Gareth Snell Portrait

Gareth Snell

Labour (Co-op) - Former Member for Stoke-on-Trent Central

Gareth Snell is not a member of any APPGs
5 Former APPG memberships
Business Brexit, Ceramics, Coalfield Communities, Fairtrade, Housing and Employment
Procedure Committee
19th Mar 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Public Accounts Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Science and Technology Committee
13th Mar 2017 - 3rd May 2017
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
13th Mar 2017 - 3rd May 2017


Division Voting information

Gareth Snell has voted in 400 divisions, and 17 times against the majority of their Party.

22 Oct 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 19 Labour Aye votes vs 217 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 329 Noes - 299
3 Apr 2019 - Business of the House - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Labour No votes vs 228 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 310 Noes - 310
3 Apr 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour Aye votes vs 230 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 220 Noes - 400
1 Apr 2019 - Business of the House - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour No votes vs 233 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 277
1 Apr 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship (Votes) - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 25 Labour No votes vs 185 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 261 Noes - 282
1 Apr 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship (Votes) - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 24 Labour No votes vs 203 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 280 Noes - 292
1 Apr 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship (Votes) - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Labour No votes vs 121 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 191 Noes - 292
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 42 Labour No votes vs 143 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 188 Noes - 283
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 22 Labour No votes vs 111 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 184 Noes - 293
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 27 Labour No votes vs 198 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 268 Noes - 295
25 Mar 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Labour No votes vs 228 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 311 Noes - 314
25 Mar 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour No votes vs 232 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 327 Noes - 300
14 Mar 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Labour No votes vs 25 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 85 Noes - 334
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 14 Labour No votes vs 232 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 301 Noes - 321
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 14 Labour No votes vs 226 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 321
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 13 Labour No votes vs 224 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 290 Noes - 322
13 Jun 2018 - European Union (Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Gareth Snell voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 15 Labour Aye votes vs 74 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 327 Noes - 126
View All Gareth Snell Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
John Bercow (Speaker)
(25 debate interactions)
Ruth Smeeth (Labour)
(20 debate interactions)
Andrea Leadsom (Conservative)
(16 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(55 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(49 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(43 debate contributions)
Home Office
(39 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Gareth Snell's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Gareth Snell

24th October 2019
Gareth Snell signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 24th October 2019

Timetable for the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill

Tabled by: Lord Field of Birkenhead (Crossbench - Birkenhead)
That this House calls on the Government, if it is granted a flexible extension to Article 50 by the European Union, to work to a 14-day timetable for passing the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill, and to bring to an immediate end the flexible extension as soon as the Bill …
14 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 7
Independent: 3
Conservative: 3
Crossbench: 1
17th October 2019
Gareth Snell signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 17th October 2019

Attack in Halle, Germany

Tabled by: Ruth Smeeth (Labour - Stoke-on-Trent North)
That this House condemns the attack and the ideology that radicalised the attacker in Halle, Germany; shows sympathy towards those who were tragically murdered, recognises that had it not been for the protective security measures at place in the synagogue, then it is likely that the death toll and the …
27 signatures
(Most recent: 16 Dec 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 14
Independent: 4
Conservative: 4
Scottish National Party: 2
Non-affiliated: 1
The Independent Group for Change: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
View All Gareth Snell's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Gareth Snell, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Gareth Snell has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Gareth Snell

Monday 23rd October 2017

1 Bill introduced by Gareth Snell


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision about health scrutiny by local authorities, including scrutiny of clinical commissioning groups' decisions; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 7th March 2018
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

176 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
7th Feb 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what information the Commission holds on the number of contract staff in the House who are paid less than the London Living Wage.

The House of Commons Commission does not hold pay information about individual contractor staff.

The House of Commons is an accredited London Living Wage Employer. In order to obtain our licence the House had to satisfy the Living Wage Foundation that no directly employed or contracted workers engaged on the Parliamentary estate are paid less than the London Living Wage. We can confirm that to our knowledge no contractor working on the Parliamentary Estate is being paid less than the London Living Wage. It is a requirement in our contracts that contractors and sub-contractors’ employees working on the Parliamentary Estate are paid at least the London Living Wage. Additionally, for House of Commons contracts and where the Lords and Commons contract together jointly, contractors and subcontractors which provide services in relation to our contracts, while not having a presence on Parliamentary premises, are required to pay staff working directly on our contracts at least the London Living Wage or the UK Living Wage if based outside London.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the rate of pay is for the lowest-paid contracted worker in the House of Commons.

I would refer the hon. Member to my response to his question (127222) answered today.

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Attorney General, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

The Attorney General’s Office does not currently have any staff that are paid below the Real Living Wage or the London Living Wage.

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Attorney General, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

The Attorney General’s Office does not currently have any staff that are paid below the Real Living Wage or the London Living Wage.

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Attorney General, what the weekly contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in his Department.

The highest paid member of staff in the Attorney General’s Office is contracted to work 41 hours a week (including lunch breaks).

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Attorney General, how many staff are (a) employed directly by, (b) seconded to and (c) work under contract to his Department.

As at 31st August 2018, the Attorney General’s Office had 40 staff on payroll, 3 on Secondment in & 1 Contractor (agency). The staff on payroll can be broken down as follows:

Payroll staff

Count

Fixed Term - Fair & Open

2

Loan In

29

Permanent

8

Secondment Out

1

Total

40

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

The majority of facilities management services, which include cleaning, security, and catering, are outsourced to an independent provider with the exception of one central London location that manages their own cleaning and security.

All outsourced and self-delivered facilities management staff are paid the National Living Wage or above.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
11th Sep 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

No staff in Cabinet Office, No.10 and its agencies that work inside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage for London of £10.20 per hour.

No staff in Cabinet Office, No.10 and its agencies that work outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the National Real Living Wage of £8.75 per hour.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
11th Sep 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

No staff in Cabinet Office, No.10 and its agencies that work inside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage of £10.20 per hour.

A total of 85 staff in Cabinet Office, No.10 and its agencies that work outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage of £10.20 per hour. They are all paid above the National Real Living Wage.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
11th Sep 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the weekly contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in his Department.

The weekly contracted hours for the highest paid member of staff in Cabinet Office, No.10 and its agencies is 41. However, people in senior roles will routinely work much longer hours than this.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
11th Sep 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff (a) are employed directly by, (b) are seconded to and (c) work under contract to his Department.

Cabinet Office has the following numbers of staff:

a) The number of staff employed directly is published online at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cabinet-office-workforce-management-data-2018-to-2019.

b) 594 full time equivalent (FTE) people were on secondment in to Cabinet Office or on a loan from another government department. This is not published elsewhere and is dated at Quarter 1 (April – June 2018).

c) The number of contractors in Cabinet Office is published online at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cabinet-office-workforce-management-data-2018-to-2019.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
14th Sep 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many incidents of electoral fraud committed by students double voting were recorded during the 2017 General Election.

Voting more than once in a national election is illegal and the Government takes all reports of electoral fraud very seriously. The National Police Chief Council have reported that a number of incidents are being investigated. However, it would be inappropriate to go into more detail whilst investigations are underway.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

Cleaning, security and catering services are delivered to the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy by external contractors. We do not hold detailed pay data for contractor employees.

Specific rates are a matter for each individual contractor, but assurances are provided to ensure full compliance with the requirements of the National Living Wage. In April 2019 Government will increase the National Living Wage to £8.21 per hour. This is an above inflation increase that will see a full-time minimum wage worker over £2,750 better off over the course of a year compared to when the policy was introduced.

We value all of our staff and they all deserve a fair and competitive wage, whether they are directly employed or working through our contractors. The Department has agreed with its facilities management and catering contractors that they will align the pay of their cleaning, catering, mailroom and security staff to the appropriate median rates for that occupation, as identified in the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings. The median applies from 1 March 2019 and will be aligned annually.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

There are no staff in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy paid less than the National Living Wage.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

There are no staff in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy paid less than the National Living Wage.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the weekly contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in his Department.

The highest paid member of staff within the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is contracted to work 42 hours per week, including an allowance of an hour a day for meal breaks. As a Senior Civil Servant, they are required to work such additional hours as may from time to time be reasonable and necessary for the efficient performance of duties, for which they are not eligible to be paid overtime.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many staff (a) are employed directly by, (b) are seconded to and (c) work under contract to his Department.

The number of staff employed by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy are as follows:

Employed directly: 3538

Seconded in: 53

Under contract: 80*

*excludes agency staff etc supplied via an agency.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
5th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to reduce the incidence of ceramic manufacturers experiencing gas price spikes.

It is normal and necessary for wholesale gas prices to fluctuate in response to changes in demand. The resulting price signals encourage a flexible supply response, and help ensure that even when the system is stressed, consumer demand is met. This is a sign of a well-functioning commodity market. Consumers in the wholesale market can benefit from price fluctuations, with companies that flexibly increase or decrease their supply of gas maximising their profit by reacting to the price signals.

There is already a liquid forward market which allows large consumers to buy gas at a pre-agreed price and minimise their exposure to price spikes. This price is historically very stable.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with (a) the Secretary of State for International Trade and (b) the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the potential effect of adopting the lesser duty rule as part of a future trade remedy scheme once the UK leaves the EU.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy regularly discusses trade policy issues with his colleagues. The Trade White Paper, published 9 October, set out the Government’s proposals for an independent UK trade remedy scheme once we have left the EU. Our policy is for the amount of any duties to be set at the lower of either: the level of the dumping or subsidy; or the level of injury caused to a UK industry as identified during the investigation process. This approach is known as the lesser duty rule. The Taxation (Cross-Border Trade) Bill, introduced on 20 November, included provisions to apply the lesser duty rule where remedies are recommended to address injury caused by dumping or subsidies.

30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the merits of seasonal gas storage facilities in obtaining greater price stability for energy-intensive users of gas.

A report published in 2013 by Redpoint, commissioned by DECC, looked at the merits of various interventions in the gas market, including new gas storage facilities. This report can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/236757/DECC_FI_Final_report_09072013.pdf

I refer the Hon Member to my answer to his previous question 1604 which notes that the UK continues to enjoy highly diverse and flexible gas supplies.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the levels of gas imports into the UK were by country of origin in the last 12 months for which figures are available.

The table below illustrates the latest published data for the last 12 months (May 2016 to April 2017) outlining the origin of gas imports into the UK rounded to the nearest 100.

GWh

Country

Gas imports May 2016 - April 2017

Norway

371,900

Qatar

93,400

Netherlands

29,500

Belgium

28,300

Algeria

5,500

Others

2,900

Total

531,500

The above table includes imports via pipeline and shipments of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG).

Imports of natural gas by origin are published monthly in Energy Trends Table 4.4 on the BEIS section of the GOVUK website at this address: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/622757/ET_4.4.xls

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish correspondence and records of telephone conversations between Centrica and his Department on the viability of the Rough gas storage facility.

Officials and I have regular discussions with industry on a range of topics, which in many cases are commercially confidential. As the Hon. Member is aware, Centrica Storage Ltd announced on 20 June 2017 that it intends to close the Rough gas storage facility following a programme of testing the injection wells and an assessment of the future commercial viability of the asset.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the cost and benefits to the consumer of gas storage provided by the Rough facility.

Centrica Storage Ltd’s decision to close the Rough gas storage facility is a commercial decision based on the age of the asset and the costs of repair. As such, we do not have the information to undertake a comprehensive assessment of the costs and benefits of maintaining the gas storage facility at Rough.

However, we have recently undertaken a full strategic assessment of our long-term gas security, including scenarios without Rough. We will publish this in due course. The UK continues to be benefit from a range of flexible sources of natural gas, including: production from the North Sea; six international gas pipelines with Norway, Belgium and the Netherlands; three Liquefied Natural Gas terminals that can bring gas from anywhere in the world; and a number of modern, responsive gas storage facilities.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

DCMS is based only in Greater London, and all our properties have facilities management provided by other Government departments.

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

No staff in the Department working (a) inside or (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

No staff in the Department working (a) inside or (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the weekly contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in his Department.

As of 1st September 2018, the highest paid member of staff in the department has contracted hours of 41 hours per week, including unpaid daily breaks of one hour.

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many staff (a) are employed directly by, (b) are seconded to and (c) work under contract to his Department.

The number of staff in each of those categories at 31 July 2018 was as follows:

a) 985

b) 8

c) 54

27th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions she has had with Stoke-on-Trent City Council on the potential relocation of Channel 4 outside of London.

We received a number of submissions to the Channel 4 regional consultation from individuals and local authorities across the UK, including from Stoke-on-Trent City Council. No decisions have been taken. We will set out next steps in due course.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

The department does not employ cleaners, security guards and catering staff.

Cleaning, security duties and catering services in buildings managed by the department are outsourced under facilities management contracts. Suppliers are responsible for setting rates of pay for their staff and rates vary dependent on the age and location of staff and market rates. All suppliers are required to pay, as a minimum, either the National Minimum Wage or the National Living Wage. The rates set by the government for the National Minimum Wage and the National Living Wage will rise in April 2019.

10th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much was paid in (a) tuition fee loans and (b) maintenance loans with respect to students undertaking undergraduate midwifery courses (a) in total and (b) on average per student midwife in each academic year since 2016-17; and what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of such loans that will be repaid by people who received them.

Information on the loans paid to students on higher education courses is published annually by the Student Loans Company in the statistics publication Student Support for Higher Education in England.

https://www.slc.co.uk/official-statistics/financial-support-awarded/england-higher-education.aspx.

A breakdown of these statistics by subject of study is not available.

Information on the proportion of student loans not expected to be repaid is published annually by the department in the statistics publication Student Loan Forecasts, England.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/student-loan-forecasts-england-2017-to-2018.

A breakdown of these statistics by subject of study is not available.

12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

The Department for Education and its executive agencies staff, including all those inside and outside of Greater London are all paid at least the Real Living Wage.

All staff based inside Greater London are paid at least the London Living Wage. There are 103 staff based outside Greater London that are paid below the London Living Wage but are all paid the Real Living Wage.

12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

The Department for Education and its executive agencies staff, including all those inside and outside of Greater London are all paid at least the Real Living Wage.

All staff based inside Greater London are paid at least the London Living Wage. There are 103 staff based outside Greater London that are paid below the London Living Wage but are all paid the Real Living Wage.

12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in his Department.

The highest paid member of staff in the department is a full-time member of the Senior Civil Service (SCS). SCS members are required to work a minimum (over a 5-day week) of 42 hours, including daily meal breaks of one hour.

6th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many people were undertaking a senior healthcare support worker (maternity support) apprenticeship at level 3 within an NHS trust at the latest period for which figures are available.

There have been 110 starts on level 3 Health Maternity and Paediatric Support apprenticeships in the 2016/17 academic year.

Note:

1) This figure is rounded to the nearest ten and based on the provisional full year data.

2) Apprenticeship data is collected via the Individualised Learner Record (ILR). We cannot identify employers through the ILR, so are not able to identify NHS Trusts.

NHS organisations are required to meet the public sector apprentice target. The NHS has a range of apprenticeships which support the Government’s commitment to widen participation and social mobility throughout the health sector. The Department of Health has recently announced proposals to train 5000 Nursing Associates through the apprentice route in 2018 and a further 7500 in 2019, which will make a significant contribution to NHS target in future years.

For further information, data on apprenticeship starts by sector subject and level are available in the FE data library:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/650226/201617_Oct_Apps_Level_SSA_And_Framework_Data_Tool_FINAL.xlsx.

6th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeship training providers are ready to deliver the senior healthcare support worker (maternity support) apprenticeship at level 3.

There are 60 providers currently on the Register of Apprenticeship Training Providers who have confirmed that they are able to deliver the apprenticeship standard ‘senior healthcare support worker’, which includes options such as maternity support. Further information can be found at: https://roatp.apprenticeships.sfa.bis.gov.uk/download.

Information about this apprenticeship, including the training providers that offer it, is available at: https://findapprenticeshiptraining.sfa.bis.gov.uk/Apprenticeship/Standard/151?keywords=senior%20healthcare%20support%20worker%20%28maternity%20support%29%20apprenticeship.

6th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much NHS trusts have paid apprenticeship training providers since 6 April 2017; how much of that spending has been on senior healthcare support worker (maternity support) apprenticeships at level 3; and how many people have started that such apprenticeship since 6 April 2017.

The department does not collect information on how much NHS trusts have paid to apprenticeship training providers or how much they have spent on a particular apprenticeship. Apprenticeship data is collected via the Individualised Learner Record (ILR). We cannot identify employers through the ILR, so are unable to identify NHS Trusts.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency publishes a list of the funding allocated to each training provider for apprenticeship starts annually and updates them throughout the year. Allocations for the 2016 to 2017 funding year can be found at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sfa-funding-allocations-to-training-providers-2016-to-2017.

Based on the provisional full year data between 6 April 2017 and the end of July 2017 there were 10 apprenticeship starts on Health Maternity and Paediatric Support apprenticeships at level 3. These figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

Information on apprenticeships by sector subject area and level is publically available in the FE data library: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/586183/apprenticeships-starts-by-geography-learner-demographics-and-sector-subject-area.xlsx.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

Defra’s office cleaners, security guards and catering staff are provided through outsourced suppliers. These suppliers hold information on the rate of remuneration of their staff, however our contracts with the suppliers require all staff to be paid the Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation, as a minimum.

The Living Wage Foundation rates can be found at the Living Wage Foundation website (https://www.livingwage.org.uk/). There is a rate for London based staff and a rate for staff based outside of London.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

The Real Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation is a voluntary rate set each November and is currently £8.75 per hour. There are no staff who work (a) inside Greater London and (b) outside Greater London in Defra that are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

The London Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation is a voluntary rate set each November and is currently £10.20 per hour. The National Living wage is currently £7.83. There are no staff who work inside Greater London in Defra that are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

There are 11 staff in the Department working outside of Greater London paid at a rate below the London Living wage as described by the Living Wage Foundation.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in his Department.

Senior Civil Servants (SCS) are contracted to work a minimum (over a 5 day week) of either 41 or 42 hours, including daily meal breaks for one hour. The new model contract was introduced on 1 July 2013, and standardised the working hours to 42 hours which was applicable to all new staff as well as those staff being promoted into or within SCS, from that date forward.

The contracted hours of the highest paid member of staff in the Department is 42 hours per week.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many staff (a) are employed directly by (b) are seconded to and (c) work under contract to his Department.

The breakdown of staff in the department as at 31 July 2018 is shown in the following table:

Assignment Category

Headcount

a

Directly Employed (inc staff on Outward Secondment / Loan and Maternity / Special Leave)

3711

b

Inward Secondment / Loan

155

c

Contingent Workers (Temporary Agency Workers, Consultants, Contractors and Interim Staff)

483

Total

4349

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

The Department does not directly employ any staff in the professions listed.

The Department leases its offices from other Government departments. Those departments may employ staff either directly or via agencies. Therefore we do not hold this information.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

I can confirm that all staff directly employed by the Department for Exiting the European Union are paid in line with the Government’s National Living Wage. All staff are based in London and are paid in line with the living wage, as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

Suella Braverman
Attorney General
12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

I can confirm that all staff directly employed by the Department for Exiting the European Union are paid in line with the Government’s National Living Wage. All staff are based in London and are paid in line with the living wage, as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

Suella Braverman
Attorney General
12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what the contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in his Department.

All SCS staff are employed on standard Senior Civil Service employment contracts. Due to the small numbers of staff affected the Department is unable to release this information as disclosure would contravene data protection principles.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how many staff (a) are employed directly by (b) are seconded to and (c) work under contract to his Department.

The Department is recruiting the brightest and the best from across the civil service, the wider public sector and the private sector. The Department for Exiting the European Union now has over 650 staff. We will not be providing a running commentary as recruitment is ongoing and numbers are regularly changing.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what information her Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in her Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

DFID has 2 HQ buildings in the UK, one in East Kilbride and one in Whitehall. We have outsourced our requirement for total facilities management services to Interserve as part of an Affiliates Cluster arrangement managed by the Cabinet Office.

All cleaning, catering and security staff are paid the national living wage or above in our East Kilbride office and the London living wage or above in the Whitehall office.

12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many staff in her Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

DFID have no staff either inside or outside Greater London that are paid at a rate below the real living wage.

12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many staff in her Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

There are no staff in the London area, either inside or outside Greater London that are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what the contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in her Department.

All Senior Civil Servants are contracted to work a minimum (over a 5 day week) either 41 or 42 hours, including daily meal breaks for one hour.

12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many staff (a) are employed directly by (b) are seconded to and (c) work under contract to his Department.

DFID currently has 3,995 staff employed directly.

There are currently 159 individuals loaned or seconded from other Departments and organisations.

There are currently 423 individuals working under contract.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps the Government plans to take to ensure that the EU’s anti-dumping tariffs against ceramic tableware from China will be maintained if the UK leaves the EU without a deal before the EU has concluded its anti-circumvention case in December.

The Government has committed to transition the current EU measures on tableware and kitchenware, once the UK begins operating an independent trade policy.

We have also been clear that any ongoing investigations, including the current circumvention review, that have not resulted in a definitive measure by that time will not be transitioned. Industry will be able to apply to the Trade Remedies Investigations Directorate for a circumvention review.

Conor Burns
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

Cleaning, security guarding and catering services in buildings managed by the Department are outsourced under a facilities management contract. Specific rates of pay are a matter for each individual contractor, as the employer, but assurances are provided to ensure full compliance with the requirements of the National Minimum Wage and the National Living Wage.

Where the Department for International Trade is a tenant in buildings belonging to other Government departments, this information is not held.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps he is taking to ensure that anti-dumping measures for ceramic tableware are not withdrawn when the UK leaves the EU.

On 24 July 2018, the Government published the provisional findings of the trade remedies call for evidence into which existing EU trade remedy measures will be transitioned. The provisional findings from this indicate the existing measures on ceramic tableware will be maintained when the UK leaves the EU. The Government is aiming to publish the final report before the end of 2018.

12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

The Department for International Trade does not have any staff that work inside and outside Greater London that are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

The Department for International Trade does not have any staff that work inside and outside Greater London that are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

In addition, the department requires that our suppliers pay at least the National Minimum Wage.

12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

The Department for International Trade does not have any staff that work inside and outside Greater London that are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

The Department for International Trade does not have any staff that work inside and outside Greater London that are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

In addition, the department requires that our suppliers pay at least the National Minimum Wage.

12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many staff (a) are employed directly by (b) are seconded to and (c) work under contract to his Department.

The number of staff employed in the Department for International Trade (DIT) and UK Export Finance (UKEF) as at 31 August 2018 is shown in the table below.

Core DIT

UKEF

Directly employed by DIT

2852

313

Seconded to DIT

21

-

Working under contract to DIT

309

20

The staff who are directly employed include only those who are on DIT payroll (for domestic staff) or on FCO payroll and then recharged to DIT (for overseas staff).

Those who are seconded are those who are working in DIT and subject to a secondment agreement.

Staff working under contract include contractors and agency staff who have been procured from Government frameworks.

These totals do not include employees working in DIT who are not paid directly through the DIT payroll.

All data above includes those working in the UK and overseas.

5th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which EU anti-dumping regulations the Government plans to maintain after the UK leaves the EU are subject to an ongoing expiry review.

On 24 July 2018, the government published the provisional findings of the trade remedies call for evidence into which existing EU trade remedy measures matter to the UK, including details of which measures the government plans to maintain.

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/call-for-evidence-to-identify-uk-interest-in-existing-eu-trade-remedy-measures

Interested parties were invited to provide further information which may affect these findings. The government is currently considering this information.

A list of EU measures currently subject to an expiry review can be found on the European Commission’s website: http://trade.ec.europa.eu/tdi/

5th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent progress he has made on UK-third country free trade agreements.

We are working with countries across the world to explore the best ways to develop our current trade and investment relationships and have established working groups and high-level dialogues with a range of key trade partners. Working Group discussions include preparatory work on the potential of future trade agreements towards pursuing an independent trade policy once we have left the EU.

Last July, we launched four public consultations on prospective new agreements with the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, as well as the UK’s potential membership of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

As a priority, we are seeking continuity of all our existing EU trade agreements. We have had positive discussions with our trading partners towards achieving a smooth transition for businesses and consumers. Ministers and officials are engaging regularly with partner countries to complete this work.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions he had with his counterpart in the Government of China during the recent trade mission on the dumping of ceramic products by that country.

My Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade recently accompanied the Prime Minister on a visit to China, where the need for open and fair trade and a global effort to tackle overcapacity was raised at the highest levels of the Chinese government.

The Governments have regular contact on the full range of issues relating to trade and have launched a trade review to put this on a more formal footing.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when officials in his Department received a draft report of the research conducted by Copenhagen Economics and Van Bael & Bellis into the design of the UK Trade Remedies Framework.

The development of this economic research was an iterative process. The researchers provided regular progress updates in order for the Department to monitor delivery against the research specification.

19th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the non-executive members of the Trade Remedies Authority will include representatives from the UK manufacturing sector and trades unions.

We are committed to creating an organisation with the expertise required to reach informed and objective conclusions on trade remedies cases and this means ensuring the Trade Remedies Authority is led by individuals with the right skills to effectively operate a UK-wide function. As with other such appointments, appointments to the Trade Remedies Authority will be made in accordance with good governance principles and rules on public appointments.

The Department for International Trade has engaged with a range of stakeholders including all sorts of businesses, and trade unions, throughout the policy and legislative development process for the trade remedies framework and will continue to do so as it sets up the Trade Remedies Authority.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Dec 2017
To the Secretary of State for International Trade, if his Department will bring forward draft (a) legislative proposals and (b) policy papers on how the Trade Remedies Authority will calculate injury in trade remedy investigations before further consideration by the House of the Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Bill.

Work is currently underway to develop the appropriate methodology for constructing normal value in dumping investigations in cases where domestic prices are inappropriate. Work is also underway examining the options for calculating injury.

We expect this process to take some months, but we will discuss our thinking with interested parties as it develops and will continue to engage with a range of stakeholders on the detail of trade remedies policy as we have done since the summer.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if his Department will bring forward draft (a) legislative proposals or (b) policy papers on how the Trade Remedies Authority will construct normal value in dumping investigations in cases where domestic prices are inappropriate before further consideration by the House of the Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Bill.

Work is currently underway to develop the appropriate methodology for constructing normal value in dumping investigations in cases where domestic prices are inappropriate. Work is also underway examining the options for calculating injury.

We expect this process to take some months, but we will discuss our thinking with interested parties as it develops and will continue to engage with a range of stakeholders on the detail of trade remedies policy as we have done since the summer.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the ordinary duration of trade remedy measures will be five years; and if he will make a statement.

Under the WTO Anti-Dumping and Anti-Subsidy Agreements, trade remedy measures can only remain in force for as long as is necessary to counteract the dumping or subsidy which is causing injury. There is no ordinary duration for measures to be in force. The maximum period measures can remain in force is five years.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether appointments made to the Trade Remedies Authority will include representatives from UK manufacturing and trades unions.

We are committed to creating an organisation with the expertise required to reach informed and objective conclusions on trade remedies cases. We will ensure that the TRA is staffed by individuals with the right skills to effectively operate the new system. Our detailed review of the structure and resources of the Australian, American, Canadian, EU and United States systems has informed our decision to recruit investigators with legal, economics or accountancy backgrounds. As with other such appointments, appointments to the TRA will be made in accordance with good governance principles and, where relevant, rules on public appointments.

The Department for International Trade has engaged with a range of stakeholders including all sorts of businesses, and trade unions, throughout the policy and legislative development process for the trade remedies framework and will continue to do so as it sets up the Trade Remedies Authority.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if he will publish all external guidance and advice his Department has received on the proposals to adopt the lesser duty rule as part of any future trade remedy scheme as set out in the Taxation (Cross Border Trade) Bill.

The UK’s trade remedies regime will provide robust protections for UK industry suffering from injury, caused by dumped or subsidised imports, or unforeseen import surges. To ensure these protections are proportionate, the regime will set measures at the level necessary to address the injury to UK industry (known as the lesser duty rule), and apply an economic interest test as part of the independent investigation process (similar to the existing Union interest test in the EU).

We have been engaging with stakeholders on how these elements of the regime will work in practice, and are committed to continuing that engagement. This process will also be informed by economic research commissioned by this Department through public tender to provide evidence on the design and implementation of a future trade remedies framework.

23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what external advice he has received on the application of an economic interest test as part of any future trade remedy scheme after the UK leaves the EU.

The UK’s trade remedies regime will provide robust protections for UK industry suffering from injury, caused by dumped or subsidised imports, or unforeseen import surges. To ensure these protections are proportionate, the regime will set measures at the level necessary to address the injury to UK industry (known as the lesser duty rule), and apply an economic interest test as part of the independent investigation process (similar to the existing Union interest test in the EU).

We have been engaging with stakeholders on how these elements of the regime will work in practice, and are committed to continuing that engagement. This process will also be informed by economic research commissioned by this Department through public tender to provide evidence on the design and implementation of a future trade remedies framework.

19th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the expiry review of Council Implementing Regulation (EU) No 917/2011, what his Department's policy is on maintaining anti-dumping duties on ceramic floor and wall tiles imported from China.

The European Commission’s review of the anti-dumping measures on imports of ceramic tiles is ongoing and yet to make its final proposals.

Currently, a number of trade remedy measures are being applied by the EU, some of which affect UK industry. The Government is looking into the detail of UK trade remedies policy as a whole as we leave the EU and will bring forth proposals shortly. The Government is aiming to maintain continuity for businesses as we exit from the EU.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether he has made an assessment of the potential implications of the outcome of the European Commission investigation R650 on UK ceramic tile manufacturers.

The European Commission’s review of the anti-dumping measures on imports of ceramic tiles is ongoing and yet to make its final proposals.

Currently, a number of trade remedy measures are being applied by the EU, some of which affect UK industry. The Government is looking into the detail of UK trade remedies policy as a whole as we leave the EU and will bring forth proposals shortly. The Government is aiming to maintain continuity for businesses as we exit from the EU.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether he has made an assessment of the potential implications of the outcome of the European Commission investigation R650 on the kaolin and ball clay industry.

The European Commission’s review of the anti-dumping measures on imports of ceramic tiles is ongoing and yet to make its final proposals.

Currently, a number of trade remedy measures are being applied by the EU, some of which affect UK industry. The Government is looking into the detail of UK trade remedies policy as a whole as we leave the EU and will bring forth proposals shortly. The Government is aiming to maintain continuity for businesses as we exit from the EU.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what (a) discussions and (b) correspondence he has had with Stoke-on-Trent City Council on the potential for bus franchising within that city; and whether he will place copies of that correspondence in the Library.

The Bus Services Act 2017 (BSA) introduces new bus franchising powers for local authorities as well as providing other tools to improve bus services. We are working with interested local authorities to determine which of the powers provided are best able to support bus networks in their areas.

We have had no formal requests or correspondence on the potential for bus franchising within the City of Stoke-on-Trent. Ministers and officials meet regularly with all local authorities to discuss a range of issues.

Mayoral Combined Authorities (MCA) have automatic access to new powers to franchise local bus services. No local authority which is not part of an MCA currently runs a franchise under the BSA.

We set out criteria for assessing proposals in our guidance, available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/694428/bus-services-act-2017-franchising-guidance.pdf)

19th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many local authorities that are not part of Mayoral Combined Authority areas, run franchised bus services under the Bus Services Act 2017.

The Bus Services Act 2017 (BSA) introduces new bus franchising powers for local authorities as well as providing other tools to improve bus services. We are working with interested local authorities to determine which of the powers provided are best able to support bus networks in their areas.

We have had no formal requests or correspondence on the potential for bus franchising within the City of Stoke-on-Trent. Ministers and officials meet regularly with all local authorities to discuss a range of issues.

Mayoral Combined Authorities (MCA) have automatic access to new powers to franchise local bus services. No local authority which is not part of an MCA currently runs a franchise under the BSA.

We set out criteria for assessing proposals in our guidance, available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/694428/bus-services-act-2017-franchising-guidance.pdf)

19th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which local authorities have submitted proposals for franchising services to his Department under the provisions of the Bus Services Act 2017.

The Bus Services Act 2017 (BSA) introduces new bus franchising powers for local authorities as well as providing other tools to improve bus services. We are working with interested local authorities to determine which of the powers provided are best able to support bus networks in their areas.

We have had no formal requests or correspondence on the potential for bus franchising within the City of Stoke-on-Trent. Ministers and officials meet regularly with all local authorities to discuss a range of issues.

Mayoral Combined Authorities (MCA) have automatic access to new powers to franchise local bus services. No local authority which is not part of an MCA currently runs a franchise under the BSA.

We set out criteria for assessing proposals in our guidance, available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/694428/bus-services-act-2017-franchising-guidance.pdf)

19th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what criteria his Department uses to assess the (a) capacity, (b) track-record and (c) economic geography of a local authority to undertake bus franchising; and whether Stoke-on-Trent City Council has complied with that criteria.

The Bus Services Act 2017 (BSA) introduces new bus franchising powers for local authorities as well as providing other tools to improve bus services. We are working with interested local authorities to determine which of the powers provided are best able to support bus networks in their areas.

We have had no formal requests or correspondence on the potential for bus franchising within the City of Stoke-on-Trent. Ministers and officials meet regularly with all local authorities to discuss a range of issues.

Mayoral Combined Authorities (MCA) have automatic access to new powers to franchise local bus services. No local authority which is not part of an MCA currently runs a franchise under the BSA.

We set out criteria for assessing proposals in our guidance, available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/694428/bus-services-act-2017-franchising-guidance.pdf)

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

The Department for Transport does not hold remuneration rates for cleaners, catering staff and security guards as these services are provided through a Total Facilities Management (TFM) contract, which has a fixed single monthly payment covering all services. Under that TFM contract all staff employed by the service provider are paid at least the National Minimum Wage.

13th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

There are no staff in the Department for Transport or its agencies, who are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

13th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in his Department.

Senior Civil Servants (SCS) are contracted to work a minimum (over a 5 day week) either 41 or 42 hours, including daily meal breaks for one hour. The new model contract was introduced on the 1st July 2013, which standardised the working hours to 42 hours. This has been applicable to all new SCS staff joining the Civil Service as well as those staff being promoted into or within SCS, from that date forward.

13th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how may staff (a) are employed directly by, (b) are seconded to and (c) work under contract to her Department.

As at 30th June 2018, the number of staff employed directly, seconded to and working under contract in the Department (including the Central Department and Executive Agencies) is as follows:

The number of staff employed directly was 14,510, published in the following link:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/publicsectorpersonnel/datasets/publicsectoremploymentreferencetable.

There were 33 staff seconded to the Department and 361 staff working under contract.

8th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, on what date construction work is planned to commence on the West Midlands to Crewe portion of HS2.

Construction work will begin on Phase 2a of the High Speed Two (HS2) rail project after the High Speed 2 (West Midlands – Crewe) Bill has passed through the full Parliamentary process. We aim to have Royal Assent by December 2019 which would mean that construction would begin in 2020. Some enabling work may commence earlier, such as modifications to utilities, highways and existing railway, under separate legal powers.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what information her Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in her Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

We can confirm that the Department holds information on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners & (b) security guards in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

The Department does not hold any information on the rate of remuneration for (c) catering staff which is part of a service price inclusive of catering staff costs.

The rates of remuneration are considered commercially sensitive and were not disclosed at point of contract award.

13th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many staff in her Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.

The Department for Work and Pensions pays all employees at least the statutory National Living Wage of £7.83 per hour, regardless of age.

The Living Wage Foundation advocates employers paying an alternative hourly rate known as the Real Living Wage (RLW) or London Living Wage (LLW). The current Real Living Wage is £8.75.

(a) Inside Greater London 33 employees are paid less than the RLW.

(b) Outside Greater London 85 employees are paid less than the RLW.

Please note the above figures are calculated based on all employees in London working a 37 hour week. We do have individuals with a reserved right to work a 36 hour week, which would reduce these figures.

13th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many staff in her Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.

The Department for Work and Pensions pays all employees at least the statutory National Living Wage of £7.83 per hour, regardless of age.

The Living Wage Foundation advocates employers paying an alternative hourly rate known as the Real Living Wage (RLW) or London Living Wage (LLW). The current London Living Wage is £10.20.

(a) Inside Greater London 33 employees are paid less than the LLW

(b) Outside Greater London 15,663 employees are paid less than the LLW. Employees outside of Greater London can be based anywhere across the country.

Please note the above figures are calculated based on all employees in London working a 37 hour week. We do have individuals with a reserved right to work a 36 hour week, which would reduce these figures.

13th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in her Department.

The highest paid member of staff at the Department for Work and Pensions is contracted to work 42 hours weekly. The standard departmental contract states that all Senior Civil Servants are subject to a minimum of 42 hours, including daily lunch breaks of 1 hour. Senior Civil Servants are also required to work any additional hours that may be reasonable and necessary for efficient performance of one’s duties.

13th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how may staff (a) are employed directly by (b) are seconded to and (c) work under contract to her Department.

(a) DWP latest published Departmental headcount and payroll data for July 2018 shows a total of 82,626 staff employed by the department.

(b) In relation to secondments in to the department, the information requested is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

(c) Departmental headcount and payroll data for July 2018 shows 614 people working under contract to the Department.

27th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many children under the age of 16 received disability living allowance after a successful appeal.

The latest appeals data that is available is to December 2017. This data is therefore from April 2017 – December 2017 (the latest financial year up to which data is available).

There were 2,520 (data rounded to the nearest 10) cases in the time period outlined for children under 16 years of age that went to appeal and were subsequently awarded DLA.

It is important to note that that this figure includes appeals where the award rate was not necessarily increased, but is still considered a successful appeal (i.e. the award changes from lower rate care to lower rate mobility or vice versa), as well as appeals where the award rate increases.

27th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made on the effect of the roll-out of universal credit on trends in the level of rent arrears in Stoke-on-Trent.

Research shows that many people come onto Universal Credit with pre-existing rent arrears. We also know that arrears are usually temporary and the majority of claimants do succeed in paying their rent, managing their monthly payments and clearing their arrears over time. In our research, the proportion of Universal Credit claimants who were in arrears at the start of their claim fell by a third after four months.

We are currently carrying out further analysis of this issue with a number of housing providers, to investigate and understand the true level of rent arrears for their tenants, what is causing them and any impacts Universal Credit may be having. It will be published when completed.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
27th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many children under the age of 16 that were in receipt of disability ilving allowance were not entitled to claim personal independence payment when they reached 16 years of age.

Personal Independence Payment is a different benefit from Disability Living Allowance with a different eligibility criteria. Therefore, in some cases, individuals will find a change in the amount of support they are entitled to following reassessment.

The Department has published information on the number of children under the age of 16, who were in receipt of Disability Living Allowance and not entitled to Personal Independence Payment when they reached 16 years of age. This can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

By filtering on age and reassessment indicator in the PIP clearances table, then tabulating the disallowance type indicator you will be able to find the information requested.

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at: https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started---SuperWEB2.html

27th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many children under the age of 16 had a claim rejected for disability living allowance in each of the last three years.

Entitlements to Child DLA awards are not determined by specific disabilities or diagnosis; instead entitlement is determined by the effects which a disability or long term health condition has on a person’s life. These are all factors to be taken into consideration when looking at the number of Child DLA new claim rejections.

The Department for Work and Pensions has specially trained case managers who examine comprehensive claimant forms and supporting evidence provided to decide the extent to which the condition affects the mobility and care needs of the claimant (this is what the assessment is based on). Case managers have access to a comprehensive medical guidance and, where consent is provided, can directly contact named professionals in the claim form to obtain additional information required to make an accurate decision.

Applicants who believe they have not received the correct level of DLA award(s) can seek for a mandatory reconsideration, where their claim will be looked at again.

Please see the table below which shows the total number of children under the age of 16, who had a claim rejected and awarded for Disability Living Allowance in each of the last three years.

Disability Living Allowance (DLA) Child - Number of New Claims Rejected and Awarded

DLA Child New Claim Rejections

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

24,734

27,703

33,951

DLA Child New Claims Awarded

71,129

73,186

78,814

Source:

Disability Living Allowance Computer System (DLACS)

Notes:

Data taken from MUs 26, 31, 81 and 84

New Claims - includes Normal Rules and Special Rules

Please note that the data supplied are derived from unpublished management information which was collected for internal Departmental use only, and have not been quality assured to National Statistics or Official Statistics publication standard. They should therefore be treated with caution.

5th Feb 2018
How many applicants for personal independence payment who appealed the initial assessment died between their initial assessment result and the date of their appeal.

The information requested is not collated centrally. Claims from people who are terminally ill are currently being dealt with in five working days on average and nearly all of them are successful.

30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many GPs were recruited to the NHS under the GP International recruitment scheme in (a) 2018 and (b) 2019; and what the cost to the public purse has been of that scheme.

The International GP Recruitment (IGPR) Programme was announced in August 2017 and recruitment began from April 2018. Prior to this, four pilot schemes were established between May 2016 and November 2017. The IGPR programme has now recruited over 150 doctors from overseas through the extended national programme and the pilots. These are part of the pipeline of over 350 doctors who are currently working through the Induction and Refresher scheme aimed at supporting both international general practitioners joining general practice in England and domestically trained doctors wishing to return to practice.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many referrals have been received by his Department under sub-section 244 of the National Health Service Act 2006 since the implementation of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 by (a) local authority and (b) clinical commissioning group where such a request has been passed to the Independent Reconfiguration Panel; and what the outcome was of any decision.

Since the commencement of the Health and Social Care Act in 2012, the Department has received 23 referrals from local authorities and none from clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). CCGs are the bodies that propose service change and do not have the power to refer such changes to the Secretary of State.

Findings and final advice on each of the 23 cases are set out in detail on the Independent Reconfiguration Panel’s website.

13th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether a central register of back-up generators at NHS hospitals is maintained by his Department.

A central register of back-up generators at National Health Service hospitals is not maintained centrally.

NHS trusts are responsible for ensuring their estate and services are resilient against emergencies, hazards and threats and their impacts and consequences.

13th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what back-up power generation systems are in place for NHS Digital; and when they were last tested under load.

NHS Digital has advised that back-up power generation systems are in place at the following locations:

- Leeds - last load bank test carried out on 6 March 2019; and

- Exeter - last load bank test carried out on 25 June 2018.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

The Department does not directly employ cleaners, security staff or catering staff. Specific rates of pay are a matter for each individual contractor, as the employer, but assurances are provided to ensure full compliance with the requirements of the National Minimum Wage and the National Living Wage.

The rates of pay for staff varies according to role, region and experience and have the following ranges:

- Catering staff from £7.83 to £11.12

- Cleaning staff from £8.75 to £9.95

- Security staff from £9.22 to £9.98

10th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average cost to the NHS has been of employing a midwife on a full-time basis in each of the last five years.

The Department’s estimates of the average cost to the National Health Service employing one midwife at a full-time equivalent (FTE) are set out in the following table in each of the last five years. These costs include total earnings, national insurance and pension contributions.

Estimated Average Pay bill per FTE (Midwife)

2013-14

£46,053

2014-15

£45,955

2015-16

£46,096

2016-17

£47,224

2017-18

£47,381

Source: The Department’s Headline HCHS pay bill metrics, which are based primarily on earnings statistics published by NHS Digital, supplemented by employer pension and national insurance contributions estimates informed by unpublished and unvalidated data from the Electronic Staff Record Data Warehouse.

Pay bill per FTE levels do not depend solely on pay policy and pay awards. They also reflect patterns in those leaving and joining the workforce and the impact this has on average experience and pay levels, and they reflect patterns in non-basic earnings such as overtime which can fluctuate.

10th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of the cost of training a student midwife is paid by (a) the student, (b) his Department and (c) other sources.

In England, the initial cost of training a midwife is paid by the Government. Part of this is in the form of student loan outlay, which the student accesses for tuition fees and maintenance loans from the Student Loans Company.

The following table shows indicative Government costs for each year of training a midwife who lives outside of London and away from home. It shows the maximum possible amount of each payment type available. Midwifery courses typically last three years.

Additional funding to students may also be available through the Student Loans Company and the Learning Support Fund. This is available to those with adult and child dependants, and for those in exceptional hardship. They may also be eligible for reimbursement of additional travel costs to attend clinical placements.

The amount shown in the table is paid by the Department directly to hospital trusts for a student’s clinical placement.

The amount paid back by the student depends on how much they earn during their career. If the loan is not fully repaid after 30 years it is written off. For example, once a student enters the workforce they pay their loans back at a rate of 9% of their earnings over the repayment threshold of £25,000. This equates to £15 a month for a student earning £27,000 a year.

Systems in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are the responsibilities of the devolved administrations in each of those countries.

2018/19 Indicative cost to the Government of training a midwife for each year of their training

Payment type

Cost

Paid by

Costs of training

Tuition fee loan to the university

£9,250

Initially by Student Loans Company. Paid back by the student over time depending on earnings.

Clinical placement funding to the placement provider

£1,383 + Market Forces Factor

Department of Health and Social Care

Additional costs for living support

Maintenance loan to the student

£8,700

Initially by Student Loans Company. Paid back by the student over time depending on earnings.

Long courses loan to the student

£1,116

Notes:

- Based on a student who lives away from their parents.

- Based on a student who lives outside of London and is eligible for the maximum amount of maintenance allowance available.

- Based on a student on a 42-week course, of which 20 weeks are on clinical placement.

- Placement funding includes Market Forces Factor (MFF). The MFF compensates for difference in the cost of providing training in different parts of the country.

Sources:

Tuition fee loan:

https://www.practitioners.slc.co.uk/products/full-time-undergraduate-education/full-time-tuition-fee-loan/whats-available/

Maintenance loan:

https://www.practitioners.slc.co.uk/products/full-time-undergraduate-education/full-time-maintenance-loan/whats-available/

Long courses loan:

https://www.practitioners.slc.co.uk/products/full-time-undergraduate-education/full-time-maintenance-loan/long-courses/

Clinical placement funding:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/629492/2017-18_ET_tariff_guidance_FINAL_July_v2.pdf

10th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many student midwives were in receipt of a bursary in each academic year since 2016-17; what the average bursary paid to a student midwife was in each of those years; and what the total cost of those bursaries was to his Department in each of those years.

The following table shows the number of midwifery students in receipt of bursary funding in the last two completed academic years and the average payment per student.

Academic Year

Student Count1

Total Value of Payments (£)2

Average Per Student (£)

2016/17

6,485

35,798,444

5,520

2017/18

4,146

23,815,211

5,744

Source: NHS Business Services Authority

Notes:

1Any student who received any element of bursary funding whilst enrolled on a midwifery course

2Total payment(s) of any award element, i.e. Basic Award or supplementary allowances

In August 2017 the education funding system changed with all new pre-registration undergraduate nursing, midwifery and allied health profession students accessing student loans for tuition fees and living costs rather than a National Health Service bursary. In August 2018 postgraduate pre-registration nursing, midwifery and allied health profession students also began to access student loans.

10th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what information his Department holds on the reasons that midwives have provided for leaving NHS employment in each of the last five years for which information is available.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS) workforce statistics for England. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups, but not staff working in primary care, local authorities or other providers.

The following table shows the reasons recorded for midwives leaving the National Health Service in England, as at 1 April in each year between 2013-2018 and the first two quarters of 2018-19, headcount:

Reason for Leaving

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19 First two quarters

Total

2,912

2,996

2,956

2,858

2,782

1,497

Of which

Dismissal

77

88

69

79

69

38

End of Fixed Term Contract

43

34

52

53

46

13

Flexi Retirement

141

143

150

195

165

86

Mutually Agreed Resignation - Local Scheme with Repayment

1

1

1

2

1

0

Mutually Agreed Resignation - Local Scheme without Repayment

0

2

0

0

0

0

Mutually Agreed Resignation - National Scheme with Repayment

0

0

1

1

0

0

Others

370

346

127

28

26

13

Redundancy - Compulsory

0

0

3

0

1

0

Redundancy - Voluntary

3

4

3

2

3

0

Retirement - Ill Health

30

29

31

39

29

8

Retirement Age

523

586

603

578

592

297

Voluntary Early Retirement - no Actuarial Reduction

45

41

63

56

43

22

Voluntary Early Retirement - with Actuarial Reduction

28

36

27

31

34

12

Voluntary Resignation - Adult Dependants

13

8

12

11

13

4

Voluntary Resignation - Better Reward Package

25

39

19

16

42

12

Voluntary Resignation - Child Dependants

58

49

45

46

33

36

Voluntary Resignation - Health

44

34

54

75

66

43

Voluntary Resignation - Incompatible Working Relationships

14

13

16

12

15

13

Voluntary Resignation - Lack of Opportunities

22

25

14

21

20

11

Voluntary Resignation - Other/Not Known

524

500

557

505

442

237

Voluntary Resignation - Promotion

86

113

102

110

120

69

Voluntary Resignation - Relocation

563

560

598

605

628

355

Voluntary Resignation - To undertake further education or training

83

71

71

44

46

42

Voluntary Resignation - Work Life Balance

225

287

344

355

353

190

NHS Improvement is leading a direct support programme to work with trusts with the highest attrition rates to identify improvements and improve retention to close the supply gap.

13th Dec 2018
o ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what correspondence he has received from (a) local authorities in Staffordshire and (b) the Midlands Partnership Foundation Trust on the future of the North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare Trust; and if he will place a copy of such correspondence in the Library.

The Department has received one item of relevant correspondence from a local authority in Staffordshire, which is attached. There has been no correspondence from the Midlands Partnership Foundation Trust on the future of the North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare Trust.

22nd Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he last met the Chair of the Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Sustainability and Transformation Partnership; and when he is next scheduled to meet that chair.

My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care last met with the Chair of Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent, Sir Neil McKay, on 18 December 2017.

The Secretary of State was due to meet Sir Neil McKay on Tuesday 26 June, but this has had to be rescheduled due to diary pressures. However, the Secretary of State will meet Sir Neil McKay on 27 June alongside the Rt. hon. member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller). This is a follow-up roundtable meeting from one held on 7 March (which Sir Neil McKay also attended).

I will be meeting with the Sustainability and Transformation Partnership (STP) Chair, Sir Neil McKay, and local system partners to discuss the STP on Thursday 28 June 2018.

Steve Barclay
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
6th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Local Authority (Public Health, Health and Wellbeing Boards and Health Scrutiny) Regulations 2013, what discussions he has had with the Independent Reconfiguration Panel on improving the referral system from local authority health scrutiny committees.

The Department remains committed to ensuring the highest standards of public involvement in, and local democratic oversight of, the development of NHS services. We therefore maintain a regular dialogue with the Independent Reconfiguration Panel (IRP), and other bodies to ensure that our systems and processes support effective scrutiny. The IRP publishes advice and guidance to support local decision making and scrutiny, as well as providing advice to interested parties. Further information can be found on the IRP website.

Steve Barclay
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
5th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total value of all fines levied by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) against NHS trusts was for the financial year 2017-18; and what guidance his Department provides to (a) NHS England and (b) each CCG on how revenue raised through such fines should be used.

Information is not held centrally on the level of fines levied by clinical commissioning groups against National Health Service trusts during 2017/18.

In terms of the use by commissioners of revenue withheld from providers through financial sanctions, guidance on this is set out in NHS England’s Contract Technical Guidance, at section 40.5 onwards. This guidance sets out how commissioners may use funding they retain as a result of the application of contractual sanctions, recommending that the commissioner considers whether it is possible to invest the withheld funding in a way that will help to rectify the performance problem.

5th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS hospital trusts have (a) reported financial deficits in their budget at the end of the 2017-18 financial year and (b) estimated such deficits for future financial years; and if he will publish that information by NHS trust.

NHS Improvement publishes quarterly reports regarding the financial position of National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts. The latest figures on current deficits can be found in the NHS Improvement Quarter 4 performance report via the following link:

https://improvement.nhs.uk/resources/quarterly-performance-nhs-provider-sector-quarter-4-201718/

NHS trusts and foundation trusts will develop their own plans for future financial years which will be collated and validated by NHS Improvement.

Steve Barclay
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
5th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his Departments policy is on clinical commissioning groups levying fines on NHS Trusts that fail to meet contractual targets.

The NHS Standard Contract, which is used by clinical commissioning groups for all contracts with hospital providers of National Health Service healthcare services, sets out the consequences of breaches of the waiting time standards and other requirements. In many cases, this consequence is in the form of a financial sanction.

Where a provider breaches a national standard set out in the Contract, prior to April 2016 it was mandatory, under the Contract, for the commissioner to apply the relevant financial sanction. This changed from April 2016, when the application of the principal sanctions (for accident and emergency waiting times, cancer waiting times and waiting times for elective care) being suspended for those NHS trusts and foundations trusts in the national Sustainability and Transformation Fund (STF). Trusts which signed up to the conditions of the STF, including in particular the delivery of a financial control total, were exempted from sanctions. Since April 2018, the arrangement has remained similar in principle, although the STF has now been renamed the Provider Sustainability Fund (PSF) and the range of sanctions suspended has been broadened.

The great majority of trusts have signed up to the STF/PSF conditions since April 2016 and have been protected from financial sanctions as a result.

5th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the refinancing of PFI contracts for NHS Trusts.

The debt incurred to finance Private Finance Initiative (PFI) projects is incurred predominantly by the PFI companies themselves. Officials at the Department discuss refinancing opportunities with the PFI companies as and when the relevant circumstances arise, although opportunities for re-financing PFI schemes are now comparatively limited given the nature of the financial instruments used by the PFI companies at the time.

More generally the Department has helped and advised local trust contract managers where requested in relation to PFI contractual issues and also to support trusts in making operational savings in their PFI schemes.

Steve Barclay
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
5th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to increase the number of GPs in Stoke-on-Trent.

Stoke-on-Trent and North Staffordshire Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) have developed a workforce strategy and plan for the area. This focuses on increasing the numbers of general practitioners (GPs), and also in diversifying the skill mix within general practice, to include clinical pharmacists, advanced nurse practitioners, nurses, physician associates, urgent care practitioners, mental health therapists and physiotherapists, to provide high quality care for patients through alternative health professionals.

Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Sustainability and Transformation Partnership successfully bid to be an early wave site for GP international recruitment, which is to commence in July 2018.

A number of newly-qualified GPs have also been recruited to the area through a GP Fellowship scheme, which enables GPs to develop areas of specialist clinical interest. In 2018 there are also up to 18 £20,000 salary supplements available to GP trainees who commit to working for their three year speciality training in Stafford and Staffordshire as part of the Targeted Enhanced Recruitment Scheme.

The CCGs are also working with the BMJ to develop a marketing campaign to raise the profile of Staffordshire as a place to work and increase the recruitment rate for General Practice. The campaign will be for 12 months and is planned to start by early July 2018.

Schemes to improve GP retention are also currently being scoped in preparation to submit a bid for NHS England funding by the end of June 2018.

30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many clinical commissioning groups have levied fines against NHS Trusts for breaches of payment by results contracts in each year for which information is available.

The information requested is not available.

Steve Barclay
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the estimated he has made of the value (a) in total and (b) by clinical commissioning group of all cancelled operations during last winter.

No estimate surrounding the value of cancelled operations during last winter has been made.

Steve Barclay
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and which clinical commissioning groups operate a shared accountable officer.

There are currently 33 joint Accountable Officers across 110 clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England. Full details of these CCGs are listed in the attached table.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he has had with (a) Stoke-on-Trent City Council and (b) the Care Quality Commission on the review of the local health and social care system report published by the Core Quality Commission on 10 November 2017.

There have been no specific discussions. However, Departmental officials are liaising with both Stoke-on-Trent Council and the Care Quality Commission.

Following the budget announcement of additional funding for adult social care in the March 2017, the Department of Health and the Department for Communities and Local Government asked the Care Quality Commission to undertake a programme of targeted system reviews in 20 local authority areas. One of these was Stoke-on-Trent. The purpose of the reviews is to understand better the pressures and challenges within a local system and identify any areas for improvement in the provision of health and care.

Following the publication of the Care Quality Commission’s review findings, Stoke-on-Trent is developing an action plan to deliver improvement, with support from the Social Care Institute for Excellence and from the Local Government Association, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Care, NHS England and NHS Improvement.

The Care Quality Commission will deliver an interim report on their review findings, including those for Stoke-on-Trent, to the Secretary of State in mid-December 2017, with a concluding report in the summer of 2018.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions his Department has had with (a) the Accountable Officer for Stoke-on-Trent Clinical Commissioning Group, (b) Stoke-on-Trent City Council, (c) Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Partnership Trust and (d) University Hospital of the North Midlands Trust on the Care Quality Commission review of local health and the social care system.

Following the budget announcement of additional funding for adult social care in the March 2017, the Department of Health and the Department for Communities and Local Government asked the Care Quality Commission to undertake a programme of targeted system reviews in 20 local authority areas. One of these was Stoke-on-Trent.

As part of the review of Stoke-on-Trent, the Care Quality Commission Review Team interviews included discussions with the Accountable Officer for Stoke-on-Trent Clinical Commissioning Group, the City Director of Stoke-on-Trent City Council, the Chief Executive Officer of Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Partnership NHS Trust, and the Chief Executive Officer and senior managers at the University Hospital of the North Midlands NHS Trust. The Department’s Deputy Director of Social Care System Oversight attended the Stoke-on-Trent area summit held on 9 November.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions (a) he and (b) NHS England have had with the University Hospital of North Midlands on the permanent appointment of a Trust chair.

There have been no discussions between the Secretary of State for Health or NHS England and the University of North Midlands NHS Trust on the permanent appointment of a Trust Chair.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the budget for Stoke-on-Trent Clinical Commissioning Group has been in each year since its creation.

NHS England advises that the budget for Stoke-on-Trent Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) in each year since its creation has been as follows:

Stoke on Trent CCG budget 2013/14 – 2017/18

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

Budget (£ million)

349.9

358.9

377.4

387.2

432.2

% increase year on year

N/A

2.6%

5.2%

2.6%

11.6%

Source: NHS England

Note:

These figures include in-year adjustments.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he has had with (a) NHS England and (b) the Accountable Officer for the Stoke-on-Trent Clinical Commissioning Group on the waiving of fines for the University Hospital of North Midlands Trust's failure to meet targets in the payment by results contract.

Any decision to waive fines would be a decision for NHS England. The Department understands that NHS England and Stoke-on-Trent Clinical Commissioning Group have not agreed to this and currently the standard National Health Service contract terms apply.

7th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many referrals by Tier 1 Authorities under Regulation 23(9) of the Local Authority (Public Health, Health and Wellbeing Boards and Health Scrutiny) Regulations 2013 have been made in each of the last five years.

Statistics on the number of referrals under Regulation 23(9) of the Local Authority (Public Health, Health and Wellbeing Boards and Health Scrutiny) Regulations 2013 can be accessed on the Independent Reconfiguration Panel website, which can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications?departments%5B%5D=independent-reconfiguration-panel

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office can confirm that the minimum rate of remuneration for Cleaners, Guards and Catering staff in London is the London Living Wage (£10.20 ph). Outside London the minimum rate of remuneration for Cleaners and Catering staff is the National Living Wage (£7.83 ph). For Security Guards outside London the rate of remuneration is £9.30 ph, exceeding the UK Living Wage.​

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

The cleaning, security and catering service at HM Treasury is provided through a service contract, let by the landlord for 1 Horse Guards Road (Exchequer Partnership). HM Treasury does not hold information on remuneration for cleaners, security guards or catering staff.

6th Nov 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, which NHS trusts have made apprenticeship levy payments since 6 April 2017; and how much has been paid since that date (a) by each NHS trust and (b) in total by all NHS trusts.

Levy information of individual NHS trusts is not available due to HMRC’s duty to maintain taxpayer confidentiality.

In 2016, the then Chancellor, in a letter to the Treasury Select Committee, set out an estimate of the impact of the apprenticeship levy on public sector bodies including the NHS Hospital and Community Health Service (which includes NHS Trusts) in England. This was published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/letter-from-chancellor-to-chairman-of-treasury-select-committee-on-the-apprenticeship-levy

It is only possible to accurately determine the total levy payments made by all NHS trusts at disproportionate costs. This is because HMRC administrative data is not produced in a form where NHS trusts and their associated PAYE schemes are easily identifiable.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
30th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of being unable to access public funds on the ability to leave exploitative employment of workers under the (a) seasonal agricultural workers scheme pilot and (b) proposed 12-month short-term work visa scheme.

The Seasonal Workers pilot will use scheme operators to ensure that migrant workers are matched with suitable UK employers.

The short-term work visa proposals set out in the recent White Paper are consistent with our approach to our existing mobility arrangements, which do not permit access to public funds.

30th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the consultation on his 19 December 2018 White Paper entitled The UK’s future skills-based immigration system will include the two proposed short-term work visas described in chapter 6 of that paper; and when that consultation will (a) begin and (b) conclude.

The Government published its White Paper “The UK’s future skills-based immigration system” (Cm 9722) on 19 December 2018. The Home Office is launching a 12-month engagement process to enable businesses and other stakeholders to shape the final details of policy and processes contained within the White Paper.

30th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to respond to the recommendations of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 Review: Second Interim Report, published on 22 January 2019, and whether he intends to accept the findings in the report.

The Home Office will formally respond to the recommendations of the Independent Review of the Modern Slavery Act, following submission of its final report and recommendations to the Home Secretary by the end of March 2019.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
30th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether workers coming to the UK under the forthcoming Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme pilot will be provided with pre-departure information on UK labour laws before arrival in the UK.

The Seasonal Workers Pilot will be managed by two licenced scheme operators. These licencing arrangements place a clear responsibility on the scheme operators to ensure the well-being of participating migrant workers, including ensuring that their employment rights are protected.

30th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the additional funding required by the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority to fulfil its role under the new Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme pilot; and whether such additional funding will be provided.

I refer the Honourable Member to the response that I gave to a question from the Honourable Member for Manchester, Gorton on 17 December 2018 (201233).

7th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what correspondence his Department has had from Stoke-on-Trent City Council on partnership working with his Department to accelerate decision making for asylum seekers and other residents who have no recourse to public funds.

The Home Office is unable to find trace of correspondence received from Stoke-on-Trent City Council regarding Partnership working with the Department to accelerate decision making for asylum-seekers and other residents who have no recourse to public funds.

29th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance his Department provides to Police and Crime Commissioners on the proportion of their budget that should be used for the running of their offices.

The Government does not issue guidance to Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) on the proportion of their budget that should be used for administration costs. Under the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011, it is the responsibility of PCCs to determine how each police area’s funding settlement is allocated, including setting the police force budget and the running of the PCC’s office.

The 2011 Act specifies that PCCs must publish key information as prescribed by the Secretary of State. The Elected Local Policing Bodies (Specified Information) order 2011 (and amended in 2012) sets out what information must be published: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2011/3050/contents/made

The publication of this information enables the local electorate to judge whether the PCC is making the best use of public money at the ballot box.

Police and Crime Panels (PCPs) have the power to scrutinise the actions and decisions of PCCs and enable the public to hold them to account. They have oversight of the commissioner’s key documents, decisions and reports, and conduct the majority of their business in public, ensuring information is available to the electorate.

29th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the fifty fourth report of the Public Accounts Committee of Session 2013-14 entitled COMPASS: provision of asylum accommodation, HC 1000, what measures his Department have in place to respond to the lessons learned following the transition to and implementation of the COMPASS contracts in preparations for the transition to the new contracts.

Since the establishment of the Asylum Accommodation and Support Transformation Project in the autumn of 2016, there has been extensive consideration of lessons learnt from the existing contracts, stakeholder feedback and external review documents, including the fifty fourth report from the Public Accounts Committee.

The new contracts include over 400 substantive changes that will provide a more accessible and easy to navigate system which ensures the safety, security and welfare of service users and their host communities. These changes will include a longer mobilisation and transition period; improved data quality and sharing with providers and a more robust contract compliance regime to improve accommodation standards.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many immigration reporting centres have been (a) closed and (b) relocated since May 2015.

Home Office reporting centres have not been closed. We have rationalised some of our police reporting locations in England and Wales to some of our Home Office reporting centres or larger regional police stations to effectively manage the reporting population.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that people subject to reporting requirements are not disadvantaged financially if the nearest immigration reporting centre is closed.

Those who are eligible for help with travel costs will have a fixed amount added to their support account in order to purchase tickets to enable them to travel to their new reporting location. The facility for those not automatically entitled to travel expenses, but who are required to report and are destitute, to apply for expenses under ‘exceptional needs’ will remain.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reasons the decision was taken to close the immigration reporting centre in Stoke-on-Trent; and if he will publish the business case which led to that decision.

To ensure the needs of our reporting population are managed effectively it is critical that Immigration Enforcement has it resource in the right places. As a result, a small number of staff moves and closures of police reporting locations have taken place to ensure we effectively serve the reporting cohort.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the effect on asylum seekers in Stoke-on-Trent of the closure of the immigration reporting centre in that city.

Asylum seekers aren’t required to report until they have had a negative decision on their case. The new location is considered to be within a reasonable travelling time. To minimise the impact on those that are required to travel for longer periods we are reducing some individuals reporting frequencies to minimise disruption.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what was the consultation process with UK Visa and Immigration prior to the decision to close the immigration reporting centre in Stoke-on-Trent.

The move of reporting away from Stoke-on-Trent was part of a wider programme of work to rationalise our reporting locations to more effectively manage the reporting population.

When the decision to move reporting operations in Stoke-on-Trent had been made, stakeholders were informed. These stakeholders included; Staffordshire Police, Asylum Seeker and Refugee Health Team; Social Services; St Marks Hall; Citizens Advice Bureau; SMK Solicitors; Morden Solicitors and Duncan Lewis Solicitors.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to respond to the letter of 22 August 2018 from the hon. Member for Stoke-on-Trent Central on the closure of the Stoke-on-Trent immigration reporting centre.

I apologise for the delay in responding to your letter of 22 August 2018. The Home Office is required to respond to such correspondence within 20 working days, and I am sorry that it has not been possible to provide a full reply within that timeframe. The response was issued on the 9th October 2018.

5th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Defence on the effect on local authority Fire and Rescue services of the Ministry of Defence's proposals to contract-out the Defence Fire and Rescue Service.

There have been no discussions between the Secretary of State for the Home Department and the Secretary of State for Defence on the effect on local authority fire and rescue services of the Ministry of Defence's proposal to contract out the Defence and Fire and Rescue Service.

5th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps his Department is taking to identify companies that are required to make declarations in relation to their supply chains under section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Under Section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, commercial organisations that carry on a business in the UK and have an annual turnover of £36 million or more, are required to publish a slavery and human trafficking statement.

There are a number of practical difficulties in using the data Government currently holds to identify businesses in scope, for example, although Companies House is working to make their data more readily accessible it is not currently possible to filter their database by turnover size. Therefore we are planning to obtain a list of organisations that are subject to this legislation from a range of non-governmental sources.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
4th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Defence on the effect on local authority fire and rescue services of his Department's proposal to contract out the Defence Fire and Rescue Service.

There have been no discussions between the Secretary of State for the Home Department and the Secretary of State for Defence on the effect on local authority fire and rescue services of the MOD’s proposal to contract out the Defence and Fire and Rescue Service.

22nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to respond to Questions 139023, 139024, 139025, 139026 and 139027, on immigrants: Caribbean, tabled on 26 April 2018.

UIN 139023 was answered on the 19th June 2018, UINs 139024, 139025 and 139027 were answered on the 18th June 2018 and UIN 139026 was answered on the 22nd June 2018.

22nd May 2018
To as the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions he has had with Chief Fire Officers on consequential effects of proposals from the Ministry of Defence to contract out the Defence Fire and Rescue Service.

There have been no discussions between the Secretary of State and Chief Fire Officers of local Fire and Rescue Services regarding the consequential effects of the MOD’s proposals to contract out the Defence and Fire and Rescue Service.

27th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Windrush generation arrival records were included in the national archive; what arrival dates they covered; and which ports of entry covered.

The National Archives holds arrival records comprising passenger lists arranged by port of arrival, from 1890 to 1960, which includes lists of the MV Empire Windrush and other ship arrivals outside of Europe. All of these lists are available to the public at The National Archives in Kew.

27th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department sought advice from the National Archives in advance of the destruction of records on the Windrush generation.

No decision was taken to destroy ‘Windrush migrant’ information specifically and records were not categorised as being related to a ‘Windrush migrant’ or the ‘Windrush generation’. Any Windrush papers would have been destroyed in line with the retention and disposal periods set for the wider records collections in which they were located.

27th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, who ordered a review of the Windrush papers prior to their disposal; when that review was carried out; and what the criteria for that review were.

No decision was taken to destroy Windrush information specifically. Immigration records are destroyed in line with the retention and disposal policy. Retention and disposal periods are set on the basis of business need and whether they are likely to be of historical interest.

27th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what advice her Department requested from the National Archives on the (a) disposal and (b) destruction of Windrush generation records in advance of the destruction of those records.

No decision was taken to destroy ‘Windrush migrant’ information specifically and records were not categorised as being related to a ‘Windrush migrant’ or the ‘Windrush generation’. Any Windrush papers would have been destroyed in line with the retention and disposal periods set for the wider records collections in which they were located.

27th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions Windrush records were used to confirm the immigration status of UK citizens in advance of the disposal of those records; and which (a) agencies of her Department and (b) Ministers of her Department received that information on immigration status.

No decision was taken to destroy ‘Windrush records’ specifically and records were not categorised as being related to a ‘Windrush migrant’ or the ‘Windrush generation’. Any Windrush papers would have been destroyed in line with the retention and disposal periods set for the wider records collections in which they were located.

When making immigration decisions, officials will have regard to a wide range of information and evidence. It is not possible to assess the full range of information considered in a case without an examination of each paper file (where these are available). This could only be done at disproportionate cost.

27th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for indefinite leave to remain from residents in Stoke-on-Trent are awaiting a decision.

The information is not published in the format requested.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with Staffordshire's Police and Crime Commissioner on future governance arrangements for Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service.

The Police and Crime Commissioner for Staffordshire has considered options for joint police and fire governance and consulted locally on a proposal to take on responsibility for the governance of fire and rescue in the area, under the Policing and Crime Act (2017) provisions. On 3 October, he submitted a written proposal to the Home Secretary for consideration.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many warranted officers there were in Staffordshire Police on 1 January in (a) 2011, (b) 2012, (c) 2013, (d) 2014, (e) 2015, (f) 2016 and (g) 2017.

The Home Office collects and publishes statistics on police workforce by each police force in England and Wales on a bi-annual basis. These data are published in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletins, which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-england-and-wales-31-march-2017

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

I am interpreting your request as referring to civilian staff. Cleaning and catering services within the Ministry of Defence (MOD) are provided through a number of facilities management contracts. Information on the rates of remuneration for cleaners and caterers is held by facilities management contractors and not by the Department.

MOD guards have the same terms and conditions and pay scales as the wider MOD Civil Service. The MOD Guard Service comprises approximately 1,800 E2 grades and 200 E1 grades. The rate of remuneration is shown per annum in the table below:

Grade

Current National Pay Scales:

London Pay Scales:

E1

£19,911 to £21,155

£21,309 to £22,637

E2

£17,476 to £17,992

£18,700 to £19,251

In addition to pay scales, dependent on location, guards may also receive additional locational allowances.

Remuneration rates for guards that are provided through commercial contracts are not held by the Department.

20th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the award of the Defence Fire and Rescue Project contract to Capita and previous contracts with that company withdrawn or ended by the Government early, what assessment his Department has made of the ability of Capita to deliver (a) that service and (b) value for money in the delivery of that service.

The Defence Fire and Rescue Project will deliver improvements in the safety of firefighter personnel through greater investment in improved firefighting technology, training and equipment whilst ensuring the Ministry of Defence continues to receive the global fire and rescue capability it needs.

Bidder proposals for the project were evaluated by subject matter experts against criteria which included technical deliverability, commercial and financial aspects. The proposals have also been subject to a rigorous scrutiny, assurance and approvals process undertaken by Ministry of Defence, Cabinet Office and HM Treasury staff.

20th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what contingency plans his Department has in place in the event that Capita is unable to complete the Defence Fire and Rescue Project contract.

Capita's proposal has been subjected to the fullest range of testing and scrutiny across Government to ensure that the services will be delivered in a sustainable and resilient manner.

Maintaining contingency plans is Defence's routine approach when outsourcing and this includes the Defence Fire and Rescue project in the event of a change in circumstances with Capita. The contingency plans ensure that if the contract was to fail there would be minimal disruption to the delivery of appropriate fire risk management services to Defence.

19th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces compensation scheme claims were turned down due to the claimant exceeding the seven year time limit before submitting a claim in (a) 2014, (b) 2015 and (c) 2016.

The number of applications recorded on the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme computer system as being turned down due to the claim exceeding the seven year time limit are as follows:

2014

2015

2016

23

34

73

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government does not directly employ (a) cleaners (b) security guards and (c) catering staff.

Cleaning, security guarding and catering services in buildings managed by the Department are outsourced under facilities management contracts. Suppliers are responsible for setting rates of pay for their staff and rates vary dependent on their age, location and market rates. All suppliers are required to pay, as a minimum, either the National Minimum Wage or the National Living Wage. The rates set by government for the National Minimum Wage and the National Living Wage are to rise in April 2019.

Cleaning, security guarding and catering services to the Department’s headquarters based in 2 Marsham Street are provided under a contract managed by the Home Office.

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent discussions (a) he and (b) officials of his Department have had with (i) Stoke-on-Trent City Council, (ii) Staffordshire County Council, (iii) Newcastle-under-Lyme Borough Council, (iv) Staffordshire Moorlands District Council and (v) Stafford Borough Council on local government reorganisation in Staffordshire.

Ministers and officials from my Department have regular discussions with local authorities covering a wide range of subjects, which can include local government reorganisation, but we have had no specific discussions with these councils about local government reorganisation in Staffordshire.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
6th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many homes have been built on greenfield sites in each calendar year since 1 January 2011.

The Department does not specifically monitor the number of homes built on greenfield sites. It does, however, produce statistics on the estimated percentage of new residential addresses created on non-previously developed land. Figures for 2013-14 to 2017-18 are given in Live Table P301, which is available within the ‘2016-17 residential address change tables’ spreadsheet at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-land-use-change-statistics.

The Government is continuing to identify ways to increase the take-up of brownfield land, especially for new homes, and ensure that suitable brownfield is prioritised for development. Since the end of 2016-17, almost all councils have published an easy-to-access register of brownfield land suitable for new homes, bringing many more sites to the attention of house builders, self-builders and investors. Our revised National Planning Policy Framework, on which we have consulted, urges the most effective use of land, including making as much use as possible of brownfield land. We are analysing the consultation responses.

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
5th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the number of empty privately owned homes.

We continue to support local authorities to encourage efficient use of our existing stock, making best use of homes that have been empty. Local authorities have powers and incentives to tackle empty homes. Through the New Homes Bonus, they earn the same financial reward for bringing an empty home back into use as building a new one.

The Ratings (Property in Common Occupation) and Council Tax (Empty Dwellings) Bill will permit a charge of up to 200 per cent of normal council tax on properties that have been empty for two years or more, instead of the current limit of 150 per cent.

Great progress has been made in recent years and the number of empty homes stands at its lowest since records began. At May 2010, over 300,000 homes in England had been standing empty for longer than 6 months. As of October 2017, the number of long term empty properties had fallen to 205,293

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
5th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many local authorities in England have completed a local plan.

In the 14 years since the current plan making regime was introduced, 280 authorities have adopted a plan with 58 authorities yet to adopt. Of the 58 authorities yet to adopt a plan, 34 have submitted a plan that is now at examination, 6 have published a plan ahead of examination and 18 are yet to publish. Having an out of date plan is not an option and we will, when necessary, intervene to ensure that plans are put in place, so that communities are not disadvantaged by unplanned growth.

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
5th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many planning applications rejected by their relevant planning authority have subsequently been granted by the Planning Inspectorate in each calendar year since 1 January 2011; and if he will publish that same data by planning authority.

The relevant information can be found at:


https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/planning-inspectorate-statistics


Table 2.4 gives overall planning appeals received and allowed back to 2010 (by financial year)


Table 5.1 gives the local authority splits for Planning for the last financial year (2017/18 only)


We also publish the entirety of our appeals data (in the interest of transparency) at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/planning-inspectorate-appeals-database


which is published every quarter and covers a rolling 5 years’ worth of appeal decisions.

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
22nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Defence on the effect on local authority Fire and Rescue services of the Ministry of Defence's proposals to contract-out the Defence Fire and Rescue Service.

There have been no recent discussions between Ministers in the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and the Secretary of State for Defence on the effect on local authority Fire and Rescue services of the Ministry of Defence's proposals to contract-out the Defence Fire and Rescue Service. Responsibility for fire and rescue policy rests with the Home Office.

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
22nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many and which local authorities are engaged in discussions with his Department on reorganisation from a two-tier structure to unitary status.

Ministers and officials regularly have discussions with many local authorities about a wide range of issues, which may include reorganisation from a two tier structure to unitary status.

In particular there have been discussions with councils in Buckinghamshire, Dorset and Oxfordshire, where proposals for unitarisation have been submitted, and with councils in Northamptonshire which have been invited to make unitary proposals.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what discussions (a) he and (b) officials of his Department have had with (i) Stoke-on-Trent City Council, (ii) Staffordshire County Council, (iii) Newcastle-under-Lyme Borough Council, (iv) Staffordshire Moorlands District Council and (v) Stafford Borough Council on local government reorganisation in Staffordshire.

Whilst Ministers and officials regularly have discussions with councils, including those in Staffordshire, on a wide range of issues that may include local government reorganisation, no specific discussions on reorganisation have been held during this Parliament with Stoke-on-Trent City Council, Staffordshire County Council, Newcastle-under-Lyme Borough Council, Staffordshire Moorlands District Council or Stafford Borough Council.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what funding has been provided to Stoke-on-Trent constituency through the Migration Fund; and how much of that provision has been spent in the last 12 months.

The Controlling Migration Fund was launched in November 2016 to support English local authorities and their communities tackle issues linked to high and unexpected volumes of recent immigration. Funding is available until 2020 to ease pressures on local services and direct enforcement action against people in the UK illegally.

So far 94 applications have been considered by ministers, of which 88, worth £34.1 million, have been approved with the main pressures focused on rogue landlords, cohesion/integration, the use of the English language and data collection.

Stoke-on-Trent City Council has submitted an application which will be considered at the next Controlling Migration Programme board in January 2018.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

Cleaning services, security guarding services and catering services across the department are mostly outsourced. Suppliers are responsible for setting rates of pay for their staff and rates vary dependent on their age, location and market rates. All suppliers are required to pay, as a minimum, either the National Minimum Wage or the National Living Wage. The rates set by government for the National Minimum Wage and the National Living Wage are to rise in April 2019.

Staff employed by the department receive a salary that is at or above National Living Wage.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what information her Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in her Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

My Department holds the following information on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff.

(i) Greater London - No information is held. These services are charged as part of our Landlords service charge.

(ii) Outside Greater London - No individual remuneration rate is held. Contacts are held collaboratively, by the Northern Ireland Centre of Procurement Excellence. Within these contracts there are general clauses requiring contractors to comply with labour laws, minimum wage etc.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

The Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland has an office in both Edinburgh and London.

It has contracts in place for both Security and Cleaning Services at its Edinburgh office. Specific rates of pay are a matter for each individual contractor, as the employer, but assurances are provided to ensure full compliance with the requirements of the National Minimum Wage and the National Living Wage. Both suppliers pay the National Living Wage or above.

The London office is leased from the Government Property Agency, who are responsible for the management of the building and delivery of support services. Information on the rates of pay paid to Security and Cleaning staff is not held by the Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland.

The Office has no catering staff in either location.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, what information his Department holds on the rate of remuneration for (a) cleaners, (b) security guards and (c) catering staff in his Department in (i) Greater London and (ii) outside Greater London.

Cleaning and security guard services provided to the Office of the Secretary of State for Wales are undertaken by outsourced providers under Ministry of Justice contracts.

Rates of pay for cleaners and security guards are determined by their respective employers and are not held by the Office of the Secretary of State for Wales or Ministry of Justice.

All employers are obligated to pay at least the National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage.

The Office does not have any in-house catering facilities.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)