Peter Dowd Portrait

Peter Dowd

Labour - Bootle

Select Committees
Panel of Chairs (since June 2020)
Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury
9th Feb 2017 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Financial Secretary (Treasury)
6th Oct 2016 - 9th Feb 2017


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Friday 22nd October 2021
Prayers
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 114 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 3 Noes - 336
Speeches
Friday 22nd October 2021
Employment and Trade Union Rights (Dismissal and Re-engagement) Bill

The House of Commons Library has produced an excellent report on this subject, which says:

“Professor Alan Bogg, a Professor …

Written Answers
Thursday 21st October 2021
Radioligand Therapy
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 4th October 2021
1. Employment and earnings
6 September 2021, received £120. Hours: 30 mins. (Registered 23 September 2021)
EDM signed
Thursday 21st October 2021
Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 22nd April 2020
Public Advocate (No. 2) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to establish a public advocate to provide advice to, and act as data controller for, representatives of the …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Peter Dowd has voted in 229 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Peter Dowd Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Sajid Javid (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
(3 debate interactions)
Scott Benton (Conservative)
(3 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Chancellor of the Exchequer
(3 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(10 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(9 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(5 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Finance Act 2021 - Government Bill
(697 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Peter Dowd's debates

Bootle Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Recognise the state of Palestine to help stop the conflict from Israel. Not recognising the Palestinian state allows Israel to continue their persecution of the Palestinians.

The Government should introduce sanctions against Israel, including blocking all trade, and in particular arms.

During the pandemic government workers have delivered vital public services and kept our country safe and secure. After ten years in which the real value of civil service pay has fallen, many face hardship. The Government must start to restore the real value of their pay with a 10% increase in 2020.

The government is helping private firms to protect jobs by paying up to 80% of staff wages through this crisis. If it can do this why can it not help key workers who will be putting themselves/their families at risk and working extra hard under extremely challenging and unprecedented circumstances.


Latest EDMs signed by Peter Dowd

23rd September 2021
Peter Dowd signed this EDM on Thursday 21st October 2021

Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall

Tabled by: Afzal Khan (Labour - Manchester, Gorton)
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; notes that this memorial now includes over 150,000 hand-painted hearts to symbolise all those who lost their lives during the coronavirus pandemic; praises the work of Covid-19 Bereaved Families for …
72 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 45
Scottish National Party: 9
Liberal Democrat: 9
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Conservative: 2
Green Party: 1
Independent: 1
12th May 2021
Peter Dowd signed this EDM on Monday 18th October 2021

Giving every child the best start in life

Tabled by: Wera Hobhouse (Liberal Democrat - Bath)
That this House notes the work of WAVE Trust and its 70/30 campaign to reduce levels of child abuse, neglect and domestic abuse by 70 per cent by 2030; further notes that over two-thirds of this House have endorsed that campaign, including a majority from all parties; recognises the role …
94 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 33
Labour: 30
Liberal Democrat: 12
Conservative: 8
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alba Party: 2
Independent: 2
View All Peter Dowd's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Peter Dowd, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Peter Dowd has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Peter Dowd has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Peter Dowd has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


110 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
17th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many (a) offices, (b) envoys and (c) advisors the Government plans to create as part of the Strategic Framework outlined in the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy.

The Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy (IR) established the Government’s national security and international policy objectives to 2025. The IR Strategic Framework is designed to be flexible, rather than an exhaustive description of all of the Government’s activity to 2025.

The Government is considering the processes, systems and structures for effective implementation of the IR. A new strategy team in the National Security Secretariat will lead implementation, working with Departments to develop plans to deliver the vision described in the IR Strategic Framework. This work is ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reasons holding wedding ceremonies will be restricted to (a) places of places of worship and (b) some public buildings from 12 April 2021 when all wedding venues can be made equally covid-secure.

Guidance for small marriages and civil partnerships was published on 22 March and can be found here - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships#wedding-and-civil-partnership-ceremony-venues

We recognise that any restrictions on wedding venues may be disappointing for those planning such events, but we have to take necessary steps to limit transmission of COVID-19. This includes the closure of some settings and restrictions on social contact, including wedding and civil partnership ceremonies. By their very nature, weddings and civil partnership ceremonies are events that bring families and friends together, making them particularly vulnerable to the spread of COVID-19. We appreciate the sacrifices people have had to make across the COVID-19 pandemic and we do not wish to keep any restrictions in place longer than we need to.

In the COVID-19 Response - Spring 2021, the Government has set out the gradual and cautious approach to reopening in England, guided by science and the data, including the staged return of weddings and civil partnerships, as well as sporting events.

In order to inform the pace and sequencing of the roadmap, the Government commissioned advice and modelling from SAGE and its sub-groups. Scientific evidence supporting the government response to coronavirus is regularly published here - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/scientific-evidence-supporting-the-government-response-to-coronavirus-covid-19.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what equalities impact assessment he has undertaken on the effect of restricting wedding ceremonies to places of worship and some public buildings from 12 April 2021 on people who are unable to marry in those settings.

Guidance for small marriages and civil partnerships was published on 22 March and can be found here - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships#wedding-and-civil-partnership-ceremony-venues

We recognise that any restrictions on wedding venues may be disappointing for those planning such events, but we have to take necessary steps to limit transmission of COVID-19. This includes the closure of some settings and restrictions on social contact, including wedding and civil partnership ceremonies. By their very nature, weddings and civil partnership ceremonies are events that bring families and friends together, making them particularly vulnerable to the spread of COVID-19. We appreciate the sacrifices people have had to make across the COVID-19 pandemic and we do not wish to keep any restrictions in place longer than we need to.

In the COVID-19 Response - Spring 2021, the Government has set out the gradual and cautious approach to reopening in England, guided by science and the data, including the staged return of weddings and civil partnerships, as well as sporting events.

In order to inform the pace and sequencing of the roadmap, the Government commissioned advice and modelling from SAGE and its sub-groups. Scientific evidence supporting the government response to coronavirus is regularly published here - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/scientific-evidence-supporting-the-government-response-to-coronavirus-covid-19.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to introduce in central Government Departments similar transparency rules to those applied to local authorities under the Local Government Transparency Code 2015.

Since 2010, the Government has been at the forefront of opening up data to allow Parliament, the public and the media to hold public bodies to account.

Under the terms of the Ministerial Code, departments regularly publish data on a range of information such as Ministers’ external meetings.

Despite the need to reprioritise resources to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, tremendous progress continues to be made this year by central government departments in publishing core transparency data.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish a list of UK companies who participate in the UK-China Green Finance Centre.

UK-China Green Finance Centre Partners can be found on the UK China Green Finance Centre website: https://www.ukchinagreen.org/about-us/partners/

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many UK companies currently have joint-partnerships with Chinese companies as part of their operations in China.

The Government does not hold this information, which is an independent commercial matter for the companies involved.

As set out in the Integrated Review, the UK will continue to pursue a positive trade and investment relationship with China, while ensuring our national security and values are protected.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many UK companies are currently involved in providing financing to China’s One Belt One Road Initiative.

The provision of all financial services is an independent commercial decision. The Government does not monitor individual companies’ activities.

As set out in the Integrated Review, the UK will continue to pursue a positive trade and investment relationship with China, while ensuring our national security and values are protected.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government has undertaken an assessment of the potential links between (a) universities based in the UK and research institutes in China and (b) the People’s Liberation Army.

The UK’s research sector is independent, but Her Majesty’s Government is supporting the sector to make informed decisions on international research collaboration. The government has published “Trusted Research” and supported the Universities representative body, Universities UK, to develop its own security guidelines which were published in October 2020. We continue to work closely with universities to promote advice and best practice, and to respond to specific inquiries.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding the Government allocated to the UK-China Green Finance Centre in 2019-20.

The UK Partnering for Accelerated Climate Transitions (UK-PACT) China Programme has spent £32,154.08 supporting the UK-China Green Finance Centre. The UK-China Green Finance Centre’s mission is to enhance UK and China green finance cooperation to accelerate the global transition to an environmentally sustainable future. UK PACT’s contribution to the UK-China Green Finance Centre is part of a wider grant supporting the City of London Green Finance Initiative and China Green Finance Committee. UK PACT has supported a number of influential initiatives under the Centre over the past two years, most notably the UK-China Taskforce on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) Pilot Working Group; and the Green Investment Principles (GIPs).

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of restricting wedding ceremonies to places of worship and some public buildings from 12 April 2021 on the wider wedding industry.

At Step 2, which will be no earlier than 12 April, weddings and civil partnership ceremonies are permitted for up to 15 people in COVID-19 Secure venues that are permitted to open or where a broader exemption applies.

Receptions can take place with up to 15 people in the form of a sit-down meal and in any COVID-19 Secure outdoor venue that is permitted to open. Such receptions must not take place in people’s private gardens or public outdoor spaces.

Over the course of the pandemic, the Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support to business, which we keep under regular review.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of a sector specific support grant of £680 million for eligible wedding business.

Over the course of the pandemic the Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support to businesses, including those in the wedding industry, which we keep under regular review.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of establishing a Government-backed scheme to support (a) consumers and (b) business in the wedding sector in the absence of available insurance cover.

Over the course of the pandemic the Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support to businesses, including those in the wedding industry, which we keep under regular review.

In order to help consumers, the Competition and Markets Authority have produced guidance for businesses to help them comply with pre-existing consumer law in respect of refunds and cancellations.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what economic impact assessment has been made on the extended closure of the wedding industry.

We have provided an unprecedented package of financial support since March 2020 to businesses, including those in the weddings sector. We keep this regularly under review, through discussions with HM Treasury.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the wedding sector and its supply chain on the sectors' re-opening timelines as covid-19 restrictions are eased.

I meet regularly with the industry-led Weddings Taskforce and we will continue to discuss how the Government can support the sector through the different steps towards reopening.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the financial support required by the wedding industry to support its safe re-opening when covid-19 restrictions are eased.

Over the course of the pandemic the Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support to businesses, including those in the wedding industry, which we keep under regular review. I meet regularly with the industry-led Weddings Taskforce and we will continue to discuss how the Government can support the sector through the different steps towards reopening.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has for the safe reopening of the wedding sector when covid-19 restrictions are eased.

I meet regularly with the industry-led Weddings Taskforce and we will continue discussions on how we can support the sector through the different steps towards reopening.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with representatives of the wedding industry on the effect of the covid-19 outbreak (a) on that sector and (b) on employment levels of women working in that sector.

I meet regularly with the industry-led Weddings Taskforce, established to represent all parts of the UK Weddings sector, to understand the impact of the pandemic on jobs and businesses.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has been made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on employment levels in wedding sector (a) in total and (b) by gender.

I meet regularly with the industry-led Weddings Taskforce, established to represent all parts of the UK Weddings sector, to understand the impact on jobs and businesses.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason the wedding sector has not received tailored financial support during the covid-19 outbreak.

Over the course of the pandemic the Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support to businesses, including those in the wedding industry, which we keep under regular review. I meet regularly with the industry-led Weddings Taskforce, established to represent all parts of the sector, to understand the impact on jobs and businesses.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of pupils whose choice of school is limited to a faith school; and what steps he will take to ensure pupils have access to a non-faith school.

Faith schools have played a longstanding and important role in our education system. Faith schools are popular with parents, with many being high performing and are more likely to be rated good or outstanding by Ofsted than non-faith schools.

The Department has not made an estimate of the number of pupils whose choice of school is limited to a faith school.

Parents are able to express a preference as to the school they would like their child to attend and, subject to very limited exceptions, local authorities and school admission authorities must comply with that preference.

The vast majority of parents are offered a place at a school of their choice. In 2021, 98% of parents received an offer from one of their top 3 choices of primary school, while 93.4% received an offer from one of their top 3 choices of secondary school.

20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to confirm the funding allocation for Music Education Hubs in 2022-23; how much funding will be allocated to those hubs; and for how many years that funding will be allocated.

Work on the refresh of the National Plan for Music Education and Model Music Curriculum was paused due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Work has since resumed, and the Government announced the publication of the Model Music Curriculum on 26 March 2021. The Plan will be published in due course.

The Model Music Curriculum is designed to support schools to refresh music lessons with rich and diverse content for Key Stages 1, 2 and 3. It will introduce pupils to great composers and artists from across the world and develop their knowledge and skills in reading and writing music. This non-statutory guidance for schools will support the Government’s ambitious plan for all children to have access to an excellent music education. The guidance is available to view here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/974366/Model_Music_Curriculum_Full.pdf.

The Government also announced it would provide the 119 music education hubs with £79 million for the financial year 2021-22. Working with 90% of state funded schools across England, the hubs are also expected to support schools that plan to implement the Model Music Curriculum, overseen by our national delivery partner Arts Council England. Decisions regarding funding for 2022-23 onwards are subject to the next Spending Review.

The Department does not hold information on instrumental music teachers employed or contracted by the music education hubs. We recognise the challenges hubs have faced during the COVID-19 outbreak due to a reduction of income from schools and parents following the first lockdown between March and July 2020. Hubs have been eligible to apply for the Government’s £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund, with a further £300 million announced in the 2021 Budget to support organisations across the cultural sector. This will help secure the viability of these hubs and allow them to continue the important role they play in sustaining music and music education in their local communities, as well as in schools.

19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if his Department will make an estimate of the number of instrumental music teachers employed by Music Education Hubs that have lost their jobs as a result of (a) the covid-19 outbreak and (b) uncertainty about the future funding of those hubs.

Work on the refresh of the National Plan for Music Education and Model Music Curriculum was paused due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Work has since resumed, and the Government announced the publication of the Model Music Curriculum on 26 March 2021. The Plan will be published in due course.

The Model Music Curriculum is designed to support schools to refresh music lessons with rich and diverse content for Key Stages 1, 2 and 3. It will introduce pupils to great composers and artists from across the world and develop their knowledge and skills in reading and writing music. This non-statutory guidance for schools will support the Government’s ambitious plan for all children to have access to an excellent music education. The guidance is available to view here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/974366/Model_Music_Curriculum_Full.pdf.

The Government also announced it would provide the 119 music education hubs with £79 million for the financial year 2021-22. Working with 90% of state funded schools across England, the hubs are also expected to support schools that plan to implement the Model Music Curriculum, overseen by our national delivery partner Arts Council England. Decisions regarding funding for 2022-23 onwards are subject to the next Spending Review.

The Department does not hold information on instrumental music teachers employed or contracted by the music education hubs. We recognise the challenges hubs have faced during the COVID-19 outbreak due to a reduction of income from schools and parents following the first lockdown between March and July 2020. Hubs have been eligible to apply for the Government’s £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund, with a further £300 million announced in the 2021 Budget to support organisations across the cultural sector. This will help secure the viability of these hubs and allow them to continue the important role they play in sustaining music and music education in their local communities, as well as in schools.

19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to publish the Model Music Curriculum.

Work on the refresh of the National Plan for Music Education and Model Music Curriculum was paused due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Work has since resumed, and the Government announced the publication of the Model Music Curriculum on 26 March 2021. The Plan will be published in due course.

The Model Music Curriculum is designed to support schools to refresh music lessons with rich and diverse content for Key Stages 1, 2 and 3. It will introduce pupils to great composers and artists from across the world and develop their knowledge and skills in reading and writing music. This non-statutory guidance for schools will support the Government’s ambitious plan for all children to have access to an excellent music education. The guidance is available to view here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/974366/Model_Music_Curriculum_Full.pdf.

The Government also announced it would provide the 119 music education hubs with £79 million for the financial year 2021-22. Working with 90% of state funded schools across England, the hubs are also expected to support schools that plan to implement the Model Music Curriculum, overseen by our national delivery partner Arts Council England. Decisions regarding funding for 2022-23 onwards are subject to the next Spending Review.

The Department does not hold information on instrumental music teachers employed or contracted by the music education hubs. We recognise the challenges hubs have faced during the COVID-19 outbreak due to a reduction of income from schools and parents following the first lockdown between March and July 2020. Hubs have been eligible to apply for the Government’s £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund, with a further £300 million announced in the 2021 Budget to support organisations across the cultural sector. This will help secure the viability of these hubs and allow them to continue the important role they play in sustaining music and music education in their local communities, as well as in schools.

19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to publish the National Plan for Music Education.

Work on the refresh of the National Plan for Music Education and Model Music Curriculum was paused due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Work has since resumed, and the Government announced the publication of the Model Music Curriculum on 26 March 2021. The Plan will be published in due course.

The Model Music Curriculum is designed to support schools to refresh music lessons with rich and diverse content for Key Stages 1, 2 and 3. It will introduce pupils to great composers and artists from across the world and develop their knowledge and skills in reading and writing music. This non-statutory guidance for schools will support the Government’s ambitious plan for all children to have access to an excellent music education. The guidance is available to view here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/974366/Model_Music_Curriculum_Full.pdf.

The Government also announced it would provide the 119 music education hubs with £79 million for the financial year 2021-22. Working with 90% of state funded schools across England, the hubs are also expected to support schools that plan to implement the Model Music Curriculum, overseen by our national delivery partner Arts Council England. Decisions regarding funding for 2022-23 onwards are subject to the next Spending Review.

The Department does not hold information on instrumental music teachers employed or contracted by the music education hubs. We recognise the challenges hubs have faced during the COVID-19 outbreak due to a reduction of income from schools and parents following the first lockdown between March and July 2020. Hubs have been eligible to apply for the Government’s £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund, with a further £300 million announced in the 2021 Budget to support organisations across the cultural sector. This will help secure the viability of these hubs and allow them to continue the important role they play in sustaining music and music education in their local communities, as well as in schools.

21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the number of farmer who will be eligible for the proposed lump sum exit scheme and delinked payments.

We are consulting on our proposed lump sum exit scheme, including the eligibility criteria that will apply. The consultation runs until 11 August 2021. We think our proposed scheme will provide a helpful option for some farmers who wish to exit the industry. We are seeking views on likely uptake via our consultation.

We intend to replace the Basic Payment Scheme with delinked payments in 2024. When payments are delinked, recipients won’t have to farm the land to receive the payments until they have been phased out by the end of 2027. Eligibility for delinked payments will be based on a reference period. Our consultation seeks views on what this reference period should be.

Our consultation can be found here: https://consult.defra.gov.uk/agricultural-policy/lump-sum-and-delinked-payments-england/.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the cost of the proposed lump sum exit scheme and delinked payments for farmers.

We know that some farmers who wish to retire or leave the industry can find it difficult to do so and lack of finance can be one of the barriers to exit. We think that a lump sum exit scheme could help such farmers leave the industry in a planned way. By freeing up land, the scheme will also open up opportunities for new entrants and expanding farmers.

We believe that the proposed lump sum exit scheme will offer good value for the taxpayer. The lump sum will be in place of the Direct Payments farmers could otherwise have received between 2022 to 2027, as we transition to our new farming system outside the Common Agricultural Policy.

This means that the scheme will not increase overall spending on farming. It will not affect the money available for other schemes.

To ensure value for money for the taxpayer, we have proposed a payment cap that will make sure farmers do not receive a lump sum which is higher in value than the amount they could have otherwise received in Direct Payments for 2022 to 2027.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what comparative assessment his Department has made of the effect of a (a) variable rate deposit and (b) flat rate deposit on the revenue received from a deposit return scheme.

The Government’s second consultation on introducing a deposit return scheme (DRS), which is currently live, sets out the intention for the scheme to be managed by an organisation called the Deposit Management Organisation (DMO). We propose that the DMO would have the ability to decide on the type of deposit for the scheme (flat or variable rate) and to set the deposit amount at the level they deem suitable for achieving the objectives of the scheme, subject to parameters set out by Government in legislation. For this reason, we have not conducted specific analysis on all possible scenarios the deposit may be set at, but our current Impact Assessment (published alongside the second consultation) assumes a flat rate 20p deposit is placed on all in-scope drinks containers and offers analysis of how the deposit level can influence return rates.

The operating costs and revenue of a DRS could be impacted by the deposit rate chosen by the DMO, which will be somewhat dependent on the extent to which unredeemed deposits are used to fund the scheme. We are seeking views in the second consultation on how unredeemed deposits should be used to fund the DRS. The department do not foresee significant administrative / operational costs to the scheme as a result of having either a flat or variable rate deposit.

No specific assessment has been made by Government on the potential effect of a variable rate deposit on return rates of in-scope containers, on product wastage, or on portion sizes, but we continue to engage with industry and consider any relevant research which should be factored into our overall design and analysis of the scheme. In any case, we propose to place a 90% collection rate target on the DMO, and the approach to setting the deposit level chosen by the DMO should reflect their obligation to achieve this target.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the planned deposit return scheme, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of a variable rate deposit on return rates.

The Government’s second consultation on introducing a deposit return scheme (DRS), which is currently live, sets out the intention for the scheme to be managed by an organisation called the Deposit Management Organisation (DMO). We propose that the DMO would have the ability to decide on the type of deposit for the scheme (flat or variable rate) and to set the deposit amount at the level they deem suitable for achieving the objectives of the scheme, subject to parameters set out by Government in legislation. For this reason, we have not conducted specific analysis on all possible scenarios the deposit may be set at, but our current Impact Assessment (published alongside the second consultation) assumes a flat rate 20p deposit is placed on all in-scope drinks containers and offers analysis of how the deposit level can influence return rates.

The operating costs and revenue of a DRS could be impacted by the deposit rate chosen by the DMO, which will be somewhat dependent on the extent to which unredeemed deposits are used to fund the scheme. We are seeking views in the second consultation on how unredeemed deposits should be used to fund the DRS. The department do not foresee significant administrative / operational costs to the scheme as a result of having either a flat or variable rate deposit.

No specific assessment has been made by Government on the potential effect of a variable rate deposit on return rates of in-scope containers, on product wastage, or on portion sizes, but we continue to engage with industry and consider any relevant research which should be factored into our overall design and analysis of the scheme. In any case, we propose to place a 90% collection rate target on the DMO, and the approach to setting the deposit level chosen by the DMO should reflect their obligation to achieve this target.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the planned deposit return scheme, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential effect of a flat rate deposit on portion sizes.

The Government’s second consultation on introducing a deposit return scheme (DRS), which is currently live, sets out the intention for the scheme to be managed by an organisation called the Deposit Management Organisation (DMO). We propose that the DMO would have the ability to decide on the type of deposit for the scheme (flat or variable rate) and to set the deposit amount at the level they deem suitable for achieving the objectives of the scheme, subject to parameters set out by Government in legislation. For this reason, we have not conducted specific analysis on all possible scenarios the deposit may be set at, but our current Impact Assessment (published alongside the second consultation) assumes a flat rate 20p deposit is placed on all in-scope drinks containers and offers analysis of how the deposit level can influence return rates.

The operating costs and revenue of a DRS could be impacted by the deposit rate chosen by the DMO, which will be somewhat dependent on the extent to which unredeemed deposits are used to fund the scheme. We are seeking views in the second consultation on how unredeemed deposits should be used to fund the DRS. The department do not foresee significant administrative / operational costs to the scheme as a result of having either a flat or variable rate deposit.

No specific assessment has been made by Government on the potential effect of a variable rate deposit on return rates of in-scope containers, on product wastage, or on portion sizes, but we continue to engage with industry and consider any relevant research which should be factored into our overall design and analysis of the scheme. In any case, we propose to place a 90% collection rate target on the DMO, and the approach to setting the deposit level chosen by the DMO should reflect their obligation to achieve this target.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether there is a difference in the operating costs of a deposit return scheme depending on whether there is a (a) variable rate deposit and (b) flat rate deposit.

The Government’s second consultation on introducing a deposit return scheme (DRS), which is currently live, sets out the intention for the scheme to be managed by an organisation called the Deposit Management Organisation (DMO). We propose that the DMO would have the ability to decide on the type of deposit for the scheme (flat or variable rate) and to set the deposit amount at the level they deem suitable for achieving the objectives of the scheme, subject to parameters set out by Government in legislation. For this reason, we have not conducted specific analysis on all possible scenarios the deposit may be set at, but our current Impact Assessment (published alongside the second consultation) assumes a flat rate 20p deposit is placed on all in-scope drinks containers and offers analysis of how the deposit level can influence return rates.

The operating costs and revenue of a DRS could be impacted by the deposit rate chosen by the DMO, which will be somewhat dependent on the extent to which unredeemed deposits are used to fund the scheme. We are seeking views in the second consultation on how unredeemed deposits should be used to fund the DRS. The department do not foresee significant administrative / operational costs to the scheme as a result of having either a flat or variable rate deposit.

No specific assessment has been made by Government on the potential effect of a variable rate deposit on return rates of in-scope containers, on product wastage, or on portion sizes, but we continue to engage with industry and consider any relevant research which should be factored into our overall design and analysis of the scheme. In any case, we propose to place a 90% collection rate target on the DMO, and the approach to setting the deposit level chosen by the DMO should reflect their obligation to achieve this target.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what considerations the Government undertook before appointing HSBC to sit on the UK Investment Council.

Members of the Investment Council are invited and appointed in a personal capacity, based on evidence relevant to the following criteria:

  • competence and experience in areas relevant to international investment,
  • sector expertise, and
  • an understanding of the UK investment climate

All members have been considered under a common due diligence process in line with 10 Downing Street and Cabinet Office guidance.

16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many of her Department's staff are based in the UK’s consulates and embassy in China.

Based on the department’s staffing data at 30th April 2021, the Department for International Trade has 188 staff based in China (including Hong Kong). This figure includes one member of staff working for UK Export Finance (UKEF).

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many Chinese companies are currently involved in the UK-China partnership on smart cities.

The UK-China partnership on Smart Cities is not an on-going programme and no companies are currently involved. The partnership was a component of a ministerial delegation in August 2018. Accompanying me were UK companies, experts, civic leaders and officials to the Fourth China Smart City International Expo in Shenzhen with a view to promoting opportunities for international trade between the UK and China.

17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of reducing maritime emissions on air quality.

In support of the 2019 Clean Maritime Plan the Department commissioned extensive research into emissions from the maritime sector covering both air pollutants and greenhouse gases.

The research examined emissions from both international and domestic shipping, and includes detailed analysis of a series of emissions scenarios out to 2050. The research package has been published on Gov.UK.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to support maritime small and medium-sized enterprises recover from the outbreak of covid-19.

Since the start of the pandemic, the Government’s priority has been to support businesses and employees. Our financial measures worth an initial £330 billion have been continually refined to support all parts of the economy, including maritime small and medium-sized enterprises. The Government has provided financial support to a range of small and medium-sized enterprises, including making available up to £22.4 million to safeguard lifeline services. As we move towards recovery, we remain committed to safeguarding livelihoods with the Chancellor extending the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme from April to September 2021.

My officials are also working with the sector on a longer-term Maritime Recovery Plan which will support the Maritime 2050 strategy launched by the Government in 2019. The Department is working closely with representatives from across the maritime sector to identify their priorities and develop interventions which can support the sector’s recovery.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of specialist centres required to ensure wide and equitable access to radioligand therapies and targeted treatments on the NHS in the next 12 months.

Radioligand therapy has not been licensed and has yet to receive approval from the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence, therefore no assessment has been made.

Recent advances in radiotherapy using cutting-edge imaging and computing technology have helped target radiation doses at cancer cells more precisely. This includes proton beam therapy and stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), both of which are available on the National Health Service. The Government has committed £250 million capital investment into two proton beam therapy facilities for the United Kingdom, at The Christie Hospital in Manchester and University College London Hospitals in London. SABR will be available as a treatment option through routine commissioning.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to support the adoption of radioligand therapies and other targeted treatments in the NHS through provision of training of specialist (a) staff and (b) equipment.

Radioligand therapy is not yet licensed for the National Health Service and has yet to receive approval from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. We therefore have no current plans to consider the adoption of equipment and training of specialist staff for Radioligand or any other targeted treatments until they are licensed.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of potential the number of nuclear medicine physicians required to provide adequate care for NHS patients in the next year; and if he will make it his policy to increase the number of nuclear medicine physicians in training.

No assessment has been made. However, Health Education England is providing additional funding to support an increase of five nuclear medicine physician training posts in the National Health Service in England in 2021/22. The next Spending Review will set out further details of the Government’s spending plans including the NHS workforce.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to (a) support the rollout of nuclear medicines across the NHS and (b) prevent regional variations in access to those medicines.

Nuclear medicine is already used widely in the National Health Service in England to diagnose and treat a variety of diseases. NHS England and NHS Improvement routinely fund licensed medicines that have been recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence or off-label use of licensed medicines that have been approved via the NHS England clinical commissioning policy process.

NHS England and NHS Improvement commission positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan while other diagnostic imaging involving nuclear medicine is commissioned by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). It is for CCGs to commission those services according to the needs of their local population.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when a decision will be taken to reinstate the collection and publication of NHS data in currently paused publications or series.

The Mixed Sex Accommodation for data relating to October 2021 and Quarterly Monitoring of Cancelled Operations for data relating to quarter 3 2021-22 collections are due to resume.

The Critical Care Bed Capacity and Urgent Operations, Delayed Transfers of Care, Direct Access Audiology and Venous Thromboembolism collections were paused from quarter 4 of 2020-21 to quarter 2 of 2021-22 and will remain paused. NHS England and NHS Improvement will keep the paused collections under review to establish at which point further collections should be reinstated and update published information when the status of the collections change.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to develop a national strategy to promote self-care for minor ailments.

There are no plans to introduce a dedicated national strategy to promote self-care for minor ailments. However, supported self-management or self-care is an integral part of the NHS Long Term Plan, to encourage and empower people to manage their ongoing physical and mental health conditions.

All community pharmacies in England delivering NHS services provide support for patients to self-care, including for minor ailments. This support can include provision of advice, information, and where appropriate the sale of medicines to patients, carers and the general public to support their self-care for minor ailments.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to (a) encourage people to self-care and (b) educate healthcare professionals to support people to self-care for minor ailments.

Supported self-management or self-care is part of the NHS Long Term Plan, to encourage and empower people to manage their ongoing physical and mental health conditions. It is also included in NHS England’s action plan ‘Universal Personalised Care: Implementing the Comprehensive Model’ published in 2019 which is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/universal-personalised-care-implementing-the-comprehensive-model/

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to require pharmaceutical companies that artificially inflate the cost of their products to make those products more affordable.

Anti-competitive behaviour, including excessive pricing, is a matter for the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA). The Department asks the CMA to investigate where it has concerns about abuses of competition law for generic medicines and where companies are found by the CMA to be in breach of the legislation, the Department will seek damages and invest that money back into the National Health Service.

The Government relies on competition to reduce the prices of generic medicines. This has led to some of the lowest prices in Europe and allows prices to react to the market. The Department has been considering proposals for ways to address high prices of generic medicines and will consult in due course.

The Department also has powers in the NHS Act 2006 to control the prices of NHS medicines. Prices of branded medicines are controlled through the 2019 Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access (VPAS) and alternative statutory scheme which utilises those powers. VPAS caps branded medicines' sales at an agreed level of growth. Any growth in sales above this level results in payments made by scheme members.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to criminalise the inflation of prices for the NHS by drug companies.

Anti-competitive behaviour, including excessive pricing, is a matter for the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA). The Department asks the CMA to investigate where it has concerns about abuses of competition law for generic medicines and where companies are found by the CMA to be in breach of the legislation, the Department will seek damages and invest that money back into the National Health Service.

The Government relies on competition to reduce the prices of generic medicines. This has led to some of the lowest prices in Europe and allows prices to react to the market. The Department has been considering proposals for ways to address high prices of generic medicines and will consult in due course.

The Department also has powers in the NHS Act 2006 to control the prices of NHS medicines. Prices of branded medicines are controlled through the 2019 Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access (VPAS) and alternative statutory scheme which utilises those powers. VPAS caps branded medicines' sales at an agreed level of growth. Any growth in sales above this level results in payments made by scheme members.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on providing a fully-costed and comprehensive multi-year funding settlement to ensure the adequacy of the size of the Cancer Nurse Specialist workforce to deliver the targets in the NHS Long Term Plan.

Discussions with HM Treasury on any multi-year settlement will take place within the Spending Review process. There are specialist training grants for 250 nurses to become cancer nurse specialists.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress the NHS is making on the rollout of electronic prescribing medications systems.

The National Health Service is on course to eliminate paper prescribing in hospitals and achieve the NHS Long Term Plan commitment to introduce digital prescribing by 2024. Since 2018, we have invested £78 million with 216 NHS trusts having received a share of this fund. The proportion of trusts with an electronic prescriptions and medicines administration system is estimated to have risen from 19% in 2018 to more than 80% to date.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the NHS Network Contract Directed Enhanced Service, Early: Cancer Diagnosis Guidance, published on 31 March 2021, what plans the Government has to produce a long-term strategy to tackle the estimated 37,000 people who had not started their first cancer treatment.

Following the ‘Help us help you’ campaign which raised awareness of general symptoms of cancer and encouraged people experiencing persistent symptoms to contact their general practitioner, cancer referrals reached over 10,500 referrals per day in April and 11,000 per day in May. Local systems, drawing on advice and analysis from their Cancer Alliance, will ensure that there is sufficient diagnostic and treatment capacity in place to meet the increased level of referrals and treatment required to address the number of first treatments by March 2022.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are prioritising delivery of NHS Long Term Plan commitments which supports recovery, such as increasing diagnostic capacity and early diagnosis and survival rates through rapid diagnostic centres (RDC). As of June 2021, there were 88 live RDC pathways across hospitals in England, compared to 12 in March 2020.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the timetable is for publishing the Getting It Right First Time dermatology national specialty report.

The Getting It Right First Time national report on dermatology was completed in 2020 and will be published later this year, following NHS England and NHS Improvement’s review of the recommendations. This publication will be timed to support the NHS recovery programme after COVID-19.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment his Department has made of the performance of NICE in (a) conducting appraisals of new medicines and (b) development of (i) clinical guidelines and (ii) quality standards in relation to the resources allocated to that body.

The Department assesses the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s (NICE) performance against the targets set out in its annual business plan. NICE is currently on track to meet its performance targets for the publication of technology appraisals, clinical guidelines and quality standards. NICE’s Annual Report and Accounts sets out its activity, performance and expenditure for key areas of its business, including its appraisals of new medicines and the development of clinical guidelines and quality standards.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to prioritise the transformation of dermatology services in England.

NHS England’s National Outpatient Transformation programme is developing a toolkit to support local systems to transform dermatology services. The toolkit includes a suite of redesign tools, optimal dermatology pathways and a baseline self-assessment tool, which will enable local systems to improve the efficiency and enhance the benefits of dermatology outpatient appointments. It also explores opportunities to improve the quality of primary care referrals into secondary care, teledermatology and the two week wait skin cancer pathway, working collaboratively with the National Cancer team to create new pathways for assessing and treating suspected skin cancer patients.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the NHS Network Contract Directed Enhanced Service, Early: Cancer Diagnosis Guidance, published on 31 March 2021, what plans the Government has to produce a long-term strategy to tackle the estimated 37,000 people who had not started their first cancer treatment.

Public Health England in partnership with NHS England and NHS Improvement, is running a campaign, ‘Help us help you’, to raise awareness of general symptoms of cancer and encourage people experiencing persistent symptoms to contact their general practitioner. Cancer referrals were over 10,500 referrals per day in April, and 11,000 per day in May.

Local systems, drawing on advice and analysis from their Cancer Alliance, will ensure that there is sufficient diagnostic and treatment capacity in place to meet the needs of cancer to meet the increased level of referrals and treatment required to address the shortfall in number of first treatments by March 2022. NHS England and NHS Improvement are prioritising delivery of NHS Long Term Plan commitments that also support recovery such as increasing diagnostic capacity and early diagnosis and survival rates through rapid diagnostic centres (RDC). As of June 2021, there were 88 active RDC pathways across hospitals in England, compared to 12 in March 2020.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on publishing a fully-costed multi-year funding settlement to ensure the adequacy of the size of the cancer nurse specialist workforce to deliver the targets in the NHS Long Term Plan.

The Spending Review 2020 provided £260 million to continue to increase the National Health Service workforce and support commitments made in the NHS Long Term Plan, including the Cancer Workforce Plan phase one published by Health Education England (HEE) in 2017. In 2020/21, HEE is prioritising the training of 400 clinical endoscopists and 450 reporting radiographers. Training grants are being offered for 250 nurses to become cancer nurse specialists and 100 chemotherapy nurses, training 58 biomedical scientists, developing an advanced clinical practice qualification in oncology and extending cancer support-worker training.

HEE is facilitating a number of initiatives to increase clinical nurse specialist capacity which will help tackle the elective backlog, including the development of cancer nurses, through provision of 250 training grants of up to £5,000 each in 2020/21. The grants are aimed at existing and aspiring cancer nurse specialists to enable them to undertake additional training to develop specialist clinical, leadership, education or research capabilities.

Discussions with HM Treasury on any multi-year settlement will take place within the Spending Review process.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to support cancer patients who have experienced disruption or delays to their cancer treatment as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The National Health Service is focusing on reducing the number of people waiting over 62 days on cancer pathways, particularly rescheduling diagnostic procedures or treatment for those who have had their care delayed by the pandemic.

An additional £1 billion has been made available in 2021/22 to support the start of the recovery of elective activity, including cancer services.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has revised the planned delivery date for the Government's commitment to provide every person with cancer with personalised care.

The National Health Service remains committed to ensuring that by 2021, where appropriate, every person diagnosed with cancer will have access to personalised care, including needs assessment, a care plan and health and wellbeing information and support.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to make further funding available to digital aspirants in relation to Electronic Health Records.

Details of the next round of funding to support digital aspirants with their Electronic Health Record implementation will be published shortly, as part of the NHSX Unified Technology Fund prospectus.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential cost savings to the NHS of having automated medicines cabinets made mandatory in every NHS trust.

The Department has made no such assessment. This year 83% of National Health Service trusts have implemented the electronic prescribing and medicines administration (EPMA) systems in hospitals. Once fully implemented, the EPMA will have significant impact on the safety of administration of medicines. Individual trusts are determining their requirements for technology such as automated cabinets and are introducing as required locally.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have advised that evidence on the impact of automated dispensing cabinets on safety is inconclusive. If future research provides evidence of a consistent positive impact on safety, their cost effectiveness can then be assessed.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve the administration of medicines in NHS trusts.

The Department has established the Medicine Safety Improvement Programme, as part of the national NHS Patient Safety Strategy, to co-ordinate the work on reducing the burden of errors related to medication.

The Medicine Safety Improvement Programme is working to meet the World Health Organization’s Medication Without Harm Challenge. The programme will look at a number of areas to support the improvement of safe medication administration in National Health Service trusts including better use of technology, guidance and support and how best to educate and inform patients about their medicines.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the NHS 2021-22 priorities and operational planning guidance, published on 25 March 2021, whether the NHS is on schedule to tackle the backlog of cancer diagnosis, care and treatment by the end of March 2022.

NHS England and Improvement are committed to clearing the cancer backlog of patients waiting over 62 days from referral to first treatment by March 2022. Progress has been made, with 2.68 million urgent referrals and over 664,000 people treated for cancer between March 2020 and May 2021. In May 2021 general practitioner urgent referrals for suspected cancer were 14% higher than the May 2019 baseline. Cancer referrals have reached over 10,500 referrals per day in April and nearly 11,000 in May.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the survey by the Royal College of Physicians in July 2021 that reported that 56 per cent of medical trainees were considering working part-time in the future, if he will make an assessment of the effect of trends in the number of doctors working less than full-time hours on his Department’s policies for increasing the size of the health and care workforce.

The average Hospital and Community Health Service doctor works 93.9% of a full-time working pattern, an increase from 93.2% in 2010. We consider the historical and potential future working patterns of doctors as one of many factors that inform workforce planning.

We are committed to providing greater flexibility for doctors. For example, the Enhancing Junior Doctors’ Working Lives programme, led by Health Education England (HEE), is supporting doctors who wish to undertake less than full time specialty training. Trainees are employed by the National Health Service and work in the service. Through this programme, HEE is monitoring the numbers of junior doctors training less than full time to ensure that this does not reduce the overall numbers of doctors in the workforce.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to increase the size of the cancer nursing workforce to help tackle the cancer treatment backlog; and if he will make a statement.

The Spending Review 2020 provided £260 million to continue to increase the National Health Service workforce and support commitments made in the NHS Long Term Plan, including the Cancer Workforce Plan phase one published by Health Education England (HEE) in 2017. In 2020/21, HEE is prioritising the training of 400 clinical endoscopists and 450 reporting radiographers. Training grants are being offered for 250 nurses to become cancer nurse specialists and 100 chemotherapy nurses, training 58 biomedical scientists, developing an advanced clinical practice qualification in oncology and extending cancer support-worker training.

HEE is facilitating a number of initiatives to increase clinical nurse specialist capacity which will help tackle the elective backlog, including the development of cancer nurses, through provision of 250 training grants of up to £5,000 each in 2020/21. The grants are aimed at existing and aspiring cancer nurse specialists to enable them to undertake additional training to develop specialist clinical, leadership, education or research capabilities.

Discussions with HM Treasury on any multi-year settlement will take place within the Spending Review process.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to produce a long-term and fully funded plan for the cancer workforce.

The Spending Review 2020 provided £260 million to continue to increase the National Health Service workforce and support commitments made in the NHS Long Term Plan, including the Cancer Workforce Plan phase one published by Health Education England (HEE) in 2017. In 2020/21, HEE is prioritising the training of 400 clinical endoscopists and 450 reporting radiographers. Training grants are being offered for 250 nurses to become cancer nurse specialists and 100 chemotherapy nurses, training 58 biomedical scientists, developing an advanced clinical practice qualification in oncology and extending cancer support-worker training.

HEE is facilitating a number of initiatives to increase clinical nurse specialist capacity which will help tackle the elective backlog, including the development of cancer nurses, through provision of 250 training grants of up to £5,000 each in 2020/21. The grants are aimed at existing and aspiring cancer nurse specialists to enable them to undertake additional training to develop specialist clinical, leadership, education or research capabilities.

Discussions with HM Treasury on any multi-year settlement will take place within the Spending Review process.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what additional resources he plans to put in place to tackle the backlog of cancer (a) diagnosis, (b) care and (c) treatment following the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government confirmed an additional £3 billion for the National Health Service in the Spending Review 2020 to support the recovery from the impact of COVID-19. Cancer patients will continue to be prioritised and will benefit from approximately £1 billion of this funding to begin tackling the elective backlog. This will be supported by £325 million for NHS diagnostics. Further funding is subject to the 2021 Spending Review in the autumn.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions his Department has had with (a) NICE and (b) NHS England and NHS Improvement on setting levels of ambition in the NICE Methods Review.

The Department regularly discuss a range of issues with colleagues in the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and NHS England and NHS Improvement, including NICE’s methods review. However, NICE is an independent body and is responsible for its own methods and processes. NICE expects to consult on the draft programme manual in the summer, with implementation of the changes from early 2022.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions his Department has had with (a) NICE and (b) NHS England and NHS Improvement on the changes needed in the NICE methods and process review to improve access to new medicines for patients.

The Department regularly discuss a range of issues with colleagues in the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and NHS England and NHS Improvement, including NICE’s methods review. However, NICE is an independent body and is responsible for its own methods and processes. NICE expects to consult on the draft programme manual in the summer, with implementation of the changes from early 2022.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department plans to take steps to help improve patients’ understanding of the merits of regular dental check-ups in helping to ensure the early diagnosis of oral cancer.

No assessment has been made. Whilst dentists play a valuable role in detecting potential oral cancers through dental check-ups, patients with concerns should seek advice from their dentist or general practitioner.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the projection by Cancer Research that cases of oral cancer will rise by 33 per cent from 2014 to 2035, whether his Department has plans to (a) promote and (b) increase the public's awareness of dental services available to support the diagnosis of that cancer.

No assessment has been made. Whilst dentists play a valuable role in detecting potential oral cancers through dental check-ups. Patients with concerns should seek advice from their dentist or general practitioner.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Cancer Research's projection that oral cancer will rise by 33% in the UK from 2014 to 2035, whether his Department has made an assessment of the (a) potential merits of increasing patients’ awareness of the dental services available to support the diagnosis of oral cancer and (b) importance of those services.

No assessment has been made. Whilst dentists play a valuable role in detecting potential oral cancers through dental check-ups. Patients with concerns should seek advice from their dentist or general practitioner.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has plans to increase patients’ understanding of the merits of regular dental check-ups in helping to ensure the early diagnosis of oral cancer.

No assessment has been made. Whilst dentists play a valuable role in detecting potential oral cancers through dental check-ups. Patients with concerns should seek advice from their dentist or general practitioner.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has taken steps to provide funding to increase resources and training to strengthen the workforce of local pharmacies.

The Department is working with NHS England and NHS Improvement, Health Education England and the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) on pharmacists’ education and training reforms. The GPhC’s new initial education and training standards which will be implemented from September, will transform the education and training of pharmacists, so they are able to play a much greater role in providing clinical care to patients and the public.

Training is also available for specific new services that are introduced in community pharmacy. For example, NHS111 and general practitioners can refer patients to community pharmacies for urgent medicines supply and minor illnesses under the Community Pharmacist Consultation Service. Free training is available for pharmacists that have signed up for this service to learn and practise new skills and to gaining confidence in performing clinical examinations.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to support pharmacies to play a greater role in primary care provision.

The Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework 2019-24 five-year deal, agreed with the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee in 2019, sets out how community pharmacy will further integrate into the National Health Service. This sets the ambition that community pharmacies will deliver more clinical services, embed their role in providing advice on medicines and preventing ill-health and further utilise the skills in community pharmacy to support the wider NHS

NHS111 can now refer patients to a community pharmacist for minor illness or the urgent supply of a prescribed medicine. At the end of 2020, we extended this service to general practitioner surgeries, who can now also formally refer patients to community pharmacy for consultation. We expect to introduce more clinical services in community pharmacy and play a larger role in primary care provision.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the need for specific NICE guidance for the diagnosis and treatment of functional neurological disorder.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has guidance in place to support clinicians in the diagnosis of functional neurological disorder. The ‘Suspected neurological conditions: recognition and referral’’ guideline published in 2019 covers the initial assessment of symptoms and signs that might indicate a neurological condition. It helps healthcare professionals to identify people more quickly who should be offered referral for specialist investigation and includes recommendations for people who have previously been diagnosed with functional neurological disorder. The guideline is available at the following link:

www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng127

In January 2021, NICE also published a quality standard on suspected neurological conditions which states that adults diagnosed with a functional neurological disorder should be supported to manage symptoms that are a part of the disorder in non-specialist care. The quality standard is available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/qs198

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans are in place to fund and deliver a national NHS care pathway for functional neurological disorder.

The National Neuro Advisory Group (NNAG), which includes NHS England and NHS Improvement, Public Health England, expert bodies, clinicians, academics, and patient voice organisations, develops and coordinates the national programme of neurology service improvement. The NNAG has a priority in their work plan for 2021/2022 to support development of a clinical pathway for functional neurological conditions, including functional neurological disorder.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment his Department has made of how complementary therapies can help to tackle (a) increased levels of stress, (b) anxiety, (c) mental health issues and (d) symptoms associated with long covid.

We have made no assessment.

It is the responsibility of local National Health Service organisations to make decisions on the commissioning and funding of any NHS healthcare treatments, taking account of safety, clinical and cost effectiveness and the availability of suitability qualified and regulated practitioners.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of complementary therapy services in supporting patients in hospitals and hospices.

We have made no assessment.

It is the responsibility of local National Health Service organisations to make decisions on the commissioning and funding of any NHS healthcare treatments, taking account of safety, clinical and cost effectiveness and the availability of suitability qualified and regulated practitioners.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to help ensure that complementary therapy services are accessible to NHS patients.

We have made no assessment.

It is the responsibility of local National Health Service organisations to make decisions on the commissioning and funding of any NHS healthcare treatments, taking account of safety, clinical and cost effectiveness and the availability of suitability qualified and regulated practitioners.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to increase the funding allocated to complementary therapy services.

We have made no assessment.

It is the responsibility of local National Health Service organisations to make decisions on the commissioning and funding of any NHS healthcare treatments, taking account of safety, clinical and cost effectiveness and the availability of suitability qualified and regulated practitioners.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to help to improve (a) cost, (b) time and (c) staffing efficiencies in the NHS by using complementary therapists.

We have made no assessment.

It is the responsibility of local National Health Service organisations to make decisions on the commissioning and funding of any NHS healthcare treatments, taking account of safety, clinical and cost effectiveness and the availability of suitability qualified and regulated practitioners.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of complementary therapists in (a) responding to health needs and (b) supporting the NHS during the covid-19 outbreak.

We have made no assessment.

It is the responsibility of local National Health Service organisations to make decisions on the commissioning and funding of any NHS healthcare treatments, taking account of safety, clinical and cost effectiveness and the availability of suitability qualified and regulated practitioners.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to ensure that the hotel covid-19 quarantine rules are consistent with UN Resolution A/75/L.37 on international cooperation to address challenges faced by seafarers as a result of the covid-19 pandemic to support global supply chains.

There is an exemption for seamen, masters, inspectors and surveyors of ships from managed quarantine which is consistent with the United Nations Resolution. The Government has introduced this exemption to ensure that vital services through freight routes and supply chains can continue, as well as providing for crew welfare.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will maintain the full exemption from covid-19 quarantine for seafarers.

The Government has maintained an exemption. Seamen, masters, inspectors and surveyors of ships returning from countries not on the ‘red list’ who live in the United Kingdom do not need to quarantine. If they live overseas, they must self-isolate in their accommodation while in England, except while they are undertaking the exempt activity or travelling as part of their work.

Seamen, masters, inspectors and surveyors of ships who arrive from ‘red list’ countries are permitted to enter the UK and do not need to quarantine in a Government approved hotel, even if they have been in any country on the travel ban list in the previous 10 days.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of seafarers who will be required to quarantine in hotels each week after arriving into the UK from red list countries during the covid-19 outbreak.

Seamen, masters, inspectors and surveyors of ships are not required to quarantine in hotels, even if they have been in any country on the travel ban ‘red list’ in the previous 10 days.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reasons he has not exempted maritime key workers from covid-19 quarantine restrictions in line with previous exemptions so granted.

We have introduced an exemption for seamen and masters, maritime pilots and inspectors and surveyors of ships, where they have travelled to the United Kingdom in the course of their work and live in the UK, they do not need to self-isolate. If they live overseas, they must self-isolate in their accommodation while in England, except while undertaking the exempt activity or travelling as part of their work. They are permitted to enter the UK and do not need to quarantine in a Government approved hotel, even if they have been in any country on the travel ban ‘red list’ in the previous 10 days. This is to reflect the critical role that seafarers play in ensuring the continued supply of goods in and out of the UK.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what representations he has received on exempting maritime key workers from hotel covid-19 quarantine measures.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish part 2 of the People Plan; and if he will set out a long-term plan for the NHS workforce.

The NHS People Plan is a shared programme of work to increase the workforce, support new ways of working and develop a compassionate and inclusive workplace culture in order to deliver the NHS Long Term Plan. We are working closely with NHS England and NHS Improvement, Health Education England, systems and employers to determine our workforce and people priorities beyond April 2021 whilst continuing to support the wellbeing of National Health Service staff.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the mental health impacts of the extended closure of the wedding industry on (a) couples and (b) business owners.

No such assessment has been made.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent information his Department holds on the adequacy of staffing levels in the mammography workforce.

While the Department does not hold information on the adequacy of staffing levels in the mammography and radiology workforce, we are aware of collaborative work undertaken by NHS England and Improvement, Public Health England and Health Education England to ensure that staffing levels are adequate.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent information his Department holds on the adequacy of staffing levels in breast radiology.

While the Department does not hold information on the adequacy of staffing levels in the mammography and radiology workforce, we are aware of collaborative work undertaken by NHS England and Improvement, Public Health England and Health Education England to ensure that staffing levels are adequate.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has had discussions with his Emirati counterpart on (a) the health of Mohammed al-Roken in response to the covid-19 pandemic and (b) his unconditional release upon completion of his full sentence on 17 July 2022.

We are aware of reports concerning the detention of Mohammed al-Roken. The UK urges all countries to comply with their human rights obligations. Our close relationship with the United Arab Emirates allows us to discuss important issues such as human rights. We consistently underline the importance of political freedoms globally. This includes respect for the right to peaceful protest, the rule of law, and freedom of speech, the press, and assembly. Where the UK has cause for concern, we raise these concerns at official and Ministerial level.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with HSBC on the freezing of pro-democracy activist Ted Hui’s bank account.

The Government engages in regular dialogue with businesses in Hong Kong and the UK, as well as monitoring the operation of the financial sector and its participants on an ongoing basis. Financial institutions operating in Hong Kong do so within a strict legal and regulatory framework.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with HSBC on the National Security Law in Hong Kong.

The Government engages in regular dialogue with businesses in Hong Kong and the UK, as well as monitoring the operation of the financial sector and its participants on an ongoing basis. Financial institutions operating in Hong Kong do so within a strict legal and regulatory framework.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the implications fpr his policies of HSBC’s decision to transfer executives from the UK to China.

The Government engages in regular dialogue with businesses in Hong Kong and the UK, as well as monitoring the operation of the financial sector and its participants on an ongoing basis. Financial institutions operating in Hong Kong do so within a strict legal and regulatory framework.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the new UK Infrastructure Bank will have a mandate to offer loan guarantees for at-scale retrofit projects.

As set out in the Budget, the UK Infrastructure Bank will have a broad mandate to offer support across different sectors. This includes being able to support retrofit projects that contribute to achieving net zero emissions, where the Bank’s investment criteria are met.

The Government will provide further guidance on the investment parameters for the Bank in the Framework document to be published at launch.

The Bank will have a range of financing tools at its disposal including senior debt, equity, hybrid products and guarantees.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
20th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the work of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) has functioned effectively since its establishment in 2016, supporting sustainable development in Asia by investing under globally accepted standards and following multilateral governance practices established by existing multilateral development banks (MDBs).

The AIIB has a large global membership of 103 approved members , including five of the G7 with whom the UK collaborates closely as shareholders.

As of May 2021, it has approved 123 investment projects worth USD 24.66 billion in 28 client countries, with USD 8.2 billion of this supporting Covid-19 recovery. The AIIB invested USD 1.2 billion as climate finance in 2020.

The UK supports the AIIB’s green ambitions, noting that its 2030 Corporate Strategy has set a 50% climate finance target for 2025, the highest among MDBs with a UK shareholding, and also commits the Bank to Paris alignment.

Over half of the AIIB’s investments to date have been co-financed with peer MDBs, predominately the World Bank and Asian Development Bank.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many Chinese companies have issued shares on the London Stock Exchange as part of the London-Shanghai Stock Connect.

The London-Shanghai Stock Connect is a commercial initiative. Information about the companies involved is publicly available, whether via the relevant exchanges, the companies listed, and third-party news and data providers.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many British companies have issued shares on the Shanghai Stock Market as part of the London-Shanghai Stock Connect.

The London-Shanghai Stock Connect is a commercial initiative. Information about the companies involved is publicly available, whether via the relevant exchanges, the companies listed, and third-party news and data providers.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the status of the UK-China Bond Connect.

A UK-China Bond Connect does not exist, so no assessment has been made of its status.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish a list of UK companies who are currently participating in the UK-China Cooperation Fund.

The UK-China Cooperation Fund is a private sector initiative. Participation in the fund is an independent commercial matter for the companies concerned.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions (a) he and (b) his officials have had with relevant stakeholders on the levels of investment required to refresh the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

The Prime Minister has appointed the Defence Secretary as Shipbuilding Tsar. As you will no doubt be aware, on 16 March 2021, the Defence Secretary outlined in his speech to the Society of Maritime Industries that he is working to refresh the National Shipbuilding Strategy to deliver a successful and sustainable UK shipbuilding enterprise.

The Chancellor is in regular contact with Cabinet colleagues, including the Defence Secretary, on investment priorities. Officials are likewise closely engaged with counterparts across government on matters of public spending.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
17th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether (a) officials and (b) Ministers in his Department have met representatives of the UK-China Cooperation Fund in the last twelve months.

The UK-China Cooperation Fund is a private sector initiative. Treasury ministers and officials have not met with representatives of the UK-China Cooperation Fund in the last twelve months, nor have officials discussed with relevant stakeholders the allocation of its funding, which is an independent commercial matter.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions officials in his Department have had with relevant stakeholders on the allocation of funding for the UK-China Cooperation Fund.

The UK-China Cooperation Fund is a private sector initiative. Treasury ministers and officials have not met with representatives of the UK-China Cooperation Fund in the last twelve months, nor have officials discussed with relevant stakeholders the allocation of its funding, which is an independent commercial matter.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions officials in his Department have had with relevant stakeholders on the provision of green finance for the Green Belt and Road.

The government engages with a range of stakeholders on the provision of green finance, particularly in the run to COP26. This involves working with international partners and the financial sector to promote advancement of and adherence to international green standards that support the delivery of sustainable infrastructure, including via initiatives such as the Belt and Road.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of extending business rates exemptions and the temporary VAT reduction to businesses in the wedding industry.

This year, due to the direct adverse effects of COVID-19, the Government has provided an unprecedented business rates holiday for eligible retail, hospitality and leisure properties. The Government has also frozen the business rates multiplier for all businesses for 2021-22.

The temporary VAT reduced rate came into effect on 15 July 2020 and was initially scheduled to end on 12 January 2021. The Government extended the reduced rate of VAT (five per cent) until 31 March 2021.

The Government has provided various schemes to support firms, including those in the wedding industry, including Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans, Bounce Back Loans, grants and VAT deferrals.

The Budget will set out the next phase of the Government’s plans to tackle the virus, protect jobs and support business.

17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding the Government plans to allocate to the owners and operators of public spaces and venues for measures to protect the public from terrorist attacks as part of the new Protect Duty announced on 26 February 2021.

The Protect Duty consultation has proposed that certain owners and operators, responsible for publicly accessible locations, would be required to consider the threat posed by terrorist attack, and to take reasonably practicable mitigating measures.

The Government considers that it is reasonable for responsible parties to take appropriate and proportionate security measures to protect their staff and the public who visit their venues, in the same way that they prepare for and fund measures for the risk of fire, or to ensure that health and safety requirements are met.

Ahead of any changes, the Government will continue to provide a range of support to owners and operators, including freely available information on threat, mitigations, tools, and training products. To further support delivery across the public and private sector, a new interactive online platform will be launched later this year. The Government will also consider, further to the consultation, where additional support may be required when the Protect Duty is taken forward. We encourage all with an interest in public security to respond to the consultation by 2 July.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on the effectiveness of the Computer Misuse Act 1990 in protecting the cyber security of local authorities.

The Home Office keeps the Computer Misuse Act (CMA) under regular review.

The Computer Misuse Act is an effective piece of legislation that allows for the prosecution of those responsible for attacks on computer systems.

The Home Office is engaged in ongoing discussions with relevant partners in law enforcement, government and private sector to ensure the legislation continues to remain effective.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent discussions he has had with the maritime sector on priorities for the refreshed National Shipbuilding Strategy announced on 16 March 2021.

The Ministry of Defence, together with Departments across Government, have worked with closely with industry to develop the National Shipbuilding Strategy Refresh. We have held one-to-one discussions and workshops with a cross-section of industry to understand their priorities. We have also been working with the Maritime Enterprise Working Group, to develop a shared industry-Government vision for the future of the sector.

We are keen to work with industry as we implement the strategy and will ensure we have the right structures in place to deliver on our shared vision and reinvigorate the enterprise together.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will bring forward emergency legislative proposals to ensure people who have no recourse to public funds and who require homelessness assistance can access emergency accommodation for the next 12 months.

The rules as to eligibility relating to immigration status, including for those with NRPF, have not changed.

Local authorities must use their judgement in assessing what support they may lawfully give to each person on an individual basis, considering that person’s specific circumstances and support needs.

Local authorities already regularly make such judgements on accommodating individuals who might otherwise be ineligible, during extreme weather for example.

We want to ensure that local areas have the tools they need to support as many people as possible off the street as possible. That is why we have established programmes such as the Next Steps Accommodation Programme and the Home Office’s Rough Sleeping Support Service.

More information on the support available to migrants during the pandemic, including those with NRPF, can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-get-support-if-youre-a-migrant-living-in-the-uk

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)