Lord Blunkett Portrait

Lord Blunkett

Labour - Life peer

2 APPG memberships (as of 2 Jun 2021)
Eye Health and Visual Impairment, T Levels
1 Former APPG membership
Democratic Participation
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Committee
29th Jun 2017 - 28th Mar 2018
Committee on Issue of Privilege (Police Searches on Parliamentary Estate)
13th Jul 2009 - 6th May 2010
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
6th May 2005 - 2nd Nov 2005
Home Secretary
8th Jun 2001 - 15th Dec 2004
Secretary of State for Education and Employment
1st May 1997 - 8th Jun 2001
Member, Labour Party National Executive Committee
1st Aug 1983 - 31st Jul 1998
Shadow Secretary of State (Education and Employment)
5th Jul 1995 - 1st May 1997
Shadow Secretary of State for Education
22nd Jul 1994 - 5th Jul 1995
Party Chair, Labour Party
1st Aug 1993 - 31st Jul 1994
Shadow Secretary of State for Health
1st Jul 1992 - 22nd Jul 1994
Opposition Spokesperson (Local Government and Poll Tax)
1st Jun 1988 - 1st Jul 1992


Scheduled Event
Monday 19th July 2021
Oral questions - Main Chamber
Regulatory requirements for British citizens visiting countries with low levels of COVID-19 infection, and returning to the UK from such countries
View calendar
Division Votes
Thursday 10th June 2021
Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development etc.) (England) (Amendment) Order 2021
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 122 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 260 Noes - 229
Speeches
Wednesday 23rd June 2021
Dormant Assets Bill [HL]

My Lords, I am very pleased to have put my name behind Amendment 55, spoken to by the noble Lord, …

Written Answers
Tuesday 15th June 2021
Reclaim Fund
To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) guidance, or (2) directions, they have given to the Reclaim Fund about the …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Wednesday 8th June 2016
Extension of Franchise (House of Lords) Bill [HL] 2016-17
First reading took place on 8 June. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available
EDM signed
Monday 16th March 2015
ACCESS TO TREATMENTS FOR DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY, TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS AND MORQUIO DISEASE
That this House is aware that the pause in NHS England's decision-making process on prioritisation and specialised commissioning has created …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Blunkett has voted in 121 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

30 Dec 2020 - European Union (Future Relationship) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Blunkett voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Labour Aye votes vs 117 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 101 Noes - 466
7 Dec 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Blunkett voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour No votes vs 122 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 287 Noes - 161
View All Lord Blunkett Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(16 debate interactions)
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(15 debate interactions)
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
(13 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(28 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(16 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(16 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Blunkett's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Blunkett, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Blunkett has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Blunkett has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Lord Blunkett


First reading took place on 8 June. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords.Second reading - the general debate on all aspects of the Bill - is yet to be scheduled.The 2016-2017 session of Parliament has prorogued and this Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for Members of the House of Lords to vote at elections to the House of Commons.


Last Event - 1st Reading : House Of Lords
Wednesday 8th June 2016

Lord Blunkett has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


45 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
8th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure diversity in the membership of their cross-Government commission to examine racial inequality, including in relation to (1) geographic, and (2) ethnic, origin.

The Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities was established by the Prime Minister in July of this year and is comprised of ten talented and diverse commissioners, outlined below, who each bring a wealth of experience from across a range of important sectors and will set a positive agenda for change.

Its work will continue to be inclusive, undertaking research and inviting submissions from those who wish to provide evidence. The Commission will shortly be setting out a public call for evidence, details of which will be announced in due course.

  • Dr Tony Sewell CBE (Chair), Head of charity Generating Genius
  • Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock MBE, Space Scientist and Educator. Experienced broadcaster including co-presenter of BBC’s ‘The Sky at Night’
  • Keith Fraser, Chair of the Youth Justice Board for England and Wales and former police superintendent
  • Dr Samir Shah CBE, CEO of Juniper TV, former BBC journalist and former chair of the race relations think tank, The Runnymede Trust
  • Lord Ajay Kakkar, Professor of Surgery at University College London, Director of the Thrombosis Research Institute, chair of the Judicial Appointments Commission, chair of the King’s Fund
  • Dr Dambisa Moyo, internationally renowned economist and author, board member of Chevron Corporation and the 3M Company
  • Martyn Oliver, Chief Executive Officer of Outwood Grange Academies Trust, one of the largest multi-academy trusts operating in the North and Midlands
  • Naureen Khalid, experienced school governor and co-founder of the dedicated online national school governor forum, UkGovChat
  • Aftab Chughtai MBE, Businessman, co-founder of the campaign group Muslims for Britain, member of the Grenfell Tower Taskforce and Chair of West Midlands Police Independent Advisory Group
  • Mercy Muroki, Senior Policy Researcher, Commentator, and Columnist.
Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what plans there are to make printed papers, including (1) select committee reports, (2) government publications, and (3) Hansard, available to members; and what consideration they have given to outsourcing the production of such papers.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf. The Printed Paper Office (PPO) continues to operate a service for members attending the Estate in person; members are able to collect papers from the Royal Gallery. Staff are available in the PPO to fetch papers which are not stocked in the Royal Gallery.

For members working remotely a temporary service has been introduced allowing members to request certain documents to be posted to their designated mail forwarding address, provided that the document relates to business at least 3 days from the working day the request is received. The documents are:

  1. Bills, explanatory notes and statutory instruments subject to scrutiny by the House;
  2. House of Lords select committee reports and Joint Committee reports published this Session; and
  3. Command papers (government publications) where there is a debate in the House scheduled.

All papers are available online and through the House Papers app, detail on accessing the app can be found on the intranet. The Services Committee has introduced a scheme to allow members to claim for the costs of printers and printer consumables, purchased since 12 June, and used for parliamentary work.

No consideration has been given to outsourcing the production of papers since the papers needed continue to be printed by the in-house reprographics team.

25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 19 January (HL11724), how many honours, broken down by each award level, were received in each region or nation in the UK; and what percentage of the population of each such region or nation that number represents.

Nominations, which are made by members of the public, come directly to the Cabinet Office. Alongside this, organisations, charities and businesses make nominations directly to other government departments and to the Devolved Administrations. Therefore, a complete record of all honours nominations submitted is not held by the Cabinet Office. There are no plans to publish data on nominations.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the New Year Honours List 2021 can be found below by region and level. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point.

Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin) and is aggregated into regional figures. This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office.

Percentage of NY21 recipients living in each region by level

Region

Number of BEM recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 BEM recipients living in each region

Number of MBE recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 MBE recipients living in each region

Number of OBE recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 OBE recipients living in each region

Number of CBE and higher recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 CBE and Higher recipients living in each region

Total recipients on NY21 List in each region

% of the total NY21 list living in each region

East

37

9.3

53

11.1

24

9.6

7

6.0

121

9.8

East Midlands

24

6.0

15

3.2

8

3.2

3

2.6

50

4.0

London

41

10.3

91

19.1

59

23.6

39

33.6

230

18.6

North East

5

1.3

14

2.9

9

3.6

4

3.4

32

2.6

Northern Ireland

38

9.6

28

5.9

8

3.2

7

6.0

81

6.5

North West

32

8.1

37

7.8

21

8.4

8

6.9

98

7.9

Scotland

44

11.1

35

7.4

18

7.2

12

10.3

109

8.8

South East

47

11.8

65

13.7

49

19.6

19

16.4

180

14.5

South West

29

7.3

43

9.0

12

4.8

6

5.2

90

7.3

Wales

28

7.1

23

4.8

10

4.0

1

0.9

62

5.0

West Midlands

34

8.6

39

8.2

14

5.6

4

3.4

91

7.3

Yorkshire & Humberside

38

9.6

31

6.5

16

6.4

4

3.4

89

7.2

Living Abroad

0

0.0

2

0.4

2

0.8

2

1.7

6

0.5

Total

397

100

476

100

250

100

116

100

1,239

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 19 January (HL11722), which data they hold on nominations for honours; what plans they have to publish those data; whether they intend to record the number of nominations (1) received, and (2) awarded, broken down by region or nation in the UK, in future; and if not, why not.

Nominations, which are made by members of the public, come directly to the Cabinet Office. Alongside this, organisations, charities and businesses make nominations directly to other government departments and to the Devolved Administrations. Therefore, a complete record of all honours nominations submitted is not held by the Cabinet Office. There are no plans to publish data on nominations.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the New Year Honours List 2021 can be found below by region and level. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point.

Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin) and is aggregated into regional figures. This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office.

Percentage of NY21 recipients living in each region by level

Region

Number of BEM recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 BEM recipients living in each region

Number of MBE recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 MBE recipients living in each region

Number of OBE recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 OBE recipients living in each region

Number of CBE and higher recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 CBE and Higher recipients living in each region

Total recipients on NY21 List in each region

% of the total NY21 list living in each region

East

37

9.3

53

11.1

24

9.6

7

6.0

121

9.8

East Midlands

24

6.0

15

3.2

8

3.2

3

2.6

50

4.0

London

41

10.3

91

19.1

59

23.6

39

33.6

230

18.6

North East

5

1.3

14

2.9

9

3.6

4

3.4

32

2.6

Northern Ireland

38

9.6

28

5.9

8

3.2

7

6.0

81

6.5

North West

32

8.1

37

7.8

21

8.4

8

6.9

98

7.9

Scotland

44

11.1

35

7.4

18

7.2

12

10.3

109

8.8

South East

47

11.8

65

13.7

49

19.6

19

16.4

180

14.5

South West

29

7.3

43

9.0

12

4.8

6

5.2

90

7.3

Wales

28

7.1

23

4.8

10

4.0

1

0.9

62

5.0

West Midlands

34

8.6

39

8.2

14

5.6

4

3.4

91

7.3

Yorkshire & Humberside

38

9.6

31

6.5

16

6.4

4

3.4

89

7.2

Living Abroad

0

0.0

2

0.4

2

0.8

2

1.7

6

0.5

Total

397

100

476

100

250

100

116

100

1,239

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many nominations for honours were (1) received, and (2) awarded, broken down by region or nation in the UK.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the New Year Honours List 2021 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point.

Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin) and is aggregated into regional figures. This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office.

Honours are awarded on the basis of merit. We are working to improve regional representation in the honours lists, including running events across the UK to raise awareness. A complete record of all nominations received is not held by the Cabinet Office.

NY21 Regional data

REGION

Total number of recipients from region

% of NY21 list living in region

% of UK population living in region

EAST

121

9.8%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

50

4%

7.2%

LONDON

230

18.7%

13.4%

NORTH EAST

32

2.6%

4.0%

NORTHERN IRELAND

81

6.6%

2.8%

NORTH WEST

99

8%

11.0%

SCOTLAND

109

8.8%

8.2%

SOUTH EAST

180

14.5%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

90

7.3%

8.4%

WALES

61

4.9%

4.7%

WEST MIDLANDS

90

7.3%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBER

90

7.3%

8.2%

CHANNEL ISLANDS / ABROAD

6

0.5%

n/a

The Government does not collate data against such political administrative areas and cannot provide information regarding honours awarded in the Sheffield city region. However, the Government publishes transparency data, broken down by both town/city and county. This can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/new-year-honours-list-2021-cabinet-office.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people were nominated for honours above the level of OBE in the Sheffield city region; and how many such honours were awarded.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the New Year Honours List 2021 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point.

Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin) and is aggregated into regional figures. This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office.

Honours are awarded on the basis of merit. We are working to improve regional representation in the honours lists, including running events across the UK to raise awareness. A complete record of all nominations received is not held by the Cabinet Office.

NY21 Regional data

REGION

Total number of recipients from region

% of NY21 list living in region

% of UK population living in region

EAST

121

9.8%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

50

4%

7.2%

LONDON

230

18.7%

13.4%

NORTH EAST

32

2.6%

4.0%

NORTHERN IRELAND

81

6.6%

2.8%

NORTH WEST

99

8%

11.0%

SCOTLAND

109

8.8%

8.2%

SOUTH EAST

180

14.5%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

90

7.3%

8.4%

WALES

61

4.9%

4.7%

WEST MIDLANDS

90

7.3%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBER

90

7.3%

8.2%

CHANNEL ISLANDS / ABROAD

6

0.5%

n/a

The Government does not collate data against such political administrative areas and cannot provide information regarding honours awarded in the Sheffield city region. However, the Government publishes transparency data, broken down by both town/city and county. This can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/new-year-honours-list-2021-cabinet-office.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the breakdown of honours received by region or nation in the UK as a percentage of the population of each such region or nation.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the New Year Honours List 2021 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point.

Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin) and is aggregated into regional figures. This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office.

Honours are awarded on the basis of merit. We are working to improve regional representation in the honours lists, including running events across the UK to raise awareness. A complete record of all nominations received is not held by the Cabinet Office.

NY21 Regional data

REGION

Total number of recipients from region

% of NY21 list living in region

% of UK population living in region

EAST

121

9.8%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

50

4%

7.2%

LONDON

230

18.7%

13.4%

NORTH EAST

32

2.6%

4.0%

NORTHERN IRELAND

81

6.6%

2.8%

NORTH WEST

99

8%

11.0%

SCOTLAND

109

8.8%

8.2%

SOUTH EAST

180

14.5%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

90

7.3%

8.4%

WALES

61

4.9%

4.7%

WEST MIDLANDS

90

7.3%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBER

90

7.3%

8.2%

CHANNEL ISLANDS / ABROAD

6

0.5%

n/a

The Government does not collate data against such political administrative areas and cannot provide information regarding honours awarded in the Sheffield city region. However, the Government publishes transparency data, broken down by both town/city and county. This can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/new-year-honours-list-2021-cabinet-office.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people received a CBE or higher honour in the Queen's Birthday Honours List, published on 9 October, in each of (1) the regions in England, and (2) the nations of the UK.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2020 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point. Data for CBE and higher levels has been aggregated and included in the same table below. Data reflects the correspondence address provided by recipients.

Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

Honours are bestowed on merit. A key aim of the honours system is to make it more equitable and better representative of the whole of the UK.

In the last 25 years (since October 1995) there have been 83 recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested, nor do we collect information on recipients of Order of Merit, as this is within the personal gift of The Sovereign.

Region

BEM

BEM%

MBE

MBE %

OBE

OBE %

CBE and Higher

CBE and Higher %

Total

Population %

East

39

7.3%

48

8.6%

24

9.4%

5

3.6%

116

9.3%

East Midlands

15

2.8%

19

3.4%

5

1.9%

1

0.7%

40

7.2%

London

45

8.4%

103

18.3%

61

23.9%

56

40.9%

264

12.9%

North East

23

4.3%

13

2.3%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

39

4.1%

North West

59

11.0%

46

8.2%

22

8.6%

9

6.6%

136

11.2%

South East

61

11.4%

76

13.5%

47

18.4%

25

18.2%

211

13.7%

South West

44

8.2%

47

8.4%

13

5.1%

5

3.6%

109

8.4%

West Midlands

40

7.4%

38

6.8%

17

6.7%

7

5.1%

102

13.7%

Yorkshire and Humberside

40

7.4%

29

5.2%

20

7.8%

11

8.0%

100

8.4%

Northern Ireland

63

11.7%

39

6.9%

12

4.7%

2

1.5%

115

2.9%

Scotland

64

11.9%

58

10.3%

21

8.2%

7

5.1%

151

8.4%

Wales

43

8.0%

43

7.7%

9

3.5%

7

5.1%

103

4.8%

Living Abroad

1

0.2%

2

0.4%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

11

-

Total

537

561

255

102

1495

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many of each category of honours were awarded in the Queen's Birthday Honours List, published on 9 October, to people in (1) Wales, (2) Scotland, (3) Northern Ireland, and (4) each of the regions of England, as a (a) number, and (b) percentage, of that country or region's population.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2020 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point. Data for CBE and higher levels has been aggregated and included in the same table below. Data reflects the correspondence address provided by recipients.

Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

Honours are bestowed on merit. A key aim of the honours system is to make it more equitable and better representative of the whole of the UK.

In the last 25 years (since October 1995) there have been 83 recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested, nor do we collect information on recipients of Order of Merit, as this is within the personal gift of The Sovereign.

Region

BEM

BEM%

MBE

MBE %

OBE

OBE %

CBE and Higher

CBE and Higher %

Total

Population %

East

39

7.3%

48

8.6%

24

9.4%

5

3.6%

116

9.3%

East Midlands

15

2.8%

19

3.4%

5

1.9%

1

0.7%

40

7.2%

London

45

8.4%

103

18.3%

61

23.9%

56

40.9%

264

12.9%

North East

23

4.3%

13

2.3%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

39

4.1%

North West

59

11.0%

46

8.2%

22

8.6%

9

6.6%

136

11.2%

South East

61

11.4%

76

13.5%

47

18.4%

25

18.2%

211

13.7%

South West

44

8.2%

47

8.4%

13

5.1%

5

3.6%

109

8.4%

West Midlands

40

7.4%

38

6.8%

17

6.7%

7

5.1%

102

13.7%

Yorkshire and Humberside

40

7.4%

29

5.2%

20

7.8%

11

8.0%

100

8.4%

Northern Ireland

63

11.7%

39

6.9%

12

4.7%

2

1.5%

115

2.9%

Scotland

64

11.9%

58

10.3%

21

8.2%

7

5.1%

151

8.4%

Wales

43

8.0%

43

7.7%

9

3.5%

7

5.1%

103

4.8%

Living Abroad

1

0.2%

2

0.4%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

11

-

Total

537

561

255

102

1495

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many honours were awarded in the Queen's Birthday Honours List, published on 9 October, to people in (1) London, and (2) each English city region that has a mayor, per head of population of that city or region.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2020 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point. Data for CBE and higher levels has been aggregated and included in the same table below. Data reflects the correspondence address provided by recipients.

Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

Honours are bestowed on merit. A key aim of the honours system is to make it more equitable and better representative of the whole of the UK.

In the last 25 years (since October 1995) there have been 83 recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested, nor do we collect information on recipients of Order of Merit, as this is within the personal gift of The Sovereign.

Region

BEM

BEM%

MBE

MBE %

OBE

OBE %

CBE and Higher

CBE and Higher %

Total

Population %

East

39

7.3%

48

8.6%

24

9.4%

5

3.6%

116

9.3%

East Midlands

15

2.8%

19

3.4%

5

1.9%

1

0.7%

40

7.2%

London

45

8.4%

103

18.3%

61

23.9%

56

40.9%

264

12.9%

North East

23

4.3%

13

2.3%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

39

4.1%

North West

59

11.0%

46

8.2%

22

8.6%

9

6.6%

136

11.2%

South East

61

11.4%

76

13.5%

47

18.4%

25

18.2%

211

13.7%

South West

44

8.2%

47

8.4%

13

5.1%

5

3.6%

109

8.4%

West Midlands

40

7.4%

38

6.8%

17

6.7%

7

5.1%

102

13.7%

Yorkshire and Humberside

40

7.4%

29

5.2%

20

7.8%

11

8.0%

100

8.4%

Northern Ireland

63

11.7%

39

6.9%

12

4.7%

2

1.5%

115

2.9%

Scotland

64

11.9%

58

10.3%

21

8.2%

7

5.1%

151

8.4%

Wales

43

8.0%

43

7.7%

9

3.5%

7

5.1%

103

4.8%

Living Abroad

1

0.2%

2

0.4%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

11

-

Total

537

561

255

102

1495

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Orders of Merit or Companions of Honour have been awarded in the last 25 years to those resident at the time in (1) London, and (2) Yorkshire.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2020 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point. Data for CBE and higher levels has been aggregated and included in the same table below. Data reflects the correspondence address provided by recipients.

Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

Honours are bestowed on merit. A key aim of the honours system is to make it more equitable and better representative of the whole of the UK.

In the last 25 years (since October 1995) there have been 83 recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested, nor do we collect information on recipients of Order of Merit, as this is within the personal gift of The Sovereign.

Region

BEM

BEM%

MBE

MBE %

OBE

OBE %

CBE and Higher

CBE and Higher %

Total

Population %

East

39

7.3%

48

8.6%

24

9.4%

5

3.6%

116

9.3%

East Midlands

15

2.8%

19

3.4%

5

1.9%

1

0.7%

40

7.2%

London

45

8.4%

103

18.3%

61

23.9%

56

40.9%

264

12.9%

North East

23

4.3%

13

2.3%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

39

4.1%

North West

59

11.0%

46

8.2%

22

8.6%

9

6.6%

136

11.2%

South East

61

11.4%

76

13.5%

47

18.4%

25

18.2%

211

13.7%

South West

44

8.2%

47

8.4%

13

5.1%

5

3.6%

109

8.4%

West Midlands

40

7.4%

38

6.8%

17

6.7%

7

5.1%

102

13.7%

Yorkshire and Humberside

40

7.4%

29

5.2%

20

7.8%

11

8.0%

100

8.4%

Northern Ireland

63

11.7%

39

6.9%

12

4.7%

2

1.5%

115

2.9%

Scotland

64

11.9%

58

10.3%

21

8.2%

7

5.1%

151

8.4%

Wales

43

8.0%

43

7.7%

9

3.5%

7

5.1%

103

4.8%

Living Abroad

1

0.2%

2

0.4%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

11

-

Total

537

561

255

102

1495

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect those civil servants who have been working at home during the COVID-19 pandemic to resume working physically in departments. [T]

Civil Service departments are planning for a phased return to the workplace from 1 August, in line with all relevant UK Government and devolved administration guidelines. Many civil servants have of course continued to attend their workplaces throughout the pandemic to support the government's response to this emergency, for example through delivering Universal Credit and the Furlough Scheme or other essential services.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Orders of Merit or Companions of Honour have been awarded in the last 25 years to those resident at the time in (1) London, and (2) Yorkshire.

Honours are bestowed on merit. However a key aim of the honours system is to make it more equitable and better representative of the whole of the UK.

In the last 25 years there have been 84 recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested, nor do we collect information on recipients of Order of Merit, as this is within the personal gift of The Sovereign.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
27th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Howe on 20 January (HL106), how many people received a CBE or higher honour in the New Year Honours List 2020 in each of (1) the regions in England, and (2) the nations of the UK.

Significant progress has been made in recent years to improve diversity in the honours system. For example, we now consistently see around half of awards overall going to women, and in the New Year 2020 Honours List, 44% of senior honours went to women. Around 10% of awards go to recipients from a BAME background. We welcome more nominations from under-represented regions and we are running a programme of regional events to promote the system in those areas most under-represented.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at CBE level or higher on the New Year Honours List 2020 can be found below. Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures.

REGION

NUMBER OF NY20 RECIPIENTS AT CBE AND ABOVE

PERCENTAGE OF NY20 RECIPIENTS AT CBE AND ABOVE

PERCENTAGE OF UK POPULATION

EAST

8

5.2%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

3

1.9%

7.2%

LONDON

74

47.4%

12.9%

NORTH EAST

2

1.3%

4.1%

NORTHERN IRELAND

4

2.6%

2.9%

NORTH WEST

9

5.8%

11.2%

SCOTLAND

7

4.5%

8.4%

SOUTH EAST

32

20.5%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

3

1.9%

8.4%

WALES

1

0.6%

4.8%

WEST MIDLANDS

7

4.5%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBERSIDE

5

3.2%

8.4%

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many of each category of honours were awarded in the New Year Honours List to people in (1) Wales, (2) Scotland, (3) Northern Ireland, and (4) each of the regions of England, as a (a) number, and (b) percentage, of that country or region's population.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients on the New Year Honours List 2020 can be found below. Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

REGION

NUMBER OF NY20 RECIPIENTS

PERCENTAGE OF NY20 LIST

PERCENTAGE OF UK POPULATION

EAST

84

7.7%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

36

3.3%

7.2%

LONDON

275

25.0%

12.9%

NORTH EAST

24

2.2%

4.1%

NORTHERN IRELAND

94

8.6%

2.9%

NORTH WEST

103

9.4%

11.2%

SCOTLAND

89

8.1%

8.4%

SOUTH EAST

141

12.9%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

79

7.2%

8.4%

WALES

42

3.8%

4.8%

WEST MIDLANDS

59

5.4%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBERSIDE

67

6.1%

8.4%

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many honours were awarded in the New Year Honours List to people in (1) London, and (2) each English city region that has a mayor, per head of population of that city or region.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients on the New Year Honours List 2020 can be found below. Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

REGION

NUMBER OF NY20 RECIPIENTS

PERCENTAGE OF NY20 LIST

PERCENTAGE OF UK POPULATION

EAST

84

7.7%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

36

3.3%

7.2%

LONDON

275

25.0%

12.9%

NORTH EAST

24

2.2%

4.1%

NORTHERN IRELAND

94

8.6%

2.9%

NORTH WEST

103

9.4%

11.2%

SCOTLAND

89

8.1%

8.4%

SOUTH EAST

141

12.9%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

79

7.2%

8.4%

WALES

42

3.8%

4.8%

WEST MIDLANDS

59

5.4%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBERSIDE

67

6.1%

8.4%

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of any (1) immediate, and (2) future estimated, decrease in income for universities from international students; what assessment they have made of the impact of any such decrease on universities' ability to maintain research capacity; and what plans they have to review the (a) timing, and (b) relevance, of the Research Excellence Framework.

In the 2018/19 academic year, tuition fees from international students at UK higher education providers accounted for around £6.9bn of sector income. The Government recognises that the COVID-19 outbreak will have an unparalleled impact on all elements of the global and UK economy. The higher education sector, including student recruitment, is no exception. We have been working closely with the sector to monitor the likely impacts of COVID-19, on international student numbers, including restrictions on travel.

We are working with the sector to assess the potential implications for university research sustainability. In order to support this, we have established a joint BEIS/DfE Ministerial Taskforce on University Research and Knowledge Exchange Sustainability to engage with university sector experts, Devolved Administration and research funders to identify and assess risks of impacts, and to consider approaches to help manage these. The aim is to sustain the university research base and its capability to contribute effectively to UK society and economy in the recovery and beyond.

The Research Excellence Framework is operated jointly by the 4 UK HE Funding Bodies, who have recently gathered views on the revised timings for the REF. The Funding Bodies intend to report on the outcome and next steps by the end of May. The role of the REF in identifying and supporting research excellence with impact remains fundamental to maintaining the quality and capability of the university research base and its contribution to UK economy and society.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the research sustainability taskforce is expected to publish its recommendations; and what assessment that taskforce has made of the impact of any decrease in income from international students on the ability of higher education institutions to conduct research. [T]

The Taskforce was announced on 4 May. It was created to advise Government on the urgent decisions needed to ensure the university research sector emerges from the pandemic able to contribute to UK society and the economy in the recovery and beyond. It will not produce formal recommendations to government. It will advise government as it seeks to address challenges to the sustainability of university research and knowledge exchange arising from COVID-19 including loss of income from international students.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the application by the Youth Futures Foundation to the Reclaim Fund specified the geographical regions in which any money it was allocated would be spent.

Reclaim Fund Ltd is the Dormant Assets Scheme’s administrator. It is responsible for managing dormant assets and transferring surplus funds to The National Lottery Community Fund, to be spent on social or environmental purposes. This funding is apportioned between the four nations with broad distribution decisions taken at a devolved level.

The Youth Futures Foundation is an independent organisation focussing on removing barriers for those furthest from the labour market. £90 million of the English portion of funding has been allocated to the Youth Futures Foundation for initiatives in England.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) guidance, or (2) directions, they have given to the Reclaim Fund about the priorities for the allocation of its funding; and what, if any, requirements that organisation must observe in the allocation of funding.

Reclaim Fund Ltd is the Dormant Assets Scheme’s administrator. It is responsible for managing dormant assets in case of customer reclaims, transferring surplus funds to The National Lottery Community Fund (TNLCF). TNLCF is the named distributor of dormant assets funding, responsible for apportioning the surplus money among the four nations to be spent on social or environmental purposes.

DCMS’ Secretary of State issues high level policy directions to TNLCF on the allocation of the English portion of this funding. It is directed to three social and environmental causes: youth, financial inclusion and social investment. These restrictions are currently set in primary legislation. To date, the funding has been directed to four independent organisations in England: Big Society Capital, Access – The Foundation for Social Investment, Fair4All Finance, and the Youth Futures Foundation.

Funding must fulfill the additionality principle, support the three defined causes and be distributed for initiatives in England. Beyond these requirements, the four specialist spend organisations are free to determine the most appropriate way to deliver against their objectives.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the process for organisations applying for funding from the Reclaim Fund; whether organisations are required to set out in their applications the geographical regions in which any funding will be spent; and whether details of those applications will be published.

Reclaim Fund Ltd is the Dormant Assets Scheme’s administrator. It is responsible for managing dormant assets and transferring surplus funds to The National Lottery Community Fund, the named distributor of dormant assets funding. Funds must be spent on social or environmental purposes.

Dormant assets funding is not central government money and there is no central bidding process for accessing it. In England, funding is currently distributed to four specialist organisations who work across the areas of youth, financial inclusion and social investment. These organisations are independent from the government, and are not required to report to the government on geographical distribution of funding.

Funding must fulfill the additionality principle, support the three defined causes and be distributed for initiatives in England. Beyond this, the four specialist spend organisations are free to determine the most appropriate way to deliver against their objectives. This includes geographical distribution of any organisations which may apply to them for funding. The organisations themselves are responsible for managing any such applications, including the geographical distribution of their work.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much of the funding distributed by the Reclaim Fund has been spent in each region of England by each of the organisations funded by the Reclaim Fund.

Reclaim Fund Ltd is the Dormant Assets Scheme’s administrator. It is responsible for managing dormant assets and transferring surplus funds to The National Lottery Community Fund, the named distributor of dormant assets funding. Funds must be spent on social or environmental purposes.

Dormant assets funding is not central government money and there is no central bidding process for accessing it. In England, funding is currently distributed to four specialist organisations who work across the areas of youth, financial inclusion and social investment. These organisations are independent from the government, and are not required to report to the government on geographical distribution of funding.

Funding must fulfill the additionality principle, support the three defined causes and be distributed for initiatives in England. Beyond this, the four specialist spend organisations are free to determine the most appropriate way to deliver against their objectives. This includes geographical distribution of any organisations which may apply to them for funding. The organisations themselves are responsible for managing any such applications, including the geographical distribution of their work.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the previously declared political affiliations of the current non-executive directors of the BBC; and what are the (1) present and (2) past, political affiliations of members of the BBC Board.

As per the BBC Charter, the Chair and Nations Members of the BBC Board are appointed by Her Majesty the Queen, via Order in Council, following a fair and open competition. All other members of the BBC Board are appointed by the BBC.

Upon appointment, the Governance Code requires that any significant political activity undertaken by an appointee in the last five years is declared. This is defined as including holding office, public speaking, making a recordable donation or candidature for election. As per the Governance Code on Public Appointments, ‘political activity should not affect any judgement of merit nor be a bar to appointment’.

The BBC Board’s Code of Practice also requires members of the BBC Board to publicly declare their personal interests (including any political interests), and to regularly update this declaration. The BBC publishes each Board member’s Declaration of Personal Interests annually via its website: https://www.bbc.com/aboutthebbc/whoweare/bbcboard.

Those BBC Board Members appointed by Her Majesty the Queen made the following declarations upon appointment:

  1. Chair: Richard Sharp declared he had made one political donation to the Conservative Party of £2,500 during the past five years at time of appointment.

  1. Scotland: Steve Morrison declared no such political activity during the past five years at time of appointment.

  1. England: Sir Robbie Gibb declared that between 2017 and 2019 he was Director of Communications at No10 Downing Street during the past five years at time of appointment.

  1. Wales: Dame Elan Cross Stephens declared no such political activity during the past five years at time of initial appointment in 2017 and reappointment in 2021.

  1. Northern Ireland: This role is currently vacant.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to increase participation in adult education below level three.

Through the adult education budget (AEB), we fully fund or co-fund skills provision for eligible adults aged 19 and above from pre-entry to level 3, to support adults to gain the skills they need for work, an apprenticeship or further learning. This includes fully funded first full level 2 and/or level 3 for learners aged 19 to 23.

Learners in receipt of low wage (£17,374.50 annual gross salary or less) who would previously have been co-funded, are eligible for full funding following the earlier low wage trial that operated in the 2018/19 and the 2019/20 academic years. This directly supports social mobility by enabling those that have been motivated to move out of unemployment and are low paid or skilled, to further progress.

We specifically recognise the importance of English, mathematics and digital skills, both in work and everyday life. That is why we are continuing to support participation in these areas to meet employers’ needs and support people to progress in employment or further study.

We provide full funding for learners who need English and mathematics skills to undertake a range of courses in GCSEs, Functional Skills and other relevant qualifications from entry level to level 2. We also fully or co-fund adults to take English for Speakers of Other Languages as part of our wider effort to improve adult literacy in England.

Adults with no or low digital skills are fully funded to undertake new Essential Digital Skills Qualifications at entry level and level 1, based on new national standards for essential digital skills, which equip learners with the digital skills needed for life, work and further study.

We also support training for adults in community settings through the AEB. Prioritised for disadvantaged learners, community learning can provide a 'stepping stone' for those adults who are not ready for formal accredited learning, or who would benefit from learning in a more informal way.

The department is reviewing post-16 qualifications at level 3 and below, to ensure that every qualification approved for public funding has a distinct purpose, is high quality and supports progression to positive outcomes. We recognise that level 2 and below study serves students with a diverse range of needs, and that some young people and adults studying at these levels may require additional support to help realise their ambitions.

One of the first steps to realise our ambitions for level 2 and below study is a government call for evidence, which launched on 12 November 2020. It gives the education sector, industry, and others with an interest in study at these levels the opportunity to share their views on how the level 2 and below system can best work in the context of our proposed reforms to level 3 qualifications. The level 2 and below call for evidence closed on 14 February. We will set out further proposals later this year. The call for evidence is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/post-16-study-at-level-2-and-below-call-for-evidence.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that all adult education funding that is clawed back from grant fund providers is re-invested in adult learning opportunities.

As we address the challenges presented by COVID-19, it is vital that we support adults, including those working in sectors directly affected by COVID-19, to attain the skills that will be needed in the economy of the future.

Starting this year, the government is investing £2.5 billion in the National Skills Fund. Investment in skills through the National Skills Fund is vital as it ensures that adults have the opportunity to retrain at different points throughout their lives and can progress into higher wage employment.

From 1 April 2021, the government is supporting any adult who does not have A levels or equivalent qualifications, to access almost 400 fully funded level 3 courses, with Free Courses for Jobs.

Complementing this support for adults, we have introduced Skills Bootcamps which offer free, flexible courses of up to 16 weeks, giving people the opportunity to build up sector-specific skills and fast-track to an interview with a local employer.

We have already introduced Skills Bootcamps in 6 areas (West Midlands, Greater Manchester and Lancashire, Liverpool City Region, Leeds City Region, Heart of South West, and Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire) and we are investing a further £43 million from the National Skills Fund to expand them across England.

Funding that is clawed back from grant fund providers will be reinvested in departmental priorities, including to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on providers and learners, enabling us to allocate resources effectively across the department and live within our Parliamentary control totals.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what information schools have received about (1) their eligibility to access the COVID-19 related funding announced on 19 June and 20 July, (2) the amount of such funding they are likely to be entitled to, and (3) the timeframe for receiving such funding.

On 19 June, the government announced a £1 billion COVID-19 catch up package, including a £650 million catch up premium to help schools support all pupils and the £350 million National Tutoring Programme for disadvantaged students. Headteachers can decide how best to use their schools’ premium allocation to tackle the impact of lost teaching time on their pupils, but are encouraged to spend it on evidence-driven approaches including small group or one-to-one tuition, support over the summer, or additional support for great teaching. To help schools make the best use of this funding, the Education Endowment Foundation has published a support guide for schools with evidence-based approaches to catch up for all students, available here: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/covid-19-support-guide-for-schools/#nav-covid-19-support-guide-for-schools1 and a further school planning guide: 2020 to 2021, available here: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/guide-to-supporting-schools-planning/.

On 20 July, the government published guidance setting out further information on the package, including details of the £650 million catch up premium. The funding will be available for all state-funded mainstream and special schools, and alternative provision. The guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-catch-up-premium.

All pupils have been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak, so schools’ allocations from the catch-up premium will be calculated on a per pupil basis. This will provide each mainstream school with a total of £80 for each pupil and special, alternative provision and hospital schools with £240 for each place, across the 2020/21 academic year. We have applied additional weighting to specialist settings, recognising the significantly higher per pupil costs they face.

The funding is to support catch up across the academic year and will therefore be provided in 3 tranches. We will provide schools with an initial part payment in autumn 2020, based on the latest available data. This will ensure schools do not need to delay in setting up programmes. We will then distribute a second grant payment in early 2021, based on actual pupil and place data for the 2020 to 2021 academic year, and a final payment will be made in the summer term 2021.

In addition to the catch-up premium, we will spend up to £350 million on a National Tutoring Programme, to provide targeted support to disadvantage and vulnerable pupils. The programme, which has 2 strands will commence from November 2020. Through the Tuition Partners strand, schools will be eligible to access heavily subsidised tuition from an approved list of tuition partners for their pupils. Through our Academic Mentors strand, schools in the most disadvantaged areas can apply for support to employ in-house Academic Mentor to provide small group and 1:1 tuition to their pupils. Further information can be found here: https://nationaltutoring.org.uk/faqs.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to review the Special Educational Needs and Disability (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2020 in line with the commitment to restoring duties under section 42 of the Children and Families Act 2014 when the current notice lapses on 1 August.

As part of our response to the COVID-19 outbreak we made temporary changes to the law relating to special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). This was to strike the right balance between:

  • the needs of children and young people with SEND to be protected and receive the right support in a timely way; and
  • managing the demands on local authorities, health bodies and education settings to respond to the outbreak.

As part of the plans for children and young people returning to full-time education in September, we have announced that (unless the evidence changes) the modification to the duties on local authorities and health commissioning bodies to secure or arrange the provision in education, health and care (EHC) plans will cease at the end of July.

We have been closely monitoring the impact of the changes we made to secondary legislation that allow greater flexibility to local authorities and their partners over the timescales for various EHC needs assessment and plan processes. As things stand, the Regulations in question expire on 25 September 2020. We have committed to keeping the changes to the law in place for no longer than is necessary. We expect to make a decision next month as to how long the changes to these timescales should remain in force.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on funding for (1) medical faculties, and (2) the teaching of STEM subjects, at higher education institutions of any fall in the amount of funding received by cross-subsidisation from students of arts and humanities subjects due to a decrease in the numbers of any such students. [T]

In light of COVID-19, we have carefully assessed the challenges the sector is facing and brought forward a comprehensive support package for higher education providers and students in order to stabilise the admissions system and ease pressures on universities’ finances. This included confirming universities’ eligibility to apply for the government financial support schemes and bringing forward £100 million of research funding and an estimated £2.6 billion worth of tuition fee payments for providers. The government continues to prioritise science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects and medicine.

Additionally, the government continues to contribute teaching grant funding to support the delivery of priority activity, including for high-cost subjects. High-cost subject funding is due to total £690 million for 2020-21 and it is targeted at many STEM courses, as well as medicine. Very high-cost STEM subject funding is due to be £24 million for 2020-21.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which countries are refusing to accept COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction tests taken in the UK for the purposes of travel and entry into their jurisdiction; and what steps they are taking to establish reciprocal arrangements for testing (1) prior to, and (2) at the conclusion of, travel into the UK.

It is a matter for each country to decide on appropriate health measures and some countries require different tests in line with their requirements. As international travel re-opens, where safe to do so, it is important for travellers to check the relevant travel advice for their destination country.

As set out in the recommendations of the Global Travel Taskforce, we are engaging bilaterally with international partners to explore how we can open international travel safely, including the potential piloting of digital and non-digital COVID-19 certification.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that occupational health services are in place to support people with long-term effects from COVID-19 with adjustments and rehabilitation to facilitate their return to work.

The Government recognise the important role that OH professionals play in supporting people with health conditions and their employers. In the Health is Everyone’s Business consultation we asked for views on how to increase access to occupational health services that can support people with disabilities and long term health conditions. We are considering the next steps in light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and anticipate that a response will be available shortly.

Access to Work offers substantial practical support to disabled people and people with heath conditions, which include people affected by Long COVID. The scheme has rolled out a number of easements to ensure that those who are eligible for support can receive it.

As research into the long-term health symptoms and impacts of Covid-19 is ongoing, we will continue to monitor and consider the Government’s support provisions and approach as evidence emerges.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to publish a White Paper in response to the Health is everyone’s business: proposals to reduce ill health-related job loss consultation,which closed on 7 October 2019; and what plans they have to include in any such White Paper proposals to reduce the costs of ill health and absence from work for (1) individuals, and (2) businesses. [T]

We plan to publish the response to the consultation ‘Health is everyone’s business: proposals to reduce ill health-related job loss’ later this year. The consultation set out proposals to encourage all employers to take positive action to support employees who are managing health conditions in work, and to manage sickness absence more effectively.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to make it a commitment that the Social Care Taskforce addresses the care and support needs of working age disabled people.

The impact of COVID-19 on people with disabilities and learning difficulties will be one of the focuses for the new Social Sector COVID-19 Support Taskforce.

The Social Care Sector COVID-19 Support Taskforce will ensure the delivery of two packages of support that the Government has put in place for the care sector and will be supported by several advisory groups including one on support for people with learning disabilities and autism.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they plan to develop a national COVID-19 test and tracing system; how that system will operate; how that system will be held accountable for its work; and what will be the role of local Directors of Public Health and related professionals.

We are developing a new test and trace programme which will bring together an app, expanded web and phone-based contact tracing, and swab testing for those with potential COVID-19 symptoms.

If someone installs the National Health Service COVID-19 app, it will start logging the distance between their phone and other phones nearby that also have the app installed. It measures this distance using a form of Bluetooth that is less energy hungry than normal Bluetooth. This log of proximity information will be stored securely on the person’s phone. If a person becomes unwell with symptoms of COVID-19, they can report this to the NHS via the app which will mean that other app users who have come into significant contact with that person over the previous few days can be alerted and provided with advice if appropriate.

The first phase of the app rollout is taking place on the Isle of Wight. This will ensure the app is functioning as expected and will help us to see how it works best alongside the web and phone-based systems and to ensure that it dovetails with the testing programme.

Ministers are accountable to Parliament for the Department’s response to COVID-19, including the test and trace programme.

Directors of Public Health and their teams will be key to the local delivery of the test and trace programme.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to invest in NHS occupational health services; and whether any such plans include procurement from private sector providers which have capacity to provide services.

Occupational health services are vitally important in keeping people healthy and safe in the workplace. The command paper, Improving Lives: The Future of Work, Health and Disability, committed to setting out a clear strategy for the future occupational health market reform. Following the Health is everyone’s business consultation published in July 2019, an upcoming response will outline future occupational health strategy.

The health and wellbeing of National Health Service staff is very important. As part of the NHS People Plan, we plan to set out a comprehensive package of support that all NHS staff can expect to receive from their employer, including rapid access to occupational health services. Publication of the final NHS People Plan has been deferred to allow the NHS to provide maximum operational effort to COVID-19 response. However, we have commissioned the NHS to urgently put in place a package of support for NHS staff during COVID-19 response.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the financial capability of UK citizens; whether it is affected by (1) age group, (2) gender, or (3) region; and what plans they have to review the provision of financial education in secondary schools.

The government is committed to ensuring that people are able to use, and maximise their use of, products and services made available by the financial services industry. Government policy on financial capability and education focuses on ensuring that people can access the guidance they need and have the confidence and skills to successfully engage with their finances. That is why the government established the Money and Pension Service (MaPS) in January 2019, merging the three former organisations providing free-to-use financial guidance (the Money Advice Service, The Pensions Advisory Service, and Pension Wise) to simplify the existing public financial guidance landscape and offer more holistic support to consumers.

MaPS’s 2018 Adult Financial Capability Survey identified and measured the key components of financial capability through a large, nationally representative sample. This data can be broken down across a range of sociodemographic factors including age, gender and region. The full dataset is publicly available and will be updated later this year.

In 2020, MaPS published the UK Strategy for Financial Wellbeing, which sets out five national goals to improve the UK’s financial wellbeing by 2030. These include 2 million more children and young people getting a meaningful financial education, and 5 million more people understanding enough to plan for, and in, later life. The Strategy also includes three cross-cutting lenses focusing on gender, mental health, and wellbeing in the workplace. MaPS are working closely with a range of stakeholders from different sectors to deliver the Strategy, including to develop delivery plans for each of the four UK nations.

The government has no plans to review the provision of financial education. In 2014, for the first time, financial literacy was made statutory within the National Curriculum in England, as part of the curriculum for citizenship education for 11 to 16 year olds. At the same time, the government also introduced a rigorous mathematics curriculum, which provides pupils with the knowledge and skills to make important financial decisions. The Department for Education trusts schools to use their professional judgement and understanding of their pupils to develop the right teaching approach for their school.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many children in receipt of (1) Disability Living Allowance, and (2) personal independence payment, received an additional Child Trust Fund (CTF) payment in each year since 2005; and what estimate they have made of the number of such children who have been able to access savings held in a CTF (a) with, and (b) without, a court order.

Estimates of the number of children in receipt of Disability Living Allowance and/or personal independence payments who received additional Child Trust Fund payments would only be available at a disproportionate cost.

HMRC has created a simple online tool to help young people find out where their account is held. If someone does not know where the CTF is held, they can use this service at any time. This will provide the details of the account. For those who do not have the identifying information required to access the tool, HMRC will provide alternative, non-digital routes to finding a CTF provider upon request. HMRC and The Share Foundation are also working together to help children in need of further support. Further information can be found - https://www.gov.uk/government/news/teenagers-to-get-access-to-child-trust-funds-for-first-time.

Data is not available for those that have accessed CTFs with or without a court order. However, On 1 December the Government made an announcement regarding the clarification of guidance on court fees and CTFs.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to protect UK consumers and businesses following Wirecard AG filing for insolvency. [T]

Wirecard AG, the German payments provider, entered administration last week. It has a UK subsidiary, Wirecard Card Solution Ltd (Wirecard UK), which is FCA regulated. This subsidiary is not in administration.

Last week, the FCA temporarily applied restrictions to Wirecard UK’s business while the firm ensured it could safeguard customers’ money. The government worked closely with the FCA to understand and mitigate the impact of this measure – for example, the DWP worked to ensure those who received benefits into accounts using Wirecard UK had an alternate means of receiving payments.

The firm has now been able to demonstrate that it has met the necessary conditions, and the restrictions were lifted on Tuesday 30 June. Customers can access their money as usual.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners continue to be in (1) Category A, and (2) Category B, prisons after the expiry of their original tariff.

The total number of prisoners serving life and Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences who have never been released and as at 31 March 2021 had served more than 10 years past the expiry of their tariff, broken down by each year served beyond 10 years (time over tariff), is shown in the following table:

Time over tariff(1)

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

From 10 years to less than 11 years

197

91

288

From 11 years to less than 12 years

159

68

227

From 12 years to less than 13 years

106

65

171

From 13 years to less than 14 years

57

71

128

From 14 years to less than 15 years

6

58

64

From 15 years to less than 16 years

0

69

69

From 16 years to less than 17 years

0

39

39

From 17 years to less than 18 years

0

39

39

From 18 years to less than 19 years

0

38

38

From 19 years to less than 20 years

0

19

19

From 20 years to less than 21 years

0

20

20

From 21 years to less than 22 years

0

17

17

From 22 years to less than 23 years

0

27

27

From 23 years to less than 24 years

0

12

12

From 24 years to less than 25 years

0

13

13

From 25 years to less than 26 years

0

6

6

From 26 years to less than 27 years

0

8

8

From 27 years to less than 28 years

0

11

11

From 28 years to less than 29 years

0

4

4

From 29 years to less than 30 years

0

6

6

30 years or more(1)

0

17

17

Total

525

698

1,223

(1) These counts have been aggregated due to small numbers. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by ethnicity as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Ethnicity Group

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Asian or Asian British

83

65

148

Black or Black British

208

172

380

Mixed

67

46

113

Other ethnic group

8

11

19

White

1,334

1,345

2,679

Unrecorded

1

2

3

Not stated

4

7

11

Total

1,705

1,648

3,353

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by prison security category as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Main Function of Prison*

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Cat A (High Security)

167

299

Cat B Trainer

229

203

*These prisons may hold prisoners with lower security categories than the main function of the prison.

Notes for all tables:

1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

2. The figures in these tables do not include recalled indeterminate-sentence prisoners.

Statistics on the indeterminate sentence population in prisons are routinely published as part of the Quarterly Offender Management Statistics on Gov.uk - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly.

By law prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the breakdown by ethnicity of the number of prisoners still in prison after their tariff expiry.

The total number of prisoners serving life and Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences who have never been released and as at 31 March 2021 had served more than 10 years past the expiry of their tariff, broken down by each year served beyond 10 years (time over tariff), is shown in the following table:

Time over tariff(1)

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

From 10 years to less than 11 years

197

91

288

From 11 years to less than 12 years

159

68

227

From 12 years to less than 13 years

106

65

171

From 13 years to less than 14 years

57

71

128

From 14 years to less than 15 years

6

58

64

From 15 years to less than 16 years

0

69

69

From 16 years to less than 17 years

0

39

39

From 17 years to less than 18 years

0

39

39

From 18 years to less than 19 years

0

38

38

From 19 years to less than 20 years

0

19

19

From 20 years to less than 21 years

0

20

20

From 21 years to less than 22 years

0

17

17

From 22 years to less than 23 years

0

27

27

From 23 years to less than 24 years

0

12

12

From 24 years to less than 25 years

0

13

13

From 25 years to less than 26 years

0

6

6

From 26 years to less than 27 years

0

8

8

From 27 years to less than 28 years

0

11

11

From 28 years to less than 29 years

0

4

4

From 29 years to less than 30 years

0

6

6

30 years or more(1)

0

17

17

Total

525

698

1,223

(1) These counts have been aggregated due to small numbers. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by ethnicity as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Ethnicity Group

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Asian or Asian British

83

65

148

Black or Black British

208

172

380

Mixed

67

46

113

Other ethnic group

8

11

19

White

1,334

1,345

2,679

Unrecorded

1

2

3

Not stated

4

7

11

Total

1,705

1,648

3,353

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by prison security category as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Main Function of Prison*

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Cat A (High Security)

167

299

Cat B Trainer

229

203

*These prisons may hold prisoners with lower security categories than the main function of the prison.

Notes for all tables:

1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

2. The figures in these tables do not include recalled indeterminate-sentence prisoners.

Statistics on the indeterminate sentence population in prisons are routinely published as part of the Quarterly Offender Management Statistics on Gov.uk - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly.

By law prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will provide (1) the total number of prisoners serving more than 10 years past the expiry of their original tariff, and (2) a breakdown by each year served beyond 10 years.

The total number of prisoners serving life and Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences who have never been released and as at 31 March 2021 had served more than 10 years past the expiry of their tariff, broken down by each year served beyond 10 years (time over tariff), is shown in the following table:

Time over tariff(1)

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

From 10 years to less than 11 years

197

91

288

From 11 years to less than 12 years

159

68

227

From 12 years to less than 13 years

106

65

171

From 13 years to less than 14 years

57

71

128

From 14 years to less than 15 years

6

58

64

From 15 years to less than 16 years

0

69

69

From 16 years to less than 17 years

0

39

39

From 17 years to less than 18 years

0

39

39

From 18 years to less than 19 years

0

38

38

From 19 years to less than 20 years

0

19

19

From 20 years to less than 21 years

0

20

20

From 21 years to less than 22 years

0

17

17

From 22 years to less than 23 years

0

27

27

From 23 years to less than 24 years

0

12

12

From 24 years to less than 25 years

0

13

13

From 25 years to less than 26 years

0

6

6

From 26 years to less than 27 years

0

8

8

From 27 years to less than 28 years

0

11

11

From 28 years to less than 29 years

0

4

4

From 29 years to less than 30 years

0

6

6

30 years or more(1)

0

17

17

Total

525

698

1,223

(1) These counts have been aggregated due to small numbers. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by ethnicity as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Ethnicity Group

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Asian or Asian British

83

65

148

Black or Black British

208

172

380

Mixed

67

46

113

Other ethnic group

8

11

19

White

1,334

1,345

2,679

Unrecorded

1

2

3

Not stated

4

7

11

Total

1,705

1,648

3,353

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by prison security category as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Main Function of Prison*

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Cat A (High Security)

167

299

Cat B Trainer

229

203

*These prisons may hold prisoners with lower security categories than the main function of the prison.

Notes for all tables:

1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

2. The figures in these tables do not include recalled indeterminate-sentence prisoners.

Statistics on the indeterminate sentence population in prisons are routinely published as part of the Quarterly Offender Management Statistics on Gov.uk - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly.

By law prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the latest data on the number of prisoners reported to have self-harmed while serving imprisonment for public protection sentences on recall.

Figures for the number of self-harm incidents by recalled Imprisonment for Public Protection prisoners for each of the past three years are shown below:

2018 = 584

2019 = 743

2020 = 761

We are focussing our efforts to address the levels of self-harm across the prison population, and are under no illusions about the impact of the measures which were put in place to protect lives during the Covid-19 pandemic, so we have made prisoners’ safety and wellbeing our priority.

We have produced a range of products to support Governors in devising and implementing local safety and welfare plans designed to mitigate risks and promote wellbeing. Over 25,000 new and existing staff have received self-harm and suicide prevention training to help them better support prisoners with complex needs. We’ve enabled continued family contact through more than 1,600 secure mobile phones and rolled out secure video call technology into every single prison in the male, female and youth estate. Each prisoner is also currently given additional PIN credit per week. We are also delivering more in cell-activities such as distraction packs, supplementary food packs, and additional educational materials to mitigate the impact of isolation.

We have renewed our partnership with the Samaritans who are providing the excellent Listeners scheme, which trains selected prisoners to provide emotional support to their fellow prisoners.

We have prioritised the roll-out of the revised version of the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork (ACCT) multi-disciplinary case management system used in prisons to support people at risk of suicide and self-harm.

We have delivered improvements to the way we support, and case manage prisoners throughout their sentences by the significant investment in and changes introduced by the new Offender Management in Custody (OMiC) model. This will provide each prisoner with a dedicated key worker who will be able to better support them and identify concerns at an early stage so that they can receive the right support at the right time.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
26th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government who are, or will be, the members of the working group, announced on 1 December 2020, to examine ways to improve the process of accessing Child Trust Funds for parents or guardians of children who lack mental capacity; and when they expect that group to report on its findings.

Following the 1 December 2020 announcement, a cross government working group has been established to look at the issues raised in relation to access to Child Trust Funds. The Group has representation from Her Majesty’s Treasury, Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs, the Department for Work and Pensions and the Ministry of Justice and convened on 8 January and 29 January. Engagement with external stakeholders will continue as proposals develop. Court of Protection application forms are a matter for the judiciary and the Court of Protection Rules Committee will review these in light of issues raised by campaigners.

The working group will report to Ministers in due course.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)