Chris Evans Portrait

Chris Evans

Labour (Co-op) - Islwyn

First elected: 6th May 2010

Shadow Minister (Tech and Digital Economy)

(since November 2023)

Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)
5th Sep 2023 - 28th Nov 2023
Shadow Minister (Defence)
14th May 2021 - 5th Sep 2023
Procurement Bill [HL]
25th Jan 2023 - 21st Feb 2023
Petitions Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 13th Jul 2021
Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 21st Sep 2020
Public Accounts Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Public Accounts Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Environmental Audit Committee
10th Dec 2012 - 18th Mar 2014
Justice Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 10th Dec 2012
Draft Defamation Bill (Joint Committee)
24th Mar 2011 - 12th Oct 2011


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Chris Evans has voted in 719 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Chris Evans Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Kevan Jones (Labour)
(59 debate interactions)
Johnny Mercer (Conservative)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
(20 debate interactions)
Alex Burghart (Conservative)
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
(13 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(120 debate contributions)
Ministry of Defence
(29 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(7 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Procurement Act 2023
(5,643 words contributed)
Finance Act 2020
(2,050 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Chris Evans's debates

Islwyn Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Currently, it is not compulsory for primary or secondary school students to be educated on Britain's role in colonisation, or the transatlantic slave trade. We petition the government to make education on topics such as these compulsory, with the ultimate aim of a far more inclusive curriculum.

The SNP government appears solely intent on getting independence at any cost.

12 kids in the UK are diagnosed with cancer daily. 1 in 5 will die within 5 years, often of the deadliest types like DIPG (brainstem cancer) - fatal on diagnosis & other cancers on relapse. Yet there has been little, or no, funding for research into these cancers and little, or no, progress.

The University and College Union has repeatedly called on its members to strike. However, strikes are ineffective if students, not employees are the main source of revenue. For this to change, government needs to step in and require universities to reimburse tuition fees lost due to strike action.

All students should be reimbursed of this years tuition fees as universities are now online only due to COVID-19, with only powerpoints online for learning materials which is not worthy of up to £9,250. Furthermore, all assessments are being reconsidered to ‘make do’ and build up credits.

As students are unable to access facilities or continue with their eduction at their university setting in the following semester, we would like to request that the government considers refunding tuition payments for Semester 3.

The quality of online lectures is not equal to face-to-face lectures. Students should not have to pay full tuition fees for online lectures, without experiencing university life. The Government should require UK universities to partially refund tuition fees while online teaching is implemented.

Students across the UK have returned to University to be told our learning will be predominantly online for the foreseeable future. The Government should therefore lower our tuition fees and we should receive a partial refund for the effects this will have on our learning and university experience.

The UK Government plans to introduce “Magnitsky law”, a law which targets people who commit gross human rights violations. Through this law or alternative means, this petition urges the UK Government to impose sanctions on China for their human rights violations on the Uyghur people.


Latest EDMs signed by Chris Evans

13th September 2021
Chris Evans signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 13th September 2021

Emma Raducanu, 2021 US Open women's champion

Tabled by: Toby Perkins (Labour - Chesterfield)
That this House is delighted, amazed and inspired by the performances of Emma Raducanu in winning the US Open without losing a set; notes that she is the first qualifier in the history of tennis to win a grand slam event; congratulates Emma and all those involved in her success; …
21 signatures
(Most recent: 25 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 8
Scottish National Party: 5
Conservative: 3
Independent: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 1
16th March 2020
Chris Evans signed this EDM on Monday 4th May 2020

Temporary universal basic income

Tabled by: Kevin Brennan (Labour - Cardiff West)
That this House calls on the Government to introduce a temporary universal basic income or an emergency measure to help freelancers and the self-employed effected by the covid-19 outbreak.
100 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Sep 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 49
Scottish National Party: 28
Liberal Democrat: 9
Independent: 6
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Alba Party: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
View All Chris Evans's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Chris Evans, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Chris Evans

Friday 18th November 2022

1 Adjournment Debate led by Chris Evans

Monday 20th June 2022

1 Bill introduced by Chris Evans


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for the collection from the UK banking sector of financial inclusion audits and data on financial transactions, including commodity trading; to make provision for further obligations on the appropriate financial regulator regarding financial consumer protection and education; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Monday 26th March 2012

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
14th Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of when people who receive a Civil Service Pension will begin to receive their remediable service statement.

We will start issuing Remedial Service Statements (RSS) from Spring 2024 and this will be completed in line with the legislative deadline of April 2025. This has been broken into cohorts starting with Ill Health Retirements and concluding with Deceased.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
14th Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has a timeline for people who receive a Civil Service Pension to receive their remediable service statement.

We will start issuing Remedial Service Statements (RSS) from Spring 2024 and this will be completed in line with the legislative deadline of April 2025. This has been broken into cohorts starting with Ill Health Retirements and concluding with Deceased.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
25th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much (a) has been and (b) will be paid under the Ministerial and Other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991 to ministers who left Government from 1 July to 25 October.

​​Under the Ministerial and Other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991, eligible Ministers who leave office are entitled to severance pay of a quarter of their annual salary. This applies only where a Minister is under 65 and is not appointed to a ministerial office within three weeks of leaving government.

Individual departments are responsible for the payment of salaries and severance payments to current and former Ministers and, as such, the information requested by the Hon. gentleman is not held centrally. Departments are required to publish compensation payments paid to former Ministers as part of their Annual Report & Accounts.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many ministers have been entitled to severance pay under the Ministerial and other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991 from 1 July to 25 October.

​​Under the Ministerial and Other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991, eligible Ministers who leave office are entitled to severance pay of a quarter of their annual salary. This applies only where a Minister is under 65 and is not appointed to a ministerial office within three weeks of leaving government.

Individual departments are responsible for the payment of salaries and severance payments to current and former Ministers and, as such, the information requested by the Hon. gentleman is not held centrally. Departments are required to publish compensation payments paid to former Ministers as part of their Annual Report & Accounts.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to progress the updating of the Integrated Review; how long the update will take; and if he will take steps to ensure that there will be a formal industry engagement process.

The Prime Minister has committed to producing a ‘refresh’ of the 2021 Integrated Review by the end of the year to ensure that the UK’s security, defence, development and foreign policy architecture is keeping pace with the evolving international environment.

The ‘refresh’ has two core aims:

  • to review changes in the strategic context since publication of the IR; and

  • to adjust the UK’s overarching approach and its priorities for action to 2025, including in line with the new Prime Minister’s specific priorities.

The ‘refresh’ will supplement and extend the IR rather than replacing it. As such, it supports the ongoing process of strategy development and delivery within government, and is an example of adaptive strategy in practice.

The Government will engage with Parliament, the Devolved Administrations, external experts, industry and wider stakeholders with an interest in our nation’s security and prosperity. This includes our allies and partners, building on our ongoing dialogue.

Although there are currently no plans for other documents to be published alongside the ‘refresh’, more detail will be published in due course on how the Government will pursue the strategic priorities set out in the IR.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
11th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of requests for Internal Review of refused FOI requests were (a) referred to and (b) decided by a Minister during the 2021 calendar year.

In line with the Freedom of Information Act 2000, officials will refer to Ministers any requests which require the opinion of a qualified person as to whether or not the exemption at section 36 is engaged.


The Cabinet Office does not gather statistics on the number of referrals made to Ministers.

11th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of Freedom of Information Act requests were (a) referred to and (b) decided by a Minister in the 2021 calendar year.

In line with the Freedom of Information Act 2000, officials will refer to Ministers any requests which require the opinion of a qualified person as to whether or not the exemption at section 36 is engaged.


The Cabinet Office does not gather statistics on the number of referrals made to Ministers.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether an official in his Department informed any employee or official of Southampton University prior to 5 August 2011 that it would be unlawful for that university to give public access to any of (a) the private diaries of Lord or Lady Mountbatten and (b) their letters to each other.

As the hon. Member will be aware, there are several FOI exemptions that remain in place for historic records. As I said in previous answers, this case is currently before the First-tier Tribunal (Information Rights) and it would not be appropriate to make further comment whilst this is subject to ongoing legal proceedings.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether there was any communication from his Department to the University of Southampton prior to 5 August 2011 which mentions (a) the diaries of Lord or Lady Mountbatten or (b) any of their letters to each other.

As the hon. Member will be aware, there are several FOI exemptions that remain in place for historic records. As I said in previous answers, this case is currently before the First-tier Tribunal (Information Rights) and it would not be appropriate to make further comment whilst this is subject to ongoing legal proceedings.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department had any involvement in the drafting of the Ministerial Direction dated 5 August 2011 under section 9 of the National Heritage Act 1980 vetting the Mountbatten Archive in the University of Southampton.

As the hon. Member will be aware, there are several FOI exemptions that remain in place for historic records. As I said in previous answers, this case is currently before the First-tier Tribunal (Information Rights) and it would not be appropriate to make further comment whilst this is subject to ongoing legal proceedings.

21st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department advised Southampton University prior to 5 August 2011 that it would be unlawful for that university to give public access to any of the private (a) diaries and (b) letters of Lord or Lady Mountbatten.

As the hon. member will be aware, there are several FOI exemptions that remain in place for historic records. As I said in previous answers, this case is currently before the First-tier Tribunal (Information Rights) and it would not be appropriate to make further comment whilst this is subject to ongoing legal proceedings.

21st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Government has a timeframe for the full release of the Broadlands Archive, including the letters and diaries of Earl Mountbatten.

As the hon. member will be aware, there are several FOI exemptions that remain in place for historic records. As I said in previous answers, this case is currently before the First-tier Tribunal (Information Rights) and it would not be appropriate to make further comment whilst this is subject to ongoing legal proceedings.

12th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she plans to investigate representations made to her Department by members of the public adversely affected by the business practices of rent-a-roof companies under the (a) Feed-In-Tariff and (b) Renewable Heat Incentive schemes.

The Government is aware of the troubling issues that householders have reported regarding commercial lease/rent-a-roof arrangements linked to the Feed-in Tariff and Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive schemes. Minister Bowie met with some of the affected consumers last month to listen to their concerns. Whilst these are private law contracts, the Department is currently investigating these issues and working with the responsible regulatory bodies, before determining what action can be taken.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to prevent online violent images being used as a form of cyber bullying.

The Online Safety Bill will require all in-scope platforms to assess and mitigate the risk of illegal content appearing on their sites, or of their sites being used to facilitate illegal activity. All in-scope platforms will need to design their services to prevent exposure to illegal content and will need to set out in their terms of service how individuals will be protected from illegal content online. In-scope platforms will also need to ensure that they quickly take down illegal content once it has been reported or they become aware of its presence on their services.

Platforms which are likely to be accessed by children will also need to assess the risks their service poses for children, including from harms such as cyberbullying and content depicting or encouraging violence, put in place measures to protect them, and monitor these to ensure they are keeping children safe on their services.

Users will be able to report abuse, and should expect to receive an appropriate response from the platform.

If major platforms don’t fulfil their own standards to keep people safe, they could face an investigation and enforcement action.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to remove violent images of assault from online sites.

The Online Safety Bill will require all in-scope platforms to assess and mitigate the risk of illegal content appearing on their sites, or of their sites being used to facilitate illegal activity. All in-scope platforms will need to design their services to prevent exposure to illegal content and will need to set out in their terms of service how individuals will be protected from illegal content online. In-scope platforms will also need to ensure that they quickly take down illegal content once it has been reported or they become aware of its presence on their services.

Platforms which are likely to be accessed by children will also need to assess the risks their service poses for children, including from harms such as cyberbullying and content depicting or encouraging violence, put in place measures to protect them, and monitor these to ensure they are keeping children safe on their services.

Users will be able to report abuse, and should expect to receive an appropriate response from the platform.

If major platforms don’t fulfil their own standards to keep people safe, they could face an investigation and enforcement action.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to prevent violent images of assault being (a) uploaded, and (b) distributed on online sites.

The Online Safety Bill will require all in-scope platforms to assess and mitigate the risk of illegal content appearing on their sites, or of their sites being used to facilitate illegal activity. All in-scope platforms will need to design their services to prevent exposure to illegal content and will need to set out in their terms of service how individuals will be protected from illegal content online. In-scope platforms will also need to ensure that they quickly take down illegal content once it has been reported or they become aware of its presence on their services.

Platforms which are likely to be accessed by children will also need to assess the risks their service poses for children, including from harms such as cyberbullying and content depicting or encouraging violence, put in place measures to protect them, and monitor these to ensure they are keeping children safe on their services.

Users will be able to report abuse, and should expect to receive an appropriate response from the platform.

If major platforms don’t fulfil their own standards to keep people safe, they could face an investigation and enforcement action.

11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has had sight of the independent QC-led review into the conduct of the Professional Footballer’s Association; and whether her Department plans to take any actions as a result of that review.

The Professional Footballers’ Association (PFA) is a trade union and has private membership. It is for the relevant National Governing Body of sport to take action in this area, but the government will take a keen interest in the findings.

We will continue to work closely with these bodies across the sports sector more broadly to ensure that appropriate measures are in place to protect participants from harm.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department plans to introduce the ability to rehome section one listed dogs to prevent their euthanasia.

Section 1 of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 prohibits the owning or keeping of four types of dog: the Pit Bull terrier, the Dogo Argentino, the Fila Brasileiro and the Japanese Tosa.

Despite the general prohibitions on these types of dog, an individual prohibited dog can be kept by its owner or by the person for the time being in charge of the dog if a court judges that the dog is not a danger to public safety. In its assessment, the court must consider the temperament of the dog and its past behaviour, whether the proposed keeper is a fit and proper person, and may consider any other relevant circumstances, such as whether the dog can be kept in a suitable environment. If the court considers these criteria to be met, the dog can be listed on the Index of Exempted Dogs and must be kept under strict conditions, including being on a lead and muzzled in public.

The Dangerous Dogs Exemption Schemes (England and Wales) Order 2015 sets out the circumstances where an exempted prohibited dog may be transferred to a new keeper should the current keeper become seriously ill or die. The Government is not planning to introduce additional abilities to enable exempted prohibited dogs to be transferred to new keepers.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to ban supertrawlers from fishing in UK waters.

As set out in the Withdrawal Agreement, during the transition period, we have agreed that we will continue to apply current fisheries rules and shared access to waters will continue until the end of 2020. When the transition period ends, we will be able to restrict the fishing activities of all vessels, including supertrawlers, throughout our waters.

The UK will be able to decide what vessels can access our waters to fish and the new licensing framework within the Fisheries Bill will allow us to apply conditions to the activities of all vessels fishing in UK waters. Any vessels granted access to fish in our waters, regardless of nationality, will need to abide by UK rules including those on sustainability.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many soliped and equidae were imported from Ireland for slaughter in Great Britain in (a) 2019 and (b) in each month of 2020.

TRACES (Trade Control and Expert System) is a European Commission system used by EU member states to facilitate and record animal/animal product movements into and throughout the EU. The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA), as the competent authority, is able to extract information from TRACES for imports of live animals into the UK.

Based on the information available, there were no solipeds or equidae certified for slaughter which had been imported from Ireland in 2019 or 2020.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what quantity of horse meat was exported from the UK in 2019.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) issues Export Health Certificates (EHCs) for animals and products of animal origin exported to non-EU countries. In 2019, APHA did not issue any EHCs for the export of horse meat to non-EU countries.

APHA is not able to provide any data regarding the quantity of horse meat exported from the UK to the EU in 2019. Data for such trade is currently drawn from EU systems based on movements of animals to the EU that require an Intra-Trade Animal Health Certificate (ITAHC). An ITAHC was not required for movements of meat between the UK and the rest of the EU in 2019.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with the British Horseracing Authority on that organisation's consultation on the rules and penalties for misuse of a whip in racing; and whether that consultation will follow Government principles for consultations.

Defra officials have regular discussions with the British Horseracing Authority (BHA), including recently on its Horse Welfare Board’s five-year Horse Welfare Strategy “A life well-lived”. The Strategy recommends that the BHA should consult as soon as possible and ideally by October 2020 on increased penalties for whip offences. The Strategy also recommends that this consultation should gather views on future restrictions on whip use and on a possible ban. As part of ongoing regular discussions, Defra officials will be advising the BHA about how to follow Government principles for conducting consultations, and Defra will be taking a close interest in how this progresses.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent representations officials in her Department have made to the British Horseracing Authority on banning the use of the whip in horseracing.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Ealing Central and Acton, Dr Rupa Huq, on 20 January 2020 PQ 1916.

Defra officials are in regular dialogue with the British Horseracing Authority to discuss the safety and welfare of racehorses and will continue to work with the industry to safeguard horse welfare.

10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish a timetable for the vaccination of all care home (a) residents and (b) staff in England.

We met our target to offer a first vaccine to everyone in the top four priority groups, as identified by the Joint Committee of Vaccination and Immunisation by 15 February. This included all residents in a care homes for older adults and their carers.

Second vaccination visits to care homes are taking place over the next month to offer vaccinations to staff or residents who were unavailable on the day of the first visit. Everyone will receive their second dose within 12 weeks of their first.

10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to enable the re-introduction of close contact care home visits in England.

New visiting arrangements have started on 8 March. Every care home should ensure that each resident can nominate one named person who can have regular, indoor visits.

Those residents with the highest care needs can also receive visits from a family member or friend who is an ‘essential care giver’. Following agreement between the care home, resident and their family or friends, these visitors will be able to visit more often in order to provide care that is critical to the resident’s immediate health and wellbeing. They will have the same testing and personal protective equipment arrangements as care home staff so that they can also provide extra support, such as help with washing and dressing or eating well.

We will assess the data and take a decision on opening up further opportunities for visiting, setting out a plan for the next phase of visits for people in residential care.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will undertake a review on the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of mould sickness in the UK.

Public Health England published a review in 2019 on bioaerosols, which include mould, related to composting and intensive farming, and their potential effects on the health of those living nearby. This followed two other reviews published in 2018.

NHS England is aware of how damp and mould can lead to respiratory problems, infections, allergies, asthma and affect the immune system. Aspergillus is a group of moulds common in the home. Most people are naturally immune and do not develop disease caused by Aspergillus. The European Respiratory Society have produced guidelines for the diagnosis and management of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will make an assessment of the knowledge of mould sickness among doctors, and what steps he plans to take to improve the diagnosis of mould sickness.

Public Health England published a review in 2019 on bioaerosols, which include mould, related to composting and intensive farming, and their potential effects on the health of those living nearby. This followed two other reviews published in 2018.

NHS England is aware of how damp and mould can lead to respiratory problems, infections, allergies, asthma and affect the immune system. Aspergillus is a group of moulds common in the home. Most people are naturally immune and do not develop disease caused by Aspergillus. The European Respiratory Society have produced guidelines for the diagnosis and management of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of whether personal protective equipment used in the NHS has been made by forced labour in the Xinjaing province of China.

Detailed Government guidance is provided to public sector contracting authorities on how to assess and mitigate the risks of modern slavery in procurement. Contracts routinely include clauses requiring Good Industry Practice to ensure that there is no slavery or human trafficking in supply chains. In the event that allegations of modern slavery are substantiated in relation to a supplier, we will consider all available options.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many soliped and equidae were slaughtered for meat in UK abattoirs in each month of 2020.

The Food Standards Agency holds the following data. For each month of 2020 the following numbers of soliped and equidae were slaughtered for meat in United Kingdom abattoirs:

Month / Year

Numbers (Throughput)

January 2020

53

February 2020

123

March 2020

183

April 2020

107

May 2020

112

June 2020

65

July 2020

95

August 2020

105

Note: Numbers are recorded under one heading of ‘soliped’.

No soliped or equidae were slaughtered in Northern Ireland in 2020.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many horses slaughtered in UK abattoirs in (a) 2018, (b) 2019 and (c) 2020 held horse passports issued by Weatherbys passport issuing agencies.

We are unable to provide the information requested as it is commercially sensitive.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many soliped and equidae were slaughtered at each abattoir licensed to slaughter horses in 2019.

The Food Standards Agency holds the following data.

In 2019, the numbers of soliped and equidae slaughtered at each abattoir licensed to slaughter horses was 2,146 and 24, totalling 2,170.

Notes: Numbers are recorded under one heading of ‘soliped’. No soliped or equidae were slaughtered in Northern Ireland in 2019.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of GP practices who have adopted the care for young carers package launched by NHS England.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer the then Minister of State for Care (Caroline Dinenage MP) gave to the hon. Member for Strangford (Jim Shannon MP) on 4 February 2020 to Question 8280.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many schools have mental health teams.

Our Green Paper on children and young people’s mental health aims to improve the provision of services in England. One of the key proposals of the Green Paper is to create new Mental Health Support Teams in and near groups of schools and colleges in their areas.

In December 2018, we announced 25 Trailblazer sites to run the first wave of 59 Mental Health Support Teams.

Initial estimates suggested that each of these teams should be working with 15-20 education settings, though this will vary depending on the number of pupils in each setting. We are collecting data as Mental Health Support Teams are established and will confirm the number of education settings they are working with once that process is complete.

21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress he has made in improving access to specialist mental health support for children.

We have introduced two waiting times: for 95% of children (up to 19 years old) with eating disorders to receive treatment within a week for urgent cases and four weeks for routine cases, and for 50% of patients of all ages experiencing a first episode of psychosis to receive treatment within two weeks of referral. We are on target to meet these aims.

Our Children and Young People’s Green Paper sets out how we plan are piloting a four-week waiting time to improve access to services and are introducing new Mental Health Support Teams. In December 2018, we announced Trailblazer sites to test our Green Paper proposals. Twelve of these sites will trial four-week waiting times.

We have also committed at least a further £2.3 billion a year to mental health services by 2023/24. The NHS Long Term Plan and Mental Health Support Teams will see at least an additional 345,000 children and young people aged 0-25 will be able to access support by 2023/24.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the future of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA) is the best, and currently only, way to monitor and constrain Iran's nuclear programme. But Iran's continued systematic non-compliance with its JCPoA commitments is undermining the non-proliferation benefits of the deal and jeopardising our efforts to preserve it. In his call with President Rouhani on 10 March, the Prime Minister stressed that while the UK remains committed to making the JCPoA a success, Iran must stop all nuclear activity that breaches the terms of the deal and come back into compliance.

We are particularly concerned by Iran's announcement on 16 April that it has started uranium enrichment up to 60% using advanced centrifuges. As the E3 said in a statement on 14 April, the production of highly enriched uranium constitutes an important step in the production of a nuclear weapon. Iran has no credible civilian need for enrichment at this level.

We continue to work with the parties to the JCPoA and the new US Administration to find a diplomatic way forward that realises the benefits of the deal, and call upon Iran not to take any further steps which violate its JCPoA commitments and make a return to mutual compliance harder to achieve.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to support the creation of the International Fund for Israeli-Palestinian Peace.

The UK remains committed to making progress towards a two-state solution. We support the objectives of the International Fund for Israeli-Palestinian Peace and continue to engage with the Alliance for Middle East Peace and Biden administration to discuss the Fund's development.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he has taken to help tackle religious persecution and gender based violence of Christian women in countries around the world.

The UK is committed to defending freedom of religion or belief for all. We recognise that women and girls from religious minorities can often suffer because of both their gender and their faith. That is why we ensure our human rights policy work considers the intersectionality of human rights, including the importance of addressing the specific vulnerabilities experienced by women and girls from religious minority communities.

The UK is recognised as a global leader in tackling violence against women and girls (VAWG) in all its forms, by pioneering approaches around the world that have shown that VAWG is preventable. In the DRC, a project with faith leaders and community action groups halved women's experience of intimate partner violence from 69% to 29%. Preventing and responding to conflict-related sexual violence remains a top priority for the FCDO. In November, the Prime Minister's Special Representative on Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon, launched the Declaration of Humanity by faith and belief leaders which calls for the prevention of sexual violence in conflict and denounces the stigma faced by survivors, including by children born of rape. Through UK Aid Connect, FCDO has supported the Creid programme (managed by the Institute of Development Studies) to work with women from religious minorities in five countries in Africa and Asia to understand the problems they face and identify effective approaches to tackle these issues.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to support and counsel persecuted Christian women who are stigmatised by sexual violence overseas.

The UK is committed to defending freedom of religion or belief for all. We recognise that women and girls from religious minorities can often suffer because of both their gender and their faith. That is why we ensure our human rights policy work considers the intersectionality of human rights, including the importance of addressing the specific vulnerabilities experienced by women and girls from religious minority communities.

The UK is recognised as a global leader in tackling violence against women and girls (VAWG) in all its forms, by pioneering approaches around the world that have shown that VAWG is preventable. In the DRC, a project with faith leaders and community action groups halved women's experience of intimate partner violence from 69% to 29%. Preventing and responding to conflict-related sexual violence remains a top priority for the FCDO. In November, Lord Ahmad launched the Declaration of Humanity by faith and belief leaders which calls for the prevention of sexual violence in conflict and denounces the stigma faced by survivors, including by children born of rape. Through UK Aid Connect, FCDO has supported the Creid programme (managed by the Institute of Development Studies) to work with women from religious minorities in five countries in Africa and Asia to understand the problems they face and identify effective approaches to tackle these issues.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment his Department has made of trends in the level of gender-specific religious persecution of women from religious minorities abroad.

The UK is committed to defending freedom of religion or belief for all. We recognise that women and girls from religious minorities can often suffer because of both their gender and their faith. That is why we ensure our human rights policy work considers the intersectionality of human rights, including the importance of addressing the specific vulnerabilities experienced by women and girls from religious minority communities.

The UK is recognised as a global leader in tackling violence against women and girls (VAWG) in all its forms, by pioneering approaches around the world that have shown that VAWG is preventable. In the DRC, a project with faith leaders and community action groups halved women's experience of intimate partner violence from 69% to 29%. Preventing and responding to conflict-related sexual violence remains a top priority for the FCDO. In November, the Prime Minister's Special Representative on Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon, launched the Declaration of Humanity by faith and belief leaders which calls for the prevention of sexual violence in conflict and denounces the stigma faced by survivors, including by children born of rape. Through UK Aid Connect, FCDO has supported the Creid programme (managed by the Institute of Development Studies) to work with women from religious minorities in five countries in Africa and Asia to understand the problems they face and identify effective approaches to tackle these issues.

3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on potential sanctions on the people responsible for human rights abuses against Uyghurs in China.

On 6 July, the UK Government established the Global Human Rights sanctions regime. It is not appropriate to speculate who may be designated in the future, as to do so could reduce the impact of the designations. We will keep all evidence and potential listings under close review.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what diplomatic steps he is taking to support independent (a) tribunals and (b) assessments on China's treatment of its Uyghur population.

We have serious concerns about gross violations of human rights occurring in Xinjiang and welcome any additional analysis on the situation in Xinjiang that is rigorous, balanced and raises awareness of the situation faced by Uyghurs and other minorities in China. At the UN Human Rights Council and UN Third Committee, the UK has repeatedly used both its national statements and joint statements with international partners to call on China to grant unfettered access to Xinjiang for UN experts and observers, including the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. We did so alongside 38 countries at the UN Third Committee on 6 October.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations he has made to the Chinese Government on allowing Human Rights Monitors access to Xinjiang's camps.

The UK is deeply concerned about the gross human rights violations taking place in Xinjiang. The Foreign Secretary reiterated the UK's longstanding calls for China to allow unfettered access to Xinjiang for independent experts, including the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Xinjiang directly with his Chinese counterpart in July. We have also repeatedly called on China to allow UN experts unfettered access to Xinjiang at the UN, including in a recent joint statement with 38 other countries at the UN Third Committee on 6 October.

21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether the UK will continue to take part in the EU monitoring mission in Georgia after leaving the EU on 31 January 2020.

The United Kingdom currently has six secondees in the EU Monitoring Mission (EUMM) in Georgia. Whilst the Withdrawal Agreement provides for continued British participation in the EU Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) operations and missions during the transition period, all six will leave the mission when their current contracts come to an end on 31 January. This follows decisions taken by the European External Action Service (EEAS) to meet the operational needs and ensure the business continuity of the mission.

The United Kingdom is proud to have contributed personnel to EUMM Georgia since its inception in 2008, and we continue to support the objectives of the mission.

12th Mar 2024
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will announce a timeline for a decision on whether additional measures will be introduced to further support mortgage prisoners.

The Government understands that being unable to switch your mortgage can be extremely stressful. Alongside the Financial Conduct Authority and industry, we have shown we are willing to act through the introduction of a ‘modified affordability assessment’, which removes the regulatory barriers that prevented some customers, who otherwise may have been able to switch, from accessing new products. We are also regularly in contact with key stakeholders, including recently with the UK Mortgage Prisoners campaign group.

The Government remains committed to this issue and will continue to work with industry and wider stakeholders to determine if there are proposals that will meaningly benefit affected borrowers and be fair to other borrowers in the wider market.

Bim Afolami
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Jun 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Financial Conduct Authority's Mortgage Prisoner Review published on 29 November 2021, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the findings of that report.

In November 2021, I laid before Parliament a review on the issue of mortgage prisoners conducted by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). This review found that there are 47,000 mortgage prisoners who might benefit from switching to a new mortgage deal but are considered too high risk to do so, despite being up to date with payments.

The review makes clear that the reasons mortgage prisoners are unable to switch are complex and varied, including a high proportion of interest-only mortgage borrowers with no clear repayment plan and pre-financial crisis legacy issues such as borrowers self-certifying their income on their loan applications. A comprehensive understanding of the circumstances of mortgage prisoners is therefore crucial in progressing work and the FCA’s review provides the key insight necessary to facilitate this. Following this and previous interventions to help borrowers switch, the Government is working with industry to determine if any further solutions that can be found to help mortgage prisoners.

This further work must consider the practicality of solutions and their effects on the wider mortgage market, including the resilience of firms and fairness to other borrowers. A cap on the Standard Variable Rates (SVRs) charged by inactive firms would be an unprecedented market intervention and would undermine the principle of risk-based pricing which underlies the mortgage market. It would entail risks to the financial stability of firms which would be unable to vary their rates in line with their costs of funding and would be deeply unfair to borrowers in the wider mortgage market who pay similar rates to mortgage prisoners. It is worth noting that the SVRs charged by inactive firms are in line with those paid by borrowers in the active market.

The Government continues to examine what further practical and proportionate solutions existing to help mortgage prisoners which do not pose unacceptable financial stability risks or are unfair to other borrowers in the mortgage market.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
29th Jun 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to cap standard variable mortgage rates for inactive lenders to protect people who cannot move their mortgages.

In November 2021, I laid before Parliament a review on the issue of mortgage prisoners conducted by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). This review found that there are 47,000 mortgage prisoners who might benefit from switching to a new mortgage deal but are considered too high risk to do so, despite being up to date with payments.

The review makes clear that the reasons mortgage prisoners are unable to switch are complex and varied, including a high proportion of interest-only mortgage borrowers with no clear repayment plan and pre-financial crisis legacy issues such as borrowers self-certifying their income on their loan applications. A comprehensive understanding of the circumstances of mortgage prisoners is therefore crucial in progressing work and the FCA’s review provides the key insight necessary to facilitate this. Following this and previous interventions to help borrowers switch, the Government is working with industry to determine if any further solutions that can be found to help mortgage prisoners.

This further work must consider the practicality of solutions and their effects on the wider mortgage market, including the resilience of firms and fairness to other borrowers. A cap on the Standard Variable Rates (SVRs) charged by inactive firms would be an unprecedented market intervention and would undermine the principle of risk-based pricing which underlies the mortgage market. It would entail risks to the financial stability of firms which would be unable to vary their rates in line with their costs of funding and would be deeply unfair to borrowers in the wider mortgage market who pay similar rates to mortgage prisoners. It is worth noting that the SVRs charged by inactive firms are in line with those paid by borrowers in the active market.

The Government continues to examine what further practical and proportionate solutions existing to help mortgage prisoners which do not pose unacceptable financial stability risks or are unfair to other borrowers in the mortgage market.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office