks, what plans he has to bring forward proposals to ban remote controlled electronic shock collars.

The Government remains committed to banning the use of remote controlled hand-held electronic training collars (e-collars) for dogs and cats in England. We will introduce the necessary legislation to implement the ban as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will take steps with (a) recreational fishermen and (b) Fish Legal to clarify the guidance for Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authorities on the introduction of emergency bylaws under section 157 of the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009.

Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authorities (IFCAs) are independent statutory authorities and have direct responsibility to sustainably manage sea fisheries resources in their districts. Therefore, it is for each IFCA to decide whether a situation warrants an emergency byelaw and if this meets the qualifying criteria as laid down in Section 157 of the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009. Defra has provided best practice guidance on IFCA byelaw-making, including emergency byelaws made under section 157, this is available online through GOV.UK and IFCA websites. Defra has not been approached by any IFCA to provide further statutory guidance on the aforementioned qualifying criteria.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the findings for the 2016 and 2017 Sea Angling survey will be published.

Publication of the Sea Angling surveys for 2016 and 2017 has been delayed due to the Government’s response to COVID 19. The findings are now due to be published in the summer of this year.

Reports for 2018 and 2019 are due to be published later in the year, and will set out estimated catches by recreational sea fishers as well as their economic contribution.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Sea Angling Survey will be published for 2020.

The annual UK Sea Angling Survey for 2020 is underway. The final report will be published in summer 2021.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what representations he has received on Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authorities being unable to introduce emergency byelaws because of uncertainty on the test in s157(2) (6) Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 which is resulting in juvenile bass being caught in nets with undersize mesh; and if he will take steps to work with Fish Legal to provide urgent clarificatory guidance for Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authorities on that matter.

Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authorities (IFCAs) are independent statutory authorities and have direct responsibility to manage sea fisheries resources sustainably in their districts. Therefore, it is for each IFCA to decide whether a situation warrants an emergency byelaw and if this meets the qualifying criteria as laid down in section 157 of the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009. Defra has provided best practice guidance on IFCA byelaw-making, including emergency byelaws made under section 157, and the department has not been approached by any IFCA to provide further statutory guidance on this statutory provision.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the results of the survey conducted in 2016 by his Department and the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science on the effect on the economy of recreational angling.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the outcome of the survey conducted in 2016 by his Department and the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science on the effect on the economy of recreational angling.

The Sea Angling Diary survey (www.seaangling.org) is carried out annually, it is analysed by Cefas (www.cefas.co.uk), and combined with information from the National Water Sports Participation Survey. It is used to understand the level of participation, catches and economic impact of sea anglers resident in the UK. The findings for 2016 and 2017 have just been finalised and will be published in Spring this year.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th May 2020
What steps her Department is taking to help ensure the recovery of international trade after the covid-19 pandemic.

Restoring an open trading system is vital for global recovery post-COVID. We will continue to champion free and fair trade, and we will support business recovery by opening up markets through free trade agreements, our new Export Strategy, and driving investment across all parts of the United Kingdom. Our ambitious free trade agreement with the US aims to reduce tariffs for key exports such as dairy. As Cornwall and the South West account for two-thirds of all our dairy exports to the US, this will be particularly important for local businesses in my Hon. Friend’s constituency and the surrounding areas, such as Davidstow creamery.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what representations his Department has received on the potential merits of bringing forward proposals to reform the law and sentencing relating to the offence of leaving the scene of a hit and run that resulted in death; and if he will meet with the hon Member for North Cornwall to discuss (a) that matter and (b) the effect of those accidents on the families of victims.

Over the past four years, the Department for Transport has received three pieces of correspondence from Members of Parliament, and one from a member of the public, on the potential merits of bringing forward proposals to reform the law and sentencing relating to the offence of leaving the scene of a hit and run that resulted in death. The Department has also responded to one petition and Ministers have held one meeting with the family of a victim and their Member of Parliament.

If you write to Baroness Vere, the Minister responsible for this policy area, she would be happy to consider meeting with you to discuss this issue.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of ensuring that seafood exporters in the South West have ready access to haulier export certificates.

I understand that the question relates to road haulage permits and market access.

The Government is committed to a Free Trade Agreement that would enable liberalised road haulage arrangements to continue.

In the event that the Transition Period ends without a Free Trade Agreement, it is not the Government’s intention to rely solely on ECMT permits for market access.

However, ECMT permits would be used to supplement wider market access arrangements, either under an EU-wide agreement or a series of bilateral agreements with EU MS.??An application window for ECMT permits opened on 2 November 2020 and will close on 20 November 2020.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many local authorities have a competitive tendering process for the procurement of speed cameras; and his Department encourages local authorities to undertake a competitive tendering process for the procurement of those cameras.

The procurement for goods and services for items such as speed cameras is entirely a matter for each local highway authority.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals on the use of electric scooters on public highways; and what assessment he has made of the potential merits of including e-scooters in the cycle to work scheme run by HMRC.

The Department is considering the use of electric scooters closely and recognises that people want to take advantage of the opportunities personal vehicles can offer. The Department is committed to encouraging innovation in transport as well as improving road safety, but new modes of transport must be safe and secure by design.

The Future of Mobility: Urban Strategy, published on 19 March 2019 includes a Regulatory Review which will address the challenges of ensuring our transport infrastructure and regulation are fit for the future.

The Strategy can be found at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/future-of-mobility-urban-strategy

The Department will use the Regulatory Review to examine current legislation and determine from the evidence what is needed to make the necessary changes for a safe and healthy future. One strand of this will look at options for enabling micromobility devices, and a consultation will be issued in due course and when we have considered the consultation responses we will consider the legislative steps needed.

One of the principles of the Future of Mobility: Urban Strategy is that cycling and walking should remain the best options for short journeys and we remain committed to that. The Department has no plans to include e-scooters in the Cycle to Work Scheme. The Cycle to Work Scheme is an employee tax-benefit scheme that enables employees to hire cycles and cycle safety equipment for active travel to work from their employer, or from a third party, in return for a deduction from their earnings via salary sacrifice.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance his Department has issued to centres administering the covid-19 vaccine on contacting people in priority groups one and two who have so far not received a covid-19 vaccine.

The National Health Service has now offered the COVID-19 vaccine to everyone in the top four priority cohorts. Any health and care staff who have not so far accepted but would now like to do so have been asked to contact their employer who is responsible for arranging their vaccination. Others in the initial priority groups one to four can arrange a vaccination through the national booking system by calling 119 or at the following link:

www.nhs.uk/covid-vaccination

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether people in receipt of pension credit will receive support for transport costs when travelling to and from their covid-19 vaccination venue.

Those in receipt of pension credit are entitled to a bus pass for free travel and 99% of people now live within 10 miles of a vaccination centre and are accessible via bus transport links.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to ensure that vaccination centres work their way through the priority list in the correct order and vaccinate only groups 3 and 4 when as many as possible from groups 1 and 2 have been vaccinated.

In order of priority, most United Kingdom residents will be contacted by their general practitioner (GP) to book their vaccine via an online or telephone system. Those in the initial priority groups can also arrange their vaccination appointment by calling 119 or through the national booking system at the following link:

http://www.nhs.uk/covid-vaccination

Additionally, the National Immunisation Management System (NIMS) is used as the national register of COVID-19 vaccinations. At the point that someone receives their COVID-19 vaccine, the vaccinating team will record the information on the NIMS system and a patient’s GP record.

The top four priority groups – people aged 70 years old and over, care home residents and staff, health and care staff and clinically extremely vulnerable patients – have now all been offered the opportunity to be vaccinated.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has been directly informed of issues with covid-19 vaccine supply in rural areas.

The Department has not been directly informed of issues with COVID-19 vaccine supply in rural areas.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
20th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of giving priority vaccines to adults who are cared for at home and their carers alongside adults resident in a care home and care workers.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) are the independent experts who advise the Government on which vaccines the United Kingdom should use and provide advice on prioritisation at a population level.  For the first phase, the JCVI have advised that the vaccine be given to care home residents and staff, as well as frontline health and social care workers, then to the rest of the population in order of age and clinical risk factors.

If a person is cared for at home and falls under the criteria for prioritisation in phase one of the COVID-19 vaccination programme, they will be vaccinated according to their priority group; this includes those considered clinically extremely vulnerable and those considered to be ‘adults at risk’.

Those who are in receipt of a carer’s allowance or those who are the main carer of an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill should also be offered vaccination in priority group six.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to reopen dental treatment services as part of the Government’s easing of covid-19 lockdown restrictions.

To meet the Government social distancing measures and to contain the spread of COVID-19 all routine dentistry was suspended at the start of the pandemic.

NHS England and NHS Improvement announced on 28 May that National Health Service dentistry outside urgent care centres will begin to gradually restart from 8 June where practices assess that they have the necessary personal protective equipment and infection prevention and control. The aim is to increase levels of service as fast as is compatible with maximising safety.

A copy of the letter that was published can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2020/03/Urgent-dental-care-letter-28-May.pdf

We still expect all NHS dental practices to provide urgent telephone advice and triage. Dentists are giving urgent advice remotely and, if needed, prescriptions for painkillers or antibiotics. All urgent face to face treatment that is clinically necessary will still be available for patients who are triaged by their dentist or NHS 111 into one of over 600 urgent dental care centres set up by NHS England and NHS Improvement.

To support dentists and teams to reopen safely NHS England and NHS Improvement and the Chief Dental Officer have published a standard operating procedure covering the recovery transition.

This can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/publication/dental-standard-operating-procedure-transition-to-recovery/

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have died with covid-19 recorded as the cause of death to date; and what proportion of those people had tested positive for covid-19.

Daily statistics for COVID-19 related deaths in the United Kingdom, which consist of deaths with lab-confirmed COVID-19 in all settings, are published on the GOV.UK website. The latest data is available at:

https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/

In addition, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes provisional weekly data on deaths registered in England and Wales where “COVID-19” was mentioned on death certificates. This data can be viewed on the ONS website at the following link:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/latest

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 12 November 2020 to Question HL9766 on Musical Instruments: Customs, what options other than a Carnet a UK citizen residing in the UK has to transport video, photography, and recording equipment between the EU and UK whilst undertaking freelance work.

In addition to using carnets, there are two main alternative options for transporting video, photography and recording equipment between the EU and the UK - Temporary Admission and Returned Goods Relief.

Temporary Admission is a customs procedure that allows a person to import non-UK goods temporarily into the UK. Using Temporary Admission means any import duty or import VAT is suspended as long as the goods are removed from the UK at a later date. Temporary Admission is useful if a person needs to temporarily import goods such as samples, professional equipment or items for auction, exhibition or demonstration into the UK. Further information can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/apply-to-import-goods-temporarily-to-the-uk-or-eu.

Returned Goods Relief (RGR) allows eligible items to be reimported free from Customs duty and import VAT. The relief can apply to exported items returning to the UK if certain conditions can be met. For RGR to apply goods must normally be returned within three years of the date of export unless exceptional circumstances exist. For RGR on import VAT to apply the exporter and importer must be the same person and any VAT due must have been previously paid in the UK or EU. Further information can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/pay-less-import-duty-and-vat-when-re-importing-goods-to-the-uk-and-eu.

Temporary Admission and Returned Goods Relief may be available in the EU. Further information on EU customs procedures can be found at https://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/business/customs-procedures_en.

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what progress he has made on the duty review for alcohol announced in the spring Budget 2020; and what assessment he has made of the potential economic merits of lowering the duty on spirits.

A call for evidence was held in 2020, which closed on 29 November. The Government is now analysing the responses provided and will provide further updates on the duty review in due course.

Alcohol duties are kept under review and the impact of a change to spirits duty is considered at each fiscal event, including its effects on the economy.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans his Department has to provide fiscal support to payroll giving organisations who have experienced a reduction in their transactions as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises that businesses across the economy face lower demand due to the impact of Covid-19.

The Government has announced unprecedented support for businesses during the pandemic, for which payroll giving organisations are eligible. Measures introduced by the government include VAT relief and loan guarantee schemes. The application deadline for the loan guarantee schemes – Bounce Back Loan Scheme, Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme – has been extended to the end of January 2021.

Payroll giving organisations can benefit from the recent extension to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme until the end of March 2021. Furloughed employees will receive 80% of their current salary for hours not worked.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to process imports that are retained in port so as to avoid demurrage charges being imposed on businesses in North Cornwall constituency.

Demurrage charges are applied to the consignee by the shipping line when a container stays in the port for longer than a set period of time. The period of time is determined by the shipping line, which varies between 5 to 7 days. This is a standard procedure at all ports across the UK.

A reason why the container might be held at the port is if it has been held to be checked by customs. The charges are applied daily, at a rate of £40 to £60 per day. In order to avoid demurrage charges on businesses in the North Cornwall constituency, the Government is minimising delays and ensuring a smooth running of the border port.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether (a) ice cream served from an ice cream van and (b) other takeaway cold foods are eligible for the reduced rate of VAT for the hospitality industry.

Cold takeaway food, for example sandwiches, is zero-rated, provided it is not of a type that is always standard rated such as ice cream, potato crisps, sweets, some beverages and bottled water.

The temporary reduced rate of VAT was introduced to support the tourism and hospitality sectors and will help over 150,000 businesses and protect over 2.4 million jobs. Ice cream served for consumption on the premises in ice cream parlours or other food establishments will benefit from the reduced rate.
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing repayment holidays for vehicle leasing during the covid-19 outbreak.

On 27 April, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) published guidance that sets out what it expects firms to do for customers who are facing temporary payment difficulties due to the exceptional circumstances arising from COVID-19. This includes granting the customer a payment deferral for 3 months on motor finance and leasing payments.

The Government continues to work closely with the FCA and industry on this matter and stand ready to protect consumers wherever it is necessary.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Government has made an assessment of the potential merits for people who have changed jobs or who were made redundant in March 2020 of extending the cut-off date for real time information submissions in the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to 31 March 2020.

On 15 April, the Government announced it would extend the cut-off date for the CJRS to 19 March, to include employees whose payroll information was notified to HMRC by 19 March. Processing claims for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme in cases where HMRC did not have RTI data by 19 March would require much greater manual handling by HMRC, which would significantly slow down the system while risking substantial levels of fraud. It would also require greater resource for HMRC when they are already under significant pressure to deliver the system designed. Those not eligible for the scheme may be able to access the other support Government is providing, including a package of temporary welfare measures and up to three months’ mortgage payment holidays for those struggling with their mortgage payments.

5th Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department plans to introduce an online chat function to the government gateway system.

Following the introduction of a new Digital Engagement Platform in January 2020, HMRC will be introducing a range of new interactive digital interventions across all of their digital services over the next two years. HMRC’s aim is to encourage taxpayers to make full use of those digital services, and this will in turn drive the choices that HMRC make on which digital interventions to deploy and where.
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons the UK is ranked fifth in the comparative productivity levels of G7 countries; and what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the levels of productivity in rural and urban communities in the UK are equal.

We recognise that UK productivity is lower than some of our peers. But we must also recognise that we have a number of strengths that we should continue to build on. We are the world’s fifth largest economy. We have many of the best universities on earth, are one of the most attractive places in the world to do business and lead in many 21st-century technologies and innovations. Closing our productivity gap, which exists compared to other nations but also between regions in the UK, will be vital in unleashing the UK’s potential.

We are committed to levelling up opportunity across all places in the UK. This means making sure that prosperity is shared across all our towns and cities. So far, we have announced a £5bn package of investment for buses and cycling, opened up a consultation on Freeports, and we’ve confirmed that we will proceed with HS2 to deliver essential North-South connectivity, greater capacity, and shorter journey times.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion of High Sped Two's construction costs will be recouped through (a) VAT, (b) corporation tax, (c) income tax and (d) National Insurance being levied on (i) the bodies contracted to construct the project and (ii) their employees.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) are unable to provide estimates on how much will be recouped from High Speed Two's construction costs.

HMRC publish aggregate level statistics on annual and monthly revenue on GOV.UK here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmrc-tax-and-nics-receipts-for-the-uk

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment her Department has made of the effectiveness of anti-money laundering provisions in the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002; and what recent assessment she has made of the effect of the 2002 Act on small businesses.

The UK is internationally recognised as having some of the strongest controls and legislation worldwide when it comes to tackling money laundering and bringing to justice those who seek to use or hide the proceeds of crime. There has been no recent assessment of the effectiveness of anti-money laundering provisions in the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002. In 2017, the Regulatory Policy Committee, which considers the impact of legislation on business, rated the Criminal Finances Bill as ‘fit for purpose’. They agreed that the Bill would “involve no significant burden on small businesses”. The Criminal Finances Act amended the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 and gained Royal Assent in 2017.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
28th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will meet the hon. Member for North Cornwall and the Police and Crime Commissioner for Devon and Cornwall to discuss the future allocation of funding for summer street marshalling schemes similar to that which was in place in Bude during summer 2020.

Devon and Cornwall Police will receive total funding of up to £338.4 million in 2020-21, an increase of up to £23.2 million compared to 2019-20.

Decisions on how to use this funding, including the scheme referenced here, are taken locally. I am in regular contact with all PCCs, and look forward to future discussions with the Hon Member and the Police and Crime Commissioner for Devon and Cornwall.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the effect of changes to licensing rules on alcohol free zones.

The provisions in the Business and Planning Bill currently progressing through Parliament include measures which will make it easier for licensed premises to expand outdoors by streamlining the processes for obtaining a pavement licence and a permission to sell alcohol for consumption off the premises. The provisions will not override existing alcohol-free zones previously set by local councils.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, where the revenue generated from fixed speed cameras is held.

Revenue generated from fixed speed camera enforcement goes to the Treasury. This income does not accrue to the police or local authority.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions he has had with members of the expatriate community that spend short periods of time in the UK when finalising the legislative proposals on the two week quarantine period for people returning to the UK during the covid-19 outbreak.

From 8 June, all passengers arriving in the UK without having travelled through another part of the Common Travel Area are required to self-isolate for 14 days, apart from those on a short list of exemptions.

Those spending fewer than 14 days in the UK can depart again before the 14 days are complete.

Communications have been set up to clarify these measures to all those coming to the UK. These are available at the border and on gov.uk.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Jul 2020
What steps his Department has taken to help support communities in north Cornwall during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Armed Forces’ contribution to the Government’s COVID-19 response has been invaluable. North Cornwall is no exception.

Mobile Testing Units deployed to Bude, Bodmin and Launceston, providing a vital service to local communities.

Nine military planners deployed to assist the Devon and Cornwall Local Resilience Forum with PPE distribution and testing, and a team of two soldiers were available to courier testing kits to Residential Care Homes across Cornwall and Devon.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what information his Department holds on the number of homes defined as affordable for purchase; and how many social rented homes are planned to be built in rural areas in the South West each year under the new planning proposals.

The department publishes the number of new affordable homes for purchase completed (including acquisitions) and starts on site. The number of new completions and starts on site of shared ownership properties can be found in live tables 1007bC and 1007bS, respectively; while the number of new completions and starts on site of affordable home ownership properties can be found in live tables 1007cC and 1007cS. These tables can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-affordable-housing-supply .

We do not set delivery targets for social housing. The Government is investing £12.2 billion in affordable housing over 5 years from next year. This includes the new £11.5 billion Affordable Homes Programme, which will provide up to 180,000 new affordable homes, should economic conditions allow. In this new Programme, 10 per cent of delivery outside of London will be targeted at rural communities.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he holds information on examples of local authority planning enforcement having been outsourced to private companies.

It is for local planning authorities to decide how best to carry out their planning enforcement functions. The Department does not hold information on which authorities have outsourced enforcement work to private companies.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps the Government has taken to support small landlords in disputes with tenants who had refused to pay rent before the covid-19 outbreak and who are now unable to evict those tenants as a result of measures put in place to support renters in genuine need during the outbreak.

The best way to support landlords is by helping tenants to pay their rent. The Government has brought forward a significant economic response, including support for business to pay staff salaries through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Job Support Scheme. We have also introduced over £9 billion of measures in 2020/21 that benefit those facing financial disruption due to the current situation. These measures include increasing Universal Credit and Working Tax Credit by £1,040 a year for the next 12 months, and a significant investment in the Local Housing Allowance of nearly £1 billion, lifting rates to the 30th percentile from April this year. Discretionary Housing Payments can also be paid to those entitled to Housing Benefit or the housing element of Universal Credit who face a shortfall in their housing costs.

Where landlords have found themselves in coronavirus-related hardship, mortgage lenders have agreed to offer payment holidays of up to three months, including for buy-to-let mortgages. On 2 June, the Financial Conduct Authority confirmed that borrowers can apply for an extension to any holiday already taken while extending the window for new applications to 31 October.

As we move forward, we have taken steps to ensure that landlords can recover their properties in the most serious circumstances whilst still protecting tenants.

Courts restarted possession proceedings on Monday 21 September 2020. The listing of the cases is a matter for the judiciary but they will be prioritising the most serious cases, including extreme rent arrears.

The Coronavirus Act 2020 means landlords must now provide six months’ notice of their intention to seek possession. However, for the most serious cases notice periods have been lowered to give landlords the ability to regain possession more quickly. This includes only requiring 4 weeks’ notice when arrears are equivalent to at least six months’ rent. This supports landlords with tenants in pre-COVID arrears to pursue repossession more quickly.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when the next tranche of coastal communities funding will be made available; and how local organisations will be able to access it.

The Coastal Communities Fund supports coastal projects delivering sustainable growth and jobs across the UK.Since 2012 the Fund has awarded grants to 369 projects across the UK to the value of £229 million.

Round 5 was announced in 2018 and 2019, with £50.7 million going to 47 projects.

A manifesto commitment was made to extend the Fund to 2022 helping to continue to drive growth in UK coastal areas


Whether there is another round of the Coastal Communities Fund is a matter for the next Spending Review.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department has taken to support shared-ownership housing scheme applicants who are enrolled on the Government furlough scheme.

The furlough scheme is a strong package of financial support, so where they can, shared owners should still pay the rent to their landlord and mortgage to their lender as normal.

Shared owners who are struggling to meet their financial commitments can apply for universal credit to get help paying their rent and might be able to get Support for Mortgage Interest if they have been on benefits for 39 weeks without any breaks.

On 17 March the Chancellor also announced, on behalf of the sector, that banks and building societies will offer a 3-month ‘mortgage holiday’ for borrowers struggling financially as a result of COVID-19. Like other mortgage holders, shared owners who are struggling to meet their mortgage payments will be able to request a mortgage payment holiday from their lender.

Shared owners should not be forced out of their home during this difficult time. The Coronavirus Act 2020 rules that landlords must give three months’ notice of possession, and the moratorium on repossessions by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) means that lenders should not commence or continue repossession proceedings against their customers.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the Community Housing fund.

Ministers and Officials from the Department have regular discussions with counterparts in HM Treasury on a range of issues, including on housing related matters.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans he has for the Community Housing fund after March 2020.

The Community Housing Fund is currently scheduled to close in March 2020. Ministers are considering all budgets in the round and allocations for 2020/21 will be confirmed at Main Estimates in the Spring. Allocations for future years will be considered at the forthcoming Budget and Spending Review.

The support and close involvement of the local community enables the community-led approach to secure planning permission and deliver housing that could not be brought forward through speculative development.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
8th Dec 2020
What assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of increasing sentences for driving offences.

Whilst many deaths and injuries are the result of a tragic accident, too many of these incidents involve criminal behaviour. Every avoidable death is one too many.

The government has committed to bring forward changes to ensure the courts have the powers they need to deal with those drivers who kill by dangerous driving or where they are over the limits for alcohol and drugs.

The Department want to close a loophole in the law that fails to recognise the harm caused where drivers cause serious injury by their careless driving.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jun 2020
What additional financial support he is providing to help protect victims of domestic abuse during the covid-19 outbreak.

We have announced an unprecedented £76 million extra funding to support survivors of?domestic abuse, sexual violence, modern slavery and vulnerable children and their families. This includes £28 million for victims of domestic abuse.

This funding will help front line charities to provide support to those in need, including through virtual or telephone-based services.

This funding is part of comprehensive measures to support vulnerable people through the pandemic and we are working closely with local bodies, charities and other partners to ensure they get the support they need.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)