Lord Blunkett Portrait

Lord Blunkett

Labour - Life peer

Citizenship and Civic Engagement Committee
29th Jun 2017 - 28th Mar 2018
Committee on Issue of Privilege (Police Searches on Parliamentary Estate)
13th Jul 2009 - 6th May 2010
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
6th May 2005 - 2nd Nov 2005
Home Secretary
8th Jun 2001 - 15th Dec 2004
Secretary of State for Education and Employment
1st May 1997 - 8th Jun 2001
Member, Labour Party National Executive Committee
1st Aug 1983 - 31st Jul 1998
Shadow Secretary of State (Education and Employment)
5th Jul 1995 - 1st May 1997
Shadow Secretary of State for Education
22nd Jul 1994 - 5th Jul 1995
Party Chair, Labour Party
1st Aug 1993 - 31st Jul 1994
Shadow Secretary of State for Health
1st Jul 1992 - 22nd Jul 1994
Opposition Spokesperson (Local Government and Poll Tax)
1st Jun 1988 - 1st Jul 1992


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 28th June 2022
10:00
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 28th June 2022
Oral questions - Main Chamber
Use of age as a trigger for substantial increases in premiums for travel and other related cover
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 5th July 2022
10:00
Division Votes
Tuesday 21st June 2022
Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2022
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 37 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 28 Noes - 181
Speeches
Thursday 16th June 2022
Houses of Parliament: Co-location
My Lords, it is a great pleasure to follow my noble friend, if I may call him that, because we …
Written Answers
Tuesday 28th June 2022
Motor Vehicles: Registration
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to grant relief from the rules requiring vehicles registered overseas to …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Wednesday 8th June 2016
Extension of Franchise (House of Lords) Bill [HL] 2016-17
First reading took place on 8 June. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available
EDM signed
Monday 16th March 2015
ACCESS TO TREATMENTS FOR DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY, TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS AND MORQUIO DISEASE
That this House is aware that the pause in NHS England's decision-making process on prioritisation and specialised commissioning has created …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Blunkett has voted in 223 divisions, and 3 times against the majority of their Party.

30 Dec 2020 - European Union (Future Relationship) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Blunkett voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Labour Aye votes vs 117 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 101 Noes - 466
7 Dec 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Blunkett voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour No votes vs 122 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 287 Noes - 161
8 Dec 2021 - Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Blunkett voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour No votes vs 59 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 82
View All Lord Blunkett Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(21 debate interactions)
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
(16 debate interactions)
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(14 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(28 debate contributions)
Home Office
(27 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(20 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(18 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Blunkett's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Blunkett, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Blunkett has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Blunkett has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Lord Blunkett


First reading took place on 8 June. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords.Second reading - the general debate on all aspects of the Bill - is yet to be scheduled.The 2016-2017 session of Parliament has prorogued and this Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for Members of the House of Lords to vote at elections to the House of Commons.


Last Event - 1st Reading : House Of Lords
Wednesday 8th June 2016

Lord Blunkett has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


116 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
5 Other Department Questions
25th May 2022
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many people (1) are directly employed in the House of Lords, (2) are employed by the House of Lords and do not get paid when their senior line manager is not on site, and (3) are employed in the House of Lords and work from home for either (a) part of, or (b) the whole of, the working week.

As of 6 June 2022 the House of Lords Administration directly employs 670 individuals. The pay of employees of the House of Lords Administration is not dependent on, nor linked to, the location of their senior line manager.

The House of Lords Administration has a Flexible Working policy which supports individuals to work from home. Some Member-facing services, such as Chamber facing work, Catering & Retail Services and Facilities, work predominantly on-site whilst other offices operate local arrangements whilst ensuring they meet business needs. The House of Lords Human Resources Department does not hold data on how many people employed by the House of Lords work from home for part of the working week. No employee of the House of Lords Administration is contracted to work from home for the whole of the working week.

8th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their White Paper Levelling up the United Kingdom, published on 2 February, when they plan to formally launch the Task Force investigating housing for older people; and what the remit of that Task Force will be.

The new taskforce, as announced in the Levelling Up White Paper, will look at ways better choice, quality and security of housing for older people can be provided, including how to address regional disparities in supply of appropriate and where necessary specialised housing.

Further details of the taskforce including its remit, will be confirmed in due course.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the commitments made in People at the Heart of Care: adult social care reform white paper, published on 1 December, what steps they will take to ensure the planning system enables the growth of housing-based care options for older people.

This Government is committed to the provision of homes for older people, including those who require care and support.  As set out in our National Planning Policy Framework, local authorities should already assess the types of specialist housing needed for older and disabled people in their areas, and this should be reflected in their planning policies.

We remain committed to working closely with a range of stakeholders to look at how we can further support the growth of a thriving older people’s housing sector. This includes considering the merits of different engagement and delivery models, including proposals from the sector for a cross-Government taskforce.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure diversity in the membership of their cross-Government commission to examine racial inequality, including in relation to (1) geographic, and (2) ethnic, origin.

The Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities was established by the Prime Minister in July of this year and is comprised of ten talented and diverse commissioners, outlined below, who each bring a wealth of experience from across a range of important sectors and will set a positive agenda for change.

Its work will continue to be inclusive, undertaking research and inviting submissions from those who wish to provide evidence. The Commission will shortly be setting out a public call for evidence, details of which will be announced in due course.

  • Dr Tony Sewell CBE (Chair), Head of charity Generating Genius
  • Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock MBE, Space Scientist and Educator. Experienced broadcaster including co-presenter of BBC’s ‘The Sky at Night’
  • Keith Fraser, Chair of the Youth Justice Board for England and Wales and former police superintendent
  • Dr Samir Shah CBE, CEO of Juniper TV, former BBC journalist and former chair of the race relations think tank, The Runnymede Trust
  • Lord Ajay Kakkar, Professor of Surgery at University College London, Director of the Thrombosis Research Institute, chair of the Judicial Appointments Commission, chair of the King’s Fund
  • Dr Dambisa Moyo, internationally renowned economist and author, board member of Chevron Corporation and the 3M Company
  • Martyn Oliver, Chief Executive Officer of Outwood Grange Academies Trust, one of the largest multi-academy trusts operating in the North and Midlands
  • Naureen Khalid, experienced school governor and co-founder of the dedicated online national school governor forum, UkGovChat
  • Aftab Chughtai MBE, Businessman, co-founder of the campaign group Muslims for Britain, member of the Grenfell Tower Taskforce and Chair of West Midlands Police Independent Advisory Group
  • Mercy Muroki, Senior Policy Researcher, Commentator, and Columnist.
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what plans there are to make printed papers, including (1) select committee reports, (2) government publications, and (3) Hansard, available to members; and what consideration they have given to outsourcing the production of such papers.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf. The Printed Paper Office (PPO) continues to operate a service for members attending the Estate in person; members are able to collect papers from the Royal Gallery. Staff are available in the PPO to fetch papers which are not stocked in the Royal Gallery.

For members working remotely a temporary service has been introduced allowing members to request certain documents to be posted to their designated mail forwarding address, provided that the document relates to business at least 3 days from the working day the request is received. The documents are:

  1. Bills, explanatory notes and statutory instruments subject to scrutiny by the House;
  2. House of Lords select committee reports and Joint Committee reports published this Session; and
  3. Command papers (government publications) where there is a debate in the House scheduled.

All papers are available online and through the House Papers app, detail on accessing the app can be found on the intranet. The Services Committee has introduced a scheme to allow members to claim for the costs of printers and printer consumables, purchased since 12 June, and used for parliamentary work.

No consideration has been given to outsourcing the production of papers since the papers needed continue to be printed by the in-house reprographics team.

21st Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 7 June (HL708), what are the original (1) regions, and (2) nations, given as the living address for the 63 current holders the Companion of Honour at the time their honour was awarded; and what percentage of current holders came from each region or nation.

There are currently 63 living recipients of the Companion of Honour. Information is only held on 41 living recipients. Honours data is routinely destroyed by the Cabinet Office in accordance with our data retention policy for honours and not all the nominations were processed by the Cabinet Office, therefore we do not hold all of the information requested.

Data is collected using the county that the recipient gives as their correspondence address; this is usually their current home address and does not necessarily reflect their area of origin.

Regional data for living Companion of Honour recipients:

Region

Number of living Companion of Honour recipients per region

Percentage of living Companion of Honour recipients per region

East

3

4.8%

East Midlands

1

1.6%

London

18

28.6%

North East

0

0.0%

Northern Ireland

1

1.6%

North West

0

0.0%

Scotland

3

4.8%

South East

10

15.9%

South West

1

1.6%

Wales

0

0.0%

West Midlands

2

3.2%

Yorkshire & Humberside

1

1.6%

Abroad

1

1.6%

No information held

22

34.9%

Data for living Companion of Honour recipients by nation:

Nation

Number of Companion of living Honour recipients per nation

Percentage of living Companion of Honour recipients per nation

England

36

57.1%

Northern Ireland

1

1.6%

Scotland

3

4.8%

Wales

0

0.0%

Abroad

1

1.6%

No information held

22

34.9%

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of private companies using internet addresses suggesting those sites are linked to the government, such as GovNet.

Government departments have a set of processes in place to tackle fraudulent websites set up by private companies, for example sites purporting to be government using government-type domains. The nature of the action depends on the type of site and can include asking the domain registrar to suspend the domain, reporting to Action Fraud or National Trading Standards or reaching out directly to organisations concerned to tell them to stop using misleading branding or information. In some cases, we work with the Government Legal Department to take direct legal action.

Some sites, although potentially misleading, are able to operate within legal boundaries. In these cases, we work to ensure that government services are correctly listed and rank highly in search engine results. This helps to ensure that they are easy for people to find and identify as government services. Where misleading websites have paid for prominent positioning in search results, we also raise this with the relevant search engine.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
14th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, for individuals beginning work at airports and requiring airside clearance, what is the average time between the point the individual is offered the job to the point where such clearance is granted.

I should advise that National Security Vetting (NSV) undertaken by Her Majesty’s Government, remains separate from concurrent industry background checks. Background checks as conducted by industry can take between 12 and 14 weeks to complete. The Department for Transport (DfT) has implemented changes to help reduce these industry timescales utilising HMRC data to support reference checks.

The Cabinet Office acts as a service provider for NSV clearances only. For national security reasons I am unable to share processing times for security clearances. However, I can advise that United Kingdom Security Vetting (UKSV) expedite all NSV cases for the aviation industry, in response to operational challenges currently impacting the aviation sector. Security checks for the aviation sector are being processed in a timely manner with no current delays.

In line with the practice followed by successive administrations, the Government does not otherwise comment on security matters.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
7th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many honours above OBE level were awarded to people who were (1) living in, or (2) working or providing service to, the South Yorkshire area at the time of their nomination for an honour in The Queen's Birthday Honours List 2022.

There are currently 63 living recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested on political affiliation, nor do we monitor areas of residence after an award is bestowed.

In supporting the levelling up agenda, Her Majesty’s Government would like to see representation in the honours system from across the whole of the United Kingdom, reflecting the extraordinary contributions made across the country.

Data is collected using the county that the recipient gives as their correspondence address; this is usually their current home address and does not necessarily reflect their area of origin.

The percentage of BD22 recipients living in each region by level is attached.

The Government publishes honours transparency data broken down by both town/city and county. Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin). This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office. The transparency data for the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2022 can be accessed at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-queens-birthday-honours-2022

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
7th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many honours, by each award level, were received in each region and nation of the UK in The Queen's Birthday Honours List 2022; and what percentage of the population of each such region and nation that number represents.

There are currently 63 living recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested on political affiliation, nor do we monitor areas of residence after an award is bestowed.

In supporting the levelling up agenda, Her Majesty’s Government would like to see representation in the honours system from across the whole of the United Kingdom, reflecting the extraordinary contributions made across the country.

Data is collected using the county that the recipient gives as their correspondence address; this is usually their current home address and does not necessarily reflect their area of origin.

The percentage of BD22 recipients living in each region by level is attached.

The Government publishes honours transparency data broken down by both town/city and county. Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin). This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office. The transparency data for the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2022 can be accessed at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-queens-birthday-honours-2022

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
6th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 25 May (HL293) and the revised arrangements for an Accession Council, how many Privy Councillors were present at the last Accession Council to affirm the transition of the monarchy.

In 1952, Part I of the Accession Council was held on Wednesday 6th February 1952. There were 191 attendees, comprising some 165 Privy Counsellors, representatives of the Realms and the Commonwealth, and the City of London. Part II of the Accession Council was held on Friday the 8th February 1952, on the return of The Queen from Kenya, and attended by 175 Privy Counsellors.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
17th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by the Lord President of the Council on 26 June 2018 (156454), why the whole of the Privy Council will no longer be invited to attend the next meeting of the Accession Council; and when was the last time that the attendance of Privy Councillors at the Accession Council was limited.

Revised arrangements for an Accession Council on the Demise of the Crown have been put in place following a routine review of operational delivery arrangements.

The updated arrangements are an equitable and proportionate response to three key challenges identified during the review:

First, the number of Privy Counsellors potentially eligible to attend an Accession Council has increased exponentially since 1952.

Secondly, whilst it has long been agreed that St. James’s Palace is the most appropriate setting for the Accession Council, the historic nature of St. James’s Palace presents a number of significant challenges in terms of capacity, accessibility and crowd flow.

Thirdly, the pace at which an Accession Council must take place means that very limited additional infrastructure and provision can be put in place to support dignified delivery of such an important occasion.


Attendance arrangements for previous Accession Councils has varied and - like current planning - took into account contemporary operational challenges. There is no constitutional understanding that all Privy Counsellors must be summonsed to an Accession Council.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made, if any, of the risk posed to national security by using products supplied by the Russian cyber security business Kaspersky.

The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), as the UK’s cyber security authority, frequently publishes advice to help individuals and organisations make informed, risk based decisions on the provider they use.

In 2017, the NCSC published specific guidance on managing the risk of cloud-enabled products - https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/blog-post/managing-supply-chain-risk-cloud-enabled-products - and in particular recommended that audio visual equipment sourced from Russian companies should not be used on government systems dealing with national security matters.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many honours above OBE level were awarded to people who were (1) living in, or (2) working or providing service to, the Sheffield City Region at the time of their nomination for an honour in the New Year Honours 2022 list.

In supporting the levelling up agenda, Her Majesty’s Government would like to see representation in the honours system from the length and breadth of the United Kingdom, reflecting the extraordinary contributions made across every part of this country, with a real focus in recognising parts of the country often overlooked.

The information requested is enclosed in the below table and includes data from the Prime Ministers List only. Data is collected using the county that the recipient gives as their correspondence address; this is usually their home address and does not necessarily reflect their area of origin.

Percentage of NY22 recipients living in each region by level.

Region

Number of BEM recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 BEM recipients living in each region

Number of MBE recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 MBE recipients living in each region

Number of OBE recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 OBE recipients living in each region

Number of CBE recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 CBE recipients living in each region

Number of higher recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 Higher recipients living in each region

Total recipients on NY22 List in each region

% of the total NY22 list living in each region

% of UK population living in DA / region

East

39

10.8%

39

7.7%

20

7.9%

7

6.1%

5

11.9%

110

8.6%

9.3%

East Midlands

16

4.4%

21

4.1%

10

4.0%

3

2.6%

1

2.4%

51

4.0%

7.2%

London

61

16.9%

87

17.1%

64

25.3%

37

32.5%

17

40.5%

266

20.8%

13.4%

North East

6

1.7%

17

3.3%

8

3.2%

1

0.9%

0

0.0%

32

2.5%

4%

Northern Ireland

39

10.8%

40

7.9%

14

5.5%

2

1.8%

0

0.0%

95

7.4%

2.8%

North West

32

8.9%

38

7.5%

14

5.5%

7

6.1%

2

4.8%

93

7.3%

11%

Scotland

19

5.3%

32

6.3%

18

7.1%

11

9.6%

2

4.8%

82

6.4%

8.2%

South East

52

14.4%

77

15.2%

45

17.8%

22

19.3%

5

11.9%

201

15.7%

13.7%

South West

36

10.0%

46

9.1%

20

7.9%

3

2.6%

1

2.4%

106

8.3%

8.4%

Wales

12

3.3%

20

3.9%

10

4.0%

4

3.5%

2

4.8%

48

3.8%

4.7%

West Midlands

30

8.3%

34

6.7%

13

5.1%

6

5.3%

2

4.8%

85

6.7%

8.9%

Yorkshire & Humberside

18

5.0%

53

10.4%

15

5.9%

10

8.8%

4

9.5%

100

7.8%

8.2%

Living Abroad

1

0.3%

4

0.8%

2

0.8%

1

0.9%

1

2.4%

9

0.7%

n/a

Total

361

100%

508

100%

253

100%

114

100%

42

100%

1278

100%

The Government publishes honours transparency data broken down by both town/city and county. Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin). This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office. The transparency data for the New Year Honours List 2022 can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/new-year-honours-list-2022-cabinet-office.

The Government does not collate data against political administrative areas and we cannot provide information regarding honours awarded in the Sheffield City Region.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many honours above OBE level were awarded to people who were (1) living in, or (2) working or providing service to, the South Yorkshire area at the time of their nomination for an honour in the New Year Honours 2022 list.

In supporting the levelling up agenda, Her Majesty’s Government would like to see representation in the honours system from the length and breadth of the United Kingdom, reflecting the extraordinary contributions made across every part of this country, with a real focus in recognising parts of the country often overlooked.

The information requested is enclosed in the below table and includes data from the Prime Ministers List only. Data is collected using the county that the recipient gives as their correspondence address; this is usually their home address and does not necessarily reflect their area of origin.

Percentage of NY22 recipients living in each region by level.

Region

Number of BEM recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 BEM recipients living in each region

Number of MBE recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 MBE recipients living in each region

Number of OBE recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 OBE recipients living in each region

Number of CBE recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 CBE recipients living in each region

Number of higher recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 Higher recipients living in each region

Total recipients on NY22 List in each region

% of the total NY22 list living in each region

% of UK population living in DA / region

East

39

10.8%

39

7.7%

20

7.9%

7

6.1%

5

11.9%

110

8.6%

9.3%

East Midlands

16

4.4%

21

4.1%

10

4.0%

3

2.6%

1

2.4%

51

4.0%

7.2%

London

61

16.9%

87

17.1%

64

25.3%

37

32.5%

17

40.5%

266

20.8%

13.4%

North East

6

1.7%

17

3.3%

8

3.2%

1

0.9%

0

0.0%

32

2.5%

4%

Northern Ireland

39

10.8%

40

7.9%

14

5.5%

2

1.8%

0

0.0%

95

7.4%

2.8%

North West

32

8.9%

38

7.5%

14

5.5%

7

6.1%

2

4.8%

93

7.3%

11%

Scotland

19

5.3%

32

6.3%

18

7.1%

11

9.6%

2

4.8%

82

6.4%

8.2%

South East

52

14.4%

77

15.2%

45

17.8%

22

19.3%

5

11.9%

201

15.7%

13.7%

South West

36

10.0%

46

9.1%

20

7.9%

3

2.6%

1

2.4%

106

8.3%

8.4%

Wales

12

3.3%

20

3.9%

10

4.0%

4

3.5%

2

4.8%

48

3.8%

4.7%

West Midlands

30

8.3%

34

6.7%

13

5.1%

6

5.3%

2

4.8%

85

6.7%

8.9%

Yorkshire & Humberside

18

5.0%

53

10.4%

15

5.9%

10

8.8%

4

9.5%

100

7.8%

8.2%

Living Abroad

1

0.3%

4

0.8%

2

0.8%

1

0.9%

1

2.4%

9

0.7%

n/a

Total

361

100%

508

100%

253

100%

114

100%

42

100%

1278

100%

The Government publishes honours transparency data broken down by both town/city and county. Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin). This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office. The transparency data for the New Year Honours List 2022 can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/new-year-honours-list-2022-cabinet-office.

The Government does not collate data against political administrative areas and we cannot provide information regarding honours awarded in the Sheffield City Region.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many honours, by each award level, were received in each region or nation of the UK in the New Year Honours 2022; and what percentage of the population of each such region or nation that number represents.

In supporting the levelling up agenda, Her Majesty’s Government would like to see representation in the honours system from the length and breadth of the United Kingdom, reflecting the extraordinary contributions made across every part of this country, with a real focus in recognising parts of the country often overlooked.

The information requested is enclosed in the below table and includes data from the Prime Ministers List only. Data is collected using the county that the recipient gives as their correspondence address; this is usually their home address and does not necessarily reflect their area of origin.

Percentage of NY22 recipients living in each region by level.

Region

Number of BEM recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 BEM recipients living in each region

Number of MBE recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 MBE recipients living in each region

Number of OBE recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 OBE recipients living in each region

Number of CBE recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 CBE recipients living in each region

Number of higher recipients in NY22 List

% of NY22 Higher recipients living in each region

Total recipients on NY22 List in each region

% of the total NY22 list living in each region

% of UK population living in DA / region

East

39

10.8%

39

7.7%

20

7.9%

7

6.1%

5

11.9%

110

8.6%

9.3%

East Midlands

16

4.4%

21

4.1%

10

4.0%

3

2.6%

1

2.4%

51

4.0%

7.2%

London

61

16.9%

87

17.1%

64

25.3%

37

32.5%

17

40.5%

266

20.8%

13.4%

North East

6

1.7%

17

3.3%

8

3.2%

1

0.9%

0

0.0%

32

2.5%

4%

Northern Ireland

39

10.8%

40

7.9%

14

5.5%

2

1.8%

0

0.0%

95

7.4%

2.8%

North West

32

8.9%

38

7.5%

14

5.5%

7

6.1%

2

4.8%

93

7.3%

11%

Scotland

19

5.3%

32

6.3%

18

7.1%

11

9.6%

2

4.8%

82

6.4%

8.2%

South East

52

14.4%

77

15.2%

45

17.8%

22

19.3%

5

11.9%

201

15.7%

13.7%

South West

36

10.0%

46

9.1%

20

7.9%

3

2.6%

1

2.4%

106

8.3%

8.4%

Wales

12

3.3%

20

3.9%

10

4.0%

4

3.5%

2

4.8%

48

3.8%

4.7%

West Midlands

30

8.3%

34

6.7%

13

5.1%

6

5.3%

2

4.8%

85

6.7%

8.9%

Yorkshire & Humberside

18

5.0%

53

10.4%

15

5.9%

10

8.8%

4

9.5%

100

7.8%

8.2%

Living Abroad

1

0.3%

4

0.8%

2

0.8%

1

0.9%

1

2.4%

9

0.7%

n/a

Total

361

100%

508

100%

253

100%

114

100%

42

100%

1278

100%

The Government publishes honours transparency data broken down by both town/city and county. Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin). This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office. The transparency data for the New Year Honours List 2022 can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/new-year-honours-list-2022-cabinet-office.

The Government does not collate data against political administrative areas and we cannot provide information regarding honours awarded in the Sheffield City Region.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many awards above OBE level were made to people who were (1) living in, and (2) working or providing service to, the Sheffield City Region at the time of their nomination for The Queen's Birthday Honours List 2021.

The Government publishes honours transparency data broken down by both town/city and county. Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin). This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office. The transparency data for the Birthday Honours List 2021 can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-queens-birthday-honours-2021.


As noted in PQ HL11724, answered on 19 January 2021, the Government does not collate data against political administrative areas and we cannot provide information regarding honours awarded in the Sheffield City Region.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many awards above OBE level were made to people who were (1) living in, and (2) working or providing service to, the South Yorkshire area at the time of their nomination for The Queen's Birthday Honours List 2021.

The Government publishes honours transparency data broken down by both town/city and county. Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin). This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office. The transparency data for the Birthday Honours List 2021 can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-queens-birthday-honours-2021.


As noted in PQ HL11724, answered on 19 January 2021, the Government does not collate data against political administrative areas and we cannot provide information regarding honours awarded in the Sheffield City Region.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
14th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many honours, broken down by each award level, were received in each region or nation in the UK; and what percentage of the population of each such region or nation that number represents.

In supporting the levelling up agenda, Her Majesty’s Government would like to see representation in the honours system from the length and breadth of the United Kingdom, reflecting the extraordinary contributions made across every part of this country, with a real focus in recognising parts of the country often overlooked.

The information requested is enclosed in the attached table; it excludes data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List.

Data is collected using the county that the recipient gives as their correspondence address; this is usually their home address and does not necessarily reflect their area of origin. Figures on representation in London and South East England should be viewed in that light.

There are also wide variations within localities. Whilst the ceremonial counties of the Lord Lieutenancy areas make precise comparisons challenging, I would note for example, that Greater Manchester received 3.2% of the awards (relative to 4.2% local authority share of the population) and West Yorkshire has 2.8% of the awards (relative to a 3.5% share of the population) – far greater representation than many other parts of the country.

Clearly, there is more to do, particularly to encourage more nominations for outstanding contributions from across all parts of the United Kingdom.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 19 January (HL11724), how many honours, broken down by each award level, were received in each region or nation in the UK; and what percentage of the population of each such region or nation that number represents.

Nominations, which are made by members of the public, come directly to the Cabinet Office. Alongside this, organisations, charities and businesses make nominations directly to other government departments and to the Devolved Administrations. Therefore, a complete record of all honours nominations submitted is not held by the Cabinet Office. There are no plans to publish data on nominations.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the New Year Honours List 2021 can be found below by region and level. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point.

Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin) and is aggregated into regional figures. This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office.

Percentage of NY21 recipients living in each region by level

Region

Number of BEM recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 BEM recipients living in each region

Number of MBE recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 MBE recipients living in each region

Number of OBE recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 OBE recipients living in each region

Number of CBE and higher recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 CBE and Higher recipients living in each region

Total recipients on NY21 List in each region

% of the total NY21 list living in each region

East

37

9.3

53

11.1

24

9.6

7

6.0

121

9.8

East Midlands

24

6.0

15

3.2

8

3.2

3

2.6

50

4.0

London

41

10.3

91

19.1

59

23.6

39

33.6

230

18.6

North East

5

1.3

14

2.9

9

3.6

4

3.4

32

2.6

Northern Ireland

38

9.6

28

5.9

8

3.2

7

6.0

81

6.5

North West

32

8.1

37

7.8

21

8.4

8

6.9

98

7.9

Scotland

44

11.1

35

7.4

18

7.2

12

10.3

109

8.8

South East

47

11.8

65

13.7

49

19.6

19

16.4

180

14.5

South West

29

7.3

43

9.0

12

4.8

6

5.2

90

7.3

Wales

28

7.1

23

4.8

10

4.0

1

0.9

62

5.0

West Midlands

34

8.6

39

8.2

14

5.6

4

3.4

91

7.3

Yorkshire & Humberside

38

9.6

31

6.5

16

6.4

4

3.4

89

7.2

Living Abroad

0

0.0

2

0.4

2

0.8

2

1.7

6

0.5

Total

397

100

476

100

250

100

116

100

1,239

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 19 January (HL11722), which data they hold on nominations for honours; what plans they have to publish those data; whether they intend to record the number of nominations (1) received, and (2) awarded, broken down by region or nation in the UK, in future; and if not, why not.

Nominations, which are made by members of the public, come directly to the Cabinet Office. Alongside this, organisations, charities and businesses make nominations directly to other government departments and to the Devolved Administrations. Therefore, a complete record of all honours nominations submitted is not held by the Cabinet Office. There are no plans to publish data on nominations.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the New Year Honours List 2021 can be found below by region and level. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point.

Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin) and is aggregated into regional figures. This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office.

Percentage of NY21 recipients living in each region by level

Region

Number of BEM recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 BEM recipients living in each region

Number of MBE recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 MBE recipients living in each region

Number of OBE recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 OBE recipients living in each region

Number of CBE and higher recipients in NY21 List

% of NY21 CBE and Higher recipients living in each region

Total recipients on NY21 List in each region

% of the total NY21 list living in each region

East

37

9.3

53

11.1

24

9.6

7

6.0

121

9.8

East Midlands

24

6.0

15

3.2

8

3.2

3

2.6

50

4.0

London

41

10.3

91

19.1

59

23.6

39

33.6

230

18.6

North East

5

1.3

14

2.9

9

3.6

4

3.4

32

2.6

Northern Ireland

38

9.6

28

5.9

8

3.2

7

6.0

81

6.5

North West

32

8.1

37

7.8

21

8.4

8

6.9

98

7.9

Scotland

44

11.1

35

7.4

18

7.2

12

10.3

109

8.8

South East

47

11.8

65

13.7

49

19.6

19

16.4

180

14.5

South West

29

7.3

43

9.0

12

4.8

6

5.2

90

7.3

Wales

28

7.1

23

4.8

10

4.0

1

0.9

62

5.0

West Midlands

34

8.6

39

8.2

14

5.6

4

3.4

91

7.3

Yorkshire & Humberside

38

9.6

31

6.5

16

6.4

4

3.4

89

7.2

Living Abroad

0

0.0

2

0.4

2

0.8

2

1.7

6

0.5

Total

397

100

476

100

250

100

116

100

1,239

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many nominations for honours were (1) received, and (2) awarded, broken down by region or nation in the UK.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the New Year Honours List 2021 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point.

Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin) and is aggregated into regional figures. This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office.

Honours are awarded on the basis of merit. We are working to improve regional representation in the honours lists, including running events across the UK to raise awareness. A complete record of all nominations received is not held by the Cabinet Office.

NY21 Regional data

REGION

Total number of recipients from region

% of NY21 list living in region

% of UK population living in region

EAST

121

9.8%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

50

4%

7.2%

LONDON

230

18.7%

13.4%

NORTH EAST

32

2.6%

4.0%

NORTHERN IRELAND

81

6.6%

2.8%

NORTH WEST

99

8%

11.0%

SCOTLAND

109

8.8%

8.2%

SOUTH EAST

180

14.5%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

90

7.3%

8.4%

WALES

61

4.9%

4.7%

WEST MIDLANDS

90

7.3%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBER

90

7.3%

8.2%

CHANNEL ISLANDS / ABROAD

6

0.5%

n/a

The Government does not collate data against such political administrative areas and cannot provide information regarding honours awarded in the Sheffield city region. However, the Government publishes transparency data, broken down by both town/city and county. This can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/new-year-honours-list-2021-cabinet-office.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people were nominated for honours above the level of OBE in the Sheffield city region; and how many such honours were awarded.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the New Year Honours List 2021 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point.

Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin) and is aggregated into regional figures. This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office.

Honours are awarded on the basis of merit. We are working to improve regional representation in the honours lists, including running events across the UK to raise awareness. A complete record of all nominations received is not held by the Cabinet Office.

NY21 Regional data

REGION

Total number of recipients from region

% of NY21 list living in region

% of UK population living in region

EAST

121

9.8%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

50

4%

7.2%

LONDON

230

18.7%

13.4%

NORTH EAST

32

2.6%

4.0%

NORTHERN IRELAND

81

6.6%

2.8%

NORTH WEST

99

8%

11.0%

SCOTLAND

109

8.8%

8.2%

SOUTH EAST

180

14.5%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

90

7.3%

8.4%

WALES

61

4.9%

4.7%

WEST MIDLANDS

90

7.3%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBER

90

7.3%

8.2%

CHANNEL ISLANDS / ABROAD

6

0.5%

n/a

The Government does not collate data against such political administrative areas and cannot provide information regarding honours awarded in the Sheffield city region. However, the Government publishes transparency data, broken down by both town/city and county. This can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/new-year-honours-list-2021-cabinet-office.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the breakdown of honours received by region or nation in the UK as a percentage of the population of each such region or nation.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the New Year Honours List 2021 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point.

Data is collected using the county the recipient gives as their correspondence address (usually their home address rather than their places of origin) and is aggregated into regional figures. This data relates only to the main Prime Minister’s List and does not include data from the Defence List or the Overseas and International List, which are not administered by the Cabinet Office.

Honours are awarded on the basis of merit. We are working to improve regional representation in the honours lists, including running events across the UK to raise awareness. A complete record of all nominations received is not held by the Cabinet Office.

NY21 Regional data

REGION

Total number of recipients from region

% of NY21 list living in region

% of UK population living in region

EAST

121

9.8%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

50

4%

7.2%

LONDON

230

18.7%

13.4%

NORTH EAST

32

2.6%

4.0%

NORTHERN IRELAND

81

6.6%

2.8%

NORTH WEST

99

8%

11.0%

SCOTLAND

109

8.8%

8.2%

SOUTH EAST

180

14.5%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

90

7.3%

8.4%

WALES

61

4.9%

4.7%

WEST MIDLANDS

90

7.3%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBER

90

7.3%

8.2%

CHANNEL ISLANDS / ABROAD

6

0.5%

n/a

The Government does not collate data against such political administrative areas and cannot provide information regarding honours awarded in the Sheffield city region. However, the Government publishes transparency data, broken down by both town/city and county. This can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/new-year-honours-list-2021-cabinet-office.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 27 October (HL9112), what is the breakdown of honours received by region or nation in the UK as a percentage of the population of each such region or nation.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2020 can be found below. Please note that data reflects the correspondence address provided by recipients rather than region of origin. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point. Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Honours are bestowed on merit. A key aim of the honours system is to make it more equitable and better representative of the whole of the UK.

Region

Total number of recipients from region

% of BD20 List living in region

% of UK population living in region

East

116

7.9%

9.3%

East Midlands

40

2.7%

7.2%

London

264

17.6%

13.4%

North East

39

2.5%

4.0%

North West

136

7.9%

11.0%

South East

211

9.1%

13.7%

South West

109

10.1%

8.4%

West Midlands

102

14.1%

8.9%

Yorkshire and Humberside

100

7.2%

8.2%

Northern Ireland

115

6.7%

2.8%

Scotland

151

6.7%

8.2%

Wales

103

6.6%

4.7%

Living Abroad

11

0.2%

-

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people received a CBE or higher honour in the Queen's Birthday Honours List, published on 9 October, in each of (1) the regions in England, and (2) the nations of the UK.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2020 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point. Data for CBE and higher levels has been aggregated and included in the same table below. Data reflects the correspondence address provided by recipients.

Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

Honours are bestowed on merit. A key aim of the honours system is to make it more equitable and better representative of the whole of the UK.

In the last 25 years (since October 1995) there have been 83 recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested, nor do we collect information on recipients of Order of Merit, as this is within the personal gift of The Sovereign.

Region

BEM

BEM%

MBE

MBE %

OBE

OBE %

CBE and Higher

CBE and Higher %

Total

Population %

East

39

7.3%

48

8.6%

24

9.4%

5

3.6%

116

9.3%

East Midlands

15

2.8%

19

3.4%

5

1.9%

1

0.7%

40

7.2%

London

45

8.4%

103

18.3%

61

23.9%

56

40.9%

264

12.9%

North East

23

4.3%

13

2.3%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

39

4.1%

North West

59

11.0%

46

8.2%

22

8.6%

9

6.6%

136

11.2%

South East

61

11.4%

76

13.5%

47

18.4%

25

18.2%

211

13.7%

South West

44

8.2%

47

8.4%

13

5.1%

5

3.6%

109

8.4%

West Midlands

40

7.4%

38

6.8%

17

6.7%

7

5.1%

102

13.7%

Yorkshire and Humberside

40

7.4%

29

5.2%

20

7.8%

11

8.0%

100

8.4%

Northern Ireland

63

11.7%

39

6.9%

12

4.7%

2

1.5%

115

2.9%

Scotland

64

11.9%

58

10.3%

21

8.2%

7

5.1%

151

8.4%

Wales

43

8.0%

43

7.7%

9

3.5%

7

5.1%

103

4.8%

Living Abroad

1

0.2%

2

0.4%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

11

-

Total

537

561

255

102

1495

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many of each category of honours were awarded in the Queen's Birthday Honours List, published on 9 October, to people in (1) Wales, (2) Scotland, (3) Northern Ireland, and (4) each of the regions of England, as a (a) number, and (b) percentage, of that country or region's population.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2020 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point. Data for CBE and higher levels has been aggregated and included in the same table below. Data reflects the correspondence address provided by recipients.

Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

Honours are bestowed on merit. A key aim of the honours system is to make it more equitable and better representative of the whole of the UK.

In the last 25 years (since October 1995) there have been 83 recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested, nor do we collect information on recipients of Order of Merit, as this is within the personal gift of The Sovereign.

Region

BEM

BEM%

MBE

MBE %

OBE

OBE %

CBE and Higher

CBE and Higher %

Total

Population %

East

39

7.3%

48

8.6%

24

9.4%

5

3.6%

116

9.3%

East Midlands

15

2.8%

19

3.4%

5

1.9%

1

0.7%

40

7.2%

London

45

8.4%

103

18.3%

61

23.9%

56

40.9%

264

12.9%

North East

23

4.3%

13

2.3%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

39

4.1%

North West

59

11.0%

46

8.2%

22

8.6%

9

6.6%

136

11.2%

South East

61

11.4%

76

13.5%

47

18.4%

25

18.2%

211

13.7%

South West

44

8.2%

47

8.4%

13

5.1%

5

3.6%

109

8.4%

West Midlands

40

7.4%

38

6.8%

17

6.7%

7

5.1%

102

13.7%

Yorkshire and Humberside

40

7.4%

29

5.2%

20

7.8%

11

8.0%

100

8.4%

Northern Ireland

63

11.7%

39

6.9%

12

4.7%

2

1.5%

115

2.9%

Scotland

64

11.9%

58

10.3%

21

8.2%

7

5.1%

151

8.4%

Wales

43

8.0%

43

7.7%

9

3.5%

7

5.1%

103

4.8%

Living Abroad

1

0.2%

2

0.4%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

11

-

Total

537

561

255

102

1495

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many honours were awarded in the Queen's Birthday Honours List, published on 9 October, to people in (1) London, and (2) each English city region that has a mayor, per head of population of that city or region.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2020 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point. Data for CBE and higher levels has been aggregated and included in the same table below. Data reflects the correspondence address provided by recipients.

Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

Honours are bestowed on merit. A key aim of the honours system is to make it more equitable and better representative of the whole of the UK.

In the last 25 years (since October 1995) there have been 83 recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested, nor do we collect information on recipients of Order of Merit, as this is within the personal gift of The Sovereign.

Region

BEM

BEM%

MBE

MBE %

OBE

OBE %

CBE and Higher

CBE and Higher %

Total

Population %

East

39

7.3%

48

8.6%

24

9.4%

5

3.6%

116

9.3%

East Midlands

15

2.8%

19

3.4%

5

1.9%

1

0.7%

40

7.2%

London

45

8.4%

103

18.3%

61

23.9%

56

40.9%

264

12.9%

North East

23

4.3%

13

2.3%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

39

4.1%

North West

59

11.0%

46

8.2%

22

8.6%

9

6.6%

136

11.2%

South East

61

11.4%

76

13.5%

47

18.4%

25

18.2%

211

13.7%

South West

44

8.2%

47

8.4%

13

5.1%

5

3.6%

109

8.4%

West Midlands

40

7.4%

38

6.8%

17

6.7%

7

5.1%

102

13.7%

Yorkshire and Humberside

40

7.4%

29

5.2%

20

7.8%

11

8.0%

100

8.4%

Northern Ireland

63

11.7%

39

6.9%

12

4.7%

2

1.5%

115

2.9%

Scotland

64

11.9%

58

10.3%

21

8.2%

7

5.1%

151

8.4%

Wales

43

8.0%

43

7.7%

9

3.5%

7

5.1%

103

4.8%

Living Abroad

1

0.2%

2

0.4%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

11

-

Total

537

561

255

102

1495

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Orders of Merit or Companions of Honour have been awarded in the last 25 years to those resident at the time in (1) London, and (2) Yorkshire.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at all levels on the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2020 can be found below. Percentages are rounded to 1 decimal point. Data for CBE and higher levels has been aggregated and included in the same table below. Data reflects the correspondence address provided by recipients.

Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

Honours are bestowed on merit. A key aim of the honours system is to make it more equitable and better representative of the whole of the UK.

In the last 25 years (since October 1995) there have been 83 recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested, nor do we collect information on recipients of Order of Merit, as this is within the personal gift of The Sovereign.

Region

BEM

BEM%

MBE

MBE %

OBE

OBE %

CBE and Higher

CBE and Higher %

Total

Population %

East

39

7.3%

48

8.6%

24

9.4%

5

3.6%

116

9.3%

East Midlands

15

2.8%

19

3.4%

5

1.9%

1

0.7%

40

7.2%

London

45

8.4%

103

18.3%

61

23.9%

56

40.9%

264

12.9%

North East

23

4.3%

13

2.3%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

39

4.1%

North West

59

11.0%

46

8.2%

22

8.6%

9

6.6%

136

11.2%

South East

61

11.4%

76

13.5%

47

18.4%

25

18.2%

211

13.7%

South West

44

8.2%

47

8.4%

13

5.1%

5

3.6%

109

8.4%

West Midlands

40

7.4%

38

6.8%

17

6.7%

7

5.1%

102

13.7%

Yorkshire and Humberside

40

7.4%

29

5.2%

20

7.8%

11

8.0%

100

8.4%

Northern Ireland

63

11.7%

39

6.9%

12

4.7%

2

1.5%

115

2.9%

Scotland

64

11.9%

58

10.3%

21

8.2%

7

5.1%

151

8.4%

Wales

43

8.0%

43

7.7%

9

3.5%

7

5.1%

103

4.8%

Living Abroad

1

0.2%

2

0.4%

2

0.8%

1

0.7%

11

-

Total

537

561

255

102

1495

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect those civil servants who have been working at home during the COVID-19 pandemic to resume working physically in departments. [T]

Civil Service departments are planning for a phased return to the workplace from 1 August, in line with all relevant UK Government and devolved administration guidelines. Many civil servants have of course continued to attend their workplaces throughout the pandemic to support the government's response to this emergency, for example through delivering Universal Credit and the Furlough Scheme or other essential services.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Orders of Merit or Companions of Honour have been awarded in the last 25 years to those resident at the time in (1) London, and (2) Yorkshire.

Honours are bestowed on merit. However a key aim of the honours system is to make it more equitable and better representative of the whole of the UK.

In the last 25 years there have been 84 recipients of the Companion of Honour. We do not collect the information requested, nor do we collect information on recipients of Order of Merit, as this is within the personal gift of The Sovereign.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
27th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Howe on 20 January (HL106), how many people received a CBE or higher honour in the New Year Honours List 2020 in each of (1) the regions in England, and (2) the nations of the UK.

Significant progress has been made in recent years to improve diversity in the honours system. For example, we now consistently see around half of awards overall going to women, and in the New Year 2020 Honours List, 44% of senior honours went to women. Around 10% of awards go to recipients from a BAME background. We welcome more nominations from under-represented regions and we are running a programme of regional events to promote the system in those areas most under-represented.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients at CBE level or higher on the New Year Honours List 2020 can be found below. Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures.

REGION

NUMBER OF NY20 RECIPIENTS AT CBE AND ABOVE

PERCENTAGE OF NY20 RECIPIENTS AT CBE AND ABOVE

PERCENTAGE OF UK POPULATION

EAST

8

5.2%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

3

1.9%

7.2%

LONDON

74

47.4%

12.9%

NORTH EAST

2

1.3%

4.1%

NORTHERN IRELAND

4

2.6%

2.9%

NORTH WEST

9

5.8%

11.2%

SCOTLAND

7

4.5%

8.4%

SOUTH EAST

32

20.5%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

3

1.9%

8.4%

WALES

1

0.6%

4.8%

WEST MIDLANDS

7

4.5%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBERSIDE

5

3.2%

8.4%

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many of each category of honours were awarded in the New Year Honours List to people in (1) Wales, (2) Scotland, (3) Northern Ireland, and (4) each of the regions of England, as a (a) number, and (b) percentage, of that country or region's population.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients on the New Year Honours List 2020 can be found below. Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

REGION

NUMBER OF NY20 RECIPIENTS

PERCENTAGE OF NY20 LIST

PERCENTAGE OF UK POPULATION

EAST

84

7.7%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

36

3.3%

7.2%

LONDON

275

25.0%

12.9%

NORTH EAST

24

2.2%

4.1%

NORTHERN IRELAND

94

8.6%

2.9%

NORTH WEST

103

9.4%

11.2%

SCOTLAND

89

8.1%

8.4%

SOUTH EAST

141

12.9%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

79

7.2%

8.4%

WALES

42

3.8%

4.8%

WEST MIDLANDS

59

5.4%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBERSIDE

67

6.1%

8.4%

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many honours were awarded in the New Year Honours List to people in (1) London, and (2) each English city region that has a mayor, per head of population of that city or region.

Statistical information held in relation to the regional breakdown of recipients on the New Year Honours List 2020 can be found below. Data is collected using county and aggregated into regional figures. Information on the number of nominations by mayoral region is not captured, as we are not able to break down the data in that way.

REGION

NUMBER OF NY20 RECIPIENTS

PERCENTAGE OF NY20 LIST

PERCENTAGE OF UK POPULATION

EAST

84

7.7%

9.3%

EAST MIDLANDS

36

3.3%

7.2%

LONDON

275

25.0%

12.9%

NORTH EAST

24

2.2%

4.1%

NORTHERN IRELAND

94

8.6%

2.9%

NORTH WEST

103

9.4%

11.2%

SCOTLAND

89

8.1%

8.4%

SOUTH EAST

141

12.9%

13.7%

SOUTH WEST

79

7.2%

8.4%

WALES

42

3.8%

4.8%

WEST MIDLANDS

59

5.4%

8.9%

YORKSHIRE AND HUMBERSIDE

67

6.1%

8.4%

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
18th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 7 April (HL7355) what steps they will take, if any, against British petrol retailers who have not passed on to consumers the entire five pence cut in fuel duty from the 23 March Spring Statement.

The Government is clear that retailers should pass the 5 pence per litre cut in Fuel Duty on to consumers immediately.

The CMA has been closely monitoring the situation and will continue to do so. The Government is ready to support the CMA to use their powers to act against petrol stations if there is evidence that they are infringing competition or consumer law. This could ultimately lead to fines or legally binding commitments from companies to change their behaviour.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to prevent profiteering by companies increasing their prices following the five pence cut in fuel duty announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in his Spring Statement on 23 March.

The Government remains committed to tackling consumer rip-offs and bad business practices, including profiteering.

The CMA monitors firms suspected of profiteering to challenge unjustifiable price increases and stands ready to take enforcement action where there is evidence that competition or consumer protection law has been broken.

The Government continues to monitor the operation of consumer markets and keeps all options under review to ensure good value and service for consumers.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of any (1) immediate, and (2) future estimated, decrease in income for universities from international students; what assessment they have made of the impact of any such decrease on universities' ability to maintain research capacity; and what plans they have to review the (a) timing, and (b) relevance, of the Research Excellence Framework.

In the 2018/19 academic year, tuition fees from international students at UK higher education providers accounted for around £6.9bn of sector income. The Government recognises that the COVID-19 outbreak will have an unparalleled impact on all elements of the global and UK economy. The higher education sector, including student recruitment, is no exception. We have been working closely with the sector to monitor the likely impacts of COVID-19, on international student numbers, including restrictions on travel.

We are working with the sector to assess the potential implications for university research sustainability. In order to support this, we have established a joint BEIS/DfE Ministerial Taskforce on University Research and Knowledge Exchange Sustainability to engage with university sector experts, Devolved Administration and research funders to identify and assess risks of impacts, and to consider approaches to help manage these. The aim is to sustain the university research base and its capability to contribute effectively to UK society and economy in the recovery and beyond.

The Research Excellence Framework is operated jointly by the 4 UK HE Funding Bodies, who have recently gathered views on the revised timings for the REF. The Funding Bodies intend to report on the outcome and next steps by the end of May. The role of the REF in identifying and supporting research excellence with impact remains fundamental to maintaining the quality and capability of the university research base and its contribution to UK economy and society.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the research sustainability taskforce is expected to publish its recommendations; and what assessment that taskforce has made of the impact of any decrease in income from international students on the ability of higher education institutions to conduct research. [T]

The Taskforce was announced on 4 May. It was created to advise Government on the urgent decisions needed to ensure the university research sector emerges from the pandemic able to contribute to UK society and the economy in the recovery and beyond. It will not produce formal recommendations to government. It will advise government as it seeks to address challenges to the sustainability of university research and knowledge exchange arising from COVID-19 including loss of income from international students.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what agreement has been reached on the timetable for the further release of official Government documents relating to the period from 1997.

Government records are released in line with the requirements set out in the Public Records Act 1958 and the Freedom of Information Act 2000. Each department is responsible for complying with its obligations under this legislation.

Since 2013, Government departments have been transitioning to a ‘20-year rule’ – that is, transferring selected records 20 years after they were created. This is a reduction from 30 years. Under this transition, departments should be compliant with the 20-year timeframe by the end of 2022.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the findings of the Youth Evidence Review, published in December 2021, when they expect to publish their final summary report outlining the implications of the review on Government policy.

Last year, DCMS conducted a Youth Review to ensure that our spending, policy and programmes meet the needs of young people. The review heard from over 6,000 young people and 120 youth organisations. The Youth Evidence Review, which was published in December 2021, although separate, informed the DCMS-led youth review. The findings from the Youth Review will be published shortly.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
17th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Barran on 15 June (HL711), whether they will Place in the Library of the House a copy of the high level policy directions issued to The National Lottery Community Fund on the allocation of dormant assets funding.

The latest policy directions issued by the Secretary of State on the allocation of dormant assets funding are published by The National Lottery Community Fund (TNLCF) as part of its annual report. These policy directions will be the most recent at the time of TNCLF reporting. The annual report for 2019-20 is in the House Library and the annual report for 2020-21 will be laid before Parliament shortly.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the application by the Youth Futures Foundation to the Reclaim Fund specified the geographical regions in which any money it was allocated would be spent.

Reclaim Fund Ltd is the Dormant Assets Scheme’s administrator. It is responsible for managing dormant assets and transferring surplus funds to The National Lottery Community Fund, to be spent on social or environmental purposes. This funding is apportioned between the four nations with broad distribution decisions taken at a devolved level.

The Youth Futures Foundation is an independent organisation focussing on removing barriers for those furthest from the labour market. £90 million of the English portion of funding has been allocated to the Youth Futures Foundation for initiatives in England.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) guidance, or (2) directions, they have given to the Reclaim Fund about the priorities for the allocation of its funding; and what, if any, requirements that organisation must observe in the allocation of funding.

Reclaim Fund Ltd is the Dormant Assets Scheme’s administrator. It is responsible for managing dormant assets in case of customer reclaims, transferring surplus funds to The National Lottery Community Fund (TNLCF). TNLCF is the named distributor of dormant assets funding, responsible for apportioning the surplus money among the four nations to be spent on social or environmental purposes.

DCMS’ Secretary of State issues high level policy directions to TNLCF on the allocation of the English portion of this funding. It is directed to three social and environmental causes: youth, financial inclusion and social investment. These restrictions are currently set in primary legislation. To date, the funding has been directed to four independent organisations in England: Big Society Capital, Access – The Foundation for Social Investment, Fair4All Finance, and the Youth Futures Foundation.

Funding must fulfill the additionality principle, support the three defined causes and be distributed for initiatives in England. Beyond these requirements, the four specialist spend organisations are free to determine the most appropriate way to deliver against their objectives.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much of the funding distributed by the Reclaim Fund has been spent in each region of England by each of the organisations funded by the Reclaim Fund.

Reclaim Fund Ltd is the Dormant Assets Scheme’s administrator. It is responsible for managing dormant assets and transferring surplus funds to The National Lottery Community Fund, the named distributor of dormant assets funding. Funds must be spent on social or environmental purposes.

Dormant assets funding is not central government money and there is no central bidding process for accessing it. In England, funding is currently distributed to four specialist organisations who work across the areas of youth, financial inclusion and social investment. These organisations are independent from the government, and are not required to report to the government on geographical distribution of funding.

Funding must fulfill the additionality principle, support the three defined causes and be distributed for initiatives in England. Beyond this, the four specialist spend organisations are free to determine the most appropriate way to deliver against their objectives. This includes geographical distribution of any organisations which may apply to them for funding. The organisations themselves are responsible for managing any such applications, including the geographical distribution of their work.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the previously declared political affiliations of the current non-executive directors of the BBC; and what are the (1) present and (2) past, political affiliations of members of the BBC Board.

As per the BBC Charter, the Chair and Nations Members of the BBC Board are appointed by Her Majesty the Queen, via Order in Council, following a fair and open competition. All other members of the BBC Board are appointed by the BBC.

Upon appointment, the Governance Code requires that any significant political activity undertaken by an appointee in the last five years is declared. This is defined as including holding office, public speaking, making a recordable donation or candidature for election. As per the Governance Code on Public Appointments, ‘political activity should not affect any judgement of merit nor be a bar to appointment’.

The BBC Board’s Code of Practice also requires members of the BBC Board to publicly declare their personal interests (including any political interests), and to regularly update this declaration. The BBC publishes each Board member’s Declaration of Personal Interests annually via its website: https://www.bbc.com/aboutthebbc/whoweare/bbcboard.

Those BBC Board Members appointed by Her Majesty the Queen made the following declarations upon appointment:

  1. Chair: Richard Sharp declared he had made one political donation to the Conservative Party of £2,500 during the past five years at time of appointment.

  1. Scotland: Steve Morrison declared no such political activity during the past five years at time of appointment.

  1. England: Sir Robbie Gibb declared that between 2017 and 2019 he was Director of Communications at No10 Downing Street during the past five years at time of appointment.

  1. Wales: Dame Elan Cross Stephens declared no such political activity during the past five years at time of initial appointment in 2017 and reappointment in 2021.

  1. Northern Ireland: This role is currently vacant.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what arrangements, in any, they have made with (1) the Russell Group of universities, or (2) Universities UK, for the recognition of Ukrainian qualifications in order that Ukrainian refugees can continue their studies in the UK.

We have seen an extremely positive response from the higher education (HE) sector who have offered significant support to Ukrainian students and are pleased to see work they are doing across the sector for a coordinated approach to support students fleeing the conflict in Ukraine.

All UK higher education institutions (HEIs) subscribe to the UK National Information Centre for the recognition of qualifications (UK ENIC). This service, provided by ECCTIS Ltd on behalf of the government under contract to the Department for Education, has the necessary expertise and resources to provide advice to HEIs on the comparability of Ukrainian qualifications with those of the UK. UK ENIC stands ready to support HEIs and Ukrainian refugees to ensure they can continue their studies in the UK: https://ecctisblog.com/2022/03/15/ukraine-support-for-the-recognition-of-qualifications-and-skills-of-refugees/.

My right hon. Friend, the Minister for Higher and Further Education convened the HE Taskforce, bringing together representatives from across the sector to discuss how we can work together on a range of important issues including supporting Ukrainian universities, academics, and students.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what waivers they have agreed, if any, in relation to eligibility for (1) financial support in the form bursaries and loans, and (2) UK residency rules, in respect of fee levels for Ukrainian refugees wishing to continue their studies in the UK.

The department has been working closely with the education sector and across government more widely to ensure that Ukrainian students are supported during this difficult time. In March 2022, my right hon. Friend, the Minister for Higher and Further Education convened the higher education (HE) taskforce, bringing together representatives from across the sector to discuss how we can work together to facilitate the progression of Ukrainian students to HE.

The department is also providing support through the Strategic Priorities Grant to support Ukrainian nationals and Ukrainian-domiciled students studying at English HE providers. We have asked the Office for Students to use up to £4 million of funding in the 2022/23 financial year for providers to support Ukrainian nationals and Ukrainian-domiciled students whose usual financial support has been impacted by events in Ukraine.

The difficulties facing Ukrainian nationals and Ukrainian-domiciled students studying in England, following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, are unique. Whilst providers are already making their own student hardship funds available to Ukrainian students who need financial assistance, we are providing this funding to ensure there is additional support available to support these students to complete their courses.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
26th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Barran on 25 October (HL2904), how much was spent on the apprenticeship levy between 1 April and 30 September.

The details of apprenticeship budget spend for the 2021-22 financial year will be included in the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Annual Report and Accounts, which is due to be published in the second half of 2022.

The apprenticeships budget is used to fund training and assessment for new apprenticeship starts in levy and non-levy paying employers, to cover the ongoing costs of apprentices already in training and any additional payments made to employers and providers. The annual apprenticeship budget is set by Her Majesty’s Treasury and although closely linked, is distinct from the total levy income collected.

The Spending Review has delivered the first increase to apprenticeships funding since the 2019-20 financial year. Funding will grow to £2.7 billion by the 2024-25 financial year.

The funds available to levy-paying employers through their apprenticeship service accounts are distinct from the department’s annual apprenticeships budget. The table below shows the value of funds spent from levy-paying employers’ accounts in each month between 1 April and 30 September. As this only includes the funds spent by levy-paying employers, this does not represent total spend on apprenticeships for all employers in this period.

Month (2021)

Levy spent (£ million)

April

£98

May

£96

June

£99

July

£99

August

£100

September

£79

Total

£571

Note:

- The payments made from employer accounts within the apprenticeship service are made one month in arrears (i.e. apprenticeship levy funds spent in April relate to delivery in March).

- The cost of additional payments to employers, providers and apprentices, and the cost of payments for English and maths training, is met by the apprenticeship budget and therefore is not deducted from the levy funds in employers’ apprenticeship service accounts.

- The apprenticeship levy is collected by Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs from all UK employers with a pay bill above £3 million. The apprenticeship service handles the apprenticeships spend of those employers who choose to register an account with the service.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the percentage of apprenticeship levy that has not been spent in the current financial year to date; and what assessment they have made, if any, of the likely overall apprenticeship levy underspend in financial year 2021–22.

The details of apprenticeship budget spend for the 2021-22 financial year will be included in the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Annual Report and Accounts, which is due to be published in the second half of 2022. Employers have until 31 March 2022 to start new apprenticeships in the current financial year.

In the 2021-22 financial year, the apprenticeships programme budget is £2.5 billion for investment in apprenticeships in England, double that spent in the 2010-11 financial year in cash terms. The annual apprenticeship budget is set by HM Treasury and, although closely linked, is distinct from the total levy income collected by HM Revenue and Customs.

The levy is an important part of our reforms to create a high quality, employer-led apprenticeships system, and it supports employers of all sizes to invest in high-quality apprenticeship training.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many tutoring opportunities for children in England are currently available at (1) primary schools, (2) secondary schools, and (3) schools catering for special educational needs.

For this academic year the National Tutoring Programme will offer access to high quality tuition for up to 2 million pupils.

The latest figures for the current academic year, to the end of September 2021 are:

  • 40 Tuition Partners have been accredited
  • 2,800 schools have placed orders with Tuition Partners
  • 6,400 pupils started a tuition program with Tuition Partners
  • 353 Academic Mentors have been placed in schools

All state-funded primary and secondary schools in England, including academies and free schools, have also received funding to deliver school-led tutoring giving them the flexibility to choose their own tutors. Funding has been calculated based on the number of pupil premium students in individual schools.

There is currently no comprehensive break down between primary schools and secondary schools. The department will have this information by the end of the autumn term.

Specialist settings including special schools and academies, alternative provision, pupil referral units and hospital schools, will receive an uplift to their school led tuition funding to cater for the additional per pupil costs they face.

I can confirm we have Tuition Partners who between them have capacity to support a total of 80,000 pupils in special educational needs settings.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they plan to monitor employers’ behaviour to ensure that they are meeting their public sector equality duties in respect of teachers with a disability.

Under the Equality Act 2010, schools must not discriminate against a pupil or member of staff in a number of respects because of a characteristic protected by the Act. As employers, schools are under the same duties to make reasonable adjustments in relation to disability for their employees or potential employees as they are for their pupils. State funded schools are also subject to the Public Sector Equality Duty.

The department has published guidance on the Equality Act 2010 for schools, which includes advice on how they can meet their duties under the Act. We expect schools to adhere to their statutory requirements as employers and do not monitor this at a school level on a routine basis. The guidance can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/315587/Equality_Act_Advice_Final.pdf.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission provides more detailed advice on workplace adjustment and has powers to enforce equality legislation. Additionally, the Equality Advisory and Support Service, is an independent service aimed at individuals who need information, advice and support on discrimination and human rights issues.

18th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to increase participation in adult education below level three.

Through the adult education budget (AEB), we fully fund or co-fund skills provision for eligible adults aged 19 and above from pre-entry to level 3, to support adults to gain the skills they need for work, an apprenticeship or further learning. This includes fully funded first full level 2 and/or level 3 for learners aged 19 to 23.

Learners in receipt of low wage (£17,374.50 annual gross salary or less) who would previously have been co-funded, are eligible for full funding following the earlier low wage trial that operated in the 2018/19 and the 2019/20 academic years. This directly supports social mobility by enabling those that have been motivated to move out of unemployment and are low paid or skilled, to further progress.

We specifically recognise the importance of English, mathematics and digital skills, both in work and everyday life. That is why we are continuing to support participation in these areas to meet employers’ needs and support people to progress in employment or further study.

We provide full funding for learners who need English and mathematics skills to undertake a range of courses in GCSEs, Functional Skills and other relevant qualifications from entry level to level 2. We also fully or co-fund adults to take English for Speakers of Other Languages as part of our wider effort to improve adult literacy in England.

Adults with no or low digital skills are fully funded to undertake new Essential Digital Skills Qualifications at entry level and level 1, based on new national standards for essential digital skills, which equip learners with the digital skills needed for life, work and further study.

We also support training for adults in community settings through the AEB. Prioritised for disadvantaged learners, community learning can provide a 'stepping stone' for those adults who are not ready for formal accredited learning, or who would benefit from learning in a more informal way.

The department is reviewing post-16 qualifications at level 3 and below, to ensure that every qualification approved for public funding has a distinct purpose, is high quality and supports progression to positive outcomes. We recognise that level 2 and below study serves students with a diverse range of needs, and that some young people and adults studying at these levels may require additional support to help realise their ambitions.

One of the first steps to realise our ambitions for level 2 and below study is a government call for evidence, which launched on 12 November 2020. It gives the education sector, industry, and others with an interest in study at these levels the opportunity to share their views on how the level 2 and below system can best work in the context of our proposed reforms to level 3 qualifications. The level 2 and below call for evidence closed on 14 February. We will set out further proposals later this year. The call for evidence is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/post-16-study-at-level-2-and-below-call-for-evidence.

18th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that all adult education funding that is clawed back from grant fund providers is re-invested in adult learning opportunities.

As we address the challenges presented by COVID-19, it is vital that we support adults, including those working in sectors directly affected by COVID-19, to attain the skills that will be needed in the economy of the future.

Starting this year, the government is investing £2.5 billion in the National Skills Fund. Investment in skills through the National Skills Fund is vital as it ensures that adults have the opportunity to retrain at different points throughout their lives and can progress into higher wage employment.

From 1 April 2021, the government is supporting any adult who does not have A levels or equivalent qualifications, to access almost 400 fully funded level 3 courses, with Free Courses for Jobs.

Complementing this support for adults, we have introduced Skills Bootcamps which offer free, flexible courses of up to 16 weeks, giving people the opportunity to build up sector-specific skills and fast-track to an interview with a local employer.

We have already introduced Skills Bootcamps in 6 areas (West Midlands, Greater Manchester and Lancashire, Liverpool City Region, Leeds City Region, Heart of South West, and Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire) and we are investing a further £43 million from the National Skills Fund to expand them across England.

Funding that is clawed back from grant fund providers will be reinvested in departmental priorities, including to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on providers and learners, enabling us to allocate resources effectively across the department and live within our Parliamentary control totals.

2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what information schools have received about (1) their eligibility to access the COVID-19 related funding announced on 19 June and 20 July, (2) the amount of such funding they are likely to be entitled to, and (3) the timeframe for receiving such funding.

On 19 June, the government announced a £1 billion COVID-19 catch up package, including a £650 million catch up premium to help schools support all pupils and the £350 million National Tutoring Programme for disadvantaged students. Headteachers can decide how best to use their schools’ premium allocation to tackle the impact of lost teaching time on their pupils, but are encouraged to spend it on evidence-driven approaches including small group or one-to-one tuition, support over the summer, or additional support for great teaching. To help schools make the best use of this funding, the Education Endowment Foundation has published a support guide for schools with evidence-based approaches to catch up for all students, available here: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/covid-19-support-guide-for-schools/#nav-covid-19-support-guide-for-schools1 and a further school planning guide: 2020 to 2021, available here: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/guide-to-supporting-schools-planning/.

On 20 July, the government published guidance setting out further information on the package, including details of the £650 million catch up premium. The funding will be available for all state-funded mainstream and special schools, and alternative provision. The guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-catch-up-premium.

All pupils have been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak, so schools’ allocations from the catch-up premium will be calculated on a per pupil basis. This will provide each mainstream school with a total of £80 for each pupil and special, alternative provision and hospital schools with £240 for each place, across the 2020/21 academic year. We have applied additional weighting to specialist settings, recognising the significantly higher per pupil costs they face.

The funding is to support catch up across the academic year and will therefore be provided in 3 tranches. We will provide schools with an initial part payment in autumn 2020, based on the latest available data. This will ensure schools do not need to delay in setting up programmes. We will then distribute a second grant payment in early 2021, based on actual pupil and place data for the 2020 to 2021 academic year, and a final payment will be made in the summer term 2021.

In addition to the catch-up premium, we will spend up to £350 million on a National Tutoring Programme, to provide targeted support to disadvantage and vulnerable pupils. The programme, which has 2 strands will commence from November 2020. Through the Tuition Partners strand, schools will be eligible to access heavily subsidised tuition from an approved list of tuition partners for their pupils. Through our Academic Mentors strand, schools in the most disadvantaged areas can apply for support to employ in-house Academic Mentor to provide small group and 1:1 tuition to their pupils. Further information can be found here: https://nationaltutoring.org.uk/faqs.

6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to review the Special Educational Needs and Disability (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2020 in line with the commitment to restoring duties under section 42 of the Children and Families Act 2014 when the current notice lapses on 1 August.

As part of our response to the COVID-19 outbreak we made temporary changes to the law relating to special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). This was to strike the right balance between:

  • the needs of children and young people with SEND to be protected and receive the right support in a timely way; and
  • managing the demands on local authorities, health bodies and education settings to respond to the outbreak.

As part of the plans for children and young people returning to full-time education in September, we have announced that (unless the evidence changes) the modification to the duties on local authorities and health commissioning bodies to secure or arrange the provision in education, health and care (EHC) plans will cease at the end of July.

We have been closely monitoring the impact of the changes we made to secondary legislation that allow greater flexibility to local authorities and their partners over the timescales for various EHC needs assessment and plan processes. As things stand, the Regulations in question expire on 25 September 2020. We have committed to keeping the changes to the law in place for no longer than is necessary. We expect to make a decision next month as to how long the changes to these timescales should remain in force.

20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on funding for (1) medical faculties, and (2) the teaching of STEM subjects, at higher education institutions of any fall in the amount of funding received by cross-subsidisation from students of arts and humanities subjects due to a decrease in the numbers of any such students. [T]

In light of COVID-19, we have carefully assessed the challenges the sector is facing and brought forward a comprehensive support package for higher education providers and students in order to stabilise the admissions system and ease pressures on universities’ finances. This included confirming universities’ eligibility to apply for the government financial support schemes and bringing forward £100 million of research funding and an estimated £2.6 billion worth of tuition fee payments for providers. The government continues to prioritise science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects and medicine.

Additionally, the government continues to contribute teaching grant funding to support the delivery of priority activity, including for high-cost subjects. High-cost subject funding is due to total £690 million for 2020-21 and it is targeted at many STEM courses, as well as medicine. Very high-cost STEM subject funding is due to be £24 million for 2020-21.

21st Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress, if any, they have made on establishing the membership, methodology and timescale of the review into the funding of special needs education for children in England.

​​In September 2019 the government announced a review of the support system for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND).

The SEND review is internal to the government. The review considers how the system can work best for all families whilst ensuring quality provision is more consistently available and improve child outcomes whilst improving value for money. The government recently called for evidence on the effectiveness of current arrangements to fund schools to support SEND pupils, and officials will consider this evidence alongside the review.

Our officials are working closely with stakeholders. There are 3 independent advisers on the cross-government steering group: Tony McArdle, Lead Commissioner in Northamptonshire County Council, former Education Endowment Fund Chair Sir Kevan Collins and Anne Heavey, National Director of Whole School SEND. We will provide an update on progress with the review and our plans for further engagement shortly.​

26th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to negotiate, under the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, the removal of the bureaucratic barriers and costs facing the owners of guide dogs and other assistance dogs entering the EU, including the expense of animal health certificates and other measures imposed following the UK's departure from the EU.

The UK has been formally 'listed' as a 'Part 2' third country for the purposes of the EU pet travel scheme, which means that new rules apply to pet movements from Great Britain to the EU and to Northern Ireland. The pet health and documentary requirements for such pet travel are set out under the EU Pet Travel Regulations.

Defra recognises the impact that these changes are having on pet owners and assistance dog users. We are continuing to seek agreement from the European Commission on awarding Great Britain 'Part 1' listed status and recognition of the UK's tapeworm-free status, and we see no valid animal health reason for these not to be granted.

We have one of the most rigorous pet checking regimes in Europe to protect our biosecurity and we are currently planning for further engagement with the EU to progress both of these issues. Achieving these would alleviate a number of pet travel rules for all travellers, including the need for an Animal Health Certificate (AHC). The costs of completing and issuing an AHC are commercial decisions, set by individual veterinary practices.

We are proactively engaging with the assistance dog community and relevant stakeholders on the impacts on dog movements from Great Britain to the EU. We will continue to work closely with assistance dog organisations to share the latest advice and guidance (in accessible formats) with their members on pet travel requirements.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to grant relief from the rules requiring vehicles registered overseas to be registered and taxed in the UK after a maximum period of six months for Ukrainian refugees arriving in the UK in private vehicles; and, if they do not have such plans, whether they will extend the six month period for vehicle registration and taxation until the first to occur of (1) an application by Ukrainian refugees for permanent residence in the UK, or (2) three years after their arrival in the UK.

The Government is determined to ensure that Ukrainian arrivals encounter a warm reception in the UK, and the Department for Transport is presently engaging with DVLA colleagues to explore policy options, including possible options surrounding the vehicle registration fees for Ukrainian plated vehicles entering the UK.

My Department has also worked with the transport sector to provide wider assistance to those fleeing here from the conflict. Since mid-March 2022, all Ukrainians that enter the UK with the appropriate visa can travel on public transport from their port of entry to their end destination at no cost if travel occurs within 48 hours of arrival. This includes rail, bus and all Transport for London routes. To date, over 2,200 rail journeys have been made via the free onward travel offer, and many more on UK bus, coach and tram services. On the 20 June, this scheme was extended for a further six months.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking (1) to return DVLA staff to their offices, and (2) to reverse any decline in the productivity of the DVLA caused by measures taken to combat the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)’s online services are the quickest and easiest way to renew a driving licence. Online applications are not subject to delays and successful applicants will receive their driving licence within a few days.

However, many people still choose or have to make a paper application for a driving licence. The DVLA receives around 60,000 items of mail every day which must be dealt with in person. The DVLA has been working with a reduced number of operational staff on site to allow for social distancing, in line with Welsh Government requirements. This, as well as ongoing industrial action by members of the Public and Commercial Services Union (PCS), has led to delays. There may be additional delays in processing more complex transactions, for example, if medical investigations are needed.

Currently, driving licence applications made on paper are likely to take six to ten weeks to process. More information on turnaround times is available on the DVLA Covid-19 update page on GOV.UK.

The DVLA has reconfigured its accommodation to safely maximise the number of staff on site and is working hard to process applications as quickly as possible. The DVLA has accelerated the development of additional online services to reduce the number of paper applications and supported their take up through a publicity campaign. Further digital service enhancements are underway.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the current waiting time is for the (1) renewal of, and (2) alteration to, driving licences.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)’s online services are the quickest and easiest way to renew a driving licence. Online applications are not subject to delays and successful applicants will receive their driving licence within a few days.

However, many people still choose or have to make a paper application for a driving licence. The DVLA receives around 60,000 items of mail every day which must be dealt with in person. The DVLA has been working with a reduced number of operational staff on site to allow for social distancing, in line with Welsh Government requirements. This, as well as ongoing industrial action by members of the Public and Commercial Services Union (PCS), has led to delays. There may be additional delays in processing more complex transactions, for example, if medical investigations are needed.

Currently, driving licence applications made on paper are likely to take six to ten weeks to process. More information on turnaround times is available on the DVLA Covid-19 update page on GOV.UK.

The DVLA has reconfigured its accommodation to safely maximise the number of staff on site and is working hard to process applications as quickly as possible. The DVLA has accelerated the development of additional online services to reduce the number of paper applications and supported their take up through a publicity campaign. Further digital service enhancements are underway.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which countries are refusing to accept COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction tests taken in the UK for the purposes of travel and entry into their jurisdiction; and what steps they are taking to establish reciprocal arrangements for testing (1) prior to, and (2) at the conclusion of, travel into the UK.

It is a matter for each country to decide on appropriate health measures and some countries require different tests in line with their requirements. As international travel re-opens, where safe to do so, it is important for travellers to check the relevant travel advice for their destination country.

As set out in the recommendations of the Global Travel Taskforce, we are engaging bilaterally with international partners to explore how we can open international travel safely, including the potential piloting of digital and non-digital COVID-19 certification.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have for the future of (1) the Kickstart programme, or (2) its successor scheme.

The Department for Work and Pension’s Kickstart Scheme has now seen over 130,000 jobs started by young people. Young people can still start a Kickstart job until the 31st March and our priority remains to get as many young people who need one into a Kickstart job by that date.

1) The Department for Work and Pensions is monitoring and evaluating the Kickstart scheme throughout and after its implementation, and will continue to evaluate the longer term outcomes for Kickstart participants after they have completed their six-month jobs. Fieldwork for the commissioned evaluation will continue until at least 2023 and we will publish the findings of the evaluation once complete.

2) Building on our experience of the Kickstart Scheme and the many new relationships we have established with employers, we have launched the Way to Work campaign. This is a new concerted national drive to help half a million people who are currently on benefits and job ready to move into jobs by the end of June 2022, supporting them to take their next step to building a more secure and prosperous future.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing Kickstart applications, referrals and starts, the data collected might be subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system, which has been developed quickly.

The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics but is provided in the interests of transparency. Work is ongoing to improve the quality of information available for the programme.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that occupational health services are in place to support people with long-term effects from COVID-19 with adjustments and rehabilitation to facilitate their return to work.

The Government recognise the important role that OH professionals play in supporting people with health conditions and their employers. In the Health is Everyone’s Business consultation we asked for views on how to increase access to occupational health services that can support people with disabilities and long term health conditions. We are considering the next steps in light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and anticipate that a response will be available shortly.

Access to Work offers substantial practical support to disabled people and people with heath conditions, which include people affected by Long COVID. The scheme has rolled out a number of easements to ensure that those who are eligible for support can receive it.

As research into the long-term health symptoms and impacts of Covid-19 is ongoing, we will continue to monitor and consider the Government’s support provisions and approach as evidence emerges.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to publish a White Paper in response to the Health is everyone’s business: proposals to reduce ill health-related job loss consultation,which closed on 7 October 2019; and what plans they have to include in any such White Paper proposals to reduce the costs of ill health and absence from work for (1) individuals, and (2) businesses. [T]

We plan to publish the response to the consultation ‘Health is everyone’s business: proposals to reduce ill health-related job loss’ later this year. The consultation set out proposals to encourage all employers to take positive action to support employees who are managing health conditions in work, and to manage sickness absence more effectively.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the extent to which all staff within the NHS have access to occupational health services, and (2) the benefits of occupational health services to staff within the NHS.

Responsibility for the provision of occupational health services lies with National Health Service employing organisations, who have a duty of care to staff linked to the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. Staff are also covered by the NHS Constitution for the right to work in healthy and safe working conditions.

The People Plan’s NHS Growing Occupational Health Programme strengthens support for occupational health as a preventative approach to health and wellbeing. Occupational health can improve attendance by addressing causes of sickness absence and support staff to return to work. The current benefits of occupational health include rapid access to evidence-based mental health interventions and tailored health and wellbeing offers for NHS staff.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the priorities for the Office for Health Improvements and Disparities will be published; and what prioritisation will be given to work-related health.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities (OHID) aims to ensure that people can live more of life in good health and address health disparities. The OHID will develop partnerships across Government, communities, industry and employers, on the factors that contribute to health, such as work, housing and education. The OHID also incorporates working with the Department for Work and Pensions via the joint Work and Health Unit. We will set out further actions on health disparities in a white paper in due course.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many individuals sentenced to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) since 2005 died whilst serving their sentence in a secure hospital; and what were the causes of death in each case.

The information requested is not collected.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the commitments made in People at the Heart of Care: adult social care reform white paper, published on 1 December, what plans they have to set out a strategy to increase the supply of supported housing for older people.

We will continue to incentivise the supply of supported housing for older and disabled people through the Care and Support Specialised Housing Fund, with £213 million available over the next three years. This is alongside a new £300 million investment to connect housing with health and care and increase the stock of new supported housing.

We are working closely with stakeholders private and social sectors to inform future cross-Government action to stimulate a specialist housing market that delivers effectively. We will work in partnership with local authorities, housing providers and others to design our new investment and will share further detail with interested parties as this work develops.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the average response time for each of the ambulance services in England in (1) April, (2) July, and (3) October, for (a) emergency, and (b) routine, calls.

The information is not collected in the format requested. Ambulance response times are measured across four categories as follows:

- Category 1 - life threatening;

- Category 2 - emergency;

- Category 3 - urgent; and

- Category 4 - non-urgent.

Data on the mean response times in hours, minutes and seconds for Category 1 to 4 calls for each ambulance service in England in April, July and October 2021, is attached due to the size of the data.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 15 September (HL2404), what steps they are taking to support primary care services in England offering both (1) initial COVID-19 vaccinations, and (2) the COVID-19 booster vaccination.

To ensure the vaccination programme is delivered sustainably, NHS England and NHS Improvement recommended that local health systems should spread capacity across community pharmacy, vaccination centres and general practice. Additional funding has been made available to support general practices to deliver the COVID-19 vaccination programme, including for the Primary Care Network (PCN) Clinical Director role and incentives to support vaccination programme delivery goals.

Throughout the vaccination programme, providers have been able to access centrally sourced workforce, including unregistered vaccinators through the lead employer model, using a national protocol as appropriate to support vaccination delivery. This workforce offer is continuing in the autumn booster programme and includes volunteers.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether the Carr-Hill funding formula for primary health care is able to address the additional pressures created by the COVID-19 pandemic and, in particular, the pressures on primary care practices in areas of low vaccine take-up; and what steps they intend to take as a result.

The Carr-Hill funding formula adjusts the global sum payment to general practitioner (GP) contractors. The formula weights a practice’s patient list against a number of factors which reflect differences in the age and sex composition of the practice demographic, additional pressures generated by differential rates of patient turnover, morbidity, and the impact of geographical location. The Carr-Hill funding formula does not reflect changes in demand unless they are a result of a change in patient demographic or unavoidable practice costs, and so does not directly address COVID-19 related pressures or areas of low vaccine take-up.

To ensure that general practices are able to meet demand generated by the pandemic, we have made available an additional ringfenced £270 million from November 2020 until September 2021, to ensure GPs and their teams are able to continue to support all patients.

6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to make it a commitment that the Social Care Taskforce addresses the care and support needs of working age disabled people.

The impact of COVID-19 on people with disabilities and learning difficulties will be one of the focuses for the new Social Sector COVID-19 Support Taskforce.

The Social Care Sector COVID-19 Support Taskforce will ensure the delivery of two packages of support that the Government has put in place for the care sector and will be supported by several advisory groups including one on support for people with learning disabilities and autism.

30th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they plan to develop a national COVID-19 test and tracing system; how that system will operate; how that system will be held accountable for its work; and what will be the role of local Directors of Public Health and related professionals.

We are developing a new test and trace programme which will bring together an app, expanded web and phone-based contact tracing, and swab testing for those with potential COVID-19 symptoms.

If someone installs the National Health Service COVID-19 app, it will start logging the distance between their phone and other phones nearby that also have the app installed. It measures this distance using a form of Bluetooth that is less energy hungry than normal Bluetooth. This log of proximity information will be stored securely on the person’s phone. If a person becomes unwell with symptoms of COVID-19, they can report this to the NHS via the app which will mean that other app users who have come into significant contact with that person over the previous few days can be alerted and provided with advice if appropriate.

The first phase of the app rollout is taking place on the Isle of Wight. This will ensure the app is functioning as expected and will help us to see how it works best alongside the web and phone-based systems and to ensure that it dovetails with the testing programme.

Ministers are accountable to Parliament for the Department’s response to COVID-19, including the test and trace programme.

Directors of Public Health and their teams will be key to the local delivery of the test and trace programme.

25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to invest in NHS occupational health services; and whether any such plans include procurement from private sector providers which have capacity to provide services.

Occupational health services are vitally important in keeping people healthy and safe in the workplace. The command paper, Improving Lives: The Future of Work, Health and Disability, committed to setting out a clear strategy for the future occupational health market reform. Following the Health is everyone’s business consultation published in July 2019, an upcoming response will outline future occupational health strategy.

The health and wellbeing of National Health Service staff is very important. As part of the NHS People Plan, we plan to set out a comprehensive package of support that all NHS staff can expect to receive from their employer, including rapid access to occupational health services. Publication of the final NHS People Plan has been deferred to allow the NHS to provide maximum operational effort to COVID-19 response. However, we have commissioned the NHS to urgently put in place a package of support for NHS staff during COVID-19 response.

14th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultation they have undertaken with banking and finance industry bodies about the new requirements for two factor authentication for online payments, in particular relating to (1) potential disruption to business continuity, (2) consumer confidence, and (3) the cost of additional time incurred.

Regulatory technical standards relating to Strong Customer Authentication have been introduced across retail banking and payment services. These set industry requirements regarding two-factor authentication, for which the Financial Conduct Authority is the responsible authority.

The FCA consulted ahead of making regulatory technical standards for strong customer authentication, and have taken steps to ensure that as far as possible retailers are ready, including working though UK Finance and engaging with retailer trade bodies. Recognising concerns about industry readiness, and to account for impacts of COVID-19, implementation for card-based e-commerce transactions was postponed in several stages, from September 2019 to March 2022.

The rules aim to ensure that the person requesting access to your account, or trying to make a payment, is either you or someone to whom you have given consent. This is in order to enhance consumer protection and improve security.

Baroness Penn
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
24th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Penn on 21 February (HL6023 and HL6024), what impact analysis was undertaken by HM Treasury on the impact of the UK's departure from the EU on income tax and national insurance receipts prior to the enactment of the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020.

HMRC did not undertake any analysis of the impact of the enactment of the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020 on Income Tax and National Insurance contribution receipts.

The Withdrawal Agreement has no effect on the arrangements to protect individuals and businesses from double taxation where the same income or gains are taxable in both countries. The UK has bilateral double taxation agreements with all EU Member States, which continue to apply now that the UK has left the EU.

The Withdrawal Agreement applies the EU Regulations on social security coordination to individuals in a ‘cross-border situation’ involving the UK and the EU at the end of the transition period, ensuring that they continue to pay social security contributions into one country’s scheme at a time.

Baroness Penn
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
7th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the loss to the Treasury in (1) tax, and (2) National Insurance, from jobs previously undertaken in the UK that were outsourced to other parts of the world in (a) 2015, and (b) 2021.

HMRC has not made any assessment of the loss to the Treasury of tax or National Insurance from:

  • individuals from Europe who have returned to the EU since the UK’s departure from the EU, or
  • jobs previously undertaken in the UK that were outsourced to other parts of the world in (a) 2015, and (b) 2021.
Baroness Penn
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
7th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the loss to the Treasury of (1) tax, and (2) National Insurance, from individuals from Europe who have returned to the EU since the UK's departure from the EU.

HMRC has not made any assessment of the loss to the Treasury of tax or National Insurance from:

  • individuals from Europe who have returned to the EU since the UK’s departure from the EU, or
  • jobs previously undertaken in the UK that were outsourced to other parts of the world in (a) 2015, and (b) 2021.
Baroness Penn
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
1st Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the calculation for the increased passenger duty on long-haul flights will be made on the shortest distance between the UK and the intended destination, or the route to be taken by the airline concerned.

Distance bands within Air Passenger Duty are based on the distance from London to the destination country’s capital city.

Distance to a country's capital city is used as a straightforward proxy for distance to that country, making it as easy as possible to administer the tax – as well as improving transparency for the end consumer.

12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the financial capability of UK citizens; whether it is affected by (1) age group, (2) gender, or (3) region; and what plans they have to review the provision of financial education in secondary schools.

The government is committed to ensuring that people are able to use, and maximise their use of, products and services made available by the financial services industry. Government policy on financial capability and education focuses on ensuring that people can access the guidance they need and have the confidence and skills to successfully engage with their finances. That is why the government established the Money and Pension Service (MaPS) in January 2019, merging the three former organisations providing free-to-use financial guidance (the Money Advice Service, The Pensions Advisory Service, and Pension Wise) to simplify the existing public financial guidance landscape and offer more holistic support to consumers.

MaPS’s 2018 Adult Financial Capability Survey identified and measured the key components of financial capability through a large, nationally representative sample. This data can be broken down across a range of sociodemographic factors including age, gender and region. The full dataset is publicly available and will be updated later this year.

In 2020, MaPS published the UK Strategy for Financial Wellbeing, which sets out five national goals to improve the UK’s financial wellbeing by 2030. These include 2 million more children and young people getting a meaningful financial education, and 5 million more people understanding enough to plan for, and in, later life. The Strategy also includes three cross-cutting lenses focusing on gender, mental health, and wellbeing in the workplace. MaPS are working closely with a range of stakeholders from different sectors to deliver the Strategy, including to develop delivery plans for each of the four UK nations.

The government has no plans to review the provision of financial education. In 2014, for the first time, financial literacy was made statutory within the National Curriculum in England, as part of the curriculum for citizenship education for 11 to 16 year olds. At the same time, the government also introduced a rigorous mathematics curriculum, which provides pupils with the knowledge and skills to make important financial decisions. The Department for Education trusts schools to use their professional judgement and understanding of their pupils to develop the right teaching approach for their school.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many children in receipt of (1) Disability Living Allowance, and (2) personal independence payment, received an additional Child Trust Fund (CTF) payment in each year since 2005; and what estimate they have made of the number of such children who have been able to access savings held in a CTF (a) with, and (b) without, a court order.

Estimates of the number of children in receipt of Disability Living Allowance and/or personal independence payments who received additional Child Trust Fund payments would only be available at a disproportionate cost.

HMRC has created a simple online tool to help young people find out where their account is held. If someone does not know where the CTF is held, they can use this service at any time. This will provide the details of the account. For those who do not have the identifying information required to access the tool, HMRC will provide alternative, non-digital routes to finding a CTF provider upon request. HMRC and The Share Foundation are also working together to help children in need of further support. Further information can be found - https://www.gov.uk/government/news/teenagers-to-get-access-to-child-trust-funds-for-first-time.

Data is not available for those that have accessed CTFs with or without a court order. However, On 1 December the Government made an announcement regarding the clarification of guidance on court fees and CTFs.

29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to protect UK consumers and businesses following Wirecard AG filing for insolvency. [T]

Wirecard AG, the German payments provider, entered administration last week. It has a UK subsidiary, Wirecard Card Solution Ltd (Wirecard UK), which is FCA regulated. This subsidiary is not in administration.

Last week, the FCA temporarily applied restrictions to Wirecard UK’s business while the firm ensured it could safeguard customers’ money. The government worked closely with the FCA to understand and mitigate the impact of this measure – for example, the DWP worked to ensure those who received benefits into accounts using Wirecard UK had an alternate means of receiving payments.

The firm has now been able to demonstrate that it has met the necessary conditions, and the restrictions were lifted on Tuesday 30 June. Customers can access their money as usual.

24th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Penn on 21 February (HL6024 and HL6025), what impact analysis was undertaken by the Home Office on likely labour shortages arising from policies designed to treat EU citizens on the same basis as migrants from other parts of the world.

The Home Office published “Impact Assessment for Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill 2020” which is attached (1) and “Impact Assessment for changes to the Immigration Rules for Skilled Workers” which is also attached (2), respectively.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many individuals are employed by the Defence Intelligence organisation; and what is the budget for its operations.

The Defence Intelligence workforce at 31 March 2021 was circa 4,100 people and the budget for the same period was £349 million. We report annually to the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament on the size of the Defence Intelligence workforce and budget. The Committee normally publishes this information in its Annual Reports.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress the National Probation Service has made towards freeing capacity to hear more Imprisonment for Public Protection release decision cases since the publication of the Joint IPP Action Plan, published by Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service and the Parole Board in June 2019.

Over the last two years, the Parole Board has adapted its operating model to increase its hearing capacity through the use of technology and via intensive paper reviews which led to a record 9202 oral hearings conducted in 2020/21, 938 more than in 2019/20. In 2020/21 the Parole Board completed a total 1566 oral hearings (reviews and recalls) for prisoners serving IPP sentences. This was a 3% increase from 2019/20.

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what support is available to (1) Imprisonment for Public Protection prisoners to address the mental health impact of their sentence, and (2) individuals serving an Imprisonment for Public Protection on licence in the community to prevent unnecessary recalls.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison andor in the community. During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

There have been four new E-learning modules introduced for the use of probation practitioners which cover different aspects of supporting offenders serving indeterminate sentences; three of the modules cover work with those serving IPP sentences specifically, whilst the fourth is about actions at the point of sentencing for life sentences.

The three packages cover progression through the sentence, taking into account individual need, the processes during the pre-release phase, and how to manage indeterminate sentenced offenders once they are released into the community.

These packages, available now, will also form part of the Continuous Professional Development packs currently being created by the Probation Service for operational staff.

We take mental health very seriously and recognise that providing the right interventions at the right time is vital to improve outcomes for people with mental health needs, including IPP offenders.

HMPPS is mindful that IPP prisoners do not have a definite release date and, on that account, provides each IPP prisoner with a key worker, as well as a qualified probation officer, to explain what they need to do to reduce their risk and to help them access the support services they need.

Health and justice partners have committed to providing a standard of health care in prisons equivalent to that available in the community. Through the National Partnership Agreement, health and justice partners are working closely to improve support and continuity of care when someone leaves prison. HMPPS continues to work with National Health Service England (NSHE) to develop RECONNECT, a care after custody service which supports vulnerable prison leavers in their transition to community-based health services.

The power to recall an offender to custody is a vital public protection measure when it comes to supervising any offender on licence. We have no evidence that probation officers are recalling IPP offenders to custody where they do not have compelling reason to do so. The HM Inspectorate of Probation Report – ‘A thematic review of probation recall culture and practice’ – published in 2020, found that the Probation Service is using recall appropriately, to prevent further serious offending and protect the public.

Probation officers explore other risk management steps to secure compliance and manage risk before requesting a recall. What might appear to be a relatively minor breach of a licence condition might, where the associated behaviour is similar to the behaviour when the offender committed the offence which attracted the IPP sentence, indicate that the offender needs to be recalled to protect the public.

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress the National Probation Service has made towards delivering a strategy to develop skills of all (1) practitioners, and (2) operational line managers, to manage Imprisonment for Public Protection cases since the publication of the Joint IPP Action Plan, published by Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service and the Parole Board in June 2019.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison andor in the community. During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

There have been four new E-learning modules introduced for the use of probation practitioners which cover different aspects of supporting offenders serving indeterminate sentences; three of the modules cover work with those serving IPP sentences specifically, whilst the fourth is about actions at the point of sentencing for life sentences.

The three packages cover progression through the sentence, taking into account individual need, the processes during the pre-release phase, and how to manage indeterminate sentenced offenders once they are released into the community.

These packages, available now, will also form part of the Continuous Professional Development packs currently being created by the Probation Service for operational staff.

We take mental health very seriously and recognise that providing the right interventions at the right time is vital to improve outcomes for people with mental health needs, including IPP offenders.

HMPPS is mindful that IPP prisoners do not have a definite release date and, on that account, provides each IPP prisoner with a key worker, as well as a qualified probation officer, to explain what they need to do to reduce their risk and to help them access the support services they need.

Health and justice partners have committed to providing a standard of health care in prisons equivalent to that available in the community. Through the National Partnership Agreement, health and justice partners are working closely to improve support and continuity of care when someone leaves prison. HMPPS continues to work with National Health Service England (NSHE) to develop RECONNECT, a care after custody service which supports vulnerable prison leavers in their transition to community-based health services.

The power to recall an offender to custody is a vital public protection measure when it comes to supervising any offender on licence. We have no evidence that probation officers are recalling IPP offenders to custody where they do not have compelling reason to do so. The HM Inspectorate of Probation Report – ‘A thematic review of probation recall culture and practice’ – published in 2020, found that the Probation Service is using recall appropriately, to prevent further serious offending and protect the public.

Probation officers explore other risk management steps to secure compliance and manage risk before requesting a recall. What might appear to be a relatively minor breach of a licence condition might, where the associated behaviour is similar to the behaviour when the offender committed the offence which attracted the IPP sentence, indicate that the offender needs to be recalled to protect the public.

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress the National Probation Service has made towards developing a package of learning for newly qualified officers on managing Imprisonment for Public Protection offenders since the publication of the Joint IPP Action Plan, published by Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service and the Parole Board in June 2019.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison andor in the community. During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

There have been four new E-learning modules introduced for the use of probation practitioners which cover different aspects of supporting offenders serving indeterminate sentences; three of the modules cover work with those serving IPP sentences specifically, whilst the fourth is about actions at the point of sentencing for life sentences.

The three packages cover progression through the sentence, taking into account individual need, the processes during the pre-release phase, and how to manage indeterminate sentenced offenders once they are released into the community.

These packages, available now, will also form part of the Continuous Professional Development packs currently being created by the Probation Service for operational staff.

We take mental health very seriously and recognise that providing the right interventions at the right time is vital to improve outcomes for people with mental health needs, including IPP offenders.

HMPPS is mindful that IPP prisoners do not have a definite release date and, on that account, provides each IPP prisoner with a key worker, as well as a qualified probation officer, to explain what they need to do to reduce their risk and to help them access the support services they need.

Health and justice partners have committed to providing a standard of health care in prisons equivalent to that available in the community. Through the National Partnership Agreement, health and justice partners are working closely to improve support and continuity of care when someone leaves prison. HMPPS continues to work with National Health Service England (NSHE) to develop RECONNECT, a care after custody service which supports vulnerable prison leavers in their transition to community-based health services.

The power to recall an offender to custody is a vital public protection measure when it comes to supervising any offender on licence. We have no evidence that probation officers are recalling IPP offenders to custody where they do not have compelling reason to do so. The HM Inspectorate of Probation Report – ‘A thematic review of probation recall culture and practice’ – published in 2020, found that the Probation Service is using recall appropriately, to prevent further serious offending and protect the public.

Probation officers explore other risk management steps to secure compliance and manage risk before requesting a recall. What might appear to be a relatively minor breach of a licence condition might, where the associated behaviour is similar to the behaviour when the offender committed the offence which attracted the IPP sentence, indicate that the offender needs to be recalled to protect the public.

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the rate of (1) deferral, and (2) adjournments, of cases by the Parole Board broken down by local region in each year since 2017.

The Parole Board has confirmed the breakdown of Deferral and Adjournment rates for oral hearings since 2017 in the table below. The Parole Board will publish data for 2021/22 in their 2021/22 Annual Report. The Parole Board reports on national rates and does not produce this data by regions.

Conducted Hearings

Completed Oral Hearings

Deferred & Adjourned Hearings

Deferred Split

Adjourned Split

2017-18

8137

5638

2499
(*31%)

744
(*9.1%)

1755
(*21.5%)

2018-19

7903

5380

2523
(*32%)

488
(*6.1%)

2035
(*25.7%)

2019-20

8264

5294

2970
(*36%)

271
(*3.3%)

2699
(*32.7%)

2020-21

9202

6421


2781
(*30%)

167
(*1.8%)

2614
(*28.4%)

*Percentage of conducted oral hearings

11th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many recalls of those with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence have subsequently resulted in (1) no further action taken, (2) charges dropped, and (3) the individual being found not guilty.

This information is not readily available. To answer the question, a manual check would be needed of each instance of an offender serving an imprisonment for public protection (IPP) sentence on licence being recalled to custody, where the reason given includes further charges (approximately 1,900). This could be completed only at disproportionate cost.

An offender on an IPP licence is recalled to custody where they breach their licence conditions in a way which indicates escalating risk, such that the supervising officer determines that they can no longer be safely managed in the community.

24th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many individuals sentenced to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) since 2005 died whilst (1) serving their sentence, or (2) whilst out on licence in the community; and what were the causes of death in each case.

A total of 231 prisoners have died in custody while serving an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence. Their causes of death are set out in the attached table. This data runs from January 2005 to December 2021.

The Government does not hold collated data about the deaths of offenders on licence in the community. I regret that the data requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Every death in prison custody and the community is a tragedy that deeply affects families, staff and other prisoners. We are committed to doing all we can to prevent deaths in prison custody and of offenders under supervision.

7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people serving an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence who have been released applied for the life licence to be lifted as they have been released more than 10 years.

The Government is committed to the protection of the public and the effective management of offenders. By law, prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

As of 31 March 2021, there were 1,784 prisoners serving the IPP sentence in custody who have never been released.

As of the same date, there were 632 prisoners serving the IPP sentence in custody who had been recalled more than once, whilst there were 2243 offenders serving the IPP sentence in the community who have been released and not been recalled.

As of 8 July, 18 applications have been received from offenders requesting termination of their IPP licence. From September this year, officials will refer automatically to the Parole Board the case of every offender serving the IPP sentence who has become eligible to apply for termination of his/her IPP licence.

Notes for all figures:

  1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large-scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people serving an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence have been released but not recalled.

The Government is committed to the protection of the public and the effective management of offenders. By law, prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

As of 31 March 2021, there were 1,784 prisoners serving the IPP sentence in custody who have never been released.

As of the same date, there were 632 prisoners serving the IPP sentence in custody who had been recalled more than once, whilst there were 2243 offenders serving the IPP sentence in the community who have been released and not been recalled.

As of 8 July, 18 applications have been received from offenders requesting termination of their IPP licence. From September this year, officials will refer automatically to the Parole Board the case of every offender serving the IPP sentence who has become eligible to apply for termination of his/her IPP licence.

Notes for all figures:

  1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large-scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people serving an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence have been recalled more than once.

The Government is committed to the protection of the public and the effective management of offenders. By law, prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

As of 31 March 2021, there were 1,784 prisoners serving the IPP sentence in custody who have never been released.

As of the same date, there were 632 prisoners serving the IPP sentence in custody who had been recalled more than once, whilst there were 2243 offenders serving the IPP sentence in the community who have been released and not been recalled.

As of 8 July, 18 applications have been received from offenders requesting termination of their IPP licence. From September this year, officials will refer automatically to the Parole Board the case of every offender serving the IPP sentence who has become eligible to apply for termination of his/her IPP licence.

Notes for all figures:

  1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large-scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people sentenced to Imprisonment for Public Protection sentences have never been released.

The Government is committed to the protection of the public and the effective management of offenders. By law, prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

As of 31 March 2021, there were 1,784 prisoners serving the IPP sentence in custody who have never been released.

As of the same date, there were 632 prisoners serving the IPP sentence in custody who had been recalled more than once, whilst there were 2243 offenders serving the IPP sentence in the community who have been released and not been recalled.

As of 8 July, 18 applications have been received from offenders requesting termination of their IPP licence. From September this year, officials will refer automatically to the Parole Board the case of every offender serving the IPP sentence who has become eligible to apply for termination of his/her IPP licence.

Notes for all figures:

  1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large-scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to use the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill to amend the law to raise the mandatory retirement age for judicial office holders; and whether, further to consultation on the matter, they will propose an amendment to that Bill to fulfil the commitment made by the Lord Chancellor on 9 March to “legislate to increase the mandatory retirement age as soon as parliamentary time allows”.

As set out in the background briefing notes to the Queen’s Speech on 11 May, the government intends to legislate to raise the mandatory retirement age of judicial office holders to 75 through the Public Service Pensions and Judicial Offices Bill, to be introduced shortly.

16th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to roll out the Ministry of Justice’s temporary accommodation service for prison leavers to all probation regions in England and Wales.

We are investing more than £20m in supporting prison leavers at risk of homelessness into temporary accommodation. Individuals released from prison will be provided up to 12 weeks of temporary accommodation and will be supported into long-term settled accommodation before the end of that 12-week period. Initially launching in five national probation regions, the service will support around 3,000 offenders in its first year and will be commencing later this Summer. This service will be in operation during this financial year 2021-22, with a view to scaling up and rolling out nationally, though the Spending Review 2021 will set out the approach for future years.

HMPPS will also work in conjunction with MHCLG’s announced funding to support prison leavers at risk of homelessness into private rental tenancies.

Working in collaboration with these initiatives Commissioned Rehabilitation Services are also due to start delivery on 26th June 2021. This will provide further services to assist in accommodation as well as those for employment training and education, financial benefit and debt and personal well-being.

16th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Category B prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence are currently serving a sentence on recall.

The information needed to provide a comprehensive answer to the question asking how many prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence and given a Category B status have been released could be provided only at disproportionate cost as central data were not stored in a way that it can be filtered by the required fields to obtain the information prior to 2015. Between 2015 and 2020, there were 86 releases of Category B IPP prisoners. This figure does not include re-releases following recall.

As of 31 March 2021, there were 91 Category B prisoners with an IPP sentence that were serving a sentence on recall.

A prisoner’s individual offending behaviour, resettlement needs and individual circumstances (such as medical requirements) may result in an individual being held in a prison of a higher category than their own category. Prisoners will not be allocated to a prison of a lower security category than the security category assigned to them personally.

Note for figures:

These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

16th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence and given a Category B status have been released.

The information needed to provide a comprehensive answer to the question asking how many prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence and given a Category B status have been released could be provided only at disproportionate cost as central data were not stored in a way that it can be filtered by the required fields to obtain the information prior to 2015. Between 2015 and 2020, there were 86 releases of Category B IPP prisoners. This figure does not include re-releases following recall.

As of 31 March 2021, there were 91 Category B prisoners with an IPP sentence that were serving a sentence on recall.

A prisoner’s individual offending behaviour, resettlement needs and individual circumstances (such as medical requirements) may result in an individual being held in a prison of a higher category than their own category. Prisoners will not be allocated to a prison of a lower security category than the security category assigned to them personally.

Note for figures:

These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence and given a category A status have been released.

The total number of Category C prisoners with an IPP sentence that were held in Category A and Category B prisons as of 31 March 2021 is shown in the table below.

Security Category

Number of IPP Prisoners

Category A

20

Category B

91

As of 31 March 2021, there were a total of three Category A prisoners with an IPP sentence that were serving a sentence on recall.

A prisoner’s individual needs in relation to offending behaviour and resettlement, or their individual circumstances (such as medical requirements) may result in an individual being held in a prison of a higher category than their own approved category. Prisoners will not be allocated to a prison of a lower security category than the security category assigned to them personally.

The information needed to provide a comprehensive answer to the final question (How many prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence and given a category A status have been released?), could be provided only at disproportionate cost as central data was not stored in a way that allowed for pre-2015 data to be obtained. Between 2015 and 2020, there were fewer than three releases of Category A IPP prisoners. The exact figure is not being provided as the release of some of this information would risk identification of the individuals concerned. However, it should not be assumed that the actual figure represented falls at any particular point within this scale.

Notes for all figures:

  1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.
  2. These figures include recalled prisoners.
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many category A prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence are currently serving a sentence on recall.

The total number of Category C prisoners with an IPP sentence that were held in Category A and Category B prisons as of 31 March 2021 is shown in the table below.

Security Category

Number of IPP Prisoners

Category A

20

Category B

91

As of 31 March 2021, there were a total of three Category A prisoners with an IPP sentence that were serving a sentence on recall.

A prisoner’s individual needs in relation to offending behaviour and resettlement, or their individual circumstances (such as medical requirements) may result in an individual being held in a prison of a higher category than their own approved category. Prisoners will not be allocated to a prison of a lower security category than the security category assigned to them personally.

The information needed to provide a comprehensive answer to the final question (How many prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence and given a category A status have been released?), could be provided only at disproportionate cost as central data was not stored in a way that allowed for pre-2015 data to be obtained. Between 2015 and 2020, there were fewer than three releases of Category A IPP prisoners. The exact figure is not being provided as the release of some of this information would risk identification of the individuals concerned. However, it should not be assumed that the actual figure represented falls at any particular point within this scale.

Notes for all figures:

  1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.
  2. These figures include recalled prisoners.
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many category C prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence are currently held in category B prisons.

The total number of Category C prisoners with an IPP sentence that were held in Category A and Category B prisons as of 31 March 2021 is shown in the table below.

Security Category

Number of IPP Prisoners

Category A

20

Category B

91

As of 31 March 2021, there were a total of three Category A prisoners with an IPP sentence that were serving a sentence on recall.

A prisoner’s individual needs in relation to offending behaviour and resettlement, or their individual circumstances (such as medical requirements) may result in an individual being held in a prison of a higher category than their own approved category. Prisoners will not be allocated to a prison of a lower security category than the security category assigned to them personally.

The information needed to provide a comprehensive answer to the final question (How many prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence and given a category A status have been released?), could be provided only at disproportionate cost as central data was not stored in a way that allowed for pre-2015 data to be obtained. Between 2015 and 2020, there were fewer than three releases of Category A IPP prisoners. The exact figure is not being provided as the release of some of this information would risk identification of the individuals concerned. However, it should not be assumed that the actual figure represented falls at any particular point within this scale.

Notes for all figures:

  1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.
  2. These figures include recalled prisoners.
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many category C prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence are currently held in category A prisons.

The total number of Category C prisoners with an IPP sentence that were held in Category A and Category B prisons as of 31 March 2021 is shown in the table below.

Security Category

Number of IPP Prisoners

Category A

20

Category B

91

As of 31 March 2021, there were a total of three Category A prisoners with an IPP sentence that were serving a sentence on recall.

A prisoner’s individual needs in relation to offending behaviour and resettlement, or their individual circumstances (such as medical requirements) may result in an individual being held in a prison of a higher category than their own approved category. Prisoners will not be allocated to a prison of a lower security category than the security category assigned to them personally.

The information needed to provide a comprehensive answer to the final question (How many prisoners with an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence and given a category A status have been released?), could be provided only at disproportionate cost as central data was not stored in a way that allowed for pre-2015 data to be obtained. Between 2015 and 2020, there were fewer than three releases of Category A IPP prisoners. The exact figure is not being provided as the release of some of this information would risk identification of the individuals concerned. However, it should not be assumed that the actual figure represented falls at any particular point within this scale.

Notes for all figures:

  1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.
  2. These figures include recalled prisoners.
17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners continue to be in (1) Category A, and (2) Category B, prisons after the expiry of their original tariff.

The total number of prisoners serving life and Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences who have never been released and as at 31 March 2021 had served more than 10 years past the expiry of their tariff, broken down by each year served beyond 10 years (time over tariff), is shown in the following table:

Time over tariff(1)

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

From 10 years to less than 11 years

197

91

288

From 11 years to less than 12 years

159

68

227

From 12 years to less than 13 years

106

65

171

From 13 years to less than 14 years

57

71

128

From 14 years to less than 15 years

6

58

64

From 15 years to less than 16 years

0

69

69

From 16 years to less than 17 years

0

39

39

From 17 years to less than 18 years

0

39

39

From 18 years to less than 19 years

0

38

38

From 19 years to less than 20 years

0

19

19

From 20 years to less than 21 years

0

20

20

From 21 years to less than 22 years

0

17

17

From 22 years to less than 23 years

0

27

27

From 23 years to less than 24 years

0

12

12

From 24 years to less than 25 years

0

13

13

From 25 years to less than 26 years

0

6

6

From 26 years to less than 27 years

0

8

8

From 27 years to less than 28 years

0

11

11

From 28 years to less than 29 years

0

4

4

From 29 years to less than 30 years

0

6

6

30 years or more(1)

0

17

17

Total

525

698

1,223

(1) These counts have been aggregated due to small numbers. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by ethnicity as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Ethnicity Group

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Asian or Asian British

83

65

148

Black or Black British

208

172

380

Mixed

67

46

113

Other ethnic group

8

11

19

White

1,334

1,345

2,679

Unrecorded

1

2

3

Not stated

4

7

11

Total

1,705

1,648

3,353

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by prison security category as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Main Function of Prison*

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Cat A (High Security)

167

299

Cat B Trainer

229

203

*These prisons may hold prisoners with lower security categories than the main function of the prison.

Notes for all tables:

1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

2. The figures in these tables do not include recalled indeterminate-sentence prisoners.

Statistics on the indeterminate sentence population in prisons are routinely published as part of the Quarterly Offender Management Statistics on Gov.uk - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly.

By law prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the breakdown by ethnicity of the number of prisoners still in prison after their tariff expiry.

The total number of prisoners serving life and Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences who have never been released and as at 31 March 2021 had served more than 10 years past the expiry of their tariff, broken down by each year served beyond 10 years (time over tariff), is shown in the following table:

Time over tariff(1)

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

From 10 years to less than 11 years

197

91

288

From 11 years to less than 12 years

159

68

227

From 12 years to less than 13 years

106

65

171

From 13 years to less than 14 years

57

71

128

From 14 years to less than 15 years

6

58

64

From 15 years to less than 16 years

0

69

69

From 16 years to less than 17 years

0

39

39

From 17 years to less than 18 years

0

39

39

From 18 years to less than 19 years

0

38

38

From 19 years to less than 20 years

0

19

19

From 20 years to less than 21 years

0

20

20

From 21 years to less than 22 years

0

17

17

From 22 years to less than 23 years

0

27

27

From 23 years to less than 24 years

0

12

12

From 24 years to less than 25 years

0

13

13

From 25 years to less than 26 years

0

6

6

From 26 years to less than 27 years

0

8

8

From 27 years to less than 28 years

0

11

11

From 28 years to less than 29 years

0

4

4

From 29 years to less than 30 years

0

6

6

30 years or more(1)

0

17

17

Total

525

698

1,223

(1) These counts have been aggregated due to small numbers. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by ethnicity as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Ethnicity Group

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Asian or Asian British

83

65

148

Black or Black British

208

172

380

Mixed

67

46

113

Other ethnic group

8

11

19

White

1,334

1,345

2,679

Unrecorded

1

2

3

Not stated

4

7

11

Total

1,705

1,648

3,353

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by prison security category as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Main Function of Prison*

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Cat A (High Security)

167

299

Cat B Trainer

229

203

*These prisons may hold prisoners with lower security categories than the main function of the prison.

Notes for all tables:

1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

2. The figures in these tables do not include recalled indeterminate-sentence prisoners.

Statistics on the indeterminate sentence population in prisons are routinely published as part of the Quarterly Offender Management Statistics on Gov.uk - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly.

By law prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will provide (1) the total number of prisoners serving more than 10 years past the expiry of their original tariff, and (2) a breakdown by each year served beyond 10 years.

The total number of prisoners serving life and Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences who have never been released and as at 31 March 2021 had served more than 10 years past the expiry of their tariff, broken down by each year served beyond 10 years (time over tariff), is shown in the following table:

Time over tariff(1)

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

From 10 years to less than 11 years

197

91

288

From 11 years to less than 12 years

159

68

227

From 12 years to less than 13 years

106

65

171

From 13 years to less than 14 years

57

71

128

From 14 years to less than 15 years

6

58

64

From 15 years to less than 16 years

0

69

69

From 16 years to less than 17 years

0

39

39

From 17 years to less than 18 years

0

39

39

From 18 years to less than 19 years

0

38

38

From 19 years to less than 20 years

0

19

19

From 20 years to less than 21 years

0

20

20

From 21 years to less than 22 years

0

17

17

From 22 years to less than 23 years

0

27

27

From 23 years to less than 24 years

0

12

12

From 24 years to less than 25 years

0

13

13

From 25 years to less than 26 years

0

6

6

From 26 years to less than 27 years

0

8

8

From 27 years to less than 28 years

0

11

11

From 28 years to less than 29 years

0

4

4

From 29 years to less than 30 years

0

6

6

30 years or more(1)

0

17

17

Total

525

698

1,223

(1) These counts have been aggregated due to small numbers. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by ethnicity as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Ethnicity Group

Status

Total

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Asian or Asian British

83

65

148

Black or Black British

208

172

380

Mixed

67

46

113

Other ethnic group

8

11

19

White

1,334

1,345

2,679

Unrecorded

1

2

3

Not stated

4

7

11

Total

1,705

1,648

3,353

The tariff-expired unreleased indeterminate sentence prisoner population, broken down by prison security category as of 31 March 2021, is shown in the following table:

Main Function of Prison*

Unreleased IPP Sentenced Prisoners

Unreleased Life Sentenced Prisoners

Cat A (High Security)

167

299

Cat B Trainer

229

203

*These prisons may hold prisoners with lower security categories than the main function of the prison.

Notes for all tables:

1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

2. The figures in these tables do not include recalled indeterminate-sentence prisoners.

Statistics on the indeterminate sentence population in prisons are routinely published as part of the Quarterly Offender Management Statistics on Gov.uk - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly.

By law prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the latest data on the number of prisoners reported to have self-harmed while serving imprisonment for public protection sentences on recall.

Figures for the number of self-harm incidents by recalled Imprisonment for Public Protection prisoners for each of the past three years are shown below:

2018 = 584

2019 = 743

2020 = 761

We are focussing our efforts to address the levels of self-harm across the prison population, and are under no illusions about the impact of the measures which were put in place to protect lives during the Covid-19 pandemic, so we have made prisoners’ safety and wellbeing our priority.

We have produced a range of products to support Governors in devising and implementing local safety and welfare plans designed to mitigate risks and promote wellbeing. Over 25,000 new and existing staff have received self-harm and suicide prevention training to help them better support prisoners with complex needs. We’ve enabled continued family contact through more than 1,600 secure mobile phones and rolled out secure video call technology into every single prison in the male, female and youth estate. Each prisoner is also currently given additional PIN credit per week. We are also delivering more in cell-activities such as distraction packs, supplementary food packs, and additional educational materials to mitigate the impact of isolation.

We have renewed our partnership with the Samaritans who are providing the excellent Listeners scheme, which trains selected prisoners to provide emotional support to their fellow prisoners.

We have prioritised the roll-out of the revised version of the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork (ACCT) multi-disciplinary case management system used in prisons to support people at risk of suicide and self-harm.

We have delivered improvements to the way we support, and case manage prisoners throughout their sentences by the significant investment in and changes introduced by the new Offender Management in Custody (OMiC) model. This will provide each prisoner with a dedicated key worker who will be able to better support them and identify concerns at an early stage so that they can receive the right support at the right time.

26th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government who are, or will be, the members of the working group, announced on 1 December 2020, to examine ways to improve the process of accessing Child Trust Funds for parents or guardians of children who lack mental capacity; and when they expect that group to report on its findings.

Following the 1 December 2020 announcement, a cross government working group has been established to look at the issues raised in relation to access to Child Trust Funds. The Group has representation from Her Majesty’s Treasury, Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs, the Department for Work and Pensions and the Ministry of Justice and convened on 8 January and 29 January. Engagement with external stakeholders will continue as proposals develop. Court of Protection application forms are a matter for the judiciary and the Court of Protection Rules Committee will review these in light of issues raised by campaigners.

The working group will report to Ministers in due course.

26th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to grant access to parents to a Child Trust Fund without requiring a Court of Protection Order.

The Government places a high degree of importance upon protecting and supporting those who lack the mental capacity to make decisions for themselves. For that reason, anyone who wishes to manage the finances of a person who lacks the mental capacity to do so for themselves must have the legal authority to do so. Legal authority for someone who lacks mental capacity can only be obtained via an order from the Court of Protection or by registering a lasting power of attorney. These processes are provided for in the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and ensure vulnerable people are not exploited. They are not new or specific to Child Trust Funds but apply to the affairs of all vulnerable people.

We understand the concerns that have been raised and want to make the process of obtaining legal authority to access a Child Trust Fund as straightforward as possible, while maintaining important safeguards. A cross-government working group has convened to consider what steps can be taken to reduce the burden placed upon the parents and guardians of disabled children. The Government announced on 1 December that court fees can be waived or refunded when seeking access to a Child Trust Fund. The Court of Protection Rule Committee will consider how to progress work on Court of Protection forms.