Ian Byrne Portrait

Ian Byrne

Labour - Liverpool, West Derby


Oral Question
Monday 11th July 2022
14:30
Department for Work and Pensions
Topical Question No. 6
If she will make a statement on her departmental responsibilities.
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Department Event
Monday 11th July 2022
18:00
Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities
First Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
11 Jul 2022, 6 p.m.
The draft Business and Planning Act 2020 (Pavement Licences) (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2022
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Department Event
Wednesday 13th July 2022
09:25
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Third Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
13 Jul 2022, 9:25 a.m.
The draft Common Agricultural Policy (Cross-Compliance Exemptions and Transitional Regulation) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2022
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Department Event
Thursday 14th July 2022
11:30
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Sixth Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
14 Jul 2022, 11:30 a.m.
The draft United Kingdom Internal Market Act 2020 (Exclusions from Market Access Principles: Single-Use Plastics) Regulations 2022
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Department Event
Thursday 8th September 2022
09:30
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Oral questions - Main Chamber
8 Sep 2022, 9:30 a.m.
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (including Topical Questions)
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Department Event
Monday 12th September 2022
14:30
Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities
Oral questions - Main Chamber
12 Sep 2022, 2:30 p.m.
Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (including Topical Questions)
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Division Votes
Monday 4th July 2022
Northern Ireland Troubles (Legacy and Reconciliation) Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 150 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 209 Noes - 282
Speeches
Wednesday 15th June 2022
Rail Strikes
I agree with my hon. Friend. Why did we not see the same urgency in calling out British Gas for …
Written Answers
Friday 24th June 2022
Passports: Applications
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to Answer of 16 June 2022 to Question 15396 …
Early Day Motions
Monday 6th June 2022
Treatment of Liverpool fans at the 2022 Champions League Final in Paris
That this House condemns the deeply disturbing treatment by French police of Liverpool and Real Madrid fans outside Stade de …
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 16th March 2020
1. Employment and earnings
31 December 2019, received £3,592.08 from IPSA for work as an MP's office manager until 12 December 2019. I repaid …
EDM signed
Tuesday 5th July 2022
Government cleaners and security guards
That this House notes with grave concern the unacceptable ways in which cleaning and security staff were treated by officials …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 5th February 2020
Education and Training (Welfare of Children) Act 2021
A Bill to impose duties on certain education and training providers in relation to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Ian Byrne has voted in 434 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Ian Byrne voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Labour No votes vs 124 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 385 Noes - 100
View All Ian Byrne Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Eddie Hughes (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
(15 debate interactions)
Shaun Bailey (Conservative)
(15 debate interactions)
Christopher Pincher (Independent)
(13 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(12 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(11 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Finance Act 2020 - Government Bill
(2,046 words contributed)
Finance Act 2021 - Government Bill
(100 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Ian Byrne's debates

Liverpool, West Derby Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We demand the Government restore England’s publicly funded, publicly provided NHS by reversing all privatising legislation, ending ongoing PFI contracts, and scrapping plans for Integrated Care Systems and for-profit US-style ‘managed care’.

We ask Government to significantly increase targeted research funding for motor neurone disease (MND).

A new investment of £50m over 5 years could kickstart a pioneering MND Research Institute.

This would lead to better, faster and more definitive research outcomes and hope for those with MND.

Enact legislation to protect retail workers. This legislation must create a specific offence of abusing, threatening or assaulting a retail worker. The offence must carry a penalty that acts as a deterrent and makes clear that abuse of retail workers is unacceptable.

Government should support vulnerable children & #endchildfoodpoverty by implementing 3 recommendations from the National Food Strategy to expand access to Free School Meals, provide meals & activities during holidays to stop holiday hunger & increase the value of and expand the Healthy Start scheme


Latest EDMs signed by Ian Byrne

13th June 2022
Ian Byrne signed this EDM on Tuesday 5th July 2022

Government cleaners and security guards

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House notes with grave concern the unacceptable ways in which cleaning and security staff were treated by officials during the rule-breaking parties at 10 Downing Street identified in the Sue Gray report; find the multiple examples of a lack of respect and poor treatment of security and cleaning …
32 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Jul 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 13
Scottish National Party: 12
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Green Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
30th June 2022
Ian Byrne signed this EDM on Monday 4th July 2022

Llwydcoed Brass Band 110th anniversary

Tabled by: Beth Winter (Labour - Cynon Valley)
That this House congratulates Llwydcoed Brass Band on reaching its 110th anniversary; celebrates the role of miners in establishing the Band in 1912; notes the efforts of the Band to support the welfare of local residents in difficult economic circumstances throughout its history, including in particular the march of band …
21 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Jul 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 13
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Scottish National Party: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Ian Byrne's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Ian Byrne, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Ian Byrne has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Ian Byrne has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Ian Byrne has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


130 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent estimate he has made of the basic annual cost of living for a family comprised of one adult and one child.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the hon. Member’s Parliamentary Question of 31 March is attached.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent estimate he has made of the basic annual cost of living for a two-person household or family.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the hon. Member’s Parliamentary Question of 31 March is attached.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent estimate he has made of the basic annual cost of living for a single person household.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the hon. Member’s Parliamentary Question of 31 March is attached.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
23rd Sep 2021
If he will take steps to consult bereaved families on the public inquiry into the Government's response to the covid-19 pandemic.

Every death from this virus is a tragedy and our deepest sympathies are with everyone who has lost loved ones. The Government remains steadfast in our commitment to ensuring that these families secure the opportunity to scrutinise the Government’s response to managing the pandemic that they deserve.

The Prime Minister made clear in his statement to this House on 12 May that bereaved families and others will be consulted on the inquiry’s terms of reference before they are finalised.

Michael Ellis
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment his Department has made of the implications for his Department's Facilities Management Framework of the merger of Mitie and Interserve, and if he will publish that assessment; and if he will take steps to introduce a social value framework in relation to the public contracts for facilities management operated by Mitie following their merger with Interserve.

The Crown Commercial Service engaged with both suppliers prior to the merger to ensure that no unfair competitive advantage over other suppliers can be achieved under the Facilities Management (RM3830) framework agreement. . The Cabinet Office has recently issued guidance that sets out how Central government organisations should use a new Social Value model to take account of the additional social benefits that can be achieved in the delivery of its contracts. The guidance applies to in-scope procurements advertised after 1 January 2021.

14th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the proposed merger between Mitie and Interserve, what plans he has to require the suitability of the resulting commercial entity to be reviewed under the Cabinet Office (Crown Commercial Service) Framework.

Interserve and Mitie have announced a proposed merger of Interserve's Support Services division with Mitie. Interserve and Mitie are both strategic suppliers to the Government, and as such are monitored by the Cabinet Office. It would be inappropriate to comment further while the Competition and Markets Authority investigation of the proposed merger is ongoing.

14th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the resulting commercial entity of the proposed merger between Mitie and Interserve will assume responsibility for the social value responsibilities of Interserve; and whether a new assessment under the Facilities Management Framework will take place.

Interserve and Mitie have announced a proposed merger of Interserve's Support Services division with Mitie. Interserve and Mitie are both strategic suppliers to the Government, and as such are monitored by the Cabinet Office. It would be inappropriate to comment further while the Competition and Markets Authority investigation of the proposed merger is ongoing.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will make extended financial support available for freelancers in the arts sector when the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme and Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme end to respond to venues not being (a) permitted to open as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased and (b) able to offer contracts of employment to freelancers in that sector.

"DCMS recognise that these are extremely challenging times for freelancers, and understand the crucial role they play in making our arts and creative industries world-leading. We are working hard to ensure that we help to provide financial support to freelancers during this period.

On 5 July, DCMS announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of sectors, including performing arts and theatres, museums and galleries, heritage sites, live music venues and independent cinema.

As a result of these grants and loans, organisations will be more able to resume cultural activity, albeit in a socially distanced way, which will increase employment opportunities for freelancers. Each organisation that receives money will know what best they can do to support their workforce, including their freelance workforce.

The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme has also been extended with applications opening in August for a second and final grant. The grant will operate in the same way as the existing scheme with self-employed workers eligible for a single payment covering three months, at a level of 70% of average monthly earnings up to a maximum of £6,570 (i.e. down from 80% and a maximum of £7,500).

Alongside this funding, ACE have announced £95m of additional support for individuals, which can include freelancers. This involves things such as an additional £75m in project grants. These will be focused on applications that maximise employment opportunities and those from under-represented groups and freelancers are eligible to apply to this directly. National Portfolio Organisations can also apply to create new work with bids that create employment opportunities prioritised. A further round of the ACE programme ‘Discover Your Creative Practice’ will also open in the autumn, which will make approximately £18m available for individuals looking to develop new creative skills that will help them to further develop their career. ACE will also be adding £2m into relevant benevolent funds to support those less well supported by the programmes outlined above, including stage managers and technicians

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if the Government will make it its policy to reinstate the provisions under the (a) Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and (b) Self-Employment Income Support Scheme for people employed in the arts sector in the event of a second wave of covid-19.

Currently, DCMS are working to aid sector reopening, and support organisations who are in need of financial support due to the coronavirus pandemic. We are tracking the public health situation and scientific guidance closely in order to ensure we are able to support sectors using clear guidelines. Should the scientific guidance change in the future, or the coronavirus situation worsen, we will continue to work through what guidance and support is necessary to support our vital arts and creative sectors.

From the Government’s £1.57bn Culture Recovery Fund we have held back £258m in reserve to provide us with flexibility to respond to the path of covid-19 and its impact. The Government will conduct a Spending Review this year and all decisions regarding funding for future financial years will be considered at that event.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will make it his policy to provide backdated financial support to freelancers in the arts sector who are not eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme or the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

DCMS recognise that these are extremely challenging times for freelancers, and understand the crucial role they play in making our arts and creative industries world-leading. We are working hard to ensure that we help to provide financial support to freelancers during this period.

On 5 July, DCMS announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of sectors, including performing arts and theatres, museums and galleries, heritage sites, live music venues and independent cinema.

As a result of these grants and loans, organisations will be more able to resume cultural activity, albeit in a socially distanced way, which will increase employment opportunities for freelancers. Each organisation that receives money will know what best they can do to support their workforce, including their freelance workforce.

The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme has also been extended with applications opening in August for a second and final grant. The grant will operate in the same way as the existing scheme with self-employed workers eligible for a single payment covering three months, at a level of 70% of average monthly earnings up to a maximum of £6,570 (i.e. down from 80% and a maximum of £7,500).

Alongside this funding, ACE have announced £95m of additional support for individuals, which can include freelancers. This involves things such as an additional £75m in project grants. These will be focused on applications that maximise employment opportunities and those from under-represented groups and freelancers are eligible to apply to this directly. National Portfolio Organisations can also apply to create new work with bids that create employment opportunities prioritised. A further round of the ACE programme ‘Discover Your Creative Practice’ will also open in the autumn, which will make approximately £18m available for individuals looking to develop new creative skills that will help them to further develop their career. ACE will also be adding £2m into relevant benevolent funds to support those less well supported by the programmes outlined above, including stage managers and technicians.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will (a) provide and (b) encourage insurers to provide freelance workers in the cultural sector with a personal insurance scheme that includes cover for covid-19-related illnesses.

DCMS recognise that these are extremely challenging times for freelancers, and understand the crucial role they play in making our arts and creative industries world-leading. We are working hard to ensure that we help to provide financial support to freelancers during this period.

On 5 July, DCMS announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of sectors, including performing arts and theatres, museums and galleries, heritage sites, live music venues and independent cinema.

As a result of these grants and loans, organisations will be more able to resume cultural activity, albeit in a socially distanced way, which will increase employment opportunities for freelancers. Each organisation that receives money will know what best they can do to support their workforce, including their freelance workforce.

The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme has also been extended with applications opening in August for a second and final grant. The grant will operate in the same way as the existing scheme with self-employed workers eligible for a single payment covering three months, at a level of 70% of average monthly earnings up to a maximum of £6,570 (i.e. down from 80% and a maximum of £7,500).

Alongside this funding, ACE have announced £95m of additional support for individuals, which can include freelancers. This involves things such as an additional £75m in project grants. These will be focused on applications that maximise employment opportunities and those from under-represented groups and freelancers are eligible to apply to this directly. National Portfolio Organisations can also apply to create new work with bids that create employment opportunities prioritised. A further round of the ACE programme ‘Discover Your Creative Practice’ will also open in the autumn, which will make approximately £18m available for individuals looking to develop new creative skills that will help them to further develop their career. ACE will also be adding £2m into relevant benevolent funds to support those less well supported by the programmes outlined above, including stage managers and technicians.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he has taken to underwrite the £270 million of repayable finance in his funding package for arts and cultural organisations in England; and what the repayment timeframe is for those loans.

The Repayable Finance Scheme is intended to assist larger organisations who need more than £3m, and that have a history of financial resilience. Thorough financial checks will be conducted prior to awards being granted, and recipients will need to demonstrate financial viability as a result of receiving the award. This support package represents the most cost effective way of preventing key cultural and heritage organisations from insolvency, and the repayable finance option will ensure a return to the taxpayer on their investment.

Loans will be available on generous terms including a payment term of up to 20 years, an initial repayment holiday of up to four years and a 2% interest rate per annum. Further details are available in the guidance published by Arts Council England.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, for what reason (a) institutions and (b) individuals in the arts sector will be required to demonstrate how they have contributed to wider economic growth in order to access the Government's support package for the arts; and what steps he is taking to ensure that the criteria for eligibility will not exclude smaller provincial venues and artists from being eligible for those funds.

On 5 July, the Government announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. In order to receive support, organisations will need to demonstrate that they are at risk in this financial year and have done all they can to exhaust other options. Guidance published by Arts Council England, the British Film Institute, Historic England and the National Lottery Heritage Fund sets out further details on eligibility requirements for the package.

While we would like this investment to go as far as it can in spreading support across the country, funding will not be available for every organisation. As such, the delivery bodies will be prioritising institutions of national and international significance and those that are crucial to levelling up places and communities and economic growth across the country. As part of that, we are ensuring that funding is distributed fairly, and that smaller organisations and cultural venues that are at the centre of their communities are protected.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish the criteria his Department will use to determine the distribution of the £880m grant funding to the arts sectors.

On 5 July, the Government announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. Guidance has been published by Arts Council England, the British Film Institute, Historic England and the National Lottery Heritage Fund for applicants to the Culture Recovery Grants application rounds, and by Arts Council England for applicants to the Repayable Finance Scheme. Further details on eligibility and application processes are available in the published guidance.

This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of sectors, with one of our core objectives being to support the cultural organisations that are crucial to places across the whole country. We will ensure that funding is distributed fairly, and that smaller organisations and cultural venues that are at the centre of their communities are protected.

We also recognise the crucial role that individuals play in making our arts and creative industries world-leading. As a result of these grants and loans, organisations will be more able to resume cultural activity, albeit in a socially distanced way, which will increase employment opportunities for freelancers.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when he plans to publish a timeframe for the release of the £880m grant funding for the arts sector.

On 5 July, the Government announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. Guidance has been published by Arts Council England, the British Film Institute, Historic England and the National Lottery Heritage Fund for applicants to the Culture Recovery Grants application rounds, and by Arts Council England for applicants to the Repayable Finance Scheme. Further details on eligibility and application processes are available in the published guidance.

This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of sectors, with one of our core objectives being to support the cultural organisations that are crucial to places across the whole country. We will ensure that funding is distributed fairly, and that smaller organisations and cultural venues that are at the centre of their communities are protected.

We also recognise the crucial role that individuals play in making our arts and creative industries world-leading. As a result of these grants and loans, organisations will be more able to resume cultural activity, albeit in a socially distanced way, which will increase employment opportunities for freelancers.

9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing air filtration devices to schools to reduce the risk of airborne transmission of covid-19.

​If used properly, air cleaning units can help reduce airborne contaminants in a poorly ventilated space while remedial work is undertaken to permanently improve ventilation. However, it is important to note that air cleaning units cannot improve ventilation, and they should never be used as a reason to reduce ventilation or not to remediate poor ventilation in a space.

The department is providing additional, exceptional funding for air cleaning units for poorly ventilated spaces in special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and alternative provision schools and colleges, including SEND units in mainstream schools and colleges, where quick fixes to improve ventilation are not possible. These settings are being prioritised, given the higher than average number of vulnerable pupils attending them. The purchase of 1,000 air cleaning units reflects our assessment of need in the sector based on recent feedback from SEND and alternative provider schools and colleges.

Schools and colleges that are not eligible for a department-funded unit will have access to an online ‘marketplace’, which provides a route to purchasing air cleaning units of a suitable specification and competitive price. However, we expect that in most classrooms existing ventilation will be sufficient.

Maintaining adequate ventilation ultimately remains the responsibility of individual schools and colleges. It is for them to decide on the use of affected rooms in accordance with their risk assessment procedures and obligations under health and safety law.

Schools and colleges are expected to plan and prioritise any necessary remedial works within existing budgets. For more substantial capital works, schools, colleges and those responsible for buildings have access to funding to improve the condition of buildings through different routes depending on their size and type.

The case for additional support for schools and colleges to maintain good ventilation will be kept under review as the programme continues, and as settings use the monitors to further assess their ventilation needs.

9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 7 December 2021 to Question 86209 on Schools: Ventilation, what estimate his Department has made of the total number of air cleaning units needed for poorly ventilated teaching spaces and staff rooms in all state educational settings in England.

​If used properly, air cleaning units can help reduce airborne contaminants in a poorly ventilated space while remedial work is undertaken to permanently improve ventilation. However, it is important to note that air cleaning units cannot improve ventilation, and they should never be used as a reason to reduce ventilation or not to remediate poor ventilation in a space.

The department is providing additional, exceptional funding for air cleaning units for poorly ventilated spaces in special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and alternative provision schools and colleges, including SEND units in mainstream schools and colleges, where quick fixes to improve ventilation are not possible. These settings are being prioritised, given the higher than average number of vulnerable pupils attending them. The purchase of 1,000 air cleaning units reflects our assessment of need in the sector based on recent feedback from SEND and alternative provider schools and colleges.

Schools and colleges that are not eligible for a department-funded unit will have access to an online ‘marketplace’, which provides a route to purchasing air cleaning units of a suitable specification and competitive price. However, we expect that in most classrooms existing ventilation will be sufficient.

Maintaining adequate ventilation ultimately remains the responsibility of individual schools and colleges. It is for them to decide on the use of affected rooms in accordance with their risk assessment procedures and obligations under health and safety law.

Schools and colleges are expected to plan and prioritise any necessary remedial works within existing budgets. For more substantial capital works, schools, colleges and those responsible for buildings have access to funding to improve the condition of buildings through different routes depending on their size and type.

The case for additional support for schools and colleges to maintain good ventilation will be kept under review as the programme continues, and as settings use the monitors to further assess their ventilation needs.

9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 7 December 2021 to Question 86209 on Schools: Ventilation, for what reason only 1000 air cleaning units are being funded for poorly ventilated teaching spaces and staff rooms; and what assessment he has made of the ability of schools that do not qualify for that funding to afford such units.

​If used properly, air cleaning units can help reduce airborne contaminants in a poorly ventilated space while remedial work is undertaken to permanently improve ventilation. However, it is important to note that air cleaning units cannot improve ventilation, and they should never be used as a reason to reduce ventilation or not to remediate poor ventilation in a space.

The department is providing additional, exceptional funding for air cleaning units for poorly ventilated spaces in special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and alternative provision schools and colleges, including SEND units in mainstream schools and colleges, where quick fixes to improve ventilation are not possible. These settings are being prioritised, given the higher than average number of vulnerable pupils attending them. The purchase of 1,000 air cleaning units reflects our assessment of need in the sector based on recent feedback from SEND and alternative provider schools and colleges.

Schools and colleges that are not eligible for a department-funded unit will have access to an online ‘marketplace’, which provides a route to purchasing air cleaning units of a suitable specification and competitive price. However, we expect that in most classrooms existing ventilation will be sufficient.

Maintaining adequate ventilation ultimately remains the responsibility of individual schools and colleges. It is for them to decide on the use of affected rooms in accordance with their risk assessment procedures and obligations under health and safety law.

Schools and colleges are expected to plan and prioritise any necessary remedial works within existing budgets. For more substantial capital works, schools, colleges and those responsible for buildings have access to funding to improve the condition of buildings through different routes depending on their size and type.

The case for additional support for schools and colleges to maintain good ventilation will be kept under review as the programme continues, and as settings use the monitors to further assess their ventilation needs.

2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to reduce covid-19 transmission in schools (a) nationally and (b) in Liverpool West Derby constituency.

The government continues to manage the risk of serious illness from the spread of COVID-19. We do not yet know how Omicron’s mutations will change the behaviour of the COVID-19 virus with regards to vaccines, treatments and transmissibility. Omicron remains a variant of COVID-19 and can be tackled using the same mitigations that have proven effective against previous variants. This includes vaccination, testing, hand hygiene, ventilation and other measures. There is no current evidence to suggest that we need to change our approach to managing variants, including Omicron.

All eligible staff and students aged 12 and over are encouraged to take up the offer of the vaccine, including boosters. Vaccines are the best defence against COVID-19. They help protect young people and adults, and benefit those around them. Vaccination makes people less likely to catch COVID-19 and less likely to pass it on.

The government’s testing strategy continues to help to break the chains of transmission of COVID-19 in schools and colleges by identifying asymptomatic positive cases quickly so that those who test positive can self-isolate. This helps to reduce transmission of COVID-19, keeping pupils and students in face-to-face education.

The department has asked all secondary schools to prepare to test their pupils once on-site on return in January. We understand that this is a significant additional ask but testing continues to play a vital role in keeping COVID-19 out of schools. Testing all pupils in school boosts testing participation and will help reduce transmission after a period of social mixing over the school holidays.

In primary schools and early years settings, the department recommends that face coverings should be worn by staff and visitors in communal areas. In secondary schools and out-of-school settings, the department recommends that face coverings are now worn by all pupils (children who were aged 11 on 31 August 2021), staff and visitors in communal areas unless they are exempt.

The department has started to provide CO2 monitors to state-funded education settings, including early years, schools and colleges, backed by £25 million in government funding. Letting fresh air into indoor spaces can help remove air that contains virus particles and is important in preventing the spread of COVID-19. The new monitors enable staff to identify areas where ventilation needs to be improved and provide reassurance that existing ventilation measures are working, helping balance the need for good ventilation with keeping classrooms warm.

The contingency framework gives directors of public health a range of flexible options for advising temporary measures in certain situations: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-local-restrictions-in-education-and-childcare-settings. In all cases, directors of public health should weigh any benefits in managing transmission against any educational drawbacks.

The department expects schools to follow the control measures set out in the guidance, continuing to comply with health and safety law. Schools must regularly review and update their risk assessments.

The measures outlined above apply nationally. There are no additional measures that apply to Liverpool West Derby.

2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to improve ventilation in school settings in England in line with guidance from the Health and Safety Executive.

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, the department has emphasised the importance of ventilation and provided guidance to nurseries, schools and colleges on ventilation requirements. We have always said that where a setting is in operation, it is important to ensure that it is well ventilated and that a comfortable teaching environment is maintained.

As of 26 November, the department has delivered 329,231 carbon dioxide (CO2) monitors to almost all eligible education and childcare settings, backed by £25 million in government funding.

The new monitors will provide further reassurance that existing ventilation measures are working, helping balance the need for good ventilation with keeping classrooms warm. The department has also provided new information on how to use CO2 monitors to better manage ventilation, which has been reviewed by the Health and Safety Executive and the UK Health Security Agency.

CO2 monitors will help prompt nurseries, schools and colleges to take actions to improve ventilation, such as opening windows or through using mechanical ventilation systems, where installed.

If this is not feasible and CO2 readings cannot be improved, nurseries, schools and colleges should look to undertake further works to address the underlying problem. Remedial works to improve ventilation remain the responsibility of individual settings. Schools receive an annual Devolved Formula Capital Allocation to spend on small capital projects or capital purchases.

For more substantial capital works, schools and those responsible for school buildings have access to funding to improve the condition of their buildings through different routes depending on their size and type. Further details are available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/school-capital-funding. Day to day maintenance, including minor repairs to improve ventilation, should be typically funded from revenue budgets.

In addition, the department is making 1,000 department funded air cleaning units available for poorly ventilated teaching spaces and staff rooms in special educational needs and disability (SEND) and alternative provision (AP) settings, including SEND units in mainstream settings, where quick fixes to improve ventilation are not possible. These settings are being prioritised given the number of vulnerable pupils attending those settings.

An online ‘marketplace’ will be available from December for those settings not eligible for a department funded unit. This will provide a route to purchasing air cleaning units directly from suppliers at a suitable specification and competitive price.

Maintaining adequate ventilation remains the responsibility of individual nurseries, schools and colleges. The department is providing additional, exceptional funding for air cleaning units in SEND and AP settings as a way to mitigate the transmission risk amongst the most vulnerable cohorts.

Further advice for schools on balancing the need for increased ventilation while maintaining a comfortable temperature is available in the Health and Safety Executive guidance on air conditioning and ventilation during the COVID-19 outbreak (which can be found here: https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/index.htm) and the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers' COVID-19 advice (which can be found here: https://www.cibse.org/coronavirus-covid-19).

1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Government's announcement of 21 August 2021 that all school settings would be provided with CO2 monitors during the autumn term and that special schools would receive them from September 2021, how many CO2 monitors have been supplied to special schools in Liverpool West Derby as of 1 December 2021.

As of 26 November, the department has delivered 329,231 carbon dioxide monitors to almost all eligible education and childcare settings, backed by £25 million in government funding.

Special schools and alternative provision were prioritised for the first deliveries, given their higher than average number of vulnerable pupils. Deliveries to these settings are now complete.

Over 99% of eligible schools, colleges, and the majority of early years settings have now received their allocation of CO2 monitors. Final deliveries will be made before the end of term, enabling all settings to identify areas where ventilation can be improved and provide reassurance that existing measures are working.

The department does not hold data on the number of settings by ward or parliamentary constituency. However, further information can be found on the fortnightly statistical release at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/co2-monitors-cumulative-delivery-statistics.

1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Government's announcement of 21 August 2021 that all school settings would be provided with CO2 monitors during the autumn term, how many CO2 monitors have been supplied to schools in England as of 1 December 2021.

As of 26 November, the department has delivered 329,231 carbon dioxide monitors to almost all eligible education and childcare settings, backed by £25 million in government funding.

Special schools and alternative provision were prioritised for the first deliveries, given their higher than average number of vulnerable pupils. Deliveries to these settings are now complete.

Over 99% of eligible schools, colleges, and the majority of early years settings have now received their allocation of CO2 monitors. Final deliveries will be made before the end of term, enabling all settings to identify areas where ventilation can be improved and provide reassurance that existing measures are working.

The department does not hold data on the number of settings by ward or parliamentary constituency. However, further information can be found on the fortnightly statistical release at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/co2-monitors-cumulative-delivery-statistics.

1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Government's announcement of 21 August 2021 that all school settings would be provided with CO2 monitors during the autumn term, how many CO2 monitors have been supplied to schools in Liverpool West Derby constituency as of 1 December 2021.

As of 26 November, the department has delivered 329,231 carbon dioxide monitors to almost all eligible education and childcare settings, backed by £25 million in government funding.

Special schools and alternative provision were prioritised for the first deliveries, given their higher than average number of vulnerable pupils. Deliveries to these settings are now complete.

Over 99% of eligible schools, colleges, and the majority of early years settings have now received their allocation of CO2 monitors. Final deliveries will be made before the end of term, enabling all settings to identify areas where ventilation can be improved and provide reassurance that existing measures are working.

The department does not hold data on the number of settings by ward or parliamentary constituency. However, further information can be found on the fortnightly statistical release at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/co2-monitors-cumulative-delivery-statistics.

17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 9 June to Question 10698 on Primary Education: Sports, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effect of uncertainty on the primary physical education and sport premium for the 2021-22 academic year on (a) school finances and (b) the ability of schools to agree programmes of support for pupils for the next academic year.

The Department aims to give as much notice as possible to schools of future funding to support effective planning and has now confirmed the overall funding for the primary physical education (PE) and sport premium will continue at £320 million for the 2021/22 academic year. Schools will be permitted to carry forward any unspent PE and sport premium funding from the current academic year to ensure it is spent to benefit primary pupils’ physical education, school sport and physical activity recovery. Funding will be allocated according to a formula and details will be confirmed in the autumn.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his timetable is for announcing arrangements for the primary PE and sport premium funding for the 2021-22 academic year; and how he plans to calculate that funding.

The Department is aware of the importance of giving schools as much notice as possible of future funding. We will confirm arrangements for the primary physical education and sport premium for the 2021/22 academic year as soon as possible.

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate the Government has made of the rate of transmission of covid-19 in SEND schools in England; what steps his department is taking to support SEND schools in Liverpool West Derby to reduce covid-19 transmission ; and what assessment he has made of the potential merits of including SEND school staff in the first phase of the covod-19 vaccination rollout.

During national lockdown restrictions, all schools and colleges, including special schools and special post-16 settings, remain open to vulnerable children and young people and the children of critical workers. We recognise that the characteristics of the cohorts in special schools will mean that these settings continue to offer face to face provision for all pupils, where appropriate. This is because we know that children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), and their families, can be disproportionately impacted by being out of education. The department has published new guidance on the period during the national lockdown, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak#history

It is important that staff in these settings continue to be supported. The rapid asymptomatic testing programme will include testing staff, vulnerable pupils and students, and children of key workers, including those within special schools and special post-16 settings. Further announcements on the roll out of testing to staff in primary schools will follow in due course, to help support the reopening of education settings.

Public Health England have advised that the current guidance on the system of controls should continue to be followed. When implemented in line with a revised risk assessment, this creates an inherently safer environment where the risk of transmission of the infection is substantially reduced.

The personal protective equipment (PPE) portal can be used by residential special settings to access COVID-19 PPE. These providers will have received an email invitation to register with the portal. Depending on local arrangements, special schools and special post-16 settings may be able to access PPE for their COVID-19 needs via their local authority or local resilience forum. Our published guidance clearly outlines the circumstances in which PPE should be used, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/safe-working-in-education-childcare-and-childrens-social-care/safe-working-in-education-childcare-and-childrens-social-care-settings-including-the-use-of-personal-protective-equipment-ppe.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) are the independent experts who advise the Government on which vaccine/s the UK should use and provide advice on who should be offered them. JCVI advises that the first priorities for the COVID-19 vaccination should be the prevention of mortality and the maintenance of the health and social care systems, and as the risk of mortality from COVID-19 increases with age, prioritisation is primarily based on age. This prioritisation captures almost all preventable deaths from COVID-19. In the next phase of the vaccine rollout, JCVI have asked that the Department of Health and Social Care consider occupational vaccination in collaboration with other Government departments. The department will input into this cross governmental exercise.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate the Government has made of the rate of covid-19 transmission in nurseries in England; what steps his department is taking to support nurseries in Liverpool West Derby to reduce transmission of covid-19; and what assessment he has made of the potential merits of including nursery staff in the first phase of thecovid-19 vaccination rollout.

Early years settings remain low risk environments for children and staff. Current evidence suggests that pre-school children (0 to less than 5 years) are less susceptible to infection and are unlikely to be playing a driving role in transmission. There is no evidence that the new strain of COVID-19 causes more serious illness in either children or adults, or that it disproportionately affects young children.

Public Health England (PHE) advice remains that the risk of transmission and infection is low if early years settings follow the system of controls, which reduce risks and create inherently safer environments. This report from PHE shows that, at present under 5s have the lowest confirmed case rate of all age groups: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/national-flu-and-covid-19-surveillance-reports.

Early years settings have been open to all children since 1 June 2020, and there is no evidence that the early years sector has contributed to a significant rise in virus cases within the community. Early modelling evidence from SAGE showed that early years provision had a smaller relative impact on transmission rate when modelled with both primary schools and secondary schools. Further information on this evidence is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/886994/s0257-sage-sub-group-modelling-behavioural-science-relaxing-school-closures-sage30.pdf.

We continue to prioritise keeping early years settings open in full because of the clear benefits to children’s education and wellbeing and to support working parents. Caring for the youngest age group is not something that can be done remotely.

These plans are being kept under review in the light of emerging scientific evidence. We are working with the scientific community to understand the properties and dynamics of the new variant VUI-202012/01 in relation to children and young people.

The department has been in regular contact with all local authorities, including that of Liverpool West Derby. During these meetings we collect and feedback the concerns and issues raised by providers and the local authority to the relevant policy teams within the department, to ensure that policy is reflective of the needs and experiences of those delivering essential early education.

PHE have endorsed a ‘system of controls’ which are the set of actions all early years settings must take. These are outlined in more detail here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-early-years-and-childcare-closures/coronavirus-covid-19-early-years-and-childcare-closures.

These build on the hierarchy of protective measures that have been in use throughout the COVID-19 outbreak. When implemented in line with a revised risk assessment, these measures create an inherently safer environment for children and staff where the risk of transmission of infection is substantially reduced.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) advises that the first priorities for the COVID-19 vaccination programme should be the prevention of mortality and the maintenance of the health and social care systems. As the risk of mortality from COVID-19 increases with age, prioritisation is primarily based on age.

Regarding the next phase of vaccine rollout, JCVI have asked that the Department of Health and Social Care consider occupational vaccination in collaboration with other government departments. The Department will input into this cross governmental exercise.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Nov 2020
What discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on replacing the temporary arrangements for supplementary funding with a new strand of the Early Years National Funding Formula for grant-maintained nursery schools.

We announced on 24 August 2020 that local authorities will continue to receive supplementary funding for their maintained nursery schools for the whole of the 2020-21 academic year. The department has regular discussions at official and ministerial level about all aspects of the education system for the forthcoming spending review.

We are committed to funding for maintained nursery schools in the longer term. Any reform to the way they are funded in the future will be accompanied by appropriate funding protections. The Government plans to spend more than £3.6 billion on early education entitlements in 2020-21.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions the Government has had with the teaching unions on keeping schools and colleges open during the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown in England; and what further steps the Government is taking to limit the spread of covid-19 in schools and colleges.

Ministers and officials have regular engagement with teaching unions about the Government’s COVID-19 response, including around keeping schools and colleges open during the November national lockdown.

On 2 July, the Department published guidance to help schools prepare for all pupils, in all year groups, to return to school full-time from the beginning of the autumn term. The full guidance can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

Our guidance for schools sets out measures which provide a framework for school leaders to put in place proportionate protective measures for children and staff, which also ensure that all pupils receive a high quality education that enables them to thrive and progress. This includes the public health advice schools must follow to minimise the risks of COVID-19 transmission.

The public health advice in the guidance for schools makes up a Public Health England-endorsed ‘system of controls’, building on the hierarchy of protective measures that schools have been using throughout the COVID-19 outbreak.

The Department is keeping the guidance under review. It will reflect any further steps necessary to keep children in school, whilst minimising the risk of COVID-19 transmission, in light of new national restrictions being implemented from 5 November.

2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of school children who did not have access to broadband and computer equipment have been given the equipment required to enable them to carry out school work from home where required in Liverpool West Derby constituency.

The Department has invested over £195 million to support remote education through laptops and tablets, internet provision, and online education platforms.

Over 220,000 laptops and tablets were delivered during the summer term for disadvantaged children who would not otherwise have access. This data can be found here https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/912888/Devices_and_4G_wireless_routers_progress_data_as_of_27_August_2020.pdf and includes data on Liverpool Council and trusts in the Liverpool region.

The Department have supplemented this support by making an additional 340,000 laptops and tablets available in the event face-to-face schooling is disrupted as a result of local Covid-19 restrictions, and children become reliant on remote education.

Over 100,000 devices have been delivered to schools since September, which includes 5,728 delivered to schools in the Liverpool region.

We have already provided over 50,000 4G wireless routers, with free data for the autumn term, to support disadvantaged children to access remote education and vital social care services.

In partnership with select mobile network operators, the Department ran a small-scale trial with a limited number of local authorities and academy trusts to identify and support disadvantaged families who would benefit from free mobile data uplifts to engage in remote education. Following the success of this pilot, we are now working with mobile network operators to provide a national service for disadvantaged children.

2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government is taking to ensure the health and safety of teachers and staff in the workplace at schools and colleges during the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown in England.

We have worked closely with the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) and Public Health England (PHE) to develop specific guidance for education settings, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus/education-and-childcare. DHSC and PHE endorsed system of controls outlined in our guidance sets out the measures that school and college leaders and staff should follow.

Where settings implement the system of controls outlined in our guidance, in line with their own workplace risk assessment, DHSC and PHE confirm that these measures create an inherently safer environment for children and staff where the risk of transmission of infection is substantially reduced.

While the national restrictions introduced from 5 November are in force, those individuals who are clinically extremely vulnerable are advised to work from home where possible and not to go into work. Individuals in this group will have been identified through a letter from the NHS or from their GP, and may have been advised to shield in the past. Staff should talk to their employers about how they will be supported, including to work from home where possible, during the period of national restrictions. All other staff can continue to attend work, including those living in a household with someone who is clinically extremely vulnerable.

11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to provide meals for disadvantaged school children during school holidays in 2020 in (a) Liverpool West Derby constituency and (b) the UK.

During the 2018 summer holidays the Department awarded £2 million to 7 organisations to deliver free healthy food and enriching activities to disadvantaged children. With this money, the Department were able to support more than 280 clubs and reach around 18,000 children.

In 2019, this funding was more than quadrupled to explore a model of local coordination of free holiday provision in 11 local authority areas, reaching around 50,000 children.

In 2020, the Department will again invest £9 million to support children and their families. Officials are currently processing the bids received and the Department will announce the outcome and the chosen organisations and locations in due course. This has been a competitive bidding process and all areas were able to apply for this funding.

The scheme operates in England only as education is a devolved matter.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Education
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what funding he has allocated to support (a) primary and (b) secondary school pupils with special educational needs in Liverpool, West Derby constituency; and how that allocation compares with the average funding level across England.

We recently announced £780 million additional high needs funding for 2020-21, a 12% rise bringing the total to over £7 billion. Every local authority in England will see an increase in high needs funding of at least 8% per head of population aged 2 to 18. Liverpool will receive £57.9 million in total high needs funding next year. The department does not break down high needs funding by constituency.

When the costs of additional support required for a pupil with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) exceed £6,000, the local authority should also allocate additional top-up funding to cover the excess costs. This top-up funding, and funding for special schools, comes from the local authority’s high needs budget.

We have also allocated £365 million special provision capital funding to local authorities in England from 2018 to 2021, to increase number of places available locally and enhance facilities for children with the most complex SEND. This could include re-purposing areas so that they meet the needs of pupils with SEND.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Education
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what effect the national funding formula for schools has had on levels of socioeconomic inequality in (a) Liverpool, West Derby constituency, (b) Liverpool and (c) Liverpool City Region.

The National Funding Formula commits extra funding for pupils with additional needs, based on levels of deprivation, low prior attainment, English as an additional language and mobility. This is because evidence shows that pupils with these characteristics are more likely to fall behind, and need extra support to reach their full potential.

In 2020-21, £6.3 billion will be allocated in the national funding formula for 5-16 year olds with additional needs in England. Areas with high levels of additional needs will attract more funding and, as a result Liverpool, West Derby constituency and the local authority of Liverpool will receive higher than average per pupil funding. Next year, primary schools and secondary schools in the Liverpool, West Derby constituency will attract, on average, £4,626 and £5,775 per pupil respectively. Across the local authority of Liverpool they will attract on average £4,560 and £5,744 per pupil respectively. In both cases, this is above the national average of £4,352 for primary schools and £5,578 for secondary schools.

In 2020-21, the local authorities that make up the Liverpool City Region (Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St. Helen’s and Wirral) will receive a total cash increase of £49.2 million in additional schools funding. Overall, these local authorities will receive a 5.1% increase in their total cash funding.

26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Government consultation on environmental targets produce its final report and recommendations.

The Environmental Targets consultation is currently open and can be accessed through Citizen Space. The consultation is due to close on 27 June. We will carefully consider responses before finalising the targets to be laid in Parliament. A Government response will be published in due course.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the change in levels of nitrogen oxide levels in ((a) Liverpool and (b) England from March 2019 to March 2022.

Assessments of concentration changes are reported in:

i) National Statistics on Air Quality are available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/air-quality-statistics

ii) The statutory compliance assessments, "Air Pollution in the UK" 2019 and 2020 (published in September 2020 and 2021 respectively) are available here:

https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/annualreport/

Concentration data for 2022 has not yet been quality assured and remains provisional. It is available in UK-Air here: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/data/

Our national statistics (published in April) are compiled on an annual basis and data for the year 2022 will be published in April 2023 following data ratification. The formal compliance assessment for 2021 will be published in "Air Pollution in the UK" this September once concentration modelling has been completed. Compliance for 2022 calendar year will be publication in September 2023.

Our National Monitoring Network (the Automatic Urban and Rural Monitoring Network (AURN)) measured a 20% decline in annual mean concentrations of nitrogen dioxide across roadside sites in the UK between the periods 2019 to 2021, and a 19% decline at urban background sites. There were two AURN sites in Liverpool throughout this period, Birkenhead Borough Road and Wirral Tranmere. Current data shows a declining trend in concentrations at both of these sites since March 2019.

26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the areas in the (a) England and (b) Liverpool where air pollution has been increasing; and what steps are being taken by central Government to reverse that process.

Assessment of air pollution concentration changes across the UK is reported annually in "Air Pollution in the UK" and the latest report covering 2020 can be found here: Annual Report 2020 Issue 1 Online Viewer - Defra, UK.

Assessment of changing emissions across the UK is also reported annually and the latest report covering 2020 can be found here: Emissions of air pollutants in the UK - Summary - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

Local assessment is carried out by Liverpool council as part of its statutory Local Air Quality Management function.

NOx concentrations recorded by two Automatic Urban Rural Monitoring sites in Liverpool have been on a downward trend, though we recognise there is more to be done. That is why the Government has taken a range of steps to tackle air pollution, including:

· Publishing the Clean Air Strategy (2019) which focuses on the actions we will take to reduce emissions of the five most damaging air pollutants: ammonia, fine particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, non-methane volatile organic compounds.

· Setting two new targets for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) under the Environment Act 2021. Our dual-target approach will tackle the highest concentrations and ensure continuous improvement across the country.

· Continuing to take action to protect people from pollutants released from domestic burning by bringing forward regulations to ensure people use cleaner fuels and solid fuel stoves.

· Working to provide a coherent regulatory framework for the setting, updating, and enforcing of standards for air quality emissions from the full range of industry sectors. This includes the development of the UK 'best available techniques' (BAT) framework, which will enable regulators and industry to work together to identify and apply up to date, challenging standards.

· Publishing our 2017 UK Plan for tackling nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations and its 2018 supplement, which set out our approach to bringing NO2 air pollution to within statutory limits. This includes placing requirements on a number of local authorities, including Liverpool City Council, to develop local air quality plans. This is supported by £880 million dedicated funding to help local authorities develop and implement their plans, and to support those impacted by these plans. This Government is also taking action across transport by supporting the switch to electric vehicles with over £3 billion of investment, and £2 billion in funding for cycling and walking over this Parliament.

We continue to make significant investment in transport in the Liverpool City Region, including a £710 million City Region Sustainable Transport Settlement over 5 years to transform local transport networks, alongside £37.52 million from the Levelling Up Fund to improve local transport, including high quality segregated walking and cycling routes.

10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to his Department's Outcome Delivery Plan published on 15 July 2021, what recent steps he has taken to deliver affordable food to consumers in the UK.

Defra’s Outcome Delivery Plan commits us to improve the productivity and economic performance of food and farming industries, ensuring the UK is a great place to start, innovate and thrive as a farming, food or drink business, delivering healthy, affordable and sustainable food and drink to consumers at home and abroad. The forthcoming Government Food Strategy will build on existing work across Government and set out the vision to create a healthier, more sustainable, more resilient, and more accessible food system for people across the UK.

We will continue to engage with supermarkets to explore the range of measures they can take to ensure the availability of affordable food, for example by price matching and price freezing measures.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate his Department has made of the cost for (a) an adult and (b) a child to eat in line with the dietary advice contained in the Community Eatwell Guide in 2022.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate his Department has made of the likely percentage change in food prices over the next 12 months.

Consumer food prices are driven by a number of factors including: domestic farmgate prices; international commodity prices; exchange rates; and food manufacturing costs.

The latest inflation statistics for food and non-alcoholic beverages, published by the Office for National Statistics, shows an annual rate of inflation of 5.1 per cent in the year to February 2022.

Food prices have been rising as a result of multiple factors including energy prices, strong commodity prices and labour shortages, among others. The conflict in Ukraine has compounded these existing pressures and also affected markets for particular commodities (e.g. wheat, maize, oilseeds) and will continue to have a direct effect on energy prices and fuel prices.

The variety of direct and indirect impacts on markets makes it very difficult to estimate the likely overall effect on consumer food prices. It is also unknown the extent to which increased costs might be absorbed within margins across the food chain, or passed on to consumers in the form of higher prices.

Defra understands the pressure that rising food prices place on household budgets, and the impacts on businesses across the food chain. Defra has ongoing and regular contact with retailers and other stakeholders across the food chain, and continues to monitor commodity markets and other inflationary pressures.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the impact of current levels of fine particulate matter PM2.5 on children’s health.

We know air pollution is a particular threat to vulnerable groups, including children. Our Clean Air Strategy sets out an ambitious programme of action to reduce air pollution from a wide range of sources. Our Environment Act also makes a clear commitment to set ambitious targets for fine particulate matter, the pollutant of most concern for human health.

The Government receives objective and independent advice from a number of air pollution and health experts on the impact of pollution on health, in particular the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants which keeps emerging evidence under regular review. We also receive advice from the UK Health Security Agency and the Department for Health and Social Care.

26th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the impact of nitrogen oxide levels on children’s health as at 26 January 2022.

We know air pollution is a particular threat to vulnerable groups, including children. Our Clean Air Strategy sets out an ambitious programme of action to reduce air pollution from a wide range of sources. Our Environment Act also makes a clear commitment to set ambitious targets for fine particulate matter, the pollutant of most concern for human health.

The Government receives objective and independent advice from a number of air pollution and health experts on the impact of pollution on health, in particular the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants which keeps emerging evidence under regular review. We also receive advice from the UK Health Security Agency and the Department for Health and Social Care.

26th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the evidential basis that substantiates the statement made by his Department's spokesperson and reported in September 2022 that (a) air pollution has reduced significantly since 2010 and (b) at a national level emissions of fine particulate matter have fallen by 11 per cent, while emissions of nitrogen oxides are at their lowest level since records began.

Emissions of key air pollutants are compiled and reported by Defra on an annual basis through the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory and the data for nitrogen oxides and both coarse and fine particulate matter is available to view at https://naei.beis.gov.uk/data. The data for 2010 and all years up to 2019 is available from this website.

The National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory is also used as the basis for the National Statistics report ‘Emissions of air pollutants in the UK’ which describes the trends in emissions of air pollutants over time. The latest report, published February 2021, is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/emissions-of-air-pollutants.

26th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the President of COP26's oral contribution of 1 December 2021, Official Report, column 907, if he will publish (a) the scientific data in support of his statement that air pollution has reduced significantly since 2010 and (b) a breakdown of that data by levels of (i) nitrogen dioxide, (b) coarse particulate matter and (c) fine particulate matter.

Emissions of key air pollutants are compiled and reported by Defra on an annual basis through the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory and the data for nitrogen oxides and both coarse and fine particulate matter is available to view at https://naei.beis.gov.uk/data. The data for 2010 and all years up to 2019 is available from this website.

The National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory is also used as the basis for the National Statistics report ‘Emissions of air pollutants in the UK’ which describes the trends in emissions of air pollutants over time. The latest report, published February 2021, is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/emissions-of-air-pollutants.

26th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the change in levels of nitrogen oxide in (a) England and (b) Liverpool since 2010.

Defra carries out an assessment of annual mean concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) across the UK each year using an air quality model; the full results are published here.

Since 2010, average modelled NO2 concentrations have decreased in both England and Liverpool; the average annual mean roadside NO2 concentration in England in 2019 was 28µgm-3, down from 42µgm-3 in 2010.

Air quality measurement data from Defra’s long-term Automatic Urban and Rural Network also illustrates the decrease in average NO2 concentrations across the UK since 2010. The average annual mean NO2 concentration measured at roadside AURN sites across the UK decreased from 46µgm-3 in 2010 to 31µgm-3 in 2019 and 23µgm-3 in 2020.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the risk of private sector forestry operators bringing foreign plant pathogens to the UK via imported trees.

From January 2021, trees entering Great Britain from the EU have been subject to third country import requirements and controls on the highest risk products have been applied. This includes requirements to pre-notify, the need for a phytosanitary certificate to accompany regulated consignments and physical inspections on imports once they have arrived in Great Britain. It was already the case that imported trees from non-EU countries were subject to import controls and risk-based checks at the border. All forestry operators and businesses supplying such operators, including those from the private sector, must comply with these requirements when importing trees or other regulated material.

Plant health risks are continually identified, assessed, and managed by the UK Plant Health Risk Group which includes key experts from within Defra, the Forestry Commission, and across the Devolved Administrations. This analysis, and the underpinning biological and economic data and evidence, is captured by the UK's publicly available Plant Health Risk Register, including how the pest has been or could be introduced into the UK. Over 1200 pests are currently recorded on the Risk Register, and the numbers are increasing. Through this screening process, we are able to identify significant threats and to prioritise our actions and resources accordingly, making evidence-based decisions on whether to regulate the pest and the control measures necessary to protect our crops, trees, gardens and countryside. It is through this mechanism that a number of tree genera are already prohibited from being imported from non-EU sources, with stringent requirements in place for other genera, which must be met before they can be imported.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will take steps to ensure that the England Tree Strategy maximises the use of domestically grown British trees and minimise reliance on imports.

We are committed to increasing tree planting across the UK to 30,000 hectares per year by the end of this parliament. We published our ambitious England Trees Action Plan on the 18th May which sets out our plans to at least treble tree planting rates in England in support of this, using more than £500 million from the Nature for Climate Fund.

Planting and establishing more domestic trees will play an important role in supporting the green economy, levelling up rural areas and creating thousands of new jobs. Using UK grown timber can reduce our carbon footprint from imports and reduce emissions by replacing carbon-intensive materials.

We committed in the Clean Growth Strategy and the 25 Year Environment Plan to increase the use of timber in construction, identifying it as key measure in encouraging commercial forestry. Our England Trees Action Plan includes measures to encourage both supply and demand for UK grown timber, including a new Forestry Innovation Fund which will provide financial support to develop innovative timber products, the use of procurement policies to increase public demand for sustainably sourced timber and increase the safe use of timber in construction.

Through the England Trees Action Plan, we are also working to increase tree production in our domestic nursery sector through targeted activities supported by the Nature for Climate Fund. This will build on current facilities and explore innovative ideas and technologies to improve production capacity. This is necessary to create a resilient, healthy, and genetically diverse planting stock, which is ready for our future climate in the UK. This should encourage further development of domestically grown trees and minimise the reliance on tree imports.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of the closure of the Wykeham Nursery site in North Yorkshire on Forestry England's ability to fulfil planting targets without increasing reliance on the import of trees to the UK.

Forestry England manages two nursery sites, one at Delamere in Cheshire and the other at Wykeham in Yorkshire. Following a detailed review of future tree seedling supply needs, Forestry England plan to close Wykeham nursery and to concentrate production at its Delamere facilities. Forestry England is strengthening the resilience of tree supply by investing to adapt to the impacts of climate change and biosecurity challenges.

The nurseries exist primarily to supply trees for Forestry England; the closure at Wykeham will not impact upon current or future tree planting ambitions nationally or by Forestry England. In support of their biosecurity assurance protocols Forestry England only plant trees grown in Britain with Plant Healthy certification.

Forestry England has been proactive in strengthening biosecurity across their operations and were the first locations in which the Plant Healthy audit protocols were tested. Forestry England are working closely with industry partners in encouraging the development of robust biosecurity assurance across the whole tree nursery sector.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the (a) private forestry sector's current stocking density levels and (b) ability of private sector operators to fulfil public contracts without increasing reliance on imported trees.

We do not keep track of the private sector's current stocking density levels. However, through the England Trees Action Plan, we have set out measures to expand our data on trees, woodlands and forests. This includes establishing a Nursery Notification Scheme which will provide information on supply and demand of different kinds of tree, which will support nurseries and seed suppliers to produce the right stock at the right time.

We do not hold information or make assessments on the ability of private sector operators to fulfil public contracts. However, we are working to increase tree production in our domestic nursery sector through targeted activities supported by the Nature for Climate Fund. This will include capital investment in nurseries to improve the quantity, quality, diversity and biosecurity of domestic tree production. This is necessary to create a resilient, healthy, and genetically diverse planting stock, which is ready for our future climate and grown in the UK. This should encourage further reliance on domestically grown trees.

We know that collaborative engagement with both the public and private forest nursery sector is crucial to enhance nursery production. Through the England Trees Action Plan, we are setting out a roadmap for future engagement, building on what we already have in place. This will allow us to develop collaborative, committed and transparent relationships with the nursery sector that delivers better strategic alignment and enhances plant and seed production further.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to reduce air pollution in (a) Liverpool and (b) other cities.

As a result of the 2017 NO2 Plan and 2018 supplement, 61 local authorities including Liverpool have been required to assess what action is needed to address NO2 exceedances in their area and develop local plans. The Government is committed to improving air quality in the UK and have provided £572 million to support the development and implementation of required measures by these local authorities.

Liverpool City Council submitted a final plan to deliver compliance with legal limits for NO2 in the form of an Outline Business Case in October last year. We continue to work with the Council to ensure their final plan delivers compliance with legal NO2 limit levels in the shortest possible time.

Our Clean Air Strategy (CAS) sets out an ambitious programme of action to reduce air pollutant emissions from a wide range of sources. The World Health Organization has recognised the CAS as an example for the rest of the world to follow. Our Environment Bill was reintroduced to Parliament on 30 January 2020 and makes a clear commitment to set an ambitious target for fine particulate matter, the pollutant of most concern for human health. It also ensures that local authorities have a clear framework and simple to use powers to tackle air pollution in their areas, and will provide the Government with new powers to enforce environmental standards for vehicles. All this action will improve air quality across the UK, including in the most affected areas

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Sep 2020
What recent discussions she has had with the UK's trade partners on protecting International Labour Organisation standards in future trade agreements.

While the details?of?free trade agreements?are?reserved?for formal negotiations,?HM Government has been clear that?increased trade does not have to come at the expense of?our high?labour standards.?The United Kingdom?is an active member of the International Labour Organisation and we?will?continue to uphold our world-leading standards and?international?commitments.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
7th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 25 May 2022 to Written Question 5695, on Electric Scooters: Pilot Schemes, whether the Government plans to publish its final report on e-scooter trials within the current Parliamentary year.

We intend to publish our plans as soon as possible.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
20th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when his Department plans to publish its final report on e-scooter trials.

Findings from this evaluation will be in the final report due to be published in the future.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he has taken to ensure that the terms of the covid-19 emergency management arrangements with train operating companies do not financially benefit those organisations compared with their franchise agreements prior to the covid-19 lockdown.

The Emergency Measures Agreements (EMAs) temporarily suspend the existing franchise agreements' financial mechanisms for an initial period of six months. They were developed at an early stage of the covid-19 crisis as a bespoke solution to address the particular circumstances of rail franchises. These include the fact that the government would face large and direct financial exposure via its obligations under the Railways Act if any franchise were to fail financially and become unable to operate its services. The EMAs include explicit provisions to prevent 'double recovery', ensuring franchisees cannot be compensated through the EMAs where funding from other government support schemes has been obtained.

Operators are required to continue to fulfil their obligations under the EMAs for a small, pre-determined management fee. Fees are set at a maximum of 2 per cent of the cost base of the franchise before the Covid-19 pandemic began, intended to incentivise operators to meet reliability, punctuality and other targets.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to establish new rail links (a) in Liverpool West Derby constituency and (b) the North West.

To help communities across the country, we have pledged £500m to start reopening lines closed following the Beeching report, reconnecting smaller towns, regenerating local economies and improving accessibility to jobs, homes and education.

I encourage MPs, to work with local authorities and community groups in their constituency to come forward with proposals to reinstate axed local services and stations. This funding will help develop these proposals, and accelerate the delivery of schemes that are already being considered for restoration.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what inter-ministerial group exists to discuss (a) poverty and (b) matters relating to the cost of living; when that group last met; and which departments are represented in its membership.

We are committed to working across Government to support households, which is why we convened the cost of living Inter-Ministerial Group to ensure a cross-Government understanding of the cost of living challenges particular for those on lower incomes and to encourage a joined up approach to future work in this area.

Ministers have had extensive and wide-ranging discussions around the cost of living and will continue to do so in the future. The Inter-Ministerial Group last formally met on 9 November 2021.

Ministers and officials from across Government have constant discussion on policy development and implementation, including ahead of the announcement on help with energy bills on 3rd March and the Spring Statement on 23rd March 2022.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what impact assessment her Department has conducted on removing the pensions triple lock; and what estimate her Department has made of how many more pensioners in the Liverpool, West Derby constituency will (a) be living in poverty and (b) unable to afford food, fuel and essentials as a result.

We are not ending the Triple Lock for State Pensions up-rating. A full impact assessment is available in the House Library (Deposited paper DEP2021-0855 - Deposited papers - UK Parliament).

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will bring forward measures to remove the six-month rule, which forces terminally ill people to prove how long they have left to live in order to access fast-track support.

The DWP announced in July 2019 that it would consider how the benefit system supports people nearing the end of their life. The DWP has conducted a wide ranging evaluation which considered the views of claimants, stakeholders and clinicians on how it supports those nearing the end of their lives. The evaluation has shown that there are three key areas for the Department to consider: a consensus to change the six-month rule; improving ​consistency with other services used by people nearing the end of their lives; and raising awareness of the support that is available. The Department is committed to delivering an improved benefit system for claimants that are nearing the end of their lives and is working across Government to bring forward proposals following the evaluation.

11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many applications for universal credit lapsed or were withdrawn due to the death of the applicant in (a) Liverpool West Derby constituency, (b) Merseyside and (c) England since the introduction of universal credit.

The breakdown requested is not available and to provide it would incur disproportionate costs. However, in the 12 months to end of 2019, 2,300, or less than 0.07 per cent, applications were made to Universal Credit where the claimant passed away and the claims closed after the declaration, but prior to receiving the first payment.

Universal Credit can be claimed by a range of working age people, some of whom have health conditions or disabilities, which may be degenerative or life limiting. The decision to claim Universal Credit can be prompted by a range of a factors, including when someone is terminally ill, so mortality figures should not be viewed in isolation.

24th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ensure that care home records are accessible to diagnosing clinicians to support the identification, assessment and diagnosis of dementia.

We are supporting integrated care systems to implement a person-based shared care record involving the local health and care partners. The initial focus has been on the sharing of information between National Health Service trusts and general practice, which will be extended to other partners involved in the delivery of health and care services. Developments such as Digital Social Care Records will allow care home records to be accessible to diagnosing clinicians, supporting the identification, assessment and diagnosis of dementia.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions he has had with organisations representing ethnic minority communities on the dementia diagnosis process.

We have had no specific discussions. However, NHS England and NHS Improvement have commissioned the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities’ Dementia Intelligence Network to investigate the underlying variation in dementia diagnosis rates in targeted areas in England. This will include a focus on social and economic deprivation, rurality, demographic characteristics including age, ethnicity and educational attainment and general health/life expectancy.

We will set out plans for dementia in England for the next 10 years later this year, which will include a focus on dementia diagnosis.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 16 May 2022 to Written Question 518 on Nutrition, if his Department will make an estimate of the cost for (a) an adult and (b) a child to eat in line with the dietary advice contained in the Community Eatwell Guide.

The Eatwell Guide shows the proportions of the different types of foods which contribute to a healthy, balanced diet. It allows for flexibility and is not prescriptive, as it is possible to eat a diet in line with the guide by choosing from a range of foods and drinks. In 2016, ‘Eatwell Guide: modelling the dietary and cost implications of incorporating new sugar and fibre guidelines’ by Scarborough et al analysed the cost of a modelled diet reflective of the Eatwell Guide recommendations. This had a guide cost £5.99 per adult per day, which was similar to the cost of the average diet in the United Kingdom at that time at £6.02 per adult per day. The Office of Health Improvement and Disparities will explore options to assess the cost of a healthy diet with a focus on families.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the daily cost for (a) an adult and (b) a child to eat in line with the dietary advice contained in the Community Eatwell Guide in 2017.

The United Kingdom’s national food model, the Eatwell Guide, provides a visual representation of the types and proportions of foods needed for a healthy balanced diet.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities has not made a specific assessment.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the daily cost for (a) an adult and (b) a child to eat in line with the dietary advice contained in the Community Eatwell Guide in 2018.

The United Kingdom’s national food model, the Eatwell Guide, provides a visual representation of the types and proportions of foods needed for a healthy balanced diet.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities has not made a specific assessment.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the daily cost for (a) an adult and (b) a child to eat in line with the dietary advice contained in the Community Eatwell Guide in 2022.

The United Kingdom’s national food model, the Eatwell Guide, provides a visual representation of the types and proportions of foods needed for a healthy balanced diet.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities has not made a specific assessment.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are eligible for a fourth dose of a covid-19 vaccine this spring.

The primary aim of the spring COVID-19 vaccination programme is to reduce the risk of severe disease across the population. As protection against severe COVID-19 disease appears to decline slowly, the most vulnerable groups have been prioritised for vaccination.

All individuals over the age of 75 years old, residents in a care home for adults or individuals aged 12 years old and over who are immunosuppressed are eligible for the spring booster dose approximately six months after their previous dose. These categories will include some individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation continues to consider the latest available data and its review of the booster programme, particularly in relation to the timing and value of any second booster doses.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support is available for people to access lateral flow tests when (a) they have tried to access lateral flow tests at their local pharmacies but they are out of stock and (b) they do not have the means to access the Government website to order tests online.

In December 2021, 280 million lateral flow tests were delivered and we have since procured new stock and increased delivery capacity. We expect to deliver 90 million tests a week across the United Kingdom, including seven million a day through GOV.UK. Those who are unable to order tests through GOV.UK should contact 119 or visit their local pharmacy. We are distributing 12 million tests a week through pharmacies in England. We expect that everyone, including those in Barnsley and County Durham, will be able to receive the tests they need.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 20 December 2021 to Question 92129, on Coronavirus: Screening, what additional support the Government is providing to pharmacies in (a) England and (b) Liverpool West Derby constituency to meet increased demand for covid-19 lateral flow test kits.

We delivered approximately 280 million lateral flow device tests in December 2021 and we have procured additional stock and increased delivery capacity. We expect to deliver 90 million tests a week across the United Kingdom. In England, this includes approximately 12 million tests a week through pharmacies and seven million tests a day through GOV.UK so we do not expect that deliveries, including those to Liverpool West Derby, will be limited.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 20 December 2021 to Question 92129, on Coronavirus: Screening, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that people who are unable to visit a pharmacy may have covid-19 lateral flow test kits delivered to their home in the context of the gov.uk website indicating that those kits are out of stock for home delivery.

We delivered approximately 280 million lateral flow device tests in December 2021 and we have procured additional stock and increased delivery capacity. We expect to deliver 90 million tests a week across the United Kingdom. In England, this includes approximately 12 million tests a week through pharmacies and seven million tests a day through GOV.UK so we do not expect that deliveries, including those to Liverpool West Derby, will be limited.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 20 December 2021 to Question 92129, on Coronavirus: Screening, and in the context of that Answer which states that there is no shortage of covid-19 lateral flow test kits, for what reason people have reported that those kits have been out of stock (a) on the gov.uk website and (b) upon collection at pharmacies following the issue of a collection code from that website.

We delivered approximately 280 million lateral flow device tests in December 2021 and we have procured additional stock and increased delivery capacity. We expect to deliver 90 million tests a week across the United Kingdom. In England, this includes approximately 12 million tests a week through pharmacies and seven million tests a day through GOV.UK so we do not expect that deliveries, including those to Liverpool West Derby, will be limited.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 20 December 2021 to Question 92129, on Coronavirus: Screening, how people can receive covid-19 lateral flow test kits in the event that those kits are unavailable (a) on the gov.uk website for home delivery and (b) collection at their local pharmacy.

We delivered approximately 280 million lateral flow device tests in December 2021 and we have procured additional stock and increased delivery capacity. We expect to deliver 90 million tests a week across the United Kingdom. In England, this includes approximately 12 million tests a week through pharmacies and seven million tests a day through GOV.UK so we do not expect that deliveries, including those to Liverpool West Derby, will be limited.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment the Government has made of the risk to (a) public health and (b) transmission of covid-19 of the gov.uk stating that there are no home delivery slots for covid-19 lateral flow tests available.

No specific assessment has been made. However, the UK Health Security Agency increased both the supply of tests and distribution capability. From January 2022, we expected to deliver approximately seven million tests a day through GOV.UK and 90 million tests a week through all delivery channels.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people in (a) England and (b) Merseyside have been unable to order a covid-19 lateral flow test kit from the Government website on 13 December 2021; and what steps his Department is taking to resume the provision of covid-19 lateral flow test kits from that website.

The information requested is not held centrally.

There is no shortage of lateral flow tests and we have enough stock to meet increased demand. We are carefully balancing the demands placed on the delivery network to ensure that kits can be delivered to homes, collected from local pharmacies and some community sites.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to increase the availability of (a) GP appointments and (b) face to face GP appointments in Liverpool, West Derby constituency.

General practitioners (GPs) have been asked to prioritise vaccinations and emergency care for the duration of the COVID-19 booster campaign. While some non-urgent appointments may need to be postponed, general practice, NHS 111 and community pharmacy teams are available for everyone with concerns about their health.

Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group has advised that commissioners are strongly encouraged to make local arrangements for extended access provision, where agreed with Primary Care Networks (PCNs). Central Liverpool PCN is currently operating a pilot scheme for enhanced access. All PCNs in Liverpool will be providing enhanced access for patients in their area by October 2022, taking into account any findings from the pilot.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of access to (a) GP appointments and (b) face to face GP appointments in Liverpool, West Derby constituency.

No assessment has been made as general practitioner appointment data is not collected by constituency.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what specific support his Department is taking to help protect people who are immunocompromised and have at least one child attending school settings from covid-19 infection; and whether his Department is taking additional steps to protect those people from infection with the omicron variant of covid-19.

On 29 November 2021, the Government accepted advice from the independent Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) in response to the Omicron variant. This stated that that severely immunosuppressed individuals who have completed the course of three primary doses should be offered a booster vaccination, with a minimum of three months between the third primary and booster dose. Those who have not yet received their third dose may receive this immediately with a booster dose given in three months.

On 22 December 2021, the JCVI further advised that those aged 16 to 17 years old, those aged 12 to 15 years old who are a household contact of someone who is immunosuppressed and 12 to 15 year olds in a clinical risk group, should be offered a booster dose no sooner than three months after completion of their primary course. It also advised that children aged five to 11 years old who are a household contact of someone who is immunosuppressed and those in a clinical risk group should be offered two doses of the vaccine.

Immunocompromised individuals are also a priority cohort for research into therapeutic and prophylaxis treatments such as monoclonal antibody therapies, novel antivirals and repurposed compounds. The highest risk cohort of non-hospitalised patients, including those who are immunocompromised, can access treatments from COVID Medicines Delivery Units, if clinically eligible. These treatments include molnupiravir, an antiviral drug, and sotrovimab, a monoclonal antibody infusion. Another monoclonal antibody treatment, ronapreve, is available to treat the most vulnerable hospitalised patients in the United Kingdom where genotyping shows they are not infected with the Omicron variant. Vulnerable patients with hospital-onset infection with the Omicron variant may be eligible to receive sotrovimab.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment their department has made of the adequacy of availability of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure machines in NHS hospitals in (a) England and (b) Merseyside; and what urgent steps the Government is taking to ensure adequacy of supply of that equipment during the covid-19 outbreak.

The availability of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure machines for hospitals is monitored at a national level as part of the COVID-19 response. The current stock of machines held by NHS Supply Chain exceeds the demands of the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling’s scenarios for this winter. National Health Service trusts can order additional equipment as required from the national reserve.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the latest guidance is on the wearing of face-coverings in non-legally required settings; and if he will provide clarity for people who are confused by the statement on the gov.uk website which states that in other indoor settings where a face covering is not legally required, you should still continue to wear a face covering in crowded and enclosed spaces where you may come into contact with other people you do not normally meet.

New regulations mean face coverings are now legally required in shops, shopping centres, transport hubs and on public transport, including taxis and private hire vehicles. The Government continues to recommend the wearing of face coverings in crowded, indoor places not covered by the regulations. The scientific evidence shows that face coverings can help to reduce transmission by reducing the amount of virus particles expelled by an infected person wearing a face covering and filtering the air a person wearing a face covering inhales. We will keep these measures under review.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to provide additional support to people with long covid in (a) Liverpool, West Derby constituency and (b) Liverpool.

The data requested is not collected centrally at constituency or city level.

On 15 June, NHS England and NHS Improvement published a new 10-point plan and announced an additional £100 million expansion of care for patients with ‘long’ COVID-19 in England. This additional investment includes £70 million which will be used to expand National Health Service treatment and rehabilitation services and establish 15 paediatric hubs to coordinate care for children and young people. A ‘long’ COVID-19 clinic is available as part of Liverpool University Foundation Hospital Trust, while one of the paediatric hubs will be set up within Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust. The remaining £30million will be used for an enhanced service for general practice to support care and enable consistent referrals.

Research is ongoing so we can better understand the virus and its long-term effects. Over £30million of funding has already been committed to research projects and a further £20million is available for a further research call which closed on 12 May. Successful applicants from this call will be announced in due course.

6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) adults and (b) children have been diagnosed with long covid in Liverpool, West Derby constituency to date.

The data requested is not collected centrally at constituency or city level.

On 15 June, NHS England and NHS Improvement published a new 10-point plan and announced an additional £100 million expansion of care for patients with ‘long’ COVID-19 in England. This additional investment includes £70 million which will be used to expand National Health Service treatment and rehabilitation services and establish 15 paediatric hubs to coordinate care for children and young people. A ‘long’ COVID-19 clinic is available as part of Liverpool University Foundation Hospital Trust, while one of the paediatric hubs will be set up within Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust. The remaining £30million will be used for an enhanced service for general practice to support care and enable consistent referrals.

Research is ongoing so we can better understand the virus and its long-term effects. Over £30million of funding has already been committed to research projects and a further £20million is available for a further research call which closed on 12 May. Successful applicants from this call will be announced in due course.

6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what impact assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of mask wearing being voluntary (a) on public transport and (b) in shops on rates of covid-19 transmission.

The Government’s decision on moving to step four of the roadmap will involve undertaking impact assessments, as part of the duties placed on it by the Public Sector Equality Duty.

We will continue to encourage the wearing of face coverings and highlight that wearing a face covering may still help to reduce risk of transmission.

6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what modelling his Department has undertaken on the effect of air pollution on hospitalisations and deaths from covid-19.

Public Health England has not undertaken any direct modelling on the effect of air pollution on hospitalisations and deaths for COVID-19.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his oral contribution on covid-19 mutations on 2 February 2021, if he will write to Members representing any related constituencies in Liverpool on risks posed by mutations discovered in that place.

The Parliamentary under-Secretary of State (Lord Bethell) called those hon. Members whose constituencies would be affected by surge testing due to the new South African variant and contacted the affected Metro Mayors and the Combined Authority Mayor of Liverpool.


We are committed to keeping Parliamentarians updated.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the UK covid-19 Vaccine Delivery Plan published on 11 January 2021, which states that 50 mass vaccination centres will be set up by the end of January in England, when he plans to publish the locations of the 43 sites not named in the plan.

As of 20 February, a total of 1,603 vaccination sites have now been established including:

- 1,034 local vaccination services;

- 195 pharmacies;

- 267 hospital hubs; and

- 107 large scale vaccination centres.

A list of the currently active local vaccination sites is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/publication/vaccination-sites/

Nadhim Zahawi
Chancellor of the Exchequer
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of covid-19 vaccinations administered each day are administered in Liverpool West Derby constituency.

NHS England and NHS Improvement publish weekly data for vaccinations in England. This provides data on vaccinations by local authority, constituency and region. This is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-vaccinations/

We do not publish daily vaccination figures at constituency level.

Nadhim Zahawi
Chancellor of the Exchequer
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he estimates that people in priority groups one and two will have received their (a) first and (b) second covid-19 vaccine.

Everyone in the top four priority cohorts was offered their first dose by 15 February. The Government will ensure everyone will be able to access their second COVID-19 vaccine within the specified time limit as outlined in the United Kingdom COVID-19 vaccine delivery plan. Local National Health Service delivery plans are ensuring second doses are given in line with timescales set out by the independent regulator, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, and advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation. Everyone will be offered a second dose within 12 weeks of their first. Therefore, we would expect all people in priority groups one and two to be offered the opportunity to receive their second dose by mid-May.

The National Health Service across the United Kingdom will continue prioritising the first dose of the vaccine to those in the most high-risk groups; however, this will not interfere with everyone receiving their second dose within 12 weeks of their first.

Further information can be found in the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/letter-from-the-health-and-social-care-secretary-on-covid-19-vaccination-to-protect-severely-immunosuppressed-adults/letter-from-jcvi-on-considerations-on-covid-19-vaccination-of-adult-household-contacts-of-severely-immunosuppressed-adults-24-march-2021

Nadhim Zahawi
Chancellor of the Exchequer
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what impact assessment the Government has undertaken on the effect of keeping schools and colleges open during the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown in England on the transmission of covid-19 in the community.

The Department of Health and Social Care has worked closely with the Department for Education and Public Health England to ensure that we are appropriately assessing the impact of keeping schools and colleges open during the November 2020 COVID-19 lockdown and to develop specific guidance for school and college settings.

The Government is mindful that being at school is important for children’s education and for their wellbeing and that there can be detrimental cognitive and academic impacts of being out of school, particularly for disadvantaged children. Where schools and colleges implement the system of controls outlined in our guidance, in line with their own workplace risk assessment, we are confident that these measures create an inherently safer environment for children and staff where the risk of transmission of infection is substantially reduced. As a result, on current evidence, the Government’s advice is that schools and colleges are not currently considered high risk settings when compared to other workplace environments.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what scientific advice the Government received from SAGE on keeping schools and colleges open during the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown in England and the potential effect of that decision on the transmission of covid-19 in communities.

The Department of Health and Social Care has worked closely with the Department for Education and Public Health England to ensure that we are appropriately assessing the impact of keeping schools and colleges open during the November 2020 COVID-19 lockdown and to develop specific guidance for school and college settings.

The Government is mindful that being at school is important for children’s education and for their wellbeing and that there can be detrimental cognitive and academic impacts of being out of school, particularly for disadvantaged children. Where schools and colleges implement the system of controls outlined in our guidance, in line with their own workplace risk assessment, we are confident that these measures create an inherently safer environment for children and staff where the risk of transmission of infection is substantially reduced. As a result, on current evidence, the Government’s advice is that schools and colleges are not currently considered high risk settings when compared to other workplace environments.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what impact assessment has been undertaken on the potential effect of the tier 3 covid-19 restrictions on the transmission of covid-19 in the Liverpool City Region; and what further support he will provide to health and social care services in that region.

A national impact assessment on the potential effect of COVID-19 restrictions on transmission across the country, including in the Liverpool City region, is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/925856/S0770_NPIs_table__pivot_.pdf

The Government is supporting councils, including the Liverpool City region, by allocating over £8 billion of funding for the pandemic within England.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what impact assessment has been undertaken on the potential effect of gym closures in tier 3 covid-19 areas on (a) health and wellbeing and (b) mental health and wellbeing.

In areas in local COVID alert level Very High, due to the impact of these new measures, we will work with local authorities to shape the set of restrictions that apply. In the case of Liverpool City Region, local leadership and the Government decided that leisure venues, such as leisure centres and gyms, should be closed in order to control the spread of COVID-19. This was considered a proportionate and necessary response given the rate of infection in the region.

We realise the impacts that these regulations have on people’s health and wellbeing and we aim to minimise the impact wherever possible and noting that these restrictions are time limited. The Government have published guidance on mental health and wellbeing which includes guidance on looking after physical wellbeing at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-the-public-on-mental-health-and-wellbeing/guidance-for-the-public-on-the-mental-health-and-wellbeing-aspects-of-coronavirus-covid-19#what-can-help-your-mental-health-and-wellbeing

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the scientific advice he received on closing gyms in tier 3 covid-19 areas.

We know that the virus spreads readily in any indoor environment where members of different households and/or support bubbles spend time together, so the transmission risk in indoor settings, such as gyms, remains high. The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies provided advice to the Department and considered the risks of transmission through different routes and environments in a paper which is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/933225/S0824_SARS-CoV-2_Transmission_routes_and_environments.pdf

A national impact assessment on the potential effect of COVID-19 restrictions on transmission across the country, including in tier 3 areas, is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/925856/S0770_NPIs_table__pivot_.pdf

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the request of 1 October 2012 from Liverpool City Region MPs and leaders in a joint statement for the Government to provide the scientific evidence relating to covid-19 measures, for what reason the advice from SAGE of 21 September 2020 was published after (a) the Downing Street press conference of 12 October 2020 which announced further measures to control covid-19 in the Liverpool City Region and (b) his meeting with Liverpool City Region MPs to discuss those measures at 12.00pm on the same day.

There was policy under consideration prior to publication of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies’ (SAGE) advice. Decisions are released as soon as these considerations permit. Further information on the validation and publication of SAGE minutes is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-publishes-sage-minutes

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 cases in Liverpool, West Derby constituency were affected by the reporting error in NHS Test and Trace; and what steps (a) were taken and (b) are being taken to ensure those affected are made aware of that reporting error.

A total of 875 of 15,841 COVID-19 cases not initially reported to Public Health England between 25 September and 2 October 2020 related to individuals from the Liverpool local authority.

This issue did not affect people receiving their COVID-19 test results and all people who tested positive have received their COVID-19 test result in the normal way.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate he has made of the basic cost of living for a family comprised of two adults and three or more children.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has increased the price and volatility of energy and some other commodities, and has added to disruption in global supply chains. This has started to affect the prices that UK consumers pay for goods including for fuel and domestic energy. Based on market prices taken after Russia invaded Ukraine, the Office for Budget Responsibility forecast inflation to peak at 8.7% in Q4 2022 before falling back towards the 2% target in late 2023.

The government understands the pressures people are facing with the cost of living. These are global challenges, however the government is providing support worth over £22 billion in 2022-23 to help families with these pressures.

This includes providing millions of households with up to £350 to help with rising energy bills and helping people keep more of what they earn. The government has cut the Universal Credit taper rate, frozen alcohol duty and has further increased the National Living Wage to £9.50 an hour from April 2022. The Spring Statement went further, with the government announcing an increase to the annual National Insurance Primary Threshold and Lower Profits Limit to £12,570, a cut to fuel duty, and an additional £500m to help with the cost of essentials through the Household Support Fund.

This builds on action the government has already taken that will help families with the cost of living. Since 2017 the government has offered eligible working parents of 3- to 4-year olds 30 hours of free childcare per week. We have also introduced Tax-Free Childcare, where for every £8 parents pay into their childcare account, the Government adds £2 up to a maximum of £2,000 in top up per year for each child up to age 11 and up to £4,000 per disabled child until they’re 17. Alongside this, £500m to transform ‘Start for Life’ and family help services for parents and babies, and carers and children in half of the council areas across England and over £200 million a year to continue the Holiday Activities and Food programme and deliver the government’s Flexible Childcare Fund commitment.

At each fiscal event HM Treasury has regularly published distributional analysis of the impact of tax, welfare and spending decisions on households. Distributional analysis published at Spring Statement 2022 shows that in 2024-25, the tax, welfare and spending decisions made since Spending Round 2019 will have benefitted the poorest households most (as a percentage of income). The government will continue to keep the situation under review.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the basic cost of living for an informal carer.

Every informal carer's situation will vary depending on their personal circumstances, so it is not possible to come to a generalised conclusion about the basic cost of living for an informal carer.

Carers and their vital contribution to society are also recognised within the welfare system. Carers can receive additional support through Carer’s Allowance, the Carer Element in Universal Credit and through Pension Credit. The weekly rate of Carer’s Allowance has increased to £69.70 (April 2022). Around 360,000 carer households on Universal Credit can receive an additional £1,965 a year through the Carer Element, ensuring that extra support is focused on those carers who need it most. This amount has increased from April 2022, benefitting carers across the country.

At each fiscal event HM Treasury has regularly published distributional analysis of the impact of tax, welfare and spending decisions on households. Distributional analysis published at Spring Statement 2022 shows that in 2024-25, the tax, welfare and spending decisions made since Spending Round 2019 will have benefitted the poorest households most (as a percentage of income). The government will continue to keep the situation under review.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
20th Apr 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate the Government has made of the basic cost of living for a family comprised of two adults and two children.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has increased the price and volatility of energy and some other commodities, and has added to disruption in global supply chains. This has started to affect the prices that UK consumers pay for goods including for fuel and domestic energy. Based on market prices taken after Russia invaded Ukraine, the Office for Budget Responsibility forecast inflation to peak at 8.7% in Q4 2022 before falling back towards the 2% target in late 2023.

The government understands the pressures people are facing with the cost of living. These are global challenges, however the government is providing support worth over £22 billion in 2022-23 to help families with these pressures.

This includes providing millions of households with up to £350 to help with rising energy bills and helping people keep more of what they earn. The government has cut the Universal Credit taper rate, frozen alcohol duty and has further increased the National Living Wage to £9.50 an hour from April 2022. The Spring Statement went further, with the government announcing an increase to the annual National Insurance Primary Threshold and Lower Profits Limit to £12,570, a cut to fuel duty, and an additional £500m to help with the cost of essentials through the Household Support Fund.

This builds on action the government has already taken that will help families with the cost of living. Since 2017 the government has offered eligible working parents of 3- to 4-year olds 30 hours of free childcare per week. We have also introduced Tax-Free Childcare, where for every £8 parents pay into their childcare account, the Government adds £2 up to a maximum of £2,000 in top up per year for each child up to age 11 and up to £4,000 per disabled child until they’re 17. Alongside this, £500m to transform ‘Start for Life’ and family help services for parents and babies, and carers and children in half of the council areas across England and over £200 million a year to continue the Holiday Activities and Food programme and deliver the government’s Flexible Childcare Fund commitment.

At each fiscal event HM Treasury has regularly published distributional analysis of the impact of tax, welfare and spending decisions on households. Distributional analysis published at Spring Statement 2022 shows that in 2024-25, the tax, welfare and spending decisions made since Spending Round 2019 will have benefitted the poorest households most (as a percentage of income). The government will continue to keep the situation under review.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
20th Apr 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate the Government has made of the basic cost of living for a family comprised of two adults and one child.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has increased the price and volatility of energy and some other commodities, and has added to disruption in global supply chains. This has started to affect the prices that UK consumers pay for goods including for fuel and domestic energy. Based on market prices taken after Russia invaded Ukraine, the Office for Budget Responsibility forecast inflation to peak at 8.7% in Q4 2022 before falling back towards the 2% target in late 2023.

The government understands the pressures people are facing with the cost of living. These are global challenges, however the government is providing support worth over £22 billion in 2022-23 to help families with these pressures.

This includes providing millions of households with up to £350 to help with rising energy bills and helping people keep more of what they earn. The government has cut the Universal Credit taper rate, frozen alcohol duty and has further increased the National Living Wage to £9.50 an hour from April 2022. The Spring Statement went further, with the government announcing an increase to the annual National Insurance Primary Threshold and Lower Profits Limit to £12,570, a cut to fuel duty, and an additional £500m to help with the cost of essentials through the Household Support Fund.

This builds on action the government has already taken that will help families with the cost of living. Since 2017 the government has offered eligible working parents of 3- to 4-year olds 30 hours of free childcare per week. We have also introduced Tax-Free Childcare, where for every £8 parents pay into their childcare account, the Government adds £2 up to a maximum of £2,000 in top up per year for each child up to age 11 and up to £4,000 per disabled child until they’re 17. Alongside this, £500m to transform ‘Start for Life’ and family help services for parents and babies, and carers and children in half of the council areas across England and over £200 million a year to continue the Holiday Activities and Food programme and deliver the government’s Flexible Childcare Fund commitment.

At each fiscal event HM Treasury has regularly published distributional analysis of the impact of tax, welfare and spending decisions on households. Distributional analysis published at Spring Statement 2022 shows that in 2024-25, the tax, welfare and spending decisions made since Spending Round 2019 will have benefitted the poorest households most (as a percentage of income). The government will continue to keep the situation under review.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
20th Apr 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate the Government has made of the basic cost of living for a family comprised of one adult and three or more children.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has increased the price and volatility of energy and some other commodities, and has added to disruption in global supply chains. This has started to affect the prices that UK consumers pay for goods including for fuel and domestic energy. Based on market prices taken after Russia invaded Ukraine, the Office for Budget Responsibility forecast inflation to peak at 8.7% in Q4 2022 before falling back towards the 2% target in late 2023.

The government understands the pressures people are facing with the cost of living. These are global challenges, however the government is providing support worth over £22 billion in 2022-23 to help families with these pressures.

This includes providing millions of households with up to £350 to help with rising energy bills and helping people keep more of what they earn. The government has cut the Universal Credit taper rate, frozen alcohol duty and has further increased the National Living Wage to £9.50 an hour from April 2022. The Spring Statement went further, with the government announcing an increase to the annual National Insurance Primary Threshold and Lower Profits Limit to £12,570, a cut to fuel duty, and an additional £500m to help with the cost of essentials through the Household Support Fund.

This builds on action the government has already taken that will help families with the cost of living. Since 2017 the government has offered eligible working parents of 3- to 4-year olds 30 hours of free childcare per week. We have also introduced Tax-Free Childcare, where for every £8 parents pay into their childcare account, the Government adds £2 up to a maximum of £2,000 in top up per year for each child up to age 11 and up to £4,000 per disabled child until they’re 17. Alongside this, £500m to transform ‘Start for Life’ and family help services for parents and babies, and carers and children in half of the council areas across England and over £200 million a year to continue the Holiday Activities and Food programme and deliver the government’s Flexible Childcare Fund commitment.

At each fiscal event HM Treasury has regularly published distributional analysis of the impact of tax, welfare and spending decisions on households. Distributional analysis published at Spring Statement 2022 shows that in 2024-25, the tax, welfare and spending decisions made since Spending Round 2019 will have benefitted the poorest households most (as a percentage of income). The government will continue to keep the situation under review.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what economic impact assessment has been undertaken on gym closures in tier 3 covid-19 areas; and what further economic support will be provided to gyms that are forced to close as a result of those restrictions.

The Government has announced an expansion of the Job Support Scheme for businesses which are legally required to temporarily close as a direct result of Coronavirus restrictions. The Government will provide employers with a grant for employees unable to work, covering two thirds of their usual wages and subject to a cap. Support will be available from 1 November for 6 months.

The Government has also introduced the Local Restrictions Support Grant scheme. Businesses which are required to close due to a local lockdown in England can now receive up to £3,000 per month and are eligible for payment after two weeks of closure.

For local authorities that agree to being placed at Very High Alert, a small amount of additional business support may be made available subject and proportionate to local needs, to complement national measures to protect jobs and businesses.

14th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what impact assessment has been made of the potential effect of tier 3 covid-19 restrictions on the economy of the Liverpool City Region; and what further economic support he will provide to that region in response to those restrictions.

The government recognises that every region and community will be feeling the impact of this crisis and remains committed to helping the unemployed return to work and supporting those most vulnerable to job losses. We will continue to work closely with local areas to make sure that individuals and businesses are directed to the right support during this difficult period. To support those on low incomes throughout the outbreak, the government has created a package of temporary welfare measures, including a £20 per week increase in the Universal Credit standard allowance and an increase in the Local Housing Allowance.

The Local Restrictions Support Grant scheme will provide businesses in England which are forced to close due to local restrictions with up to £3,000 per month, depending on their rateable value.

Additionally, and from 1 November, in line with the Jobs Support Scheme, businesses in England which have been forced to close on a national basis or which have not been able to reopen since the national lockdown was introduced in March, will also be eligible for these grants.

In order to protect jobs and UK businesses, we are expanding the Job Support Scheme for businesses legally required to temporarily close their premises as a direct result of Coronavirus restrictions. The Government will provide employers with a grant for employees unable to work, covering two thirds of their usual wages and subject to a cap. Support will be available to eligible businesses from 1 November for 6 months, with a review in January.

The Prime Minister also announced on Monday that a further £1bn will be made available to LAs in England to support them during this unprecedented time; and that up to £465m would be provided to LAs at High or Very High Alert through the Contain Outbreak Management Fund. This is in addition to the more than £4.8bn of funding which has already been provided to LAs in England to help them manage the impacts of Covid.

16th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to Answer of 16 June 2022 to Question 15396 on Passports, whether her Department holds a weekly breakdown of data between March and May 2022 on the processing times of UK passport (a) applications and (b) renewals.

Since April 2021, people applying for a passport have been advised to allow up to ten weeks when applying for their British passport as more than 5 million people delayed applying due to the pandemic. This guidance is in place for all applications from the UK, including those for a first British passport and renewals.

Between March and May 98.5% of UK applications processed were completed within ten weeks.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to Answers of 8 June 2022 to Questions 10035 to10038, whether her Department holds weekly data on the processing times of UK passport (a) applications and (b) renewals.

Since April 2021, people have been advised to allow up to ten weeks when applying for their British passport as more than 5 million people delayed applying due to the pandemic.

Between March and May 2022, over 90% of applications processed were completed within six weeks, with approximately 98.5% completed within ten weeks.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of UK passport (a) applications and (b) renewals submitted in the week beginning 28 March 2022 were processed within 10 weeks by HM Passport Office.

Since April 2021, people have been advised to allow up to ten weeks when applying for their British passport as more than 5 million people delayed applying due to the pandemic. 98.6% of all passport applications continue to be dealt with well within 10 weeks.

A British passport cannot be issued until all checks are satisfactorily completed to confirm the applicant is entitled to one. If further information is required to enable an application to be progressed, then it will take longer.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of UK passport (a) applications and (b) renewals submitted in the week beginning 21 March 2022 were processed within 10 weeks by HM Passport Office.

Since April 2021, people have been advised to allow up to ten weeks when applying for their British passport as more than 5 million people delayed applying due to the pandemic. 98.6% of all passport applications continue to be dealt with well within 10 weeks.

A British passport cannot be issued until all checks are satisfactorily completed to confirm the applicant is entitled to one. If further information is required to enable an application to be progressed, then it will take longer.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of UK passport (a) applications and (b) renewals submitted in the week beginning 14 March 2022 were processed within 10 weeks by HM Passport Office.

Since April 2021, people have been advised to allow up to ten weeks when applying for their British passport as more than 5 million people delayed applying due to the pandemic. 98.6% of all passport applications continue to be dealt with well within 10 weeks.

A British passport cannot be issued until all checks are satisfactorily completed to confirm the applicant is entitled to one. If further information is required to enable an application to be progressed, then it will take longer.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of UK passport (a) applications and (b) renewals submitted in the week beginning 28 February 2022 were processed within 10 weeks by HM Passport Office.

Since April 2021, people have been advised to allow up to ten weeks when applying for their British passport as more than 5 million people delayed applying due to the pandemic. 98.6% of all passport applications continue to be dealt with well within 10 weeks.

A British passport cannot be issued until all checks are satisfactorily completed to confirm the applicant is entitled to one. If further information is required to enable an application to be progressed, then it will take longer.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Afghan citizens resettlement scheme will open by the end of 2021.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme remains under development. Officials are working urgently to stand up the remaining elements of the scheme. The first to be resettled through this scheme will be some of those who arrived in the UK under the evacuation programme, which included individuals who were considered to be at particular risk.

Further information on the eligibility, prioritisation and referral of people for the ACRS is set out in the policy statement published on gov.uk on 13 September, available at www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement.

2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what practical support and services, including legal support, will be available to help families, including constituents in Liverpool West Derby, to navigate the Afghan citizens resettlement scheme when it opens.

The first to be resettled through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will be many of those who arrived in the UK under the evacuation programme, which included individuals who were considered to be at particular risk.

Eligible evacuees already in the UK who currently hold Leave Outside the Rules can, if they wish, seek legal advice as part of the process.

All those brought to the UK eligible for the ACRS will have the right to work, access to education and health care and be able to apply for public funds. To ensure they will be supported properly, changes have been made to legislation where necessary, so that they do not need to meet the habitual residence test when applying for benefits.

Under the ACRS, councils will receive £20,520 per person, over 3 years, to enable them to support these vulnerable people as they rebuild their lives in the UK. Councils also receive additional funding per child towards educational costs, and can claim £850 per adult to provide additional English language tuition in the first year after arrival.

13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of the 12 July 2021 to Question 28365 on the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, when her Department plans to publish the equality impact assessment relating to Part 4 of the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill.

We aim to publish an equality impact assessment covering the Home Office measures in the Bill before Lords Second Reading.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make available the equality impact assessment relating to Part 4 of the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill 2021.

We will be publishing an equality impact assessment in relation to the Home Office provisions in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, including Part 4.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to reduce the rates of (a) gun and (b) knife offences in Liverpool.

The Government is committed to tackling gun crime and knife crime across England and Wales. Through the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 we have introduced a ban on certain rapid-firing rifles and we are also introducing greater regulation of antique firearms to prevent their misuse by criminals.

We have also consulted on statutory guidance on firearms licensing to improve standards and the consistency of police licensing decisions, and we have established a multi-agency national firearms threat assessment centre to improve our capability to disrupt the supply and use of illegal firearms by criminals and Organised Crime Groups. This unit works closely with Merseyside police and the North West Regional Organised Crime Unit.

The Offensive Weapons Act 2019 will also give the police with more powers to tackle knife crime and make it more difficult for young people to get hold of knives in the first place. The Act also introduces Knife Crime Prevention Orders which will give the police an important new tool to help them to help to steer those most at risk away from serious violence and knife crime.

Funding for Merseyside Police increased by £18.3 million last year and the Merseyside Police and Crime Commissioner has set out her plans to use this funding to recruit 80 more police officers. In addition, the Home Office has provided £100 million in 2019/2020 through the Serious Violence Fund. Of this, Merseyside Police has been allocated and additional £4.2 million this year from the Home Office Serious Violence Fund to pay for a surge in police operational activity against serious violence, and a further £3.37 million to develop Merseyside’s Violence Reduction Unit. This is a non-statutory partnership which offers leadership and strategic coordination of the local response to serious violence by bringing together police, local government, health and education professionals, community leaders and other keypartners to identify the drivers of serious violence and agree a multi-agency response. The Government has announced a further £35 million to continue funding Violence Reduction Units next year, and Merseyside has been allocated a further £3.37 million for 2020/21 as part of this.

The Government has also provided Merseyside Police and Crime Commissioner with £700,000 over two years through our £22 million Early Intervention Youth Fund for an early interventions programme targeting young people aged 8-19, to tackle serious violence and criminal exploitation. Under year 3 of the anti-knife crime Community Fund (2019-20), we have funded 5 community-based projects in Liverpool and Merseyside totalling £132,550.

We are also providing a targeted £25million to tackle county lines drugs gangs, given the links between drugs, county lines and serious violence.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what impact assessment his Department has made of the effect of reintroduction of bailiff enforcement from 1 June 2021 on the risk of covid-19 transmission.

The ban on bailiff enforcement has now been lifted, reflecting the gradual easing of national restrictions and ensuring that landlords are able to exercise their right to justice. Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunal Service, which runs the bailiff service, has worked with the Ministry of Justice's Health and Safety team and Public Health England to ensure that measures are put in place to protect all parties to reduce the risk of Covid-19 transmission during the enforcement of possession.

Where an eviction is scheduled with the mandatory minimum notice period of 14 days, the tenant can inform the court if they or anyone they live with has coronavirus symptoms, has tested positive for Covid-19 or are is waiting for a test result, or has been instructed by the NHS to self-isolate. Where this is the case, the appointment will be rescheduled for a later date with a minimum of 14 days' notice. The tenant can also apply to suspend the eviction in certain circumstances, for example where they were unable to attend the original hearing and would have had a good chance of defending the claim for possession had they done so.

When carrying out an eviction, the bailiff will follow the latest Public Health England and government guidance. They will conduct the eviction wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and maintain social distancing. They must ask if anybody in the household has symptoms, is self-isolating or shielding. If that is the case, or if the bailiff observes any visible symptoms of Covid-19, then they must withdraw from the property immediately. Bailiffs also will not evict if the household is quarantining in line with government guidelines on return from an amber list country, and the eviction will be rescheduled. Bailiffs have also been asked to undertake regular Covid-19 tests and not to attend work if they or anyone they live with has tested positive for Covid-19.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what impact assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the reintroduction of bailiff enforcement from 1 June 2021 on homelessness.

Bailiffs are now able to enforce an eviction if a landlord has a valid warrant of possession. This reflects the gradual easing of national restrictions and ensures that landlords are able to exercise their right to justice. The bailiff measures were appropriate at the height of the pandemic to help control the spread of infection but these restrictions could only ever be temporary. They prevent landlords from repossessing properties when they have valid grounds to proceed.

The latest statistics for the first quarter of 2021 show that the volume of possession claims by landlords is down by 74% compared to the same quarter in 2020. This suggests that landlords are bringing significantly fewer claims for possession than before the pandemic. The reduction in claims means that fewer cases will proceed to the stage at which someone could be evicted, compared to before the Covid-19 pandemic.

Where an eviction is scheduled, this will not be carried out by bailiffs if they are made aware that the tenant or anyone they live with has coronavirus symptoms, has tested positive for Covid-19, is waiting for a test result, or has been instructed by the NHS to self-isolate.

To mitigate against the accumulation of rent arrears and associated possession action, the government has put in place an unprecedented financial package. This includes support for businesses to pay staff salaries through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme which has been extended until the end of September 2021, continued support for low income households with an extension of the £20 per week uplift in Universal Credit until the end of September, and maintaining Local Housing Allowance rates at the increased level applied in April 2020 in cash terms.

Tenants will further be protected through longer notice periods, as landlords are now required to serve four months' notice in all but the most serious cases, giving them more time to find alternative accommodation.

The latest homelessness statistics covering the period October - December 2020 show a 40% decrease in households owed a homelessness duty due to the end of an Assured Shorthold Tenancy compared with the same period in 2019.

Where a person is at risk of losing their home, local authorities have a legal duty to take reasonable steps to prevent homelessness. In 2021/22 we are providing local authorities with £310 million to discharge their duties under the Act, a £47 million increase on previous years funding. This can be used to offer financial support for people to find a new home, to work with landlords to prevent evictions, or to provide temporary accommodation to ensure families have a roof over their head. This underlines the government's commitment to fully enforcing the Homelessness Reduction Act 2017 by ensuring councils have the funding they need to prevent homelessness and help more people sooner.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate his Department has made of the potential number of households that will be in 2 months’ or more accumulated rent arrears as of 1 August 2021 in (a) Liverpool West Derby constituency and (b) England.

Data from the English Housing Survey (EHS) Household Resilience Study November-December 2020 suggested that approximately 1% of private renters were 2 months or more behind. Additionally, approximately 3% of social renters were 2 months or more behind. Most renters in arrears had arrears of less than 2 months.

We do not hold data on the potential number of households that will be in 2 months' or more accumulated rent arrears as of 1 August 2021 in Liverpool West Derby constituency.

The UK Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support which is available to support tenants with living costs. The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and £20 per week uplift in Universal Credit are in place until the end of September helping renters to continue paying their rent. Local housing allowance rates have been maintained at their increased level in cash terms in 2021/22, meaning claimants renting in the private rented sector continue to benefit from the significant increase in the local housing allowance rates applied in April 2020. For those who require additional support, Discretionary Housing Payments (DHP) are available. For 2021-22 the Government has made £140 million available in DHP funding.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, wat estimate he has made of the number of households with 4 months’ or more accumulated rent arrears as of 1 June in (a) Liverpool West Derby Constituency and (b) England.

Data from the English Housing Survey (EHS) Household Resilience Study November-December 2020 suggested that 1% of private renters were 2 months or more behind. Additionally, approximately 3% of social renters were 2 months or more behind.

The Department does not hold information about the number of households with 4 months' or more accumulated rent arrears in Liverpool West Derby Constituency.

The UK Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support which is available to support tenants with living costs. The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and £20 per week uplift in Universal Credit are in place until the end of September helping renters to continue paying their rent. Local housing allowance rates have been maintained at their increased level in cash terms in 2021/22, meaning claimants renting in the private rented sector continue to benefit from the significant increase in the local housing allowance rates applied in April 2020. For those who require additional support, Discretionary Housing Payments (DHP) are available. For 2021-22 the Government has made £140 million available in DHP funding, building on the £180 million provided last year.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many households were at risk of bailiff enforcement in (a) Liverpool West Derby constituency and (b) England as of 1 June 2021.

The Department does not hold information on the total number of households which were at risk of bailiff enforcement on 1 June 2021.

However, the latest published figures on warrants issued show that there were 2,480 warrants of possession issued to landlords and 43 warrants of possession issued to mortgagors in England and Wales in January to March 2021. The volume of mortgage possession warrants issued was down 99% compared to the same Quarter in 2020, whilst the volume of landlord possession warrants issued was down 80% on Q1 2020. Repossessions in mortgage cases were down almost 100% compared to the first quarter of 2021, whilst repossessions in landlord cases were down by 96%. Across all claim types, there were 37 warrants of possession issued in the Liverpool Local Authority area in Q1 2021, compared to 234 in Q1 2020. The statistics are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/mortgage-and-landlord-possession-statistics-january-to-march-2021/mortgage-and-landlord-possession-statistics-january-to-march-2021

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, for what reason his Department did not extend the landlord licensing scheme in Liverpool; and what steps his Department is taking to ensure the protection of tenants in the private rental sector in (a) Liverpool West Derby constituency and (b) Liverpool.

Liverpool City Council made an application for selective licensing under the condition of low housing demand across the whole city.

The evidence provided by the local authority was carefully considered against all the relevant statutory conditions, including those contained within section 80(4) of the Housing Act 2004. The application did not meet the statutory tests because it did not sufficiently evidence the existence of low housing demand in every ward in the city, nor that every ward in the city would become an area of low housing demand. Selective licensing is part of wider robust enforcement powers available to councils to protect vulnerable tenants, tackle rogue landlords and support responsible landlords in the private rented sector, including civil penalties and banning orders for the most serious offences.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what additional steps his Department is taking to support the mental health of prisoners during the covid-19 outbreak.

Visits to children in the youth custody estate and compassionate visits to adult establishments have continued throughout national lockdown. In line with changes to the stay at home guidance and travel restrictions in the community, over the coming weeks and months we will support establishments to ease some of the regime restrictions currently in place. This will be done when it is safe to do so and guided by public health advice. Our National Framework, which sets out in detail how we will take decisions about easing coronavirus-related restrictions in prisons, was published on GOV.UK on 2 June: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-national-framework-for-prison-regimes-and-services

Maintaining safety and the mental health and wellbeing of prisoners continues to remain a priority, as it has throughout the pandemic. A range of tools have been made available to support Governors in devising and implementing local safety and welfare plans designed to mitigate any risks. Healthcare providers have continued to provide access to services for prisoners throughout the pandemic.

We recognise that family contact provides a crucial lifeline for those in our care. Secure video calls have now been introduced at all prisons across England and Wales. As of 5 April, over 169,000 secure video calls have been made. Currently 66% of prison cells have in-cell telephony.

We have tailored guidance for supporting specific groups of people in prison whose wellbeing may be more impacted by Covid-19 measures put in place. We are delivering more in cell-activity and are continuing to improve our offer to support prisoners during this period.

Work is currently underway to roll-out of a revised version of the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork (ACCT), which is the care planning process for prisoners identified as being at risk of suicide or self-harm. This is first being rolled-out in the female estate and ten ACCT pilot sites from April 2021, followed by roll-out in the rest of the estate in Summer 2021. We will, however, be keeping these timeframes under review to ensure they remain feasible in the context of covid-19.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to support the wellbeing of prisoners that are unable to receive social visitors due to covid-19 health restrictions.

Visits to children in the youth custody estate and compassionate visits to adult establishments have continued throughout national lockdown. In line with changes to the stay at home guidance and travel restrictions in the community, over the coming weeks and months we will support establishments to ease some of the regime restrictions currently in place. This will be done when it is safe to do so and guided by public health advice. Our National Framework, which sets out in detail how we will take decisions about easing coronavirus-related restrictions in prisons, was published on GOV.UK on 2 June: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-national-framework-for-prison-regimes-and-services

Maintaining safety and the mental health and wellbeing of prisoners continues to remain a priority, as it has throughout the pandemic. A range of tools have been made available to support Governors in devising and implementing local safety and welfare plans designed to mitigate any risks. Healthcare providers have continued to provide access to services for prisoners throughout the pandemic.

We recognise that family contact provides a crucial lifeline for those in our care. Secure video calls have now been introduced at all prisons across England and Wales. As of 5 April, over 169,000 secure video calls have been made. Currently 66% of prison cells have in-cell telephony.

We have tailored guidance for supporting specific groups of people in prison whose wellbeing may be more impacted by Covid-19 measures put in place. We are delivering more in cell-activity and are continuing to improve our offer to support prisoners during this period.

Work is currently underway to roll-out of a revised version of the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork (ACCT), which is the care planning process for prisoners identified as being at risk of suicide or self-harm. This is first being rolled-out in the female estate and ten ACCT pilot sites from April 2021, followed by roll-out in the rest of the estate in Summer 2021. We will, however, be keeping these timeframes under review to ensure they remain feasible in the context of covid-19.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to facilitate visits to prisons that are not currently allowing social visitors; and what steps he is taking to support prisons in reaching stage 3 of the covid-19 national framework for prison regimes and services.

Visits to children in the youth custody estate and compassionate visits to adult establishments have continued throughout national lockdown. In line with changes to the stay at home guidance and travel restrictions in the community, over the coming weeks and months we will support establishments to ease some of the regime restrictions currently in place. This will be done when it is safe to do so and guided by public health advice. Our National Framework, which sets out in detail how we will take decisions about easing coronavirus-related restrictions in prisons, was published on GOV.UK on 2 June: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-national-framework-for-prison-regimes-and-services

Maintaining safety and the mental health and wellbeing of prisoners continues to remain a priority, as it has throughout the pandemic. A range of tools have been made available to support Governors in devising and implementing local safety and welfare plans designed to mitigate any risks. Healthcare providers have continued to provide access to services for prisoners throughout the pandemic.

We recognise that family contact provides a crucial lifeline for those in our care. Secure video calls have now been introduced at all prisons across England and Wales. As of 5 April, over 169,000 secure video calls have been made. Currently 66% of prison cells have in-cell telephony.

We have tailored guidance for supporting specific groups of people in prison whose wellbeing may be more impacted by Covid-19 measures put in place. We are delivering more in cell-activity and are continuing to improve our offer to support prisoners during this period.

Work is currently underway to roll-out of a revised version of the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork (ACCT), which is the care planning process for prisoners identified as being at risk of suicide or self-harm. This is first being rolled-out in the female estate and ten ACCT pilot sites from April 2021, followed by roll-out in the rest of the estate in Summer 2021. We will, however, be keeping these timeframes under review to ensure they remain feasible in the context of covid-19.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timeframe is for the (a) easing of covid-19 lockdown restrictions in prisons and (b) the resumption of prison visits in England and Wales as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

As a result of the strong but necessary measures we introduced in prisons, including suspending social visits, lives have been saved and the NHS is being protected from the impact of widespread local outbreaks.

Some prisons have already started to ease restrictions, including re-starting social visits with appropriate social distancing and hygiene arrangements, and enabling more time out of cell. More prisons will do so over the coming weeks, guided by public health advice and with safety remaining the absolute priority.

Individual prisons and the youth estate will progress at their own speed, taking full account of their specific local circumstances.

A temporary video call service to support prisoners maintaining contact with family and friends has also been introduced. This is intended for use whilst contact is limited and we are considering the benefits of maintaining these digital solutions in the longer term, in line with the recommendations of Lord Farmer’s reviews.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what funding his Department has allocated to ensure access to free legal support for people on low incomes in (a) Liverpool West Derby constituency and (b) the UK.

The Lord Chancellor has a duty to ensure that legal aid is made available in accordance with the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (2012) and last year the Government spent £1.7bn on legal aid.

Legal aid can help meet the costs of legal advice, family mediation and representation in a court or tribunal. Legal Aid is not allocated by constituency but is available for cases where the relevant criteria, such as the financial eligibility of the applicant and/or the degree of legal merit in their case, is met, where applicable. Legal aid may not always be ‘free’, for instance where contributions are required towards the overall subsidised costs depending on the means of the applicant, or where this must be paid back, such as upon conviction in criminal matters, or where assets are recovered in civil proceedings.

Alongside this, in February 2019 the Ministry of Justice published the Legal Support Action Plan which outlines how the Government aims to improve the breadth of support on offer to people when they experience legal problems. As part of this, a series of pilots will be launched to test early forms of intervention that stop people’s problems from escalating and becoming more complex. This includes an investment of up to £5m into a Legal Support Innovation Fund to explore the role technology can play in helping people identify and resolve their legal issues, and we are enhancing the support on offer to litigants in person by providing a further £3m of funding over the next two years, ensuring that those representing themselves in court understand the process and are better supported through it. Many of the measures announced in the action plan will help people, including those on low incomes, access free legal support.

Access to justice is a fundamental right and the Government is committed to ensuring that everyone can get the support they need to access the justice system across England and Wales.