Madeleine Moon Portrait

Madeleine Moon

Labour - Former Member for Bridgend

Defence Sub-Committee
12th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Defence Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Panel of Chairs
22nd Jun 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Defence Sub-Committee
8th Sep 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Defence Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Panel of Chairs
25th Jun 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Defence Committee
19th Jan 2009 - 30th Mar 2015
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 6th Nov 2007
Welsh Affairs Committee
17th Jul 2005 - 6th Mar 2006


Division Voting information

Madeleine Moon has voted in 2057 divisions, and 10 times against the majority of their Party.

27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Madeleine Moon voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 42 Labour No votes vs 143 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 188 Noes - 283
8 Feb 2017 - European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Madeleine Moon voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Labour No votes vs 163 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 496 Noes - 111
8 Feb 2017 - European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Madeleine Moon voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 52 Labour No votes vs 161 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 494 Noes - 122
1 Feb 2017 - European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Madeleine Moon voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 47 Labour No votes vs 166 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 498 Noes - 114
11 Sep 2015 - Assisted Dying (No. 2) Bill - View Vote Context
Madeleine Moon voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 73 Labour Aye votes vs 91 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 118 Noes - 330
28 Apr 2014 - High Speed Rail (London – West Midlands) Bill - View Vote Context
Madeleine Moon voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Labour Aye votes vs 185 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 50 Noes - 451
10 Jul 2012 - House of Lords Reform Bill - View Vote Context
Madeleine Moon voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Labour No votes vs 201 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 462 Noes - 124
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Madeleine Moon voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Labour No votes vs 50 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 203 Noes - 82
15 Jun 2010 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Madeleine Moon voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Labour Aye votes vs 57 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 171 Noes - 263
17 Oct 2006 - Gambling Act 2005 (Amendment) - View Vote Context
Madeleine Moon voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 46 Labour No votes vs 49 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 240
View All Madeleine Moon Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all Madeleine Moon's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Madeleine Moon

23rd January 2019
Madeleine Moon signed this EDM on Wednesday 23rd January 2019

PARENTAL RIGHTS OF CONVICTED RAPISTS

Tabled by: Louise Haigh (Labour - Sheffield, Heeley)
That this House notes the case of Sammy Woodhouse, in which a man convicted of rape and serving a 35-year prison sentence was notified of family court proceedings for the child he fathered as a result of the rape; further notes that the man had no parental responsibilities for the …
97 signatures
(Most recent: 23 Apr 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 70
Conservative: 9
Scottish National Party: 5
Liberal Democrat: 4
Independent: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Green Party: 1
Crossbench: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
10th October 2017
Madeleine Moon signed this EDM on Monday 16th October 2017

VAT ON COMMUNITY PUBLIC ACCESS DEFIBRILLATORS

Tabled by: Thelma Walker (Labour - Colne Valley)
That this House notes that VAT of 20 per cent is charged on community public access defibrillators and the secure cabinet in which they are housed; further notes that more than 30,000 people a year have a cardiac arrest in a non-hospital location; observes that from cardiac arrest there is …
53 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Jan 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 31
Scottish National Party: 10
Independent: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Liberal Democrat: 2
The Independent Group for Change: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Madeleine Moon's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Madeleine Moon, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Madeleine Moon has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Madeleine Moon has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Madeleine Moon


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the definition of terminal illness in the Welfare Reform Act 2012; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 18th July 2018
(Read Debate)

1072 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
9 Other Department Questions
23rd Nov 2015
To ask the Prime Minister, (a) whether the RAF Voyager aircraft being refitted for ministerial travel has been leased to the Government, (b) what the capacity of that aircraft was before it was refitted and (c) what the cost of Prime Ministerial air travel has been since 2010; and if he will make a statement.

Details about the RAF Voyager aircraft being refitted for ministerial travel can be found on page 32, section 4.49, of the National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015, copies of which are available in the Vote Office.

Details about Ministerial overseas travel are published on a quarterly basis and can be accessed via gov.uk website.

9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what assessment she has made of the effect on carbon emissions of the reduction on feed-in tariffs; and if she will make a statement.

In order to meet the 2050 target, we know we will need significant cuts in emissions across all parts of the economy.

This will not depend on any single technology, but rather will need a balanced mix of low carbon technologies, including nuclear, renewables, and carbon capture and storage (CCS) in order to help tackle the threat of climate change while keeping the lights on and ensuring the best value for consumers.

The feed-in tariff scheme has been extremely successful in deploying small-scale renewables. The scheme has already exceeded our 2020/21 projections for hydro, wind, and anaerobic digestion and is within the projected range for solar PV. Given this, alongside the risk of rising costs to consumers, it is right to consider cost control measures.

17th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, whether Government funding or subsidy has been offered or promised to Suncredit UK Ltd to develop a solar park at Court Colman, Bridgend; and if she will make a statement.

The Government mechanisms for incentivising deployment of renewable electricity are generation-based. This means that support is granted on the basis of each megawatt-hour of electricity actually generated by stations which qualify for accreditation under a scheme or which secure a contract for difference (CfD) to provide support. No scheme offers financial support for the development of generating stations.

3rd Mar 2015
To ask the Prime Minister, on what occasions he visited Bridgend constituency between May 2010 and February 2015.

Details of my visits within the United Kingdom are published on the gov.uk website.

20th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, whether the final recipient of Restoration Lump Sum was (a) private companies or (b) the public purse.

The British Coal Corporation operated a practice whereby it retained a portion of sums payable to those private sector firms it contracted to operate surface mining sites on its behalf. On a site by site basis, those formed lump sums which were progressively paid to the contractor for the purposes of funding restoration.

15th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what tonnage of coal was extracted from Parc Slip Opencast site in Mid-Glamorgan in each year since 1985; what levy was imposed in each of those years; and if he will make a statement.

The original Parc Slip site was worked by British Coal and had been completed before The Coal Authority existed.

The National Archive hold files from the National Coal Board and British Coal Corporation Production Department and its successors which include breakdowns of production by the Corporation - http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/record?catid=3748&catln=3

We have been able to obtain, from The Coal Authority, figures for Parc Slip West opencast site which started operations in 1996.

The annual figures are shown below:

Calendar Year

Production

(tonnes)

1996

100,948

1997

301,458

1998

345,517

1999

390,563

2000

330,909

2001

371,416

2002

276,186

2003

227,427

No royalties were taken on the Parc Slip West site.

12th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, whether the £2 per ton levied by the Coal Board for restoration on every ton of coal sold prior to the privatisation of the coal industry was paid to his Department; and if he will make a statement.

Prior to its sale to private sector purchasers in 1994, the British Coal Corporation was empowered (pursuant to the Coal Industry Nationalisation Act 1946) to license the activities of small-scale, private mining operators and to levy a rent on those operators’ production. Such rents, which varied over time, were a payment for the resource rather than a reserve for subsequent restoration, and it is my understanding that the income they represented was offset against the Corporation’s operating expenditure.

To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what the electoral registration figures were in each ward in the recent confirmation dry run conducted in Bridgend County Borough Council; and if he will make a statement.

The Electoral Commission informs me that the confirmation dry run involved matching all entries on the electoral registers against the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) Customer Information System database. Entries would be marked as green if they matched with DWP, amber if they were a partial match or red if there was no match.

The ward results for Bridgend County Borough Council were as shown in the following table:


Results for all wards are available on the Commission's website here: http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/__data/assets/excel_doc/0003/163146/Confirmation-dry-run-2013-Results-Wards.xls


The Electoral Commission also produced a report analysing the results of the Confirmation Dry Run Process, which can be found on its website here: http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/163144/Confirmation-Dry-run-2013-Results-report.pdf

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Attorney General, how many members of staff have left the Law Officers' Departments since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

The following number of staff left the Attorney General’s Office (AGO), Government Legal Department (GLD) and HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI) during the period 1 January 2015 to 30 November 2017:

Attorney General’s Office 41

Government Legal Department 543

HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate 18

Of these 602 moves, 266 were to other government departments.

During the period 1 January 2015 to 13 December 2017, 1,429 employees left the CPS.

The number of staff who have left the SFO since 2015 is as follows:

2015 72

2016 72

2017 64

The recording of nationality information within the AGO, GLD and HMCPSI is the responsibility of the individual to input via employee self-service. The information held relating to the above 602 moves is as follows:

  • British 385

  • No declaration 205

  • Irish 2 (taken to be Republic of Ireland as Northern Irish is a separate option)

  • Other nationality 10 (the data held does not distinguish between EU and non-EU)

The CPS acts in accordance with guidance on the handling of this information and does not keep certificate information for any longer than is necessary once a recruitment (or other relevant) decision has been made. This is generally for a period of up to six months, to allow for the consideration and resolution of any disputes or complaints. The CPS is unable to confirm therefore how many of those members of staff who left during this period were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

As there is no legal requirement for employers to keep records on the nationality of staff, the SFO does not collate information on how many of these individuals were non-UK EU nationals.

17th Jul 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to tackle third party websites from posing as Government entities.

Government organisations work collaboratively to address misleading websites. Websites that directly attempt to defraud users (for example, by copying government design and logos) are tackled directly and taken down.

Sites can be challenged through the company that sold them the web address, or through organisations that administer the web address system. Government may also pursue site owners through trading standards bodies or through direct legal challenge.

Some sites are able to operate within legal boundaries (for example, by displaying disclaimers on their sites). In these cases, government works to optimise government sites for indexing by search engines so they are easy to find. Where identified, we challenge sites that pay for prominent positioning in search returns by reporting them to the search provider.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
27th Jun 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of striking a medal for humanitarian service; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is committed to consideration of how best to recognise humanitarian service in a range of ways, including existing honours and medals and as part of wider
developments in medallic recognition. Examples include the announcement in 2015 of the Ebola Medal, which recognised people from both military and civilian organisations for
their brave service to assist communities in West Africa. This new medal was announced alongside existing honours in the Orders of St. Michael and St. George and the Order of
the British Empire for people whose contribution to tackling the crisis was part of well-established outstanding service.

Recommendations for new medals are made to HM The Queen by the Committee on the Grant of Honours, Decorations and Medals.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will undertake a review of the requirement for EU citizens to fill in a UC1 or EC6 form in order to participate in the 2019 European elections.

It is the Government's intention to respect the 2016 referendum result and leave the European Union with a deal as soon as possible, meaning we will not participate in future European Parliamentary elections.

The Electoral Commission will produce a review at the recent European Elections and the Government will consider its conclusions.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the information communicated to EU citizens on the requirement for them to fill in a UC1 or EC6 form in order to participate in the 2019 European elections.

The Government took all the legal steps necessary to prepare for the European Parliamentary
elections and put in place all the necessary legislative and funding elements to enable Returning
Officers to make their preparations required for the polls on 23 May

Electoral Registration Officers (EROs) are under a statutory duty to ensure people who are eligible
to vote in elections have the opportunity to do so. For the recent European Parliamentary elections
that included making sure relevant citizens of the EU who are resident in the UK and registered to
vote in local elections were made aware they needed to complete a voter registration and
declaration form (commonly referred to as a UC1 or EC6 form) in order to enable them to vote

The Electoral Commission supported EROs in the discharge of this function and encouraged them
to take additional steps to raise awareness of this requirement locally, through social media
channels and other means.

The Electoral Commission supported EROs in the discharge of this function. It issued guidance on
the 4th April which recommended that EROs should identify EU citizens who are on the local
government register and send them a declaration form and supporting information explaining how
they can declare their intent to vote in these elections in the UK should they wish to.

In line with their statutory duty, the Electoral Commission will be publishing a report into the
administration of the polls later this year.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will launch an inquiry into why some EU citizens were prevented from voting in the 2019 European elections.

The Government took all the legal steps necessary to prepare for the European Parliamentary elections and put in place all the legislative and funding elements to enable Returning Officers to make their preparations required for the polls.

In line with their statutory duty, the Electoral Commission will be publishing a report into the administration of the polls later this year, which the Government will carefully consider in due course.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department took to ensure that local authorities communicated with EU citizens on the need to fill in a UC1 or EC6 form in order to participate in the 2019 European elections.

The Government took all the legal steps necessary to prepare for the European Parliamentary
elections and put in place all the necessary legislative and funding elements to enable Returning
Officers to make their preparations required for the polls on 23 May

Electoral Registration Officers (EROs) are under a statutory duty to ensure people who are eligible
to vote in elections have the opportunity to do so. For the recent European Parliamentary elections
that included making sure relevant citizens of the EU who are resident in the UK and registered to
vote in local elections were made aware they needed to complete a voter registration and
declaration form (commonly referred to as a UC1 or EC6 form) in order to enable them to vote

The Electoral Commission supported EROs in the discharge of this function and encouraged them
to take additional steps to raise awareness of this requirement locally, through social media
channels and other means.

The Electoral Commission supported EROs in the discharge of this function. It issued guidance on
the 4th April which recommended that EROs should identify EU citizens who are on the local
government register and send them a declaration form and supporting information explaining how
they can declare their intent to vote in these elections in the UK should they wish to.

In line with their statutory duty, the Electoral Commission will be publishing a report into the
administration of the polls later this year.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
23rd Jul 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make it his policy to launch a public consultation on civil service pay guidance.

The Cabinet Office does not have any plans to hold a public consultation on any elements of the civil service pay remit guidance.

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and I met with the General Secretaries of the FDA, Prospect and PCS trade unions on 27 June to discuss the Civil Service pay guidance, which was published on 25 June.

In my capacity as the Minister with responsibility for Civil Service HR, including trade unions, I previously met with the General Secretaries of the FDA and Prospect on the 22 February 2018, and with the PCS General Secretary, on the 27th February 2018.

Cabinet office officials regularly meet with trade union representatives to discuss a range of workforce issues, including pay.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
23rd Jul 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent discussions he has had with trades unions on the civil service pay guidance.

The Cabinet Office does not have any plans to hold a public consultation on any elements of the civil service pay remit guidance.

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and I met with the General Secretaries of the FDA, Prospect and PCS trade unions on 27 June to discuss the Civil Service pay guidance, which was published on 25 June.

In my capacity as the Minister with responsibility for Civil Service HR, including trade unions, I previously met with the General Secretaries of the FDA and Prospect on the 22 February 2018, and with the PCS General Secretary, on the 27th February 2018.

Cabinet office officials regularly meet with trade union representatives to discuss a range of workforce issues, including pay.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
6th Dec 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many members of staff have left his Department since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

I can confirm that since 1 January 2015, 2,115 staff have left my Department (of which 59% was inter-Civil Service movement).

The Civil Service does not routinely collect information on the nationality of civil servants. The information requested is not held.

10th Jan 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the (a) entry level and (b) top level annual salary for the grade of Higher Executive Officer is in each government department; and if he will make a statement.

Remuneration for all grades below Senior Civil Service, including that of Higher Executive Officer, is delegated to each individual department.

6th Jan 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to reply to the letter of 17 October 2016 from the hon. Member for Bridgend on the Gulf Strategy Unit.

I responded to the hon. Member on 20 December 2016.

17th Dec 2014
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the responsibilities are for dealing with civil emergencies of each of the devolved administrations; and if he will make a statement.

The primary responsibility for emergency planning in the UK sits with local responders who form the basic building block of the response to most emergencies.

Where an emergency occurs in Scotland, Wales, or Northern Ireland and falls within the competence of the relevant devolved administration, they will lead the response in their territory reporting through the relevant minister to the devolved legislature.

The relevant UK central government territorial department will usually be the first point of contact with the relevant devolved administration.

Where an emergency occurs in Scotland, Wales, or Northern Ireland but competence lies with the UK Parliament, the relevant UK government department will lead the response, liaising closely with the affected devolved administration(s) as appropriate.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will hold discussions with representatives of Ford UK on that company meeting 50 per cent of the tax deductions from redundancy payments to workers at Ford Bridgend; and if he will make a statement.

The terms of the separation packages for Ford Bridgend Engine plant workers have only recently been communicated by the company.

Ford has indicated that they will seek to avoid compulsory redundancies. They have also stated that they will be offering generous voluntary redundancy packages and options for redeployment.

United Kingdom Government and Welsh Government are working together to support Ford workers and the local community.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
7th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 8 April 2019 to Question 239920, when his Department plans to publish its response to the consultation on proposed changes to the Furniture and Furnishings (Fire) (Safety) Regulations 1988; and if he will make a statement.

The Department will publish its response to the 2016 consultation in due course.

This is a complex issue and it is absolutely vital that the Government gets this right: we are committed to reviewing these regulations to ensure that the highest levels of fire safety are maintained while minimising risks to health and the environment.

2nd Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish its response to the consultation on updating the Furniture and Furnishings (Fire) (Safety) Regulations 1988; and if he will make a statement.

The Department will publish its response to the consultation in due course.

This will take account of the responses received from the consultation, the views of experts from across government including the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Public Health England, the Food Standards Agency and the Fire Services, as well as a range of evidence from external sources such as academic papers.

The Government considers the safety of consumers to be a priority, and consumers should have confidence that the products in their homes are produced to rigorous safety requirements.

26th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has taken steps to support the Green Alliance’s Community Energy Manifesto; and if he will make a statement.

I am really impressed by the work community groups up and down the United Kingdom are already doing to help their wider communities decarbonise and get involved in this transition.

In the Clean Growth Strategy, I announced the creation of a Local Energy Contact Group and a Local Energy Programme. The Contact group made up of communities, local authorities and local enterprise partnerships and provides local insight for policy teams across BEIS.

The Local Energy Programme has funded Local Energy Strategies in every Local Enterprise Partnership. These strategies will feed into the newly developed Local Energy Hubs, also funded by BEIS to create capacity and capability to help Local Authorities deliver low carbon energy projects at scale.

I have brought the Rural Community Energy Fund into my department to allow it to integrate better with the other work we are doing on heat and local ownership. Together with the Local Energy Programme, that will be almost £20m committed by this Government to support local energy in the last three years. Alongside this we have launched Prospering from the Energy Revolution, a £100m innovation fund designed to support local areas demonstrate future integrated energy systems.

This funding will unlock commercial investment in our local energy system and following a successful national Local Green finance event in Leeds in January, we will be supporting five regional events this summer to bring investors and local projects together.

The Government has a clear vision for an energy system which fairly rewards flexibility for the value it provides to the system.

We have set out in our The Smart Systems & Flexibility Plan, and in the Progress Update in October 2018, a number of actions to open up markets to distribution-connected flexibility, including community energy groups. We are also consulting on a range of changes to the energy market which offer communities a chance to have their say, and ensuring consumers are at the heart of the future energy system.

8th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 January 2019 to Question 210560, when his Department will publish its review of the provisions for parents of premature babies and sick babies; and if he will make a statement.

The review of provisions for parents of premature, sick and multiple babies is being carried out by officials in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy to enable them to provide advice to Ministers. We have no plans to publish this advice but I look forward to discussing the conclusions we reach with interested parties in due course.

9th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the effect of removing the export tariff on the number of solar installations.

As part of the consultation published in July on our proposal to close the Feed-in Tariff export tariff from 1 April 2019, we included an impact assessment:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/feed-in-tariffs-scheme.

We are currently considering the responses to this and will publish a government response in due course. This will include an updated impact assessment.

17th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to work with his counterparts from other countries to ensure that global temperatures do not exceed 1.5 degrees C.

One hundred and eighty one of the 197 parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) have now ratified the Paris Agreement, and I am proud that the UK is one of them. The UK is fully committed to working with other countries to achieve the Paris Agreement goals including limiting global average temperature increase to well below 2°C and pursuing efforts to limit warming to 1.5°C. We are actively involved in the UNFCCC negotiations and are fully committed to finalising the rulebook that will underpin the Paris Agreement at COP24 this December. We drive the work of several progressive groups, comprising developed and developing countries, such as the High Ambition Coalition. We are one of the largest contributors of international climate finance, helping developing countries mitigate and adapt to climate change through coalitions and partnerships, and we will spend at least £5.8bn on this between 2016 and 2020. Additionally, we are promoting global alliances to encourage clean growth, such as the Powering Past Coal Alliance, to reduce emissions from the most polluting fuel, which I launched last year, and which now has over 70 members. We are also working to build on the progress made at the UK Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Summit, hosted by the Prime Minister in September 2018, to help the development of the ZEV market around the world and tackle carbon emissions. The UK is also showing leadership through domestic action, between 1990 and 2017 we have reduced our emissions by 43% whilst growing our economy by 71%, demonstrating that it is possible to grow your economy while reducing emissions.

2nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he will enable (a) onshore wind and (b) solar technologies to compete in the Contract for Difference mechanism.

No decisions have been taken on future Contract for Difference allocation rounds for established technologies.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many members of staff have left his Department since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

Since April 1 2017, when data is available for BEIS, 280 members of staff have left the Department. The nationalities of staff that leave is not collated and to do so would incur disproportionate costs.

27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Answer of 24 April 2017 to Question 70328, when he plans to publish his Department's response to the final report of the Working Group on Product Recalls and Safety; and if he will make a statement.

The Working Group on Product Recalls and Safety submitted its final report in April 2017. I had intended to publish the report then, but the announcement of the General Election prevented me from doing so.

Following the Grenfell Tower fire tragedy, I asked the Working Group to urgently review their findings and their report has been published today.

I have also asked the Working Group to look at further potential areas of product safety and recalls where action might be required, in light of the tragic events at Grenfell Tower.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he expects the final report of the Working Group on Product Recalls and Safety to be published; and if he will place a copy of that report in the Library.

We have now received the report produced by the Working Group on Product Recalls and Safety which was set up by the Department to develop options to improve the safety of white goods and the recall system. We are considering the recommendations made by the Group, and are continuing to engage with them on their progress on activity aimed at improving the recall process. We expect to publish the report on the Product Safety page of gov.uk in due course and will place a copy in the Libraries of both Houses.

29th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether a review has been carried out of the environmental impact assessment of the Swansea Bay tidal lagoon; and if he will make a statement.

In taking the decision to grant development consent for the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon in June 2015, my right hon. Friend the then Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change considered and reviewed the environmental impact assessment for the project. The Secretary of State's consideration was informed by the Planning Inspectorate`s Report on the application for development consent and other relevant information, including environmental information provided by the developer and other parties.

28th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether (a) a lease has been granted from the Crown Estates for the development of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon and (b) contracts for four different strike prices have been received; and if he will make a statement.

In respect of (a) the responsibility for deciding whether to grant a lease rests with the Crown Estate and not the Department. We understand that discussions are ongoing but as yet a lease has not been granted. In respect of (b) the Contract for Difference negotiations are commercially sensitive and it is not appropriate for us to comment on the proposals that have been received.

28th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether a marine licence has been granted for the proposed development of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon.

We understand that Natural Resource Wales are currently examining the developer’s marine licence application.

28th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will provide research funding for an assessment of the potential effect of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon on 10 year fishing spawning cycles; and if he will make a statement.

The Department considers funding for a range of research activities and is carefully considering the recommendations contained in Charles Hendry’s recent report on tidal lagoons.

Any decisions arising from the Review, including whether to proceed with the Swansea Bay project, will need to balance the priorities of security of supply, affordability and meeting our climate change obligations.

We understand that Natural Resources Wales are currently examining the developer’s marine licence application.

28th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of alternative forms of tidal energy generation; what the result of the modelling of those alternatives was; what assessment was made of the effect of each such alternative on (a) coastal erosion and (b) sediment build-up; and if he will make a statement.

In 2010, the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) published its feasibility assessment of a scheme to generate electricity from the tides of the Severn estuary. It found that, since the Severn estuary is highly dynamic, and without detailed information on specific projects, it was impossible to predict the impacts of the tidal power schemes surveyed with absolute certainty.

Environmental impacts, along with other relevant matters, would be considered as part of the relevant statutory planning processes when consent applications for tidal energy generation projects are submitted.

16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to introduce independent regulation of the media to protect individuals from (a) invasive and (b) unethical journalism.

We have seen great improvements in press regulation with the formation of IPSO and Impress, which have the power to hold publications to account, including ordering prominent corrections. Both regulators are independent of government and enforce Codes of Practice, which include provisions on privacy and intrusion. They both operate free complaints handling systems and low cost arbitration schemes.

Ofcom, as the independent broadcast regulator, sets rules for broadcasters to meet in its Broadcasting Code. This includes rules ensuring that broadcasters avoid any unwarranted infringement of privacy in the making of programmes.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will introduce independent regulation of the media to protect people from invasive and unethical journalism.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to ensure that insurance companies request medical reports under the provisions of the Access to Medical Reports Act 1988 instead of Subject Access Requests under the General Data Protection Regulation.

If a solicitor is acting on behalf of an insurer and is seeking health information about a prospective customer, these are not subject access requests under the GDPR. Such requests should be made under the Access to Medical Records Act (AMRA) 1988 and standard charges apply.

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) is responsible for regulating compliance with data protection legislation and may consider taking action against insurance companies which fail to comply with the relevant legislation.

The ICO has updated its guidance on Subject Access Requests and this can be viewed on its website at www.ico.org.uk.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many members of staff have left her Department since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

Since 1 January 2015, 358 staff have left the department (of which 53% was inter-Civil Service movement).

The Civil Service does not routinely collect information on the nationality of civil servants. The information requested is not held.

10th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of DAB radio reception across Wales; what information his Department holds on which areas in Wales have poor DAB reception; what steps his Department has taken to improve poor reception in such areas; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is working with the radio industry to improve digital radio coverage for listeners across the UK. DCMS is providing up to £7.75m of capital funding to support investment made by commercial radio and supported by the BBC to expand the coverage local DAB network across the UK towards commercial FM equivalence. The programme will see a total of 182 new digital transmitters built across Wales, England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, and technical modifications and frequency changes at a further 49 existing transmitter sites across the UK by the end of September 2016. Wales,will receive around 9% of the total DCMS capital funding to improve the coverage of local DAB including BBC Radio Wales and BBC Radio Cymru.

Ofcom, the independent communications regulator has worked closely with the radio industry to develop a coverage plan for the local DAB network expansion to determine the most technically efficient way of matching DAB coverage levels to FM. Ofcom has published detailed maps outlining the improvements to local DAB network coverage for each of the local digital radio multiplex areas in Wales – i.e. Swansea, South East Wales, Mid & West Wales, North East Wales and West Cheshire and North West Wales - as a result of the local DAB expansion programme. These maps are available at the following web address http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/broadcasting/radio/coverage/dab-coverage-plans/

Ofcom’s analysis of local DAB coverage of households (percentage) in Wales is summarised in the following table.

Local DAB

Currently

(1% time interference)

Local DAB

predicted end of 2016

(1% time interference)

63%

85.4%

For comparison current figures for BBC national and commercial radio FM household coverage (percentage) in Wales are in the following table. These are not directly comparable to the DAB coverage figures, mainly because although it is possible to receive FM reception (albeit poor quality) with low signal strength, DAB reception is either good or completely absent.

BBC FM coverage (robust indoor -54dB)

Commercial FM coverage (robust indoor - 54dB)

87.1%

54.1%

22nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will provide The Share Foundation with support in identifying young people who would benefit from the Stepladder of Achievement programme; and if he will make a statement.

We recognise the importance of care leavers being well prepared to deal with the challenges of living independently at a young age, which includes having good budgeting skills. Care leavers have to be more independent and resilient than young people who live with their parents. My officials will contact the Share Foundation to discuss their request in more detail.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many members of staff have left her Department since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

1664 members of staff have left the department from 1 January 2015 to 30 November 2017.

The department does not hold nationality data for all staff. Evidence of nationality is checked at the point of recruitment into the Civil Service as part of wider pre-employment checks, but there is no requirement on departments to retain this information beyond the point at which it has served its purpose.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if her Department will be responsible for the administration of the 1918 Representation of the People commemoration fund; and if she will publish details on how organisations can apply for grants from that fund.

The government has set up a £5m fund to help celebrate this important occasion.

Officials in the Government Equalities Office are responsible for this fund. The funding will be available for projects in England, and details including application criteria will be announced in due course.

The Barnett formula has been applied to this funding in the usual way and it is for the devolved administrations, including the Welsh Government, to decide whether, and how, they choose to mark the centenary.

20th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to help ensure that local authorities have the resources to enforce the Animal Welfare Act 2006.

Under the Animal Welfare Act 2006, local authorities, in common with the Animal and Plant Health Agency and the police, have powers of entry to inspect complaints of suspected animal cruelty and take out prosecutions where necessary. Local authorities are able to make decisions based on local needs and the arrangements that work best for them, and it is for local authorities to determine how to prioritise their resources. The Government is investing in Britain’s future, and this year’s local government finance settlement includes extra funding for local services. Local authorities will have access to £46.4 billion this financial year (2019/20) to meet the needs of their residents. This is a cash increase of 2.8% and a real terms increase which will strengthen services and support for local communities.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking with the European Commission to tackle illegal seabass fishing activity from commercial fixed netters.

Under recovery measures for the bass stock, there is a general prohibition in EU legislation on fishing for bass, with a number of specific derogations allowing for limited bass landings from directed and by-catch fisheries. The current derogation for fixed gillnetters provides for a 1.2 tonne annual limit per vessel to allow for unavoidable by-catches of bass. This limit means landings of UK gillnetting bass catches are over 70% lower than pre-recovery measures levels.

I am aware of concerns being raised about targeting of bass under that unavoidable by-catch provision and at this year’s Fisheries Council on 17-18 December, we will be considering new management measures relating to seabass, including new proposals from the European Commission in relation to commercial fixed gillnets.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the operation of the UK-EU medical devices supply chain of the ongoing use of cobalt in UK-manufactured medical devices in the event that the UK is no longer subject to EU REACH regulations; and if he will make a statement.

To provide continuity for businesses in a no deal scenario, the EU Withdrawal Act copies EU legislation into UK law, including REACH, as far as possible. This means that the requirements established through these regulations will continue to apply in the UK. This includes retaining all exemptions that remain applicable, including chemicals used in medical products or equipment. By doing this we would minimise disruption to the supply in chemicals.

While it would not be appropriate to pre-judge the outcome of negotiations regarding the Future Economic Partnership, we will discuss with the EU and Member States how best to continue cooperation in chemicals regulation in the best interests of both the UK and the EU.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
10th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has plans to provide funding from the public purse to provide farmers with payments for fulfilling their legal duties to keep paths on their land clear after the UK leaves the EU.

In England, the cornerstone of future agriculture policy will be the payment of public money for environmental public goods. The Agriculture Bill includes public access in the list of purposes that the Secretary of State may pay for in the future. Paths that provide access to farmers’ land enable people to access and spend time in the natural environment. Infrastructure is required for recreational walking, cycling and horse-riding and providing access to greenspace and countryside for disabled people. This is important for maintaining and improving physical and mental health and wellbeing and therefore provides public benefits.

There are a number of requirements relating to Public Rights of Way that are currently set out in legislation across the UK. We expect land managers to comply with these regulatory obligations, irrespective of whether financial assistance is to be received or not. As we leave the EU we will be assessing how best to deliver outcomes, including through regulation, enforcement and incentives.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many members of staff have left his Department since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

Since January 2015, 1070 staff on the payroll have left Defra. Of those, the recorded number of staff that have left the department in the same period, where non-UK EU nationality is known, is 36.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 6 July 2017 to Question 1556, how many people have received the maximum six months imprisonment for the most serious cases of animal cruelty in each of the last five years.

The number of offenders sentenced to immediate custody for the maximum penalty for offences under Sections 4 to 8 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006, in England and Wales, from 2012 to 2016, can be viewed in the table below.

Defendants sentenced to the maximum penalty (1) for offences under selected sections of the Animal Welfare Act 2006, England and Wales, 2012 to 2016 (2)(3)

Section of Act

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

4

3

5

1

3

3

5

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

'-' = Nil

(1) Six months imprisonment

(2) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 4 July 2017 to Question 1761, when he plans to launch a consultation on further UK restrictions on the sale of ivory.

Bringing an end to elephant poaching is a priority for this government. We are currently considering next steps and will set these out in due course.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
5th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government plans for steps taken to meet the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive to continue after the UK leaves the EU; and if he will make a statement.

In the Queen’s speech 2017 it was announced that a Bill will be introduced to repeal the 1972 European Communities Act. The Bill is to provide certainty for individuals and businesses on leaving the EU by converting current EU law, including that transposing the Water Framework Directive, into UK law. This will ensure a smooth and orderly transition as well as retaining legislation that protects our environment.

We remain fully committed to delivering our manifesto commitment to be the first generation to leave the natural environment of England in a better state than we found it.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
5th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the likelihood of rivers in England and Wales meeting the 2027 EU Water Framework Directive deadline for good ecological status; and if he will make a statement.

Implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive within the UK is a devolved matter.

Updated River Basin Management Plans published in 2016 provide the framework for protecting and improving the water environment, and focus on the improvements for the period 2016 to 2021. The plans for England confirm over £3billion of investment by 2021, leading to improvements in at least 680 water bodies, including an overall target to enhance at least 8000 km of waters by 2021. The plans will be reviewed and updated in 2021 taking account of progress that has been made and the best evidence then on what can be achieved by 2027.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
20th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the merits of the National Farmer Union's application for the use of neonicotinoids.

The National Farmers’ Union (NFU) applied for authorisations to use two neonicotinoids to protect oilseed rape crops planted in England this year. This use of neonicotinoids is not routinely permitted but the legislation allows for “emergency” authorisation of the limited and controlled use of a pesticide to control a danger which cannot be contained by any other reasonable means.

Decisions on whether or not to grant authorisation are made on the basis of an examination of the technical and scientific information submitted by the applicant. This assessment is made by the independent UK Expert Committee on Pesticides (ECP) and the Health and Safety Executive.

The ECP has submitted its advice on the NFU applications to the Government. It finds that neither of the applications meets the requirements for emergency authorisation. The ECP’s full advice note has been published on the GOV.UK website.

Based on the evidence and the expert advice, Defra has rejected the applications.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
19th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 18 April 2017 to Question 69570, whether she has seen a copy of the flooding impact assessment carried out by the Welsh Government; and if she will place a copy in the Library.

This is a devolved matter for the Welsh Government.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
19th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 18 April 2017 to Question 69569, if she has seen a copy of the Environmental Impact Assessment carried out by the Welsh Government; and if she will place a copy in the Library.

This is a devolved matter for the Welsh Government.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Justice and the Home Secretary on increasing the maximum custodial sentence for acts of animal cruelty to five years imprisonment; and if she will make a statement.

Ministers and officials in Defra have had regular dialogue with Ministers and officials in the Home Office and Ministry of Justice. The issue of sentencing was discussed most recently in the context of two Private Members Bills tabled on this issue.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
28th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether an Environmental Impact Assessment has been carried out on the effect of sediment movements along the Severn Estuary following the development of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon; and if she will make a statement.

This is a devolved matter for the Welsh Government.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
28th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether a flooding impact assessment has been made for areas on the southern side of the Severn Estuary following the development of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon; and if she will make a statement.

This is a devolved matter for the Welsh Government.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
1st Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 17 January 2017 to Question 60831, what the country of origin was of each trophy for which an import application was received; and if she will make a statement.

Records show that two of the hunting trophy export applications originate in Tanzania, and 15 originate from South Africa.
Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
19th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 17 January 2017 to Question 59331, how many applications for import permits relating to hunting trophies were (a) received, (b) approved and (c) refused by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee in each of the last five years.

There has only been a requirement for Lion (Panthera leo) hunting trophies to have import permits since the beginning of 2015.

APHA act as the Management Authority for CITES. JNCC act as our scientific advisors on the matter of CITES applications.

Data for calendar year 2015 :

  1. Number of applications received: 11

  2. Number of applications approved: 11

  3. Total refused = 0

    Data for calendar year 2016

  1. Number of applications received: 6

  2. Number of applications approved: 6

  3. Total refused = 0

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
10th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 27 June 2016 to Question 40644, what recent assessment she has made of improvements in the way lion hunting takes place; what criteria are used to measure such improvements; and if she will make a statement.

Defra is continuing to look carefully at the issue of lion hunting and trophy imports.

At the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in September 2016, which I attended, Parties agreed to remove a loophole allowing hunting trophies to be transported as personal effects. Parties also agreed clear criteria which the exporting country should consider when assessing that the hunt was both legal and sustainable before issuing an export permit.

In the case of lions, the UK has to then confirm that we agree with this assessment and issue a corresponding import permit before any import can take place. As part of this process, the UK’s scientific advisors for fauna, the Joint Nature Conservation Committee, considers whether the import would be harmful to the conservation of the species or the extent of its range, taking into account available scientific evidence. An import permit is only issued if the trade is not considered to be detrimental to the survival of the species in the wild.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
22nd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the need for offshore patrol vessels capable of patrolling the UK's Exclusive Economic Zone once the UK leaves the EU; and if she will make a statement.

The Royal Navy provides up to three vessels for the purposes of fisheries control, including the enforcement of EU fishing quotas in the offshore waters of England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Fisheries control in the waters off Scotland is the responsibility of the Scottish Government.

Cefas has one vessel which undertakes scientific research in offshore waters, including the monitoring of fish stocks.

Work is also being conducted to scope the utility of using other vessels, such as those owned and operated by Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities, for offshore monitoring.

Operating outside the Common Fisheries Policy will give us the opportunity to establish a new fisheries regime that better meets the UK’s needs. We are reviewing all aspects of fisheries management, including the future requirements for patrol vessels, and will work with stakeholders, Devolved Administrations and other Government Departments to agree the most effective way to achieve this.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
22nd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans she has to increase the number of offshore patrol vessels to monitor fish stocks; and if she will make a statement.

The Royal Navy provides up to three vessels for the purposes of fisheries control, including the enforcement of EU fishing quotas in the offshore waters of England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Fisheries control in the waters off Scotland is the responsibility of the Scottish Government.

Cefas has one vessel which undertakes scientific research in offshore waters, including the monitoring of fish stocks.

Work is also being conducted to scope the utility of using other vessels, such as those owned and operated by Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities, for offshore monitoring.

Operating outside the Common Fisheries Policy will give us the opportunity to establish a new fisheries regime that better meets the UK’s needs. We are reviewing all aspects of fisheries management, including the future requirements for patrol vessels, and will work with stakeholders, Devolved Administrations and other Government Departments to agree the most effective way to achieve this.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
22nd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many offshore patrol vessels the UK has at its disposal to monitor fish stocks, and if she will make a statement.

The Royal Navy provides up to three vessels for the purposes of fisheries control, including the enforcement of EU fishing quotas in the offshore waters of England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Fisheries control in the waters off Scotland is the responsibility of the Scottish Government.

Cefas has one vessel which undertakes scientific research in offshore waters, including the monitoring of fish stocks.

Work is also being conducted to scope the utility of using other vessels, such as those owned and operated by Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities, for offshore monitoring.

Operating outside the Common Fisheries Policy will give us the opportunity to establish a new fisheries regime that better meets the UK’s needs. We are reviewing all aspects of fisheries management, including the future requirements for patrol vessels, and will work with stakeholders, Devolved Administrations and other Government Departments to agree the most effective way to achieve this.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
22nd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the consultation on bans of sales of items containing ivory dated between 1947 and the present day will start; how long people will be given to respond to that consultation; and if she will make a statement.

The Government will consult on the ban on sales of items containing ivory dated between 1947 and the present day early next year as a first step in meeting the manifesto commitment to press for a total ban on ivory sales. Details of the consultation duration will be announced in due course.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
11th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs of 18 October 2016, Official Report, 299WH, in which areas her Department has increased spending in the last six years; and if she will make a statement.

The attached table sets out departmental spending by area from 2010/11 to 2015/16.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
1st Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the oral contribution by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, of 18 October 2016, Official Report, column 300WH, on environmental protection, for what reasons judgments can be made by (a) judicial review, (b) the European Court of Justice and (c) the European Commission; what the scope is of such judgments; and if she will make a statement.

(a) Judicial review is the process by which the Court supervises the lawfulness of the actions and decisions of inferior courts and tribunals, public bodies and individuals who carry out public duties and functions. Judgments can be given on grounds including illegality, irrationality or unreasonableness, fettering discretion, unlawful delegation, procedural fairness, legitimate expectation and breach of the European Convention on Human Rights.

(b) The Court of Justice of the European Union examines the legality of EU measures and provides for the uniform interpretation and application of EU law. Judgments may be given in infraction proceedings, direct actions against EU institutions or Member States, preliminary references from national courts or requests for opinions.

(c) The European Commission does not give judgments. But it is given the power under the Treaties to bring infraction proceedings against a Member State where the Commission considers that the Member State has failed to fulfil an obligation under the Treaties.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
1st Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the oral contribution by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, of 18 October 2016, Official Report, column 300WH, on Environmental protection, what information the Government holds on the average costs to the litigant of (a) a judicial review, (b) a case being considered by the European Court of Justice and (c) the European Commission; what the scope is of such judgments; and if she will make a statement.

(a) The Department does not hold data on costs to claimants of specifically environmental judicial reviews. However, information on costs can be found in the paper The Value and Effects of Judicial Review. The Nature of Claims, their Outcomes and Consequences. London: Public Law Project. (available at: http://www.publiclawproject.org.uk/data/resources/210/Value-and-Effects-of-Judicial-Review.pdf). Claimants in environmental cases in the High Court may be entitled to costs protection, limiting their exposure to the defending public authority’s costs to £5,000 for an individual and £10,000 in other cases.

(b) The department does not hold specific information on the costs to a litigant of a case being considered by the Court of Justice of the EU. There are no court fees in the Court of Justice which has power to grant legal aid to litigants.

(c) The department does not hold any information about potential costs to litigants associated with the process of bringing a complaint to the attention of the European Commission.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
1st Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of harmonising with the Council of Europe's Emerald Network of Areas of Special Conservation Interest; and if she will make a statement.

The Government is currently considering the impact of leaving the EU, including future arrangements for existing legislation. This will include future arrangements for the Natura 2000 suite of sites. The aims and objectives of the Natura 2000 network, designated under the EU Nature Directives, are analogous to those of the Emerald Network, designated under the Bern Convention.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
19th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to her oral contribution of 18 October 2016, Official Report, 301WH, which directives are no longer fit for purpose; and if she will make a statement.

The Government is currently considering future arrangements for existing EU legislation in preparation for the repeal of the European Communities Act 1972. This ‘Great Repeal Bill’ will end the authority of EU law and return power to the UK. The Bill will effectively convert current EU law into our domestic law. We look forward to working with the industry, rural communities and the wider public to shape our plans for a future outside the EU when we can assess the benefits of moving to an outcomes-focussed regulatory framework.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
19th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to her oral contribution of 18 October 2016, Official Report, 301WH, which aspects of Natura 2000 will need to be incorporated into UK law; what the other elements she referred to are; and if she will make a statement.

The Government is currently considering the impacts of leaving the EU, including future arrangements for existing legislation. This will include future arrangements for the Natura 2000 suite of sites.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
19th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to her oral contribution of 18 October 2016, Official Report, 301WH, whether she plans for the UK's participation in Natura 2000 to continue; and if she will make a statement.

The Government is currently considering the impacts of leaving the EU, including future arrangements for existing legislation. This will include future arrangements for the Natura 2000 suite of sites.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
19th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to her oral contribution of 18 October 2016, Official Report, 301WH, which UK sites are already designated for protection because of international agreements; and if she will make a statement.

The UK has designated 150 sites under the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, including 25 in the UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies. In addition UK Marine Protected Areas contribute to the well managed ecologically coherent network of Marine Protected Areas under the OSPAR Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic. These can be found on line at http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/page-1389 and http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=4549

Our network of protected sites, including Sites of Special Scientific Interest, National Parks, Marine Conservation Zones, European and Ramsar sites, support the UK’s contribution to achieving the Convention on Biological Diversity’s Aichi Target 11 (protected areas increased and improved). These networks also contribute to the achievement of UN Sustainable Development Goals 14: conservation and sustainable use of the marine environment and its resources; and 15: sustainable use of the terrestrial environment and halting biodiversity loss.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
6th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the effect of the vote to leave the EU on her policy on the EU nature directives; and if she will make a statement.

Until we leave the EU, current arrangements for farming, fisheries, food and drink, rural affairs and our environment remain in place.

Defra will continue to ensure the right policies are in place for a cleaner, healthier environment for everyone.

The priorities for negotiating our exit from the EU will be a matter for the new Prime Minister and their Cabinet.

14th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to limit the use of antibiotics on farms to sick animals.

There are no plans to significantly revise the Veterinary Medicines Regulations 2013 until the conclusion of the current review of the EU legislative framework on veterinary medicines and medicated feedingstuffs.


The Government has reissued guidance on the responsible use of animal medicines on the farm to emphasise that we do not support the routine preventative use of antibiotics, or the use of antibiotics to compensate for poor animal husbandry.


Under the current UK legislation, all antibiotic veterinary medicines are only available through a prescription from a veterinary surgeon, who in turn can only prescribe to animals under their care following a clinical diagnosis. Using antibiotics responsibly is a requirement of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Code of Professional Conduct for Vets.



George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will assess the effect on the bee population of the repeal of the ban on neonicotinoid pesticides; and if she will make a statement.

The UK Government has not repealed a ban on neonicotinoids. There is not a ban, but an EU restriction on the use of three neonicotinoids that has been in place since 1 December 2013. A number of uses of these neonicotinoids remain approved. The restriction has been implemented in full in the UK.

EU rules on pesticides allow for the limited and controlled use of restricted neonicotinoids in emergency situations to control a danger which cannot be contained by any other reasonable means. In assessing applications for limited and controlled use, the UK Expert Committee on Pesticides considers all the relevant environmental and agronomic factors, including the effects on bees and the value of the products as a consequence of safeguarding crop yields. Recently, Ministers followed the Committee’s advice in the granting of two authorisations to use neonicotinoids to protect an area equivalent to 5% of the national oilseed rape crop.

The European Commission has begun a review of the science on neonicotinoids and pollinators. The UK Government is participating fully in that process.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will take steps to enable the establishment of a market in 100 per cent sustainable timber by 2020.

Defra is committed to tackling the trade in illegal timber. We implement the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR), which makes it an offence to place illegally logged timber on the EU market for the first time, and the EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Regulation, which aims to combat illegal logging and improve the supply of legal timber to the EU. The EU FLEGT Regulation establishes Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) between the EU and timber producing countries. Once VPAs have been agreed, timber producing countries will issue exports with a ‘FLEGT licence’ which verifies the timber’s legality.

The Government’s Timber Procurement Policy also requires Government Departments, Executive Agencies and Non-Departmental Public Bodies to procure timber and timber products that are both legal and sustainable.

Domestic forests provide about 20% of the UK’s timber needs. They are managed in accordance with the UK Forestry Standard, the reference standard for sustainable forest management in the UK. Moreover, about 85% of UK timber production is independently certified, providing additional assurances of sustainability. We are strongly supportive of initiatives such as Grown in Britain, which create new sustainably managed woodland to increase the supply of British timber destined for use by local people and businesses. Timber and wood products labelled with the Grown in Britain logo are from trees and forests assured as compliant with the UK Forestry Standard.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the non-inclusion of Swansea Bay as an identified breeding site of harbour porpoise and Special Area of Conservation in the Joint Nature Conservation Committee Report Number 544, published in March 2015; and if she will make a statement.

Predicted porpoise density at or above the 90th percentile (i.e. areas that had the top 10% of predicted porpoise density) was chosen as the threshold to define ‘high density’ based on a method used by Embling et al. (2010)[i]. This method considered boundary placement to delineate protected areas for harbour porpoise using a perimeter length to area ratio approach. By comparing areas with the top 1%, 5% and 10% of porpoise densities, the perimeter–area ratio was lowest (desirable) and its confidence interval was narrowest (greater certainty) for areas defined by the top 10% threshold (i.e. equivalent to the 90th percentile). The Inter-Agency Marine Mammal Working Group therefore considered it appropriate to adopt this published approach for the analyses undertaken in Report 544. Both Embling et al. (2010) and Report 544 have been subject to peer review by experts.

Member States, including the UK, use Annex III of the Habitats Directive and additional EU Guidance in the identification of Special Areas of Conservation (SACs), but decisions on implementation are taken at the national level. This includes the determination of appropriate thresholds.

The identification of breeding sites for porpoise is not a requirement of Annex III of the EU Habitats Directive. A representative large-scale picture of porpoise calve distribution could not be attained from the data set that informed Report 544, and therefore was unable to support the identification of breeding areas.

The CCW Atlas of Marine Mammals of Wales included data collected and reported on in Pierpoint 2006 and 2008. All data from the Atlas were submitted to the Joint Cetacean Protocol, which provided the dataset that informed Report 544 where consents from the data providers were given.

The designation of SACs is a devolved responsibility, and decisions with regards to the Swansea Bay area are for the Welsh Government.

Report 544 is one step in wider assessment of information towards the identification of possible SACs for harbour porpoise, carried out by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee and Country Statutory Nature Conservation Bodies. Full information on the assessment process and other key documentation would be made available in a public consultation, providing an opportunity to comment on the scientific process undertaken.

[i] Embling, C. B., Gilibrand, P. A., Gordon, J., Shrimpton, J., Stevick, P. T. & Hammond, P. S. 2010. Using habitat models to identify suitable sites for marine protected areas for harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena). Biological Conservation 143, 267–279.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether Report No. 544 of the Joint Nature Conservation Committee, on the identification of discrete and persistent areas of relatively high harbour porpoise density in the wider UK marine area, published in March 2015, identifies breeding sites for harbour porpoise as required by the 1992 EU Habitats Directive; and if she will make a statement.

Predicted porpoise density at or above the 90th percentile (i.e. areas that had the top 10% of predicted porpoise density) was chosen as the threshold to define ‘high density’ based on a method used by Embling et al. (2010)[i]. This method considered boundary placement to delineate protected areas for harbour porpoise using a perimeter length to area ratio approach. By comparing areas with the top 1%, 5% and 10% of porpoise densities, the perimeter–area ratio was lowest (desirable) and its confidence interval was narrowest (greater certainty) for areas defined by the top 10% threshold (i.e. equivalent to the 90th percentile). The Inter-Agency Marine Mammal Working Group therefore considered it appropriate to adopt this published approach for the analyses undertaken in Report 544. Both Embling et al. (2010) and Report 544 have been subject to peer review by experts.

Member States, including the UK, use Annex III of the Habitats Directive and additional EU Guidance in the identification of Special Areas of Conservation (SACs), but decisions on implementation are taken at the national level. This includes the determination of appropriate thresholds.

The identification of breeding sites for porpoise is not a requirement of Annex III of the EU Habitats Directive. A representative large-scale picture of porpoise calve distribution could not be attained from the data set that informed Report 544, and therefore was unable to support the identification of breeding areas.

The CCW Atlas of Marine Mammals of Wales included data collected and reported on in Pierpoint 2006 and 2008. All data from the Atlas were submitted to the Joint Cetacean Protocol, which provided the dataset that informed Report 544 where consents from the data providers were given.

The designation of SACs is a devolved responsibility, and decisions with regards to the Swansea Bay area are for the Welsh Government.

Report 544 is one step in wider assessment of information towards the identification of possible SACs for harbour porpoise, carried out by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee and Country Statutory Nature Conservation Bodies. Full information on the assessment process and other key documentation would be made available in a public consultation, providing an opportunity to comment on the scientific process undertaken.

[i] Embling, C. B., Gilibrand, P. A., Gordon, J., Shrimpton, J., Stevick, P. T. & Hammond, P. S. 2010. Using habitat models to identify suitable sites for marine protected areas for harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena). Biological Conservation 143, 267–279.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Report No. 544 of the Joint Nature Conservation Committee, on the identification of discrete and persistent areas of relatively high harbour porpoise density in the wider UK marine area, published in March 2015, for what reasons the 90th percentile was used as the cut-off point for the threshold of the prediction of porpoise presence; whether the same cut-off point is used (a) for prediction of other marine mammals and (b) by other EU countries; and if she will make a statement.

Predicted porpoise density at or above the 90th percentile (i.e. areas that had the top 10% of predicted porpoise density) was chosen as the threshold to define ‘high density’ based on a method used by Embling et al. (2010)[i]. This method considered boundary placement to delineate protected areas for harbour porpoise using a perimeter length to area ratio approach. By comparing areas with the top 1%, 5% and 10% of porpoise densities, the perimeter–area ratio was lowest (desirable) and its confidence interval was narrowest (greater certainty) for areas defined by the top 10% threshold (i.e. equivalent to the 90th percentile). The Inter-Agency Marine Mammal Working Group therefore considered it appropriate to adopt this published approach for the analyses undertaken in Report 544. Both Embling et al. (2010) and Report 544 have been subject to peer review by experts.

Member States, including the UK, use Annex III of the Habitats Directive and additional EU Guidance in the identification of Special Areas of Conservation (SACs), but decisions on implementation are taken at the national level. This includes the determination of appropriate thresholds.

The identification of breeding sites for porpoise is not a requirement of Annex III of the EU Habitats Directive. A representative large-scale picture of porpoise calve distribution could not be attained from the data set that informed Report 544, and therefore was unable to support the identification of breeding areas.

The CCW Atlas of Marine Mammals of Wales included data collected and reported on in Pierpoint 2006 and 2008. All data from the Atlas were submitted to the Joint Cetacean Protocol, which provided the dataset that informed Report 544 where consents from the data providers were given.

The designation of SACs is a devolved responsibility, and decisions with regards to the Swansea Bay area are for the Welsh Government.

Report 544 is one step in wider assessment of information towards the identification of possible SACs for harbour porpoise, carried out by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee and Country Statutory Nature Conservation Bodies. Full information on the assessment process and other key documentation would be made available in a public consultation, providing an opportunity to comment on the scientific process undertaken.

[i] Embling, C. B., Gilibrand, P. A., Gordon, J., Shrimpton, J., Stevick, P. T. & Hammond, P. S. 2010. Using habitat models to identify suitable sites for marine protected areas for harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena). Biological Conservation 143, 267–279.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether Report No. 544 of the Joint Nature Conservation Committee, on the identification of discrete and persistent areas of relatively high harbour porpoise density in the wider UK marine area, published in March 2015, takes into account data on the presence of harbour porpoise identified in the 2nd edition of the CCW Atlas of Marine Mammals of Wales and the Pierpoint Reports of 2006 and 2008; and if she will make a statement.

Predicted porpoise density at or above the 90th percentile (i.e. areas that had the top 10% of predicted porpoise density) was chosen as the threshold to define ‘high density’ based on a method used by Embling et al. (2010)[i]. This method considered boundary placement to delineate protected areas for harbour porpoise using a perimeter length to area ratio approach. By comparing areas with the top 1%, 5% and 10% of porpoise densities, the perimeter–area ratio was lowest (desirable) and its confidence interval was narrowest (greater certainty) for areas defined by the top 10% threshold (i.e. equivalent to the 90th percentile). The Inter-Agency Marine Mammal Working Group therefore considered it appropriate to adopt this published approach for the analyses undertaken in Report 544. Both Embling et al. (2010) and Report 544 have been subject to peer review by experts.

Member States, including the UK, use Annex III of the Habitats Directive and additional EU Guidance in the identification of Special Areas of Conservation (SACs), but decisions on implementation are taken at the national level. This includes the determination of appropriate thresholds.

The identification of breeding sites for porpoise is not a requirement of Annex III of the EU Habitats Directive. A representative large-scale picture of porpoise calve distribution could not be attained from the data set that informed Report 544, and therefore was unable to support the identification of breeding areas.

The CCW Atlas of Marine Mammals of Wales included data collected and reported on in Pierpoint 2006 and 2008. All data from the Atlas were submitted to the Joint Cetacean Protocol, which provided the dataset that informed Report 544 where consents from the data providers were given.

The designation of SACs is a devolved responsibility, and decisions with regards to the Swansea Bay area are for the Welsh Government.

Report 544 is one step in wider assessment of information towards the identification of possible SACs for harbour porpoise, carried out by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee and Country Statutory Nature Conservation Bodies. Full information on the assessment process and other key documentation would be made available in a public consultation, providing an opportunity to comment on the scientific process undertaken.

[i] Embling, C. B., Gilibrand, P. A., Gordon, J., Shrimpton, J., Stevick, P. T. & Hammond, P. S. 2010. Using habitat models to identify suitable sites for marine protected areas for harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena). Biological Conservation 143, 267–279.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
8th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of the (a) threats to and (b) steps necessary to address the decline of British bees; and if she will make a statement.

Defra recognises the importance of pollinators, including bees, and their value to food security and sustaining the natural environment. This is why Defra committed to producing the National Pollinator Strategy (NPS) (www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-pollinator-strategy-for-bees-and-other-pollinators-in-england).

To help inform the NPS, Defra commissioned a report published in July 2014 on the ‘Status and Value of Pollinators and Pollination Services’ (http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Default.aspx?Menu=Menu&Module=More&Location=None&Completed=0&ProjectID=18916#RelatedDocuments). The report reviewed evidence on threats to pollinators and served to highlight the many pressures which pollinators face. A loss of flower-rich habitat is considered to be the likely primary cause of the recorded decline in diversity of wild bees and other pollinating insects. Another key finding was the uncertainty that remains over population levels. Addressing such key gaps in our understanding is one of the key aims of the NPS. Defra has commissioned a research project to develop a national pollinator monitoring framework to detect changes in pollinator populations in the future.

The NPS, published in November 2014, forms a framework for collective action to help manage and raise awareness of the pressures facing pollinators. To raise public awareness a ‘Call to Action’, “Bees’ Needs: Food and a Home” (www.wildlifetrusts.org/Bees-needs) was launched in July 2014. This is a simple message on the essential needs of pollinators and how to fulfil them.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many representatives of her Department will attend the Ramsar Conference in Uruguay in June 2015; what steps she is taking to protect UK wetlands; and if she will make a statement.

Defra has sent two representatives to the 12th Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention in Uruguay.

The UK is a party to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance and has designated 172 Ramsar sites. This is more than any other Contracting Party and includes 24 sites in the UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies. In Great Britain, Ramsar sites cover an area of almost 700,000 hectares. Detailed site information is available on the Joint Nature Conservation Committee’s website at: http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=161.

In Great Britain, Ramsar sites are not afforded statutory protection but as a matter of Government policy receive the same protection as European sites designated under the EU Wild Birds and Habitats Directives. For example, in England the National Planning Policy Framework (2012) states that listed or proposed Ramsar sites should be given the same protection as European sites. In regard to the broader protection of wetlands, this is mainly delivered through national implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive and the Birds and Habitats Directives. Defra takes a strategic approach to ensure that the implementation of these Directives is complementary to deliver common objectives.

Information regarding Northern Ireland is the responsibility of the Northern Ireland Office.

3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many wetland sites there are in the UK; what area those sites cover; what statutory protections have applied to each such site in each year since 2005; and if she will make a statement.

Defra has sent two representatives to the 12th Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention in Uruguay.

The UK is a party to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance and has designated 172 Ramsar sites. This is more than any other Contracting Party and includes 24 sites in the UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies. In Great Britain, Ramsar sites cover an area of almost 700,000 hectares. Detailed site information is available on the Joint Nature Conservation Committee’s website at: http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=161.

In Great Britain, Ramsar sites are not afforded statutory protection but as a matter of Government policy receive the same protection as European sites designated under the EU Wild Birds and Habitats Directives. For example, in England the National Planning Policy Framework (2012) states that listed or proposed Ramsar sites should be given the same protection as European sites. In regard to the broader protection of wetlands, this is mainly delivered through national implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive and the Birds and Habitats Directives. Defra takes a strategic approach to ensure that the implementation of these Directives is complementary to deliver common objectives.

Information regarding Northern Ireland is the responsibility of the Northern Ireland Office.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of the UK's ability to meet the Aichi global biodiversity targets by 2020; what steps she is taking to ensure the UK meets those targets; and if she will make a statement.

Biodiversity is a devolved issue; actions to deliver biodiversity outcomes are set out in individual country strategies - the England Biodiversity Strategy Biodiversity 2020, and Scottish Biodiversity Strategy http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2013/06/5538. Wales’ biodiversity strategy, The Nature Recovery Plan for Wales, to be published by the end of this year, will set out the action to reverse the decline of biodiversity in Wales. The Northern Ireland Biodiversity Strategy http://www.doeni.gov.uk/nibs_2002.pdf is under review and a new Biodiversity Strategy for Northern Ireland will be published by the summer.

The UK submitted its 5th National report to the CBD in May 2014 and it is available on the CBD website at https://www.cbd.int/doc/world/gb/gb-nr-05-en.pdf. Key actions taken by the UK include:

· Continued designation of protected areas, especially at sea, and the development of a UK Marine Strategy;

· Continued work to improve the management and condition of all designated sites, with 96% of SSSIs in England in favourable or recovering condition;

· Integrated, landscape-scale approaches to improving the natural environment, such as Nature Improvement Areas (NIAs) and river-basin management plans.

· Agri-environment programmes to support environmental improvements on farmed land, for example with 67,000ha being brought under management for creation of priority habitat in England since 2011, and the development of country policies and strategies for issues which impact on biodiversity such as such as forestry, water, invasive species, pollinators, and fisheries.

· Research to develop knowledge and evidence-based guidance, such as ecosystem assessment and payment for ecosystem services.

The most recent update on progress is presented in the UK Biodiversity Indicators, published in December 2014: http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/page-4229. The indicators show a mixed picture, with recent improvements in the area of land in agri-environment schemes, sustainable fisheries, air pollution, the extent of protected sites on land and at sea, the condition of areas/sites of special scientific interest, status of species of European importance and plant genetic resources.

However, pressures on biodiversity remain high and there is more to do, which will require the engagement of all sectors and civil society as a whole.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will repeat the national barn owl surveys of 1982-85, 1995-97 and 2000-09; and if she will make a statement.

The Barn Owl was surveyed as part of the British Trust for Ornithology 2007-11 Bird Atlas for Britain and Ireland and populations are also monitored annually by the BTO/Joint Nature Conservation Committee/Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. Consequently Defra has no present plans to repeat these surveys.

Surveys suggest that the Barn Owl was declining during much of the twentieth century. However the 2007-11 Bird Atlas indicates a 67% increase in distribution since the last atlas for 1988-91. In addition the annual Breeding Bird Survey indicates that numbers increased by 277% in the UK between 1995 and 2012 and 273% for England. The increase is believed to result from the provision of nest boxes, mild winters and the sympathetic management of suitable feeding habitat through agri-environment schemes.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many farmers have (a) obtained Fair to Nature accreditation and (b) are working towards Fair to Nature accreditation; if she will assess the effect of the scheme on UK biodiversity; and if she will make a statement.

Conservation Grade reports that approximately 86 farmers are currently accredited and approximately 20 are waiting to establish a commercial relationship. This information is not held by Defra.

Fair to Nature is part of Conservation Grade, an independent, non-profit accreditation organisation that establishes commercial relationships between farmers and customers. Membership of Conservation Grade requires standards to be maintained for biodiversity benefits. Fair to Nature have undertaken their own trials demonstrating benefits for a range of biodiversity species, notably bumblebees, small mammals and farmland birds. Although independent, the scheme requirements are similar in scope to our supported agri-environment schemes, that have been shown to deliver outcomes for biodiversity.

12th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she has taken to protect bass fish stocks during spawning in January 2015 since meetings with EU officials on 16 December 2014; and if she will make a statement.

At the December Council we secured a statement that underlined the commitment of the Commission and Member States involved in the bass fishery to take urgent action to reduce fishing pressure, protect spawning aggregations and so prevent a collapse of the stock. The Government followed up this commitment by formally requesting emergency measures to protect bass during the spawning season (January to April). The Commission has responded positively to the UK request and has now tabled such a measure for consideration by the fisheries management committee.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
27th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will take unilateral steps to manage bass stocks in UK waters until EU agreement is reached; and if she will make a statement.

The UK Government are continuing to push for effective EU-wide conservation measures that will ensure the stock recovers and becomes sustainable by working with the Commission and interested Member States. We expect EU bass management proposals to be agreed before the end of the year, to apply in 2015.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
10th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of progress made by the European Commission on steps to sustainably manage bass stocks using technical conservation measures; and if she will make a statement.

As a result of discussions facilitated by the European Commission, there is now a consensus amongst interested Member States to significantly reduce targeting of bass across all sectors exploiting that stock. The Commission has also requested advice from the North Sea, North Western Waters and South West Waters Advisory Councils on the appropriate short term measures to apply in 2015, and the development of a long term management plan. We expect EU bass management proposals to be published before the end of the year.

The UK Government will continue to push for effective EU-wide conservation measures that will ensure the stock recovers and becomes sustainable by working with the Commission and interested Member States. We will consider the need for any further domestic management of bass in the light of these European discussions.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what steps he is taking to ensure that British citizens with properties in EU member states maintain their rights in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

All EU Member States are bound by Article 1 of Protocol 1 to the European Convention on Human Rights, which obliges them to respect property rights. This includes those who own property, own shares in a property and those who own a property and let it to tenants. UK national’s right to sell their existing property in the EU will remain unchanged and the property tax they pay on their properties will not be affected by the UK leaving the EU.

Some Member States have laws which govern property and land purchasing that differentiate between their own citizens, EU citizens and Third Country Nationals when purchasing property. Individuals considering purchasing a property in an EU Member State should check with local authorities to confirm how these laws apply to them.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how many members of staff have left his Department since its creation; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

The Department for Exiting the European Union’s monthly average attrition is 3.1% which equates to a quarterly figure of 8-9%. This level of attrition is not out of line with other Government departments, like the Cabinet Office, that operate a similar employment model. This figure includes the contractual exit of agency workers, secondees, contractors and fast streamers. The figure also includes a number of individuals who were on short-term loan from other Government Departments, brought in to aid in the establishment of DExEU.

Information on nationality cannot be released as individuals may be identifiable.

10th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what assessment he has made of the effect of EU rules of origin on UK motor manufacturing after the UK leaves the EU; and if he will make a statement.

The Government wants to see zero tariffs on trade in goods, frictionless trade and to minimise the regulatory and market access barriers for both goods and services. The role of preferential or non-preferential Rules of Origin in any deal, and our approach to minimising administration and friction, will depend on the precise nature of the agreement between the UK and the EU. We have been working closely with stakeholders in various sectors, including the automotive sector, to understand the needs of UK industry. Ministers have met with a variety of automotive companies and the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions he has had with his Zambian counterpart on declaring a national emergency in relation to the drought and famine in western and southern Zambia.

The British Government is engaging actively with the Government of Zambia on the drought affecting large parts of Zambia to ensure assistance is provided to the many Zambians facing food insecurity.

On 29th August, the Department for International Development’s (DFID) visiting Director for West and Southern Africa met with the Zambian Minister of Finance and raised the allocation of resources for the drought response. The Head of Office for DFID Zambia and the British High Commissioner also met with the Vice President last month and encouraged Zambia to request international emergency assistance to scale up the response. DFID is in close contact with Zambia’s Disaster Management Response Unit, the United Nations, and international Non-Governmental Organisations on the ground. The UK is planning to provide support to respond through Emergency Cash Transfers and treatment of acute malnutrition in the worst affected areas.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
28th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps he is taking to provide additional aid to alleviate the impending famine in Zambia.

DFID is following the impact of the drought in Western and Southern Zambia very closely and has visited affected areas to discuss the response with local authorities. The Government of Zambia has not yet declared an emergency but estimates that 1.5 million people will need emergency assistance over the next nine months. We are in contact with the Government’s Disaster Management and Mitigation Unit and with the World Food Programme about how best to distribute food supplies in the event that the Government requests support. We are exploring with the UN the feasibility of emergency cash transfers and responding to a likely increase in acute malnutrition cases. DFID is also a key donor of the START fund, which funds non-governmental organisations responding to localised emergencies.

28th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps he is taking to support the Zambian Government to ensure that farmers are able to purchase sufficient grain from Government food agencies.

Maize production has dropped by over 50% in Western and Southern Zambia this year as a result of drought, showing just how vulnerable Zambian farmers are to climatic shocks. Through its Climate Smart Agriculture programme, DFID is supporting over 260,000 small-scale farmers to protect yields better from the impact of climate change. DFID is also supporting engagement between Zambian civil society organisations, the Zambian Government and the Food Reserve Agency on agricultural policy and on the implementation of the Government of Zambia’s agricultural e-voucher reform programme, which has great potential to help smallholder farmers source inputs in a more timely fashion and promote agricultural diversification.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many members of staff have left her Department since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

Since 1 January 2015, 530 staff have left DFID, of which 12 have declared as non-UK EU nationals.

19th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what funds for which purposes the Government pledged at the Brussels conference on Afghanistan, held on 4-5 October 2016; what measures she has put in place to monitor how those funds are (a) distributed and (b) spent; and if she will make a statement.

On 2 October the Secretary of State announced that the UK would spend up to £750m in ODA to Afghanistan to 2020, depending on Afghan government performance and security conditions. UK support will help build a safer, more stable and prosperous Afghanistan through increased state capacity and legitimacy; it will support increased economic growth and self-reliance and decreased poverty and vulnerability. It will be delivered via multi-donor trust funds and contracts with commercial providers of good and services, UN agencies and UK, Afghan, and international NGOs, and monitored by both internal and external mechanisms.

19th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what (a) technical support her Department has offered and (b) political engagement with the Afghan government her Department plans in order to ensure that the Afghan government fulfils the commitment it made at the Brussels Conference on Afghanistan, held on 4-5 October 2016, on amendments to the mining law; and if she will make a statement.

The UK aims to reduce Afghanistan’s dependence on aid and help make it a more prosperous safe and stable country.

The UK supports the extractives sector to accelerate economic development and revenue generation. Through the £10.3m Extractive Sector Support Programme, the UK has recommended revisions to the Minerals Law and provided support for the Ministry of Mines and Petroleum to incorporate amendments.

The Mining Advisory Council is currently reviewing the amendments. Following this review, the amendments will go to the Ministry of Justice, the Council of Ministers, Parliament and finally the President for enactment. The UK remains committed to working closely with the Government and other stakeholders in support of this process.

18th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much of her Department's budget is spent on supporting water, sanitation and hygiene services; and if she will make a statement.

Expenditure by sector is reported in Statistics on International Development (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-on-international-development-2014).

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
18th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the relationship between clean water and sanitation in schools and girls' school attendance in developing countries; and if she will make a statement.

Clean water and adequate sanitation in schools ensure safe and hygienic environments for learning. The UK Government supports the view that providing toilets at schools for girls is necessary to provide privacy and dignity. There is some evidence that WASH interventions in schools do improve attendance by girls but much evidence points to other important factors as well.


In 2011, DFID published a systematic review of this issue. This determined that separate facilities for girls were likely to encourage their attendance at school, but insufficient alone to increase attendance and that there are many influential factors, including social and economic pressures on poor families. DFID therefore takes a holistic approach to this issue.


The UK played a key role in ensuring that the recently agreed Sustainable Development Goals include a dedicated goal on water which aims to ensure universal access to water and sanitation by 2030.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, with reference to the Answer of 15 December 2015 to Question 218242, in which country each of the contacts with private security companies was operating; and if she will make a statement.

DFID has held a total of 8 centrally let contracts with private security companies since 2008. The table below provides the details of where these contracts were operating.

Country

Number of Contracts

Contracts still active

U.K.

3

1

Kenya

2

Kenya and Somalia

1

India

2

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many contracts her Department has held with private security companies for work in (a) Iraq and (b) Afghanistan in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement.

The department has not held any contracts with private security companies in Iraq and Afghanistan within the last 5 years.

5th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if she will detail the (a) number and (b) cost of contacts with private military companies in each year since 2008; and if she will make a statement.

DFID does not categorise its suppliers by the terminology ‘private military companies’ so cannot provide this level of information requested.

10th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many contracts her Department has held with private security companies in each year since 2008; what the cost of those contracts was; and if she will make a statement.

DFID has held a total of 8 centrally let contracts with private security companies since 2008 and the total cost of those contracts is £6.2M. The table below provides details by year concerning the number of contracts and the cost of those contracts. It should be noted that some of these contracts were active over multiple years:

Year

Number of Contracts

Cost of Contract (GBP)

2008

3

13,589

2009

5

1,008,753

2010

2

816,566

2011

2

725,825

2012

1

1,147,414

2013

1

1,680,187

2014

1

854,352

18th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment her Department has made of the effectiveness of the New Alliance for Food and Security and Nutrition programmes on small-scale food producers in areas supported by that programme.

Every DFID programme which is contributing to the New Alliance initiative is subject to DFID’s annual review processes. In addition, this year partner governments have been conducting their first annual reviews of the effects of the New Alliance at country level. The list of countries who have submitted reports to date is available on the New Alliance website.

4th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, with reference to the Answer of 10 April 2014, Official Report, column 381W, on development aid, if she will publish the agreement (a) between her Department, the CDC and ACTIS on the Department for International Development impact fund and (b) between her Department and ACTIS when it was spun off from the CDC; and if she will make a statement.

The agreement between my Department and CDC for the Impact Fund will be placed in the House of Commons Library.

Copies of the key documents relating to CDC and Actis were placed in the Library of the House by the then Secretary of State for International Development subsequent to his Ministerial Statement on the CDC reorganisation of 12 July 2004.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many members of staff have left UK Export Finance since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

In the period July 2016 to November 2017, a total of 195 UK based employees have left the Department for International Trade (DIT).

Since January 2015, there have been 144 leavers from UK Export Finance (UKEF).

The reasons for members of staff leaving include, amongst others, retiring, transferring departments, resignation and end of contract.

Neither DIT nor UKEF holds data on the nationalities of these staff.

Evidence of nationality is checked at the point of recruitment into the Civil Service as part of wider pre-employment checks, but there is no requirement on departments to retain this information beyond the point at which it has served its purpose.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many members of staff have left his Department since it was created; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

In the period July 2016 to November 2017, a total of 195 UK based employees have left the Department for International Trade (DIT).

Since January 2015, there have been 144 leavers from UK Export Finance (UKEF).

The reasons for members of staff leaving include, amongst others, retiring, transferring departments, resignation and end of contract.

Neither DIT nor UKEF holds data on the nationalities of these staff.

Evidence of nationality is checked at the point of recruitment into the Civil Service as part of wider pre-employment checks, but there is no requirement on departments to retain this information beyond the point at which it has served its purpose.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if he will take steps for the UK to have third-party membership of existing EU Free Trade Agreements to comply with rules of origin requirements.

We are currently working with existing EU trading partners, including South Africa, to ensure that where preferential trading agreements are in place, arrangements are made that will allow maximum possible continuity in the effect of these agreements, when the UK leaves the EU. This is a technical exercise to ensure continuity in existing trading arrangements.

In this regard, we are engaging with trading partners to understand mutually beneficial options for ensuring the greatest continuity. Rules of Origin, as a key element of trade agreements, form an important part of this ongoing engagement.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions he is having with (a) South Africa and (b) other countries that have an existing Free Trade Agreement with the EU on rules of origin or originating content issues arising from the UK's exit from the EU.

We are currently working with existing EU trading partners, including South Africa, to ensure that where preferential trading agreements are in place, arrangements are made that will allow maximum possible continuity in the effect of these agreements, when the UK leaves the EU. This is a technical exercise to ensure continuity in existing trading arrangements.

In this regard, we are engaging with trading partners to understand mutually beneficial options for ensuring the greatest continuity. Rules of Origin, as a key element of trade agreements, form an important part of this ongoing engagement.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what restrictions exist on the import to the UK of goods from Zimbabwe.

Imports from Zimbabwe must comply with all relevant licensing and declaration requirements. As a member of the interim Eastern and Southern Africa Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with the EU, the import of goods from Zimbabwe currently benefit from duty-free access to the UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to publish the best practice guidance on disability awareness training for bus drivers.

The Government remains committed to publishing best practice guidance on the provision of high quality disability awareness training for bus and coach drivers, to support operators to ensure that every driver has the knowledge and skills to assist disabled passengers.

We will publish the guidance later in the year and will work with the bus and coach industry to encourage its adoption.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to ensure that electric charging stations on motorways are maintained and operate effectively.

The Government does not hold data on the numbers of out of service electric vehicle chargepoints or the average length of time they have been out of service in the last two years. The Government wants to ensure that the public charging network is reliable, widespread, accessible, convenient and affordable. The Government has taken powers in the newly adopted Automated and Electric Vehicles Act to set reliability and maintenance standards and to ensure public chargepoints are accessible.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what information he holds on the average length of time that electric charging stations have been out of service in the last two years.

The Government does not hold data on the numbers of out of service electric vehicle chargepoints or the average length of time they have been out of service in the last two years. The Government wants to ensure that the public charging network is reliable, widespread, accessible, convenient and affordable. The Government has taken powers in the newly adopted Automated and Electric Vehicles Act to set reliability and maintenance standards and to ensure public chargepoints are accessible.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what information he holds on the number of electric charging stations that have been out of service for over 24 hours in the last (a) 3 months, (b) 6 months and (c) 12 months.

The Government does not hold data on the numbers of out of service electric vehicle chargepoints or the average length of time they have been out of service in the last two years. The Government wants to ensure that the public charging network is reliable, widespread, accessible, convenient and affordable. The Government has taken powers in the newly adopted Automated and Electric Vehicles Act to set reliability and maintenance standards and to ensure public chargepoints are accessible.

14th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make it his policy to undertake a review of road traffic offences and penalties to improve road safety.

First, on 5 December 2016 the Government launched a consultation on driving offences and penalties relating to causing death and serious injury. This ran until 1 February 2017. The Government response to the consultation was published on 16 October 2017, and confirmed proposals to increase the maximum penalty for causing death by dangerous driving and for causing death by careless driving whilst under the influence of drink or drugs from 14 years to life; and to create a new offence of causing serious injury by careless driving. These are still under review by the ministry of justice.

Secondly, on 9 March 2018, the Department for Transport published an independent legal report which considers the case for a change in law for cycling, equivalent to causing death or serious injury by dangerous or careless driving. The Department is considering the report and will publish a response shortly. This work is part of an open and comprehensive review TO improve safety for all road users and encourage more people to walk and cycle. The Government intends to bring forward proposals for changes in the law as and when parliamentary time allows.

Finally, on 13 June the Department for Transport published a progress report to the 2015 Road Safety Statement, which announced that it would be refreshing the Statement and developing a two year action plan for road safety. There are four priority user groups to be addressed in this plan: young people, rural road users, motorcyclists and older vulnerable users.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will detail the steps his Department is taking to ensure the close monitoring of ships registered to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea which change their (a) ship names, (b) flag, (c) company name and (d) reported beneficial owner; and if he will make a statement.

The Department for Transport takes all possible measures to ensure that all states implement and enforce UN Security Council resolutions. Such measures can include engagement with partner states, and the UN Panel of Experts on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), regarding the misuse of country flags by ships connected to the DPRK.

UN Security Council resolutions call on Member States to de-register any vessel that is owned, operated or crewed by the DPRK, and not to register any such vessels that have been de-registered by another Member State. The ship registry of the UK fully complies with this measure.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking proactively to monitor Democratic People's Republic of Korea foreign-flagged ships in order to ensure enforcement of the mandate to inspect their cargo; and if he will make a statement.

The Department for Transport takes all possible measures to ensure that all states implement and enforce UN Security Council resolutions. Such measures can include engagement with partner states, and the UN Panel of Experts on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), regarding the misuse of country flags by ships connected to the DPRK.

UN Security Council resolutions call on Member States to de-register any vessel that is owned, operated or crewed by the DPRK, and not to register any such vessels that have been de-registered by another Member State. The ship registry of the UK fully complies with this measure.

6th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the cost to the public purse has been of electrification of the railway line (a) in the Severn Tunnel, (b) between the Severn Tunnel and Cardiff Central station, (c) between Cardiff Central Station and Bridgend, (d) between Bridgend and Port Talbot Parkway, (e) between Port Talbot Parkway and Neath and (f) between Neath and Swansea; and if he will make a statement.

Network Rail is delivering the Great Western Electrification Programme to the dates set out in the latest publication of their Enhancement Delivery plan.

This includes completing electrification of the Great Western Mainline to Cardiff Central by December 2018. The recent National Audit Office’s report states that electrification is expected to cost £2.8 billion.

Network Rail have advised the Department that expenditure on the mainline between Cardiff and Swansea has yet to be finalised.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit claimants submitted a DS1500 form during that application process in each year from 2016 to 2018.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

The Department takes seriously the need to support vulnerable claimants. We are committed to supporting those with health conditions, and ensuring that terminally ill patients are treated with the utmost sensitivity and care, when making a claim to Universal Credit.

Universal Credit provides enhanced personalised support for all claimants, including those with a terminal illness. We are continuously reviewing and improving the service for vulnerable people who claim Universal Credit to ensure that it is accessible and responsive to their needs. This includes how they are identified and supported, either from our own staff or via referrals from local services.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants received universal credit payments through the special rules for terminal illness route in each year from 2016 to 2018.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

The Department takes seriously the need to support vulnerable claimants. We are committed to supporting those with health conditions, and ensuring that terminally ill patients are treated with the utmost sensitivity and care, when making a claim to Universal Credit.

Universal Credit provides enhanced personalised support for all claimants, including those with a terminal illness. We are continuously reviewing and improving the service for vulnerable people who claim Universal Credit to ensure that it is accessible and responsive to their needs. This includes how they are identified and supported, either from our own staff or via referrals from local services.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit claimants who submitted a DS1500 form met with a work coach during that application process.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

The Department takes seriously the need to support vulnerable claimants. We are committed to supporting those with health conditions, and ensuring that terminally ill patients are treated with the utmost sensitivity and care, when making a claim to Universal Credit.

Universal Credit provides enhanced personalised support for all claimants, including those with a terminal illness. We are continuously reviewing and improving the service for vulnerable people who claim Universal Credit to ensure that it is accessible and responsive to their needs. This includes how they are identified and supported, either from our own staff or via referrals from local services.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants who applied for universal credit died within six months of having their application rejected in each year from 2016 to 2018.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

The Department takes seriously the need to support vulnerable claimants. We are committed to supporting those with health conditions, and ensuring that terminally ill patients are treated with the utmost sensitivity and care, when making a claim to Universal Credit.

Universal Credit provides enhanced personalised support for all claimants, including those with a terminal illness. We are continuously reviewing and improving the service for vulnerable people who claim Universal Credit to ensure that it is accessible and responsive to their needs. This includes how they are identified and supported, either from our own staff or via referrals from local services.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit claimants using the standard application route have been rejected and subsequently applied under the special rules for terminal illness route.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

The Department takes seriously the need to support vulnerable claimants. We are committed to supporting those with health conditions, and ensuring that terminally ill patients are treated with the utmost sensitivity and care, when making a claim to Universal Credit.

Universal Credit provides enhanced personalised support for all claimants, including those with a terminal illness. We are continuously reviewing and improving the service for vulnerable people who claim Universal Credit to ensure that it is accessible and responsive to their needs. This includes how they are identified and supported, either from our own staff or via referrals from local services.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of employment support allowance in each year since 2010.

I would like to refer the Hon. Member to the Department’s published benefit expenditure information, which can be found in the public domain:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/benefit-expenditure-and-caseload-tables-2019.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the cost to the public purse was of revising her Department's guidance notes for the DS1500 form.

The Department’s recent work to revise the guidance notes section of the DS1500 was completed through DWP standard processes and incurred no additional costs to the public purse.

14th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 28 May 2019 to Question 256267 on State Retirement Pensions, what estimate he has made of the number of cases where a person has received an inaccurate state pension forecast as a result of part of their state pension being contracted out.

I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Chancellor. State Pension forecasts are based on the individual’s National Insurance record that is held at the time the forecast is produced. There may be subsequent changes to the National Insurance information; additionally for a small percentage of National Insurance records the information may be incomplete. Where this is the case, this may affect the State Pension forecast. For this reason the forecasts make it clear that they are subject to change.

HMRC and DWP continue to work closely to improve our ability to identify and correct inaccuracies as quickly as possible. Where inaccurate or incomplete National Insurance records are identified they are routinely corrected by HMRC. Additionally, HMRC also ensure that any inconsistencies that remain on an individual’s National Insurance record are investigated in the period leading up to State Pension age to ensure the correct amount of State Pension is put into payment.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the administrative cost is of processing a new application for personal independence payment under normal rules.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the cost is to the public purse of processing a new personal independence payment application under special rules for terminal illness.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 30 April 2019 to Question 245707, Personal Independence Payment: Terminal Illnesses, whether the Assessment Provider discusses a personal independence payment claim made under special rules for terminal illness with the claimant’s GP prior to rejecting as a special rules case for not satisfying the terminally ill definition.

Assessment Providers undertake Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessments under the Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI) provisions in accordance with the department’s PIP Assessment Guide. Medical evidence is required to be able to advise the department on a claim, and this is often provided on form DS1500 along with the claim.

When it appears that the criteria for a SRTI claim is not met, the Assessment Provider will contact the health professional(s) named on the customer’s claim or records to clarify the situation prior to issuing their advice to the department.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 30 April 2019 to Question 245707, Personal Independence Payment: Terminal Illnesses, what criteria is used by Assessment Providers to determine whether a claimant does not satisfy the terminally ill definition.

The criteria used by Personal Independence Payment Assessment Providers dealing with claims under Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI) are set out in legislation and are that the claimant: ‘is suffering from a progressive disease and death in consequence of that disease can reasonably be expected within 6 months’.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 18 March 2019 to Question 230077, Personal Independence Payment, for what reasons 100 claims made under special rules for the terminally ill were disallowed due to non-return of Part 2 within the time limit.

The information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Some claims to Personal Independence Payment made under special rules for terminally ill people can be found not to satisfy the definition of terminal illness. When this occurs the claim is processed under the normal rules, which includes asking the claimant to complete a PIP2 questionnaire. A claim can be disallowed if the claimant fails to return the PIP2 questionnaire under the normal rules process, even though the claimant originally made their claim under special rules for terminally ill people.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the accessibility of the digital DS1500 service by GPs in the Welsh NHS who do not (a) have NHS smartcards and (b) use NHS.net email addresses.

User research with clinicians to develop the Report that a patient may live less than 6 months (Digital DS1500) found that using the NHS smartcard authentication into the service was the preferred approach to ensure sensitive patient data was protected. Extending smartcard identity management into Wales would be a decision for NHS Wales and at present there are no active plans to pursue this.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2019 to Question 209781, Personal Independence Payment: Terminal Illnesses, how many claimants who registered under special rules for terminal illness over a year after being disallowed at initial decision under normal rules died within (a) three months and (b) six months of their registration.

Between April 2013 and October 2018, 2,840 Personal Independence Payments (PIP) claims were registered under Special Rules for Terminally Ill people (SRTI) by claimants at least 12 months after they had previously been disallowed at initial decision under normal rules. To put this into context, over 4 million applications to PIP were made between April 2013 and 31st October 2018.

The table below shows the number of these PIP claimants who died within 3 months or within 6 months of their SRTI registration between April 2013 and 30th April 2019.

Table 1: Number of Claimants who died after their Special Rules for The Terminally Ill registration which took place at least 12 months after a Normal Rules initial disallowance

Time between Special Rules Registration and Death

Number of Claimants

Less Than 3 Months

440

Less Than 6 Months

740

Source: PIP ADS and Customer Information System

Notes:

  • These figures include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • By definition the less than 3 months’ figure is included in the less than 6 months’ figure.
  • These figures include claimants whose case was disallowed at initial decision under Normal rules who then went on to make a subsequent claim under SRTi at least 12 months later. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP.
  • Only the closest subsequent registration is counted. For example, a claimant may have made more than one subsequent claim under SRTI. In such a case, only the closest subsequent registration is counted in this data.
  • Only the closest initial clearance is counted. For example, a claimant may have had multiple disallowances under Normal Rules for different claims. In such a case, only the closest initial disallowance to the subsequent registration is counted in this data.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Data is as recorded on the PIP Computer System.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Figures cover Special Rules registrations made up to and including 31st October 2018 and claimant deaths up to 30th April 2019.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2019 to Question 209781, Personal Independence Payment: Terminal Illnesses, how much it cost in administration to process claims from initially registering under normal rules to receiving an award under special rules for terminal illness.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 30 April 2019 to Question 245707, Personal Independence Payment: Terminal Illnesses, what (a) qualifications and (b) training Assessment Providers have to determine whether a special rules case should be rejected for not satisfying the terminally ill definition.

Healthcare Professionals undertake Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessments under the Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI) provisions in accordance with the department’s PIP Assessment Guide. Healthcare Professionals dealing with claims under SRTI are (a) fully qualified in their health discipline and (b) have a broad training in disability analysis. As well as their qualified profession, the Department recognises the importance of ensuring individuals also have sufficient experience, skills and training to undertake assessments and so any health professional undertaking assessments must also have at least two years' experience following registration. Both Assessment Providers conform to a rigorous set of standards regarding staff recruitment and training which are being closely monitored by the department.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she has made an assessment of the effectiveness of Scottish Government guidance for registered medical professionals on making clinical judgments about terminal illness; and if she will make a statement.

It is a matter for the Scottish Government how they assess entitlement for devolved benefits and to decide on appropriate guidance to support that.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether Scottish Government guidance for registered medical professionals on making clinical judgments about terminal illness was a contributory factor in revised UK guidance notes for the DS1500 form.

A variety of stakeholders were involved in the development of the revised guidance notes for the DS1500 form. This included specialist clinicians as well as disability charities, representing a broad clinical perspective. This work was a result of our continual improvement activity and engagement with stakeholders.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many (a) consultants, (b) GPs and (c) specialist nurses were consulted during the process to develop the revised guidance notes for the DS1500 form.

A variety of stakeholders were involved in the development of the revised guidance notes for the DS1500 form. This included specialist clinicians as well as disability charities, representing a broad clinical perspective. This work was a result of our continual improvement activity and engagement with stakeholders.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have been called for reassessment for personal independence payments after their three year award under special rules for terminal illness came to an end; and if she will make a statement.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claimants under Special Rules for Terminal Illness do not undergo an Award Review at the end of their three-year award. Claimants can make an advanced new claim towards the end of their existing award and, without a face-to-face assessment, can have their claim fast-tracked.

20th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many state pension forecasts have been revised down after people have raised discrepancies with their statements in each of the last five years.

State Pension Forecasts are based on the National Insurance record at the time the State Pension Forecast is produced. If the National Insurance record changes subsequently this will affect the forecast. The DWP does not hold data in relation to changes to State Pension Forecasts following discrepancies being raised by customers. Where discrepancies are identified the DWP refers to HMRC for investigation.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to ensure the accuracy of state pension forecasts.

State Pension Forecasts are based on the National Insurance record at the time the State Pension Forecast is produced. If the National Insurance record changes subsequently this will affect the forecast. The DWP does not hold data in relation to changes to State Pension Forecasts following discrepancies being raised by customers. Where discrepancies are identified the DWP refers to HMRC for investigation.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2019 to Question 209776 on Personal Independence Payment, how many of the 56,920 claimants of personal independence payments who died within six months of their claim being registered received a payment claimed under (a) the normal rules and (b) the special rules for terminal illness process.

Over 3.6 million applications to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. 73,870 of these claimants died within 6 months of their claim being registered.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

56,950* of the 73,870 claims have been credited with a payment. 16,520 and 40,430 of these claimants registered their PIP claim under Normal Rules and Special Rules for Terminal Illness respectively.

*This is a slight increase on the answer to Question 209776 (56,920) as payments continue to be credited.

There is no evidence in this data to suggest someone’s reason for claiming PIP was the cause of their death and it would be misleading to suggest otherwise. People claim PIP for various reasons, the majority of which are non-life threatening.

Notes:

  • These figures include claims made under both Normal Rules and Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI) and include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018 and clearances up to and including 31st October 2018.
  • Data is as recorded on the PIP Computer System.
  • GB only.

18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 18 March 2019 to Question 230076 on Personal Independence Payment, how many claimants of personal independence payments over that period who applied under the special rules for terminal illness process and had their claim disallowed subsequently lived for longer than six months; what medical conditions those claimants had; and what reasons were given for their claims being disallowed.

Table 1A shows the main disabling conditions of personal independence payment (PIP) claimants who registered a claim under special rules for terminal illness (SRTI) and were disallowed but had not died within 6 months of their claim being registered. The claim may have been disallowed under normal rules or special rules for terminal illness as claims can transition between the two as the claim progresses. The Department only records a claimant’s disability at assessment so does not hold this information where a claimant was disallowed prior to attending an assessment.

Table 1A: Disability Category of claimants who registered a claim under SRTI and were disallowed and had not died within 6 months of registration. Registrations to 30th April 2018 and Clearances to 31st October 2018.

Disability

Number of Outcomes

Autoimmune disease (connective tissue disorders)

30

Cardiovascular disease

250

Diseases of the immune system

-

Diseases of the liver, gallbladder, biliary tract

110

Endocrine disease

110

Gastrointestinal disease

110

Genitourinary disease

140

Haematological Disease

30

Hearing disorders

30

Infectious disease

90

Malignant disease

1,070

Metabolic disease

-

Musculoskeletal disease (general)

290

Musculoskeletal disease (regional)

420

Neurological disease

350

Psychiatric disorders

820

Respiratory disease

280

Skin disease

50

Unknown or missing

2,610

Visual disease

30

Total (ALL)

6,830

*The Department only records a claimant’s disability at assessment so does not hold this information where a claimant was disallowed prior to attending an assessment.

Table 1B shows the first outcomes at the initial assessment of PIP claimants who had registered a claim under SRTI but were disallowed and had not died within 6 months of their claim being registered.

It is possible for a PIP claim made under special rules for terminal illness to be rejected as a special rules case by the Assessment Provider for not satisfying the terminally ill definition. When this occurs the claim is subsequently referred back to the Department for Work and Pensions and the claim process will proceed under normal rules. A claim can be disallowed for the claimant failing to return the PIP2 form or attend an assessment under the normal rules process, even though the claimant originally registered under special rules.

Table 1B: Outcome of claimants who had not died 6 months after registration: Registrations to 30th April 2018 and Clearances to 31st October 2018.

Outcome

Number of Outcomes

Disallowed pre-referral to the AP

440

Disallowed pre-referral to the AP - due to non return of Part 2 within the time limit

1,450

Disallowed post-referral to the AP - Failed Assessment

4,160

Disallowed post-referral to the AP - FTA

780

Total

6,830

Source: PIP ADS

Notes:

  • These figures include claims made under SRTI and include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • The Normal Rules and Special Rules indicator is taken at the point of registration. It’s possible during the claim to move between Special Rules and Normal Rules and vice- versa as the claim progresses. This may mean that someone who registers under Special Rules moves to Normal Rules during the process and is invited to an assessment but is marked as Special Rules here.
  • Data is based on primary disabling condition as recorded on the PIP and DLA computer systems. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which the decision is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • The outcome is the first DWP decision recorded on the PIP Computer system. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or Appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP. Some cases do not have a decision recorded.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Data is as recorded on the PIP Computer System.
  • Components may not sum to the whole.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018 and clearances up to and including 31st October 2018.
  • Figures cover claimant deaths up to and including 31st October 2018.
  • “#” indicates fewer than 5 cases
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 18 March 2019 to Question 230077 on Personal Independence Payment, which team is responsible for making decisions to disallow claims under special rules for the terminally ill prior to a referral to the assessment provider.

Cases under Special Rules for the Terminally Ill are routinely referred to the Assessment Provider for a decision and not disallowed by DWP staff. The exception to this would only be when a claim is made by a customer outside of the age restrictions or where there is no recourse to public funds e.g. fails to meet nationality requirements.

Previous Question 230077 asked about claims made under special rules for terminal illness and reason for disallowance. It is possible for a PIP claim made under special rules for terminal illness to be rejected as a special rules case by the Assessment Provider for not satisfying the terminally ill definition. When this occurs the claim is subsequently referred back to the Department for Work and Pensions and the claim process will proceed under normal rules. A claim can be disallowed for the claimant failing to return the PIP2 form or failing to attend an assessment under the normal rules process, even though the claimant originally registered under special rules.

18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 18 March 2019 to Question 230077 on Personal Independence Payment, whether it is a requirement to complete and return Part 2 of the Personal Independence Payment application form for claims made under special rules for the terminally ill.

There is no requirement for a claimant claiming under Special Rules for the Terminally Ill to complete Part 2 of the Personal Independence Payment application form. Where an Assessment Provider believes that a claimant does not satisfy the criteria to claim under Special Rules for the Terminally Ill and the claim is to progress under normal rules then a part 2 would need to be completed.

18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 18 March 2019 to Question 230077 on Personal Independence Payment, what steps she is taking to identify the reasons for claimants failing to attend assessments.

If a claimant fails to attend an assessment the Assessment Provider shares any reasons provided by the claimant with DWP.

If the case is a New Claim no further enquiries are made unless where a case is disallowed a Mandatory Reconsideration is requested, in which case, further enquiries are made to establish if there was “good reason” for the claimant Failing to Attend.

If the case is a PIP Reassessment or an Award Review and the claimant fails to attend the case is referred to a Case Manager to consider the impact on benefit already in payment and further enquiries are made to establish reasons for non attendance.

18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 18 March 2019 to Question 230077, Personal Independence Payment, how any claimants failed to attend assessments as a result of (a) ill health, (b) death, (c) transport difficulties and (d) accessibility issues of the assessment centre.

The information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Question 230077 asked about claims made under special rules for terminal illness and reason for disallowance. It is possible for a PIP claim made under special rules for terminal illness to be rejected as a special rules case by the Assessment Provider for not satisfying the terminally ill definition. When this occurs the claim is subsequently referred back to the Department for Work and Pensions and the claim process will proceed under normal rules where a claimant may be required to attend an assessment. A claim can be disallowed for the claimant failing to attend an assessment under the normal rules process, even though the claimant originally registered under special rules.

25th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants who applied for (a) attendance allowance, (b) employment support allowance and (c) universal credit have died within six months of having those applications rejected.

The Department holds data across a number of data sets which would require analysis and quality assurance and would be a substantial piece of work to bring together to answer these questions; therefore the information requested could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

25th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants of (a) attendance allowance, (b) employment support allowance and (c) universal credit have died after registering those claims but prior to her Department making a decision on those claims; and how many of those claimants applied for those social security benefits under (i) normal and (ii) special rules.

The Department holds data across a number of data sets which would require analysis and quality assurance and would be a substantial piece of work to bring together to answer these questions; therefore the information requested could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

25th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many employment support allowance claimants who have had their application rejected under normal rules have subsequently reapplied for that social security benefit under the special rules for terminal illness process; and what medical conditions those claimants had.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

25th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit claimants who have had their application rejected under normal rules have subsequently reapplied for that social security benefit under the special rules for terminal illness process; and what medical conditions those claimants had.

The special rules applying to people who are terminally ill were first introduced in 1990 for Attendance Allowance following a recommendation from the Social Security Advisory Committee. The rules are common to a range of benefits and are also used elsewhere, for example the Early Access to Financial Assistance Scheme, administered by the Pension Protection Fund. The design of Universal Credit for terminally ill claimants is based on this well tested process. This is not a separate entitlement; this is part of the Universal Credit process, and as such, the information requested is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost. The Department is currently looking into what analytical information it can publish.

25th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many attendance allowance claimants who have had their application rejected under normal rules have subsequently reapplied for that social security benefit under the special rules for terminal illness process; and what medical conditions those claimants had.

The information requested is not available. When a decision is made not to award Attendance Allowance, the claim is closed. Any further application would be treated as a new claim and will be considered on the merits of the information provided.

25th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 1 Feb 2019 to Question 209781 on Personal Independence Payment, how many personal independence payments claimants died within six months of their claim being disallowed at initial decision under normal rules.

Over 3.8 million applications to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were made between April 2013 and 31st July 2018. Of these, 10,380 PIP claimants died within six months of their claim being disallowed at initial decision under normal rules.

There is no evidence in this data to suggest someone’s reason for claiming PIP was the cause of their death and it would be misleading to suggest otherwise. People claim PIP for various reasons, the majority of which are non-life threatening.

Notes:

  • These figures include claims cleared under normal rules as recorded at the point of disallowance.
  • These figures include claimants whose initial claim was disallowed after assessment, for failing to attend assessment, for failing to return the PIP2 form or for failing lay rules. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP.
  • The point of initial decision on the application to PIP is taken as the day the DWP decision maker made a decision and recorded it on the PIP computer system.
  • This data includes both new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) reassessment claims.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10 and “six months” has been measured in months for example, 5th March to the 5th April is one month.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 31st July 2018 and claimant deaths up to and including 31st January 2019.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

25th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 1 Feb 2019 to Question 209781 on Personal Independence Payment, what the average length of time was between a claimant receiving an award under special rules for terminal illness and initially registering that claim under normal rules.

The median time between registration and clearance for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claims that were initially registered under Normal Rules but were awarded under Special Rules for Terminal Illness is 34 working days for all claims cleared between April 2013 to the end of January 2019. For reference, the clearance time from the point a claim changes from Normal Rules to Special Rules for Terminal Illness to clearance under Special Rules for Terminal Illness is 3 working days.

Source: PIP ADS

Notes:

  • Figures have been rounded to the nearest working day, i.e. Monday to Friday (including bank holidays).

  • This data includes both new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) reassessment claims.

  • The median time is the middle value if you were to order all the times within the distribution from lowest value to highest value. The median is presented here instead of the mean because the mean can be unduly affected by outlying cases (e.g. cases were the person has been hard to reach due to being in prison, hospital, failed to attend the assessment on numerous occasions etc.)

  • The 'Registration to DWP decision (end to end)' clearance time is measured as the average time between the date of registration of the claim and the date of the DWP decision to either award or disallow the claim. It does not include claims that were withdrawn by the claimant or claims that were disallowed by DWP pre-referral to the Assessment Providers (e.g. for failure to meet basic eligibility criteria).

  • This is unpublished data. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are for Great Britain only.

  • Figures are correct as at 31st January 2019.

8th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2019 to Question 209781 on Personal Independence Payment, what the recorded reasons for claimants being disallowed at initial decision under normal rules.

With reference to Answer 209781, between April 2013 and October 2018, 5,630 Personal Independence Payments (PIP) claims were registered under Special Rules for Terminally Ill people (SRTI) by claimants who had previously been disallowed at initial decision under normal rules prior to 30th April 2018. To put this into context, over 4 million applications to PIP were made between April 2013 and 31st October 2018.

Of these 5,630 initial claims under normal rules, 3,160 (56%) had been disallowed at assessment, 310 (6%) had been disallowed for failing to attend assessment, 2,000 (36%) had been disallowed for failing to return a PIP2 form and 160 (3%) had been disallowed for other reasons prior to an assessment taking place.

Notes:

  • These figures include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • It is possible for claims to transition between Normal Rules and SRTI during the claimant journey. Included in these figures are claimants assessed under normal rules at the point of initial decision whose subsequent claim was treated as SRTI at the point of registration.
  • These figures include claimants whose case was disallowed at initial decision after assessment, for failing to attend assessment, for failing to return the PIP2 form or for failing lay rules. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or Appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP.
  • Only the most recent initial clearance is counted. For example, a claimant may have had multiple disallowances under Normal Rules for different claims. In such a case, only the most recent initial disallowance to the subsequent registration is counted in this data.
  • Only the closest subsequent registration to the initial clearance as outlined above is counted. For example, a claimant may have made more than one subsequent claim under SRTI. In such a case, only the closest subsequent registration is counted in this data.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Figures cover disallowances up to and including 30th April 2018 and subsequent registrations made up to and including 31st October 2018.
  • There has been a slight adjustment to the figures as presented in Answer 209781 to account for claimants who made multiple applications under both Normal Rules and SRTI.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

8th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2019 to Question 209780 on Personal Independence Payment, how many personal independence payment claimants who died within three months of their initial application being disallowed had made previous claims that were refused.

Over 3.5 million applications to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018 under Normal Rules. Of these, 3,590 claimants died within three months of their initial application being disallowed.

The table below shows the number of PIP claimants who died within three months of their application under normal rules being disallowed and these claimants’ disabilities. The Department only records a claimant’s disability at assessment so does not hold this information where a claimant was disallowed prior to attending an assessment.

Table: PIP claimants under normal rules who died within three months of their application being disallowed, by category of disability (where available)

Disability category

No. claimants with this disability

Autoimmune disease (connective tissue disorders)

10

Cardiovascular disease

90

Diseases of the immune system

#

Diseases of the liver, gallbladder, biliary tract

70

Endocrine disease

50

Gastrointestinal disease

20

Genitourinary disease

30

Haematological Disease

#

Hearing disorders

10

Infectious disease

10

Malignant disease

120

Metabolic disease

#

Musculoskeletal disease (general)

120

Musculoskeletal disease (regional)

110

Neurological disease

120

Psychiatric disorders

400

Respiratory disease

110

Skin disease

10

Unknown or missing

2,310

Visual disease

10

Total

3,590

Source: PIP ADS

630 of these claimants had previously been disallowed at least once in their initial application for PIP.

In addition, 90 claimants who applied under Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI) died within three months of their initial application being disallowed. Of these, 10 had previously been disallowed at least once in their initial application for PIP.

The cause of death of claimants to PIP is not collated centrally by the Department and the recorded condition may not have been the cause of death of the claimant.

Notes:

  • These figures include claimants whose initial claim was disallowed after assessment, for failing to attend assessment, for failing to return the PIP2 form or for failing lay rules. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP.
  • Figures include both New Claims and reassessments from Disability Living Allowance (DLA).
  • The point of initial decision on the application to PIP is taken as the day the DWP decision maker made a decision and recorded it on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10, “#” indicates a total of less than 5 and “three months” has been taken to be 93 days or less.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

8th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 1 February 2019 to Question 209780 on Personal Independence Payment, how many personal independence payment claimants who died within three months of their initial application being disallowed applied under normal rules; and what conditions those claimants had.

Over 3.5 million applications to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018 under Normal Rules. Of these, 3,590 claimants died within three months of their initial application being disallowed.

The table below shows the number of PIP claimants who died within three months of their application under normal rules being disallowed and these claimants’ disabilities. The Department only records a claimant’s disability at assessment so does not hold this information where a claimant was disallowed prior to attending an assessment.

Table: PIP claimants under normal rules who died within three months of their application being disallowed, by category of disability (where available)

Disability category

No. claimants with this disability

Autoimmune disease (connective tissue disorders)

10

Cardiovascular disease

90

Diseases of the immune system

#

Diseases of the liver, gallbladder, biliary tract

70

Endocrine disease

50

Gastrointestinal disease

20

Genitourinary disease

30

Haematological Disease

#

Hearing disorders

10

Infectious disease

10

Malignant disease

120

Metabolic disease

#

Musculoskeletal disease (general)

120

Musculoskeletal disease (regional)

110

Neurological disease

120

Psychiatric disorders

400

Respiratory disease

110

Skin disease

10

Unknown or missing

2,310

Visual disease

10

Total

3,590

Source: PIP ADS

630 of these claimants had previously been disallowed at least once in their initial application for PIP.

In addition, 90 claimants who applied under Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI) died within three months of their initial application being disallowed. Of these, 10 had previously been disallowed at least once in their initial application for PIP.

The cause of death of claimants to PIP is not collated centrally by the Department and the recorded condition may not have been the cause of death of the claimant.

Notes:

  • These figures include claimants whose initial claim was disallowed after assessment, for failing to attend assessment, for failing to return the PIP2 form or for failing lay rules. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP.
  • Figures include both New Claims and reassessments from Disability Living Allowance (DLA).
  • The point of initial decision on the application to PIP is taken as the day the DWP decision maker made a decision and recorded it on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10, “#” indicates a total of less than 5 and “three months” has been taken to be 93 days or less.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

8th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2019 to Question 209778 on Personal Independence Payment, how many of the 7,990 personal independence payment claimants who died within six months of their claim being registered and had their claim disallowed applied under special rules for terminal illness; what conditions such claimants had; and what reasons were given for their claim being disallowed.

Over 3.6 million applications to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. Of these, 73,800 claimants died within 6 months of their claim being registered. Prior to any Mandatory Reconsideration or Appeal action, 7,990 of these claimants had their claims disallowed.

Table 1A, shows the main disabling conditions of the 7,990 claimants who were disallowed and died within 6 months of their claim being registered, split by whether the claim was lodged under Normal Rules or Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI). The Department only records a claimant’s disability at assessment so does not hold this information where a claimant was disallowed prior to attending an assessment.

The cause of death of claimants to PIP is not collated centrally by the Department and the recorded condition may not have been the cause of death of the claimant.

Table 1A: Disability Category of claimants who were disallowed and died within 6 months of registration: Registrations to 30th April 2018 and Clearances to 31st October 2018.

Disability Category

Normal Rules

Special Rules for the Terminally Ill

Total

Autoimmune disease (connective tissue disorders)

20

#

20

Cardiovascular disease

140

10

140

Diseases of the immune system

#

#

#

Diseases of the liver, gallbladder, biliary tract

110

20

140

Endocrine disease

60

#

60

Gastrointestinal disease

30

#

30

Genitourinary disease

40

10

40

Haematological Disease

10

#

10

Hearing disorders

10

#

10

Infectious disease

10

#

10

Malignant disease

200

790

980

Metabolic disease

#

#

#

Musculoskeletal disease (general)

130

#

130

Musculoskeletal disease (regional)

130

#

130

Neurological disease

170

10

180

Psychiatric disorders

520

#

520

Respiratory disease

160

10

160

Skin disease

10

#

10

Unknown or missing

5,190

210

5,400

Visual disease

10

#

10

Total

6,930

1,060

7,990

Source: PIP ADS

Table 1B shows the outcomes at the initial assessment of the 7,990 claimants who were disallowed and died within 6 months of their claim being registered, split by whether the claim was lodged under Normal Rules or SRTI.

Table 1B: Outcome of claimants who died 6 months after registration split by Normal Rules and Special Rules: Registrations to 30th April 2018 and Clearances to 31st October 2018.

Outcome

Normal Rules

Special Rules for the Terminally Ill

Total

Disallowed pre-referral to the Assessment Provider

960

570

1,530

Disallowed due to non-return of Part 2 within the time limit

3,910

310

4,220

Disallowed - Failed Assessment

1,320

140

1,460

Disallowed - Failed to Attend Assessment

750

30

780

Total

6,930

1,060

7,990

Source: PIP ADS

Notes:

  • These figures include claims made under both Normal Rules and SRTI and include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • The Normal Rules and Special Rules indicator is taken at the point of registration. It’s possible during the claim to move between Normal Rules and Special Rules and vice- versa as the claim progresses. This may mean that someone who registers under Special Rules moves to Normal Rules during the process and is invited to an assessment but is marked as Special Rules here.
  • Data is based on primary disabling condition as recorded on the PIP and DLA computer systems. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which the decision is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • The outcome is the first DWP decision recorded on the PIP Computer system. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or Appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP. Some cases do not have a decision recorded.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Components may not sum to the whole.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018 and clearances up to and including 31st October 2018.
  • “#” indicates fewer than 5 cases
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

8th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2019 to Question 209778 on Personal Independence Payment, how many of the 7,990 personal independence payment claimants who died within six months of their claim being registered and had their claim disallowed applied under normal rules; what conditions such claimants had; and what reasons were given for their claims being disallowed.

Over 3.6 million applications to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. Of these, 73,800 claimants died within 6 months of their claim being registered. Prior to any Mandatory Reconsideration or Appeal action, 7,990 of these claimants had their claims disallowed.

Table 1A, shows the main disabling conditions of the 7,990 claimants who were disallowed and died within 6 months of their claim being registered, split by whether the claim was lodged under Normal Rules or Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI). The Department only records a claimant’s disability at assessment so does not hold this information where a claimant was disallowed prior to attending an assessment.

The cause of death of claimants to PIP is not collated centrally by the Department and the recorded condition may not have been the cause of death of the claimant.

Table 1A: Disability Category of claimants who were disallowed and died within 6 months of registration: Registrations to 30th April 2018 and Clearances to 31st October 2018.

Disability Category

Normal Rules

Special Rules for the Terminally Ill

Total

Autoimmune disease (connective tissue disorders)

20

#

20

Cardiovascular disease

140

10

140

Diseases of the immune system

#

#

#

Diseases of the liver, gallbladder, biliary tract

110

20

140

Endocrine disease

60

#

60

Gastrointestinal disease

30

#

30

Genitourinary disease

40

10

40

Haematological Disease

10

#

10

Hearing disorders

10

#

10

Infectious disease

10

#

10

Malignant disease

200

790

980

Metabolic disease

#

#

#

Musculoskeletal disease (general)

130

#

130

Musculoskeletal disease (regional)

130

#

130

Neurological disease

170

10

180

Psychiatric disorders

520

#

520

Respiratory disease

160

10

160

Skin disease

10

#

10

Unknown or missing

5,190

210

5,400

Visual disease

10

#

10

Total

6,930

1,060

7,990

Source: PIP ADS

Table 1B shows the outcomes at the initial assessment of the 7,990 claimants who were disallowed and died within 6 months of their claim being registered, split by whether the claim was lodged under Normal Rules or SRTI.

Table 1B: Outcome of claimants who died 6 months after registration split by Normal Rules and Special Rules: Registrations to 30th April 2018 and Clearances to 31st October 2018.

Outcome

Normal Rules

Special Rules for the Terminally Ill

Total

Disallowed pre-referral to the Assessment Provider

960

570

1,530

Disallowed due to non-return of Part 2 within the time limit

3,910

310

4,220

Disallowed - Failed Assessment

1,320

140

1,460

Disallowed - Failed to Attend Assessment

750

30

780

Total

6,930

1,060

7,990

Source: PIP ADS

Notes:

  • These figures include claims made under both Normal Rules and SRTI and include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • The Normal Rules and Special Rules indicator is taken at the point of registration. It’s possible during the claim to move between Normal Rules and Special Rules and vice- versa as the claim progresses. This may mean that someone who registers under Special Rules moves to Normal Rules during the process and is invited to an assessment but is marked as Special Rules here.
  • Data is based on primary disabling condition as recorded on the PIP and DLA computer systems. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which the decision is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • The outcome is the first DWP decision recorded on the PIP Computer system. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or Appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP. Some cases do not have a decision recorded.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Components may not sum to the whole.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018 and clearances up to and including 31st October 2018.
  • “#” indicates fewer than 5 cases
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

8th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2019 to Question 209777 on Personal Independence Payment, after how many days on average the 5,290 claimants who applied for personal Independence payment under special rules for terminally ill people died after registering but prior to her Department making a decision.

Between April 2013 and 30th April 2018, 109,000 applications to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were made under Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI).

5,290 of these 109,000 claimants died after registering but prior to the DWP making a decision on their claim. The median time between a PIP registration under SRTI and the death of a claimant whilst waiting for an initial decision was 6 working days.

Notes:

  • These figures include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • Special rules indicator is taken at the point of registration. It is possible for claims to transition between normal rules and special rules for terminally ill people during the claimant journey.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • The median time is the middle value if you were to order all the times within the distribution from lowest value to highest value. The median is presented here instead of the mean because the mean can be unduly affected by outlying cases (e.g. cases were the person has been hard to reach due to being in prison, hospital, failed to attend the assessment on numerous occasions etc.)
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and S125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

8th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer 1 February 2019 to Question 209777 on Personal Independence Payment, what the medical conditions were of personal independence payment claimants who applied under normal rules and died after registering but prior to her Department making a decision on their claim.

Over 3.5 million applications to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were made under Normal Rules between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. Of these claimants, 11,790 died after registering but prior to the DWP making a decision on their claim.

The table below shows the high level category of the main disabling condition, where one is available, of the 11,790 Normal Rules claimants who died after registration but before clearance. The Department only records a claimant’s disability at assessment so does not hold this information where a claimant was disallowed prior to attending an assessment.

The cause of death of claimants to PIP is not collated centrally by the Department and the recorded disabling condition may not have been the cause of death of the claimant.

Disability Category

Number of Claimants

Autoimmune disease (connective tissue disorders)

30

Cardiovascular disease

260

Diseases of the immune system

#

Diseases of the liver, gallbladder, biliary tract

250

Endocrine disease

60

Gastrointestinal disease

30

Genitourinary disease

100

Haematological Disease

10

Hearing disorders

#

Infectious disease

10

Malignant disease

630

Metabolic disease

10

Multisystem and extremes of age

#

Musculoskeletal disease (general)

170

Musculoskeletal disease (regional)

160

Neurological disease

340

Psychiatric disorders

690

Respiratory disease

410

Skin disease

30

Unknown or missing

8,590

Visual disease

20

Total

11,790

Source: PIP ADS

Notes:

  • These figures include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • Data is based on primary disabling condition as recorded on the PIP and DLA computer systems. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which the decision is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics.
  • SRTI indicator is taken at the point of registration. It is possible for claims to transition between normal rules and special rules for terminally ill people during the claimant journey.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • ‘#’ indicates were fewer than 5 cases.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

7th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to reduce length of time it takes for a claimant to receive their first universal credit payment after the claimant’s first assessment period has ended.

The Department has implemented a range of measures to support claimants during the transition to Universal Credit. New claimants can apply for a Universal Credit advance within 72 hours and can receive payment within a day if needed. We have previously increased the maximum amount available for advances from 50 per cent to 100 per cent of the claimant’s total indicative award, and have increased the repayment period from 6 months to 12 months.

Since April 2018 Housing Benefit claimants moving on to Universal Credit are also provided with a ‘transition to Universal Credit housing payment’, equivalent to 2 weeks of housing costs. Additionally, Autumn Budget 2018 announced plans to introduce, from July 2020, a two-week run-on of Employment Support Allowance Income Related (ESA IR), income based Jobseeker’s Allowance and Income Support (IS) which provides an extra two weeks of benefits for people moved onto Universal Credit from those benefits. These run-on payments are intended to help claimants during their first assessment period, as they wait for their first monthly payment, and do not need to be repaid.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
4th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 11 January 2019 to Question 203813, how many applications were subsequently successful of claimants who died after registering but prior to her Department making a decision on their claim.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is claimed by people with a range of health conditions and disabilities, many of which are degenerative or life limiting and the Department aims to treat the death of any claimant sympathetically. Claims made under the special rules for people who are terminally ill are fast tracked and are currently being cleared within 6 working days for new claimants. The cause of death of PIP claimants is not collated centrally by the Department.

Over 3.6 million applications to PIP were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. Of these, 17,070 claimants died after registering but prior to the DWP making a decision on their claim.

Of those 17,070, the Department made an initial decision to award PIP for 5,420 claims. This data is prior to any Mandatory Reconsideration or Appeal action.

If a claimant dies before a decision is made on an outstanding claim, the Department establishes whether the claimant’s representative or next of kin wishes to proceed with the claim. If not, the claim is withdrawn. Around 7,610 of the 17,070 claims were withdrawn rather than awarded or disallowed.

The table below shows the outcomes of PIP decisions that were made on the 17,070 claimants who died prior to the Decision being made:

Outcome of Initial Decision*

Number of Claims

Awarded

5,420

Disallowed pre-referral to the Assessment Provider

1,220

Disallowed pre-referral to the Assessment Provider - due to non-return of Part 2 within the time limit

2,070

Disallowed post-referral to the Assessment Provider - Failed Assessment

290

Disallowed post-referral to the Assessment Provider - Failed to Attend Assessment

470

Withdrawn

7,610

Total

17,070

Source: PIP ADS

* This data shows the initial decision and may change after Mandatory Reconsideration or Appeal.

Notes:

  • These figures include claims made under both Normal Rules and Special Rules for the Terminally Ill and include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • This data shows the initial decision and may change after Mandatory Reconsideration and Appeal.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Components may not sum to the totals due to rounding.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

There is no evidence in this data to suggest someone’s reason for claiming PIP was the cause of their death and it would be misleading to suggest otherwise. People claim PIP for various reasons, the majority of which are non-life threatening.

4th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 11 January 2019 to Question 203813, how many claimants who died after registering but prior to her Department making a decision on their claim subsequently received a payment to their estate.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is claimed by people with a range of health conditions and disabilities, many of which are degenerative or life limiting and the Department treats the death of any claimant sympathetically. Claims made under the special rules for people who are terminally ill are fast tracked and are currently being cleared within 6 working days for new claimants.

Unfortunately, the information requested on payments to an individual’s estate is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

4th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people are on the severe conditions criteria list; how long those people have been on that list; and what conditions they have.

The Severe Conditions Criteria was introduced on Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) on 29 September 2017 and means that claimants with the most severe and lifelong health conditions or disabilities will no longer be routinely reassessed. We worked closely with the assessment provider, the Centre for Health and Disability Assessments (CHDA), healthcare professionals and disability charities when developing the criteria to cease re-assessments for people with the most severe health conditions or disabilities (unless there is a change in their circumstances).

Since August 2018 we also introduced updated guidance for Personal Independence Payment claimants to ensure that claimants on the highest level of support, whose needs will not improve, receive an ongoing award with a light touch review at the 10-year point.

The information requested on the length of time on the severe conditions criteria list is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

The information requested is not centrally collated for Universal Credit claimants and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

The available information on the number of people on the ESA caseload who have been assessed as meeting the severe conditions criteria, by primary medical condition group and claim duration is shown in the following table.

Number of Employment and Support Allowance claimants on the ESA caseload who have been assessed as meeting the severe conditions criteria, by primary medical condition group and by claim duration, as at the end of May 2018, Great Britain

Number

Total

23,900

By Primary Medical Condition group

Certain Infectious and Parasitic Diseases (A00 - B99)

100

Neoplasms (C00 - D48)

200

Diseases of the Blood and Blood forming organs and certain diseases involving the immune mechanism (D50 - D89)

-

Endocrine, Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases (E00 - E90)

200

Mental and Behavioural Disorders (F00 - F99)

9,500

Diseases of the Nervous System (G00 - G99)

4,700

Diseases of the Eye and Adnexa (H00 - H59)

400

Diseases of the Ear and Mastoid Process (H60 - H95)

200

Diseases of the Circulatory System (I00 - I99)

1,000

Diseases of the Respiratory System (J00 - J99)

500

Diseases of the Digestive System (K00 - K93)

100

Diseases of the Skin and Subcutaneous System (L00 - L99)

-

Diseases of the Musculoskeletal system and Connective Tissue (M00 - M99)

800

Diseases of the Genitourinary System (N00 - N99)

-

Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Puerperium (O00 - O99)

-

Congenital Malformations, Deformations and Chromosomal Abnormalities
(Q00 - Q99)

1,900

Symptoms, Signs and Abnormal Clinical and Laboratory findings, not
elsewhere classified (R00 - R99)

2,300

Injury, Poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00 -
T98)

300

External causes of morbidity and mortality (V01-Y98)

100

Factors influencing health status and contact with health services (Z00 - Z99)

300

Unknown or claimants without diagnosis on the system

1,200

By Duration of claim

under 3 months

900

3- 6 months

1,000

6-12 months

2,000

1-2 years

1,000

2-5 years

10,700

5 years

7,900

Unknown

400

Source: Employment Support Allowance and Work Capability Assessment dataset and Work and Pensions Longitudinal Survey.

Notes:

  1. Statistical disclosure control has been applied to these tables to avoid the release of confidential data. Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 100. ‘-‘ denotes nil or under 50.
  2. The figures may not match with published sources as they have been derived from a different source.
  3. Individuals may have moved into the severe condition criteria list during their claim.
  4. Medical condition classification is based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, published by the World Health Organisation.
  5. Medical condition is based on evidence provided at the start of the claim, this in itself does not confer entitlement to Employment Support Allowance and may not represent a claimant’s most recent medical condition.
  6. For reporting purposes, the disability conditions as recorded on the Employment Support Allowance Benefit system have been mapped to reflect as closely as possible the appropriate ICD10 code.
  7. Where someone has more than one diagnosis or disabling condition, only the predominant one is reported on in these statistics, which should be the most predominant condition.
  8. From 29th September 2017 the Work Capability Assessment criteria changed for some ESA claimants. Claimants in the Support Group no longer need to go for reassessment if they meet the severe condition criteria.

4th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department determines that a claimant has a health condition or disability that qualifies them to apply for personal independence payment at the point of (a) testing, (b) diagnosis or (c) treatment.

Other than for claims from people who are terminally ill, entitlement to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is on the basis of an assessment of an individual’s needs arising from a long-term health condition or disability, not the health condition or disability itself. The definition of a health condition or disability being long-term is through the application of a three month qualifying period, during which a claimant would have met the PIP entitlement conditions, and a nine month prospective test during which they are expected to meet the entitlement conditions. A diagnosis is not a necessary pre-cursor to a decision although details of any treatment may be taken in to account as part of the assessment.

4th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 11 January 2019 to Question 203813, how many people applied for carer’s allowance in relation to personal independence payment claimants who died after registering but prior to her Department making a decision on their claim.

We do not hold administrative data where we could identify people who had applied for Carer’s Allowance in relation to caring for a person who had registered for Personal Independence Payment who died after registering but prior to the Department making a decision on the claim.

4th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people who have been on a DS1500 for over three years have had their benefits (a) reviewed and (b) withdrawn; and what conditions did they have.

The DS1500 is not a claim form and it is not obligatory to use it to provide evidence to support claims from people who are terminally ill. The information requested is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

4th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, which medical bodies and clinicians the Chief Medical Officer liaised with to develop the guidance in the benefit system on terminal illness.

The rules for people who are terminally ill were introduced into Attendance Allowance in 1990 following a recommendation from the Social Security Advisory Committee. The rules have been carried forward into a number of benefits unchanged and now apply across Attendance Allowance, Disability Living Allowance, Employment and Support Allowance, Personal Independence Payment and Universal Credit.

The Department has recently met with a range of stakeholders, including leading clinicians, to discuss the current wording used in the benefit system around terminal illness, with the aim of improving guidance on terminal illness cases and understanding of the rules. This is part of our continuous improvement work to improve people’s experience of claiming benefits.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 11 January 2019 to Question 203813, how many claimants of personal independence payments (PIP) who have had their application rejected under Normal Rules subsequently reapplied for PIP under the Special Rules for Terminal Illness process.

Between April 2013 and October 2018, 5,670 Personal Independence Payments (PIP) claims were registered under Special Rules for Terminally Ill people (SRTI) by claimants who had previously been disallowed at initial decision under normal rules prior to 30th April 2018. To put this into context, over 4 million applications to PIP were made between April 2013 and 31st October 2018.

Of these 5,670 claims, 20% were made within 3 months of the original disallowance, 36% were made within 6 months of the original disallowance and 58% were made within a year of the initial decision. The remaining 42% were made over a year after the original claim was disallowed.

Notes:

  • These figures include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • It is possible for claims to transition between normal rules and SRTI during the claimant journey. Included in these figures are claimants assessed under normal rules at the point of initial decision whose subsequent claim was treated as SRTI at the point of registration.
  • These figures include claimants whose case was disallowed at initial decision after assessment, for failing to attend assessment, for failing to return the PIP2 form or for failing lay rules. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or Appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP.
  • Only the closest subsequent registration is counted. For example, a claimant may have made more than one subsequent claim under SRTI. In such a case, only the closest subsequent registration is counted in this data.
  • Only the closest initial clearance is counted. For example, a claimant may have had multiple disallowances under Normal Rules for different claims. In such a case, only the closest initial disallowance to the subsequent registration is counted in this data.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Figures cover disallowances up to and including 30th April 2018 and subsequent registrations made up to and including 31st October 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants of personal independence payments have died within three months of having their application rejected.

Over 3.6 million applications to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. Between April 2013 and 30th April 2018, 3,680 Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claimants died within three months of their initial application being disallowed.

Claims made under the special rules for people who are terminally ill are fast tracked and are currently being cleared at a median average of 6 working days for new claimants. This has reduced from a median average of 11 working days between April 2013 and March 2014.

Notes:

  • These figures include claims cleared under normal rules and Special Rules for Terminally Ill people (SRTI).
  • These figures include claimants whose initial claim was disallowed after assessment, for failing to attend assessment, for failing to return the PIP2 form or for failing lay rules. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP.
  • The point of initial decision on the application to PIP is taken as the day the DWP decision maker made a decision and recorded it on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10 and “three months” has been taken to be 93 days or less.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 11 January 2019 to Question 203813, how many claimants of personal independence payments (a) had their application rejected under Normal Rules and (b) were subsequently awarded benefits after appeal; and what primary condition those claimants had.

Between April 2013 and September 2018 3.6 million Personal Independence Payment (PIP) decisions have been made under Normal Rules. Of these 1.6 million were disallowed PIP – this will include those who attended the PIP assessment but did not secure enough points, as well as for other reasons such as failing to attend the assessment or not returning Part 2 of the PIP claim form within the time limit.

Of the 1.6 million disallowed PIP, 96,680 had the decision overturned at appeal, representing 6% of disallowance decisions. These appeals will include cases where the initial decision was changed at Mandatory Reconsideration.

Statistics on the primary medical condition for those disallowed PIP at the initial decision are available in the PIP clearances dataset in Stat-Xplore:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html

Details of the claimant’s primary medical condition, where recorded, where decisions were overturned at appeal are in the accompanying spreadsheet.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 11 January 2019 to Question 203813, how many claimants of personal independence payments who died within six months of their claim being registered had their application rejected.

Over 3.6 million applications to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. Of these, 73,800 claimants died within 6 months of their claim being registered.

Prior to any Mandatory Reconsideration or Appeal action, 56,770 and 7,990 of these claimants had their claims awarded and disallowed respectively.

If a claimant dies before a decision is made on an outstanding claim, the Department establishes whether the claimant’s representative or next of kin wishes to proceed with the claim. If not, the claim is withdrawn so around 7,700 of the 73,800 claims were withdrawn rather than awarded or disallowed.

56,920 of the 73,800 claims have been credited with a payment.

Claims made under the special rules for people who are terminally ill are fast tracked and are currently being cleared at a median average of 6 working days for new claimants. This has reduced from a median average of 11 working days between April 2013 and March 2014.

Notes:

  • These figures include claims made under both Normal Rules and Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI) and include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • The outcome is the first DWP decision recorded on the PIP Computer system. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or Appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP. Some cases do not have a decision recorded.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018 and clearances up to and including 31st October 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 11 January 2019 to Question 203813, how many claimants of personal independence payments who died within six months of their claim being registered received a payment.

Over 3.6 million applications to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. Of these, 73,800 claimants died within 6 months of their claim being registered.

Prior to any Mandatory Reconsideration or Appeal action, 56,770 and 7,990 of these claimants had their claims awarded and disallowed respectively.

If a claimant dies before a decision is made on an outstanding claim, the Department establishes whether the claimant’s representative or next of kin wishes to proceed with the claim. If not, the claim is withdrawn so around 7,700 of the 73,800 claims were withdrawn rather than awarded or disallowed.

56,920 of the 73,800 claims have been credited with a payment.

Claims made under the special rules for people who are terminally ill are fast tracked and are currently being cleared at a median average of 6 working days for new claimants. This has reduced from a median average of 11 working days between April 2013 and March 2014.

Notes:

  • These figures include claims made under both Normal Rules and Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI) and include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • The outcome is the first DWP decision recorded on the PIP Computer system. This does not take into account any mandatory reconsideration or Appeal action so some of these claimants may have subsequently been awarded PIP. Some cases do not have a decision recorded.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018 and clearances up to and including 31st October 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer on 11 January 2019 to Question 203813, how many claimants who died after registering a personal independence payments claim but prior to her Department making a decision on their claim applied under (a) Normal Rules and (b) Special Rules.

Over 3.6 million applications to PIP were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. 17,070 of these claimants died after registering but prior to the DWP making a decision on their claim. Over 3.5 million applications were made under normal rules and 11,790 of these claimants died after registering but prior to the DWP making a decision on their claim.

Nearly 109,000 applications were made under special rules for terminally ill people and 5,290 of these claimants died after registering but prior to the DWP making a decision on their claim.

Claims made under the special rules for people who are terminally ill are fast tracked and are currently being cleared at a median average of 6 working days for new claimants. This has reduced from a median average of 11 working days between April 2013 and March 2014.

Notes:

  • These figures include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • Special rules indicator is taken at the point of registration. It is possible for claims to transition between normal rules and special rules for terminally ill people during the claimant journey.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

19th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have died while waiting for their eligibility for personal independence payment to be determined, and what the main disabling condition was of those people.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is claimed by people with a range of health conditions and disabilities, many of which are degenerative or life limiting.

All benefit claims can be made under the special rules for people who are terminally ill which will mean that they are fast tracked. These are currently being cleared within 6 working days for new claimants to PIP. The Department would encourage all claimants with a terminal illness to let the department know and to apply using the special rules.

The cause of death of PIP claimants is not collated centrally by the Department.

Over 3.6 million applications to PIP were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. Of these:

  • 4,760 claimants1 died between their case being referred to, and returned from, an assessment provider;
  • 73,800 claimants died within 6 months of their claim being registered; and
  • 17,070 claimants died after registering but prior to the DWP making a decision on their claim. Details of the claimant’s primary medical condition, where recorded, are in the accompanying spreadsheet.

Notes:

  • These figures include claims made under both Normal Rules and Special Rules for the Terminally Ill and include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • 1These figures only include claimants whose case has been referred to an assessment provider and who died before their case was returned from an assessment provider to DWP. All new claims and DLA to PIP reassessment claims which reach the assessment stage are referred to an assessment provider.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

19th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people who applied for personal independence payment died within six months of making their application.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is claimed by people with a range of health conditions and disabilities, many of which are degenerative or life limiting.

All benefit claims can be made under the special rules for people who are terminally ill which will mean that they are fast tracked. These are currently being cleared within 6 working days for new claimants to PIP. The Department would encourage all claimants with a terminal illness to let the department know and to apply using the special rules.

The cause of death of PIP claimants is not collated centrally by the Department.

Over 3.6 million applications to PIP were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. Of these:

  • 4,760 claimants1 died between their case being referred to, and returned from, an assessment provider;
  • 73,800 claimants died within 6 months of their claim being registered; and
  • 17,070 claimants died after registering but prior to the DWP making a decision on their claim. Details of the claimant’s primary medical condition, where recorded, are in the accompanying spreadsheet.

Notes:

  • These figures include claims made under both Normal Rules and Special Rules for the Terminally Ill and include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • 1These figures only include claimants whose case has been referred to an assessment provider and who died before their case was returned from an assessment provider to DWP. All new claims and DLA to PIP reassessment claims which reach the assessment stage are referred to an assessment provider.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

19th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have died while waiting for their personal independence payment assessment to be completed; and what conditions those people died from.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is claimed by people with a range of health conditions and disabilities, many of which are degenerative or life limiting.

All benefit claims can be made under the special rules for people who are terminally ill which will mean that they are fast tracked. These are currently being cleared within 6 working days for new claimants to PIP. The Department would encourage all claimants with a terminal illness to let the department know and to apply using the special rules.

The cause of death of PIP claimants is not collated centrally by the Department.

Over 3.6 million applications to PIP were made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018. Of these:

  • 4,760 claimants1 died between their case being referred to, and returned from, an assessment provider;
  • 73,800 claimants died within 6 months of their claim being registered; and
  • 17,070 claimants died after registering but prior to the DWP making a decision on their claim. Details of the claimant’s primary medical condition, where recorded, are in the accompanying spreadsheet.

Notes:

  • These figures include claims made under both Normal Rules and Special Rules for the Terminally Ill and include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • 1These figures only include claimants whose case has been referred to an assessment provider and who died before their case was returned from an assessment provider to DWP. All new claims and DLA to PIP reassessment claims which reach the assessment stage are referred to an assessment provider.
  • The point of application is taken as the day the claimant registered a claim to PIP as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Figures cover claims made up to and including 30th April 2018.
  • GB only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

19th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the financial effect of enabling registered healthcare professionals to make clinical judgments about whether illnesses are terminal without using the six-month time limit.

No such assessment has been made. However, the Department has recently engaged with leading clinicians to discuss the current wording and guidance used in the benefit system around terminal illness, with the aim of improving understanding of the Special Rules process and to consider proposed suggestions for improvement. We will also shortly be engaging with disability charities, such as the Motor Neurone Disease Association and others to help inform this work.

19th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she will ask the Scottish Government for advanced sight of the guidance being developed to enable registered medical practitioners to make a clinical judgement on whether an illness is regarded as terminal.

It is for the Scottish Government to decide their policies on the devolved matters under the Scotland Act 2016, my Department is working closely with them. The Joint Ministerial Working Group on Welfare is the forum in which exchanges take place at Ministerial level and officials from the two governments work closely together, including on matters which have an effect on reserved benefits. This includes assessments relevant to disability and carer benefits.

19th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent discussions she has had with the Scottish Government on enabling registered medical practitioners to make clinical judgments about whether illnesses are terminal.

It is for the Scottish Government to decide their policies on the devolved matters under the Scotland Act 2016, my Department is working closely with them. The Joint Ministerial Working Group on Welfare is the forum in which exchanges take place at Ministerial level and officials from the two governments work closely together, including on matters which have an effect on reserved benefits. This includes assessments relevant to disability and carer benefits.

26th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to promote the Access to Work Scheme for people with arthritis and related conditions.

Access to Work continues to undertake targeted awareness of the scheme to the most under-represented groups, including people with musculoskeletal conditions like arthritis. We have worked with Arthritis Research UK (ARUK) and Arthritis Care on marketing Access to Work to their clients, including sharing information about how to apply for the support.

Access to Work is promoted to a range of business leaders through the Disability Confident scheme, to benefit claimants through Jobcentre Plus and we are working with a number of our stakeholders to target employers and health professionals

25th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the state pensions of UK pensioners living in the EEA will continue to be up-rated annually after the UK leaves the EU; and if she will make a statement.

The UK State Pension will remain payable worldwide following our departure from the EU. We have now reached agreement with the EU to maintain State Pension up-rating for those covered by the Withdrawal Agreement, subject to reciprocity. This information can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/safeguarding-the-position-of-eu-citizens-in-the-uk-and-uk-nationals-in-the-eu

For UK State Pension recipients living in the EU on the specified date, this includes those who are already receiving their UK State Pension as well as future UK State Pension recipients. We will wish to discuss State Pension up-rating for individuals not covered by the Withdrawal Agreement in future talks. We are currently in discussion with the EEA-EFTA states (Norway, Iceland, and Liechtenstein) and Switzerland on agreements to protect the rights of UK nationals living in those countries and their nationals living in the UK.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when her Department plans to publish its response to the Supreme Court's ruling on Widowed Parent's Allowance; and if she will make a statement.

We are considering the court’s ruling carefully and will update Parliament in due course.

26th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of (a) personal independence payment and (b) disability living allowance claimants with (i) Motor Neurone Disease and (ii) Parkinson’s Disease receive the highest rate award.

The latest available data on claimants that with Motor Neurone Disease and Parkinson’s disease that receive the highest rate of award is published and available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance for users is available at:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

26th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the Scottish Government's decision to remove the time-limited definition of terminal illness and to allow the clinical judgment of a registered medical practitioner to determine a terminal diagnosis.

It is a matter for the Scottish Government how they assess entitlement for devolved benefits. We will continue to work with the Scottish Government on the interaction between those benefits which are reserved and those which are devolved.

16th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of people have died within (a) six months, (b) one year, (c) two years and (d) more than two years after they were issued with a DS1500.

The information requested is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost. The DS1500 is not compulsory to support claims from people who are terminally ill.

2nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson’s disease with an indefinite disability living allowance award received a (a) one-year award (b) two-year award or (c) no award following reassessment for personal independence payments in the latest period for which figures are available.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Detailed Reassessment Outcome statistics for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/personal-independence-payment-april-2013-to-october-2017

Table 8D of the “Personal Independence Payment: DLA to PIP reassessment outcomes, October 2017” tables shows the outcomes of Disability Living Allowance (DLA) claimants reassessed for PIP by their main disabling condition. Please note this is not broken down by the length of DLA award but will give the DLA reassessment outcome for people with Parkinson’s disease.

2nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson's disease have been given personal independence payment awards of (a) enhanced rate daily living and (b) enhanced rate care by length of award in each of the last three years.

The table below shows the number of people who have been awarded either one or both of the Daily Living and Mobility components at the enhanced rate of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) for awards made between November 1st 2014 and 31st October 2017, where the main disabling condition recorded was Parkinson’s Disease.

Table 1: Enhanced PIP Daily living and Mobility component awards made between 1st November 2014 and 31st October 2015 with main disabling condition recorded as Parkinson’s Disease.

(a) Enhanced Daily Living (may also have Enhanced Mobility)

(b) Enhanced Mobility (may also have Enhanced Daily Living)

Total Awards

1,000

550

Indefinite Award

180

160

Finite

820

390

Of which

Less than 1 year

70

30

1 year

80

30

2 years

270

110

3 years

230

120

4 years

60

30

5 years

70

40

6 years

0

0

7 years

0

0

8 years

0

0

9 years

0

0

10 years

20

40

10+ years

0

0

Short Term Award

10

10

Source: PIP ADS

Table 2: Enhanced PIP Daily living and Mobility component awards made between 1st November 2015 and 31st October 2016 with main disabling condition recorded as Parkinson’s Disease.

(a) Enhanced Daily Living (may also have Enhanced Mobility)

(b) Enhanced Mobility (may also have Enhanced Daily Living)

Total Awards

1,650

1,290

Indefinite Awards

790

730

Finite Awards

870

560

Of which

Less than 1 year

40

20

1 year

60

30

2 years

240

120

3 years

270

190

4 years

80

60

5 years

120

100

6 years

#

#

7 years

0

0

8 years

0

0

9 years

#

#

10 years

50

40

10+ years

#

#

Short Term Award

10

10

Source: PIP ADS

Table 3: Enhanced PIP Daily living and Mobility component awards made between 1st November 2016 and 31st October 2017 with main disabling condition recorded as Parkinson’s Disease

(a) Enhanced Daily Living (may also have Enhanced Mobility)

(b) Enhanced Mobility (may also have Enhanced Daily Living)

Total Awards

2,310

1,890

Indefinite Award

1,440

1,400

Finite Award

870

490

Of which

Less than 1 year

20

10

1 year

30

20

2 years

270

130

3 years

310

160

4 years

100

60

5 years

100

80

6 years

#

#

7 years

0

0

8 years

0

0

9 years

0

0

10 years

30

20

10+ years

0

0

Short Term Award

10

10

Source:PIP ADS

Notes for tables:

  • Figures are based on the first outcome recorded for each case and include both new claims and DLA reassessment claims assessed under normal rules.
  • Data has been rounded to the nearest 10 cases; totals less than 5 but greater than 0 are indicated by “#”.
  • This is unpublished data and it should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • Data is based on main disabling condition as recorded on the PIP computer system.
  • Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which the decision is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics.
  • The one year award length group includes cases whose award lengths are in the range 1-1.5 years. The two years award length group includes cases whose award lengths are in the range 1.5-2.5 years, and so on.
  • The greater than 10 years group includes cases whose lengths are greater than or equal to 10.5 years but excludes cases whose award is indefinite.
  • Award lengths are calculated from the date of on-flow to PIP to the review date.
2nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many completed second or third personal independence payment assessment planned award reviews there have been of people with (a) Parkinson's disease, (b) multiple sclerosis, (c) motor neurone disease, (d) rheumatoid arthritis and (e) cystic fibrosis by year of repeat assessment since the introduction of personal independence payments in 2013; and if she will make a statement.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

2nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson’s disease who previously received the (a) higher rate mobility component and (b) higher rate care component under disability living allowance received (i) a lower rate of award or (ii) no award following reassessment for personal independence payments in the latest period for which figures are available.

The table below shows the number of claimants with Parkinson’s disease who received higher rate mobility or higher rate care awards under DLA but who, following reassessment to PIP, received a standard or nil award.

Table: DLA to PIP Reassessment outcomes for claimants with Parkinson’s disease

Outcome Following Reassessment to PIP

Award Received Under DLA

Standard Rate of Award

No Award

Higher Rate Care Component

190

90

Higher Rate Mobility Component

500

430

Source: PIP Computer System claimant records and DLA Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study claimant data (1st October 2013 to 31st October 2017)

Notes:

1. PIP Reassessment outcome shows the outcome of the first DWP decision on each reassessment claim (i.e. they reflect outcomes prior to any reconsideration appeal action and award review), where that decision was made between 1st October 2013 and 31st October 2017.

2. For each individual who has a PIP reassessment outcome their PIP entitlement has been compared to their DLA entitlement at the time of their PIP reassessment registration.

3. Main disabling condition used is the disability recorded on the DLA administrative system for each individual. This is used because disability information is recorded on the PIP computer systems only for the group of cases who have a PIP assessment report.

4. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which their entitlement decision is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics. It is possible that a reassessment claim could have a different main disabling condition recorded on the DLA and PIP systems.

5. Figures include reassessment outcomes for individuals who were aged between 16 and 64 on 8th April 2013, and include both PIP Normal Rules and Special Rules for the Terminally Ill claims.

6. Figures exclude withdrawn cases.

7. The definition of “Parkinson’s disease” includes a small number of claimants who have “Parkinson’s syndrome”.

  1. The breakdown of data provided is unpublished data. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.

9. Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10.

10. Totals may not sum due to rounding.

11. Great Britain only.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many members of staff have left his Department since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

Since 1 January 2015, 24,889 individuals have left the Department.

We do not know how many of these were nationals of non-UK EU countries. Evidence of nationality is checked at the point of recruitment into the Civil Service, as part of wider pre-employment checks. But, there is no requirement on departments to retain this information, beyond the point at which it has served its purpose.

12th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson's disease have been placed in the (a) support group and (b) work-related activity group with a prognosis statement (i) of three months, (ii) of six months, (iii) of 12 months, (iv) of 18 months, (v) of two years and (vi) in the longer term since the introduction of employment and support allowance in 2008; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 5 September 2017 to Question UIN 6544

http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2017-07-20/6544/

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many women over the age of 60 claim jobseeker's allowance at (a) Bridgend Jobcentre and (b) Porthcawl Jobcentre; and if he will make a statement.

There were 30 female Jobseeker’s Allowance claimants over the age of 60 in the county borough of Bridgend, which includes Porthcawl, as of July 2017.

This information is published by NOMIS and available at https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/default.asp> and can be accessed by choosing the Jobseekers Allowance Age and Duration dataset and selecting “local authorities: county / unitary (as of April 2015) (Oct 2004 onwards)”, age, sex and date.

Guidance for users can be found at https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/home/newuser.asp>.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many completed repeat assessments there have been of people with (a) Parkinson's disease, (b) multiple sclerosis, (c) motor neurone disease, (d) rheumatoid arthritis and (e) cystic fibrosis, by year of repeat assessment, since the introduction of personal independence payments in 2013; and if he will make a statement.

To answer this question, “repeat assessments” has been interpreted to mean Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) reassessments. The table below gives statistics on the number of completed DLA reassessments to PIP by year of DLA reassessment for people with (a) Parkinson's disease, (b) multiple sclerosis, (c) motor neurone disease, (d) rheumatoid arthritis and (e) cystic fibrosis.

Table 1: reassessments for Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Motor neurone disease, rheumatoid arthritis and cystic fibrosis by year of reassessment (April 2013 to October 2016)

2013

2014

2015

2016

Total

Parkinson's disease

0

70

420

1,490

1,980

Multiple sclerosis

0

490

1,950

7,710

10,160

Motor neurone disease

0

40

130

190

360

Rheumatoid arthritis

0

1,130

3,860

9,930

14,920

Cystic fibrosis

0

40

150

460

650

Total

0

1,170

6,510

19,800

October 2016 is the latest published data available. Later data is available but has been withheld as will be published as part of official statistics in December 2017.

We recognise that claimants in the ESA Support Group and UC Limited Capability for Work Related Activity with the most severe health conditions or disabilities who have conditions that are unlikely to improve, and are unlikely to ever be able to move closer to the labour market and into work, are having to go through a very lengthy, stressful and bureaucratic process to claim their benefits.

We are working with our assessment provider, medical professionals and other stakeholders, to develop a set of criteria that will help us identify those with the most severe health conditions or disabilities, for whom ESA reassessments can be stopped unless there is a change of circumstances.

Reviews of PIP are a key part of the benefit and ensure that not only awards remain correct where needs may change and that we also maintain contact with the claimant, both features missing from its predecessor Disability Living Allowance. PIP recognises that for the most severely disabled claimants, the award review process could seem unnecessarily intrusive. Existing PIP claimants with the most severe, lifetime disabilities, whose functional ability has remained the same, are more likely to have their evidence reviewed by a DWP Decision-Maker and will not need to have another face-to-face assessment with a healthcare professional.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, which conditions are included within the movement disorders disability category Stat-Xplore sub group; and if he will make a statement.

The information requested is shown in the list below.

List 1: Breakdown of ‘movement disorders’ disability category for primary disabling condition as recorded on the PIP computer system

Detailed Medical Condition for ‘Movement disorders’

Blepharospasm

Essential tremor - benign

Huntington's disease

Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's syndrome / Parkinsonism

Torticollis

Tourette's syndrome

Writer's cramp

Movement disorders - Other / type not known

Data is based on primary disabling condition as recorded on the PIP computer system. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which the assessment is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics.

All health conditions are coded on DWP systems using the high level “block” codes, consisting of a letter and two numbers in the range A00 to Z99, of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition, published by the World Health Organisation.

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd10/browse/2016/en.

Please note that we are not able to break this data down to the four-character subcategories specified by the codes using decimal points.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether there is an older claimant champion employed at (a) Bridgend and (b) Porthcawl Jobcentre; and if he will make a statement.

Our network of older claimant champions has been extended so that there is now an older claimant champion to provide best practice and support to work coaches in each of our 34 Jobcentre Plus Districts. Bridgend and Porthcawl Jobcentres are both supported by the older claimant champion for our South West Wales District.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many complaints his Department has (a) received and (b) investigated in the last 12 months in each region from women born in the 1950s and affected by changes in state pension age; what criteria are used to determine whether a complaint is investigated; how many such investigations have been completed; and what the anticipated (i) timescale and (ii) cost is of each such investigation under way.

The number of complaints received and investigated from August 2016 to August 2017 is 3782.

All complaints are investigated. We are unable to attribute the complaints to Region due to limitations of data recording.

DWP contact the customer within 15 working days to tell them of the outcome or when they can expect a response, if it will take longer.

The department does not hold cost figures for such investigations and these complaints are handled within the normal business of the department.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many (a) staff are deployed to respond to complaints received from women born in the 1950s affected by the change to the state pension age and (b) additional staff have been employed to respond to those complaints in each of the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement.

The responses to complaints received are being handled within normal business activities.

No additional staff have been employed to respond to these complaints.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, on what date his Department opened an investigation into complaints made by women born in the 1950s affected by the changes to the state pension age; and if he will make a statement.

The Department investigate each complaint received.

The first formal complaint relating to women born in the 1950s affected by the changes to the state pension age was received on 16 August 2016.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with (a) cystic fibrosis, (b) rheumatoid arthritis, (c) motor neurone disease, (d) multiple sclerosis and (e) Parkinson's disease have qualified for (i) income-related employment and support allowance and (ii) income-related jobseeker's allowance since 2008; and if he will make a statement.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson's disease have had employment and support allowance cancelled after 12 months without undergoing a work capability assessment; and if he will make a statement.

Between October 2008 and September 2015 there were fewer than 50 individuals, whose main disabling condition was recorded as Parkinson’s disease, who stopped receiving Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) after twelve months and did not have a completed Work Capability Assessment.

Notes

  1. An individual may have made more than one ESA claim and had more than one assessment in the time period shown. These individuals will only be counted once.
  2. The primary medical condition recorded on the claim form does not itself confer entitlement to ESA. So, for example, a decision on entitlement for a customer claiming ESA on the basis of Parkinson’s disease would be based on their ability to carry out the range of activities assessed by the work capability assessment.
Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
6th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many employment and support allowance claimants with motor neurone disease are in (a) the work related activity group and (b) support group; and if he will make a statement.

At 30 November 2016 the number of Employment and Support Allowance claimants with Motor Neurone Disease as their primary medical condition in the Work-Related Activity Group and the Support Group was 10 and 640 respectively.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Answer of 27 April 2017 to Question 71691, on personal independence payment: appeals, what recent discussions he has had with the Tribunals Service on establishing detailed and regular feedback on personal independence payment appeal tribunal decisions; and if he will make a statement.

The department continues to have regular meetings with the Tribunals Service where all aspects of the appeals process, including feedback, are discussed. In this regard, and although they are still developing into the role, the feedback from the Presenting Officers in PIP and ESA appeals, referred to in my previous reply, is proving informative.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Answer of 10 March 2017 to Question 66119, on children: maintenance, when he plans to publish his Department's response to the 2016 consultation on child maintenance deduction orders against joint accounts; and if he will make a statement.

Further to our answer dated 10 March 2017 to Question 66119 we have been working to progress our analysis of the consultation responses. We are now finalising our response which will be published shortly.

27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Answer of 26 April 2017 to Question 71635, on personal independence payment, when he plans to respond to the Second independent review of the personal independence payment assessment by Paul Gray, published on 30 March 2017; and if he will make a statement.

Our position has not changed since the Answer of 26 April 2017 to Question 71635 and planning to respond later this year.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Answer of 5 April 2017 to Question 69486, on housing benefit: young people, how many applications for the housing cost element of universal credit from applicants between the ages of 18 and 25 have been refused; and what the reasons were for those refusals.

The information requested is not available. Data will become available as this policy area matures.

24th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if his Department will take steps to share personal independence payment (PIP) appeal tribunal decisions with assessment providers in order to improve the quality of initial PIP assessments.

The Department is working with the Tribunals Service to establish how it can get more detailed and regular feedback on tribunal decisions. A recent initiative to use more Presenting Officers will help in this regard. The Presenting Officer will note any of the tribunal’s comments regarding the assessment, in particular anything adverse, and, where it is appropriate, feed this back to the provider.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what guidance his Department provides to family members submitting evidence to support a persons claim for personal independence payment; and what weight is given to that evidence by assessment providers.

The Department provides guidance to family members for those who are approaching 16 and in receipt of DLA regarding the invite to claim PIP. Additionally claimants are asked if they want carers or relatives to provide information regarding health conditions or disabilities, space is provided for this in the “How your disability affects you” evidence gathering form. Decisions regarding PIP are made by Decision Makers, not Assessment Providers. Decision Makers will consider all evidence on the case.

Guidance for Health Professionals on how to evaluate and analyse evidence in preparing the Assessment Report can be accessed on the gov.uk website, section 2.8.13. https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/547146/pip-assessment-guide.pdf.

Furthermore, we introduced two comprehensive, statutory, independent reviews of the PIP Assessment. The second of Paul Gray’s Independent Review's was published on 30 March 2017. We are considering the review’s recommendations carefully and will respond later this year.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how long his Department holds medical evidence submitted to support a claim for disability living allowance; and whether that evidence may be used to support a claim for personal independence payment.

Evidence that supports any decision awarding benefit is kept for as long as that award is current and 14 months after it eventually ends. DLA claimants who are invited to claim PIP are asked if they want if any medical evidence that supported their award of DLA to be used in considering their claim for PIP.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many home visits there were by Jobcentre Plus outreach workers providing home-based advice and support for claimants of personal independence payments in the last year.

The department does not hold the requested data.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
18th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants attended Porthcawl Job Centre to claim (a) employment and support allowance and (b) universal credit in the latest period for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement.

The information requested for Employment and Support Allowance is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Statistics on the claimant count, which show the number of Jobseeker’s Allowance and Universal Credit claimants by Jobcentre Plus office, can be found at:

https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/default.asp

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at:

https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/home/newuser.asp

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether his Department carried out an assessment of the availability of suitable alternative local premises in advance of the decision to close Pyle Jobcentre Plus.

Our proposal is to relocate staff and services from Pyle Jobcentre to Porthcawl Jobcentre. The new site at Porthcawl is 4.9 miles and 35 minutes by public transport from Pyle Jobcentre. This proposal is part of a broader national approach and we have carefully considered the merits of alternative options as part of these plans but believe that our proposal is the only viable option.

Our aim is to have larger, better quality offices which will allow a more digitally enabled environment, optimising use of space, ensuring value for money for the Department and the taxpayer and enabling effective delivery of services.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
28th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment his Department made of the travel distance between Pyle Jobcentre and Porthcawl prior to its decision on whether a consultation should take place in regard to the closure of that jobcentre; and if he will make a statement.

We committed to a public consultation for Jobcentres over three miles and 20 minutes away from existing offices by public transport. The new site at Porthcawl is 4.9 miles and 35 minutes by public transport from Pyle Jobcentre.

Throughout our planning we calculated distances and journey times to Porthcawl using a variety of methods to ensure accuracy, including online tools and timetables, information collected on local public transport routes, and input and scrutiny from local DWP staff and management.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
28th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants are registered at the jobcentre in Pyle; how many of those claimants are required to attend for daily signing; what cost impact analysis was undertaken for claimants travelling to Porthcawl from Pyle as a result of the decision to close the Pyle Jobcentre; and if he will make a statement.

There are currently (February 2017) 170 people claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance or Universal Credit at Pyle Jobcentre. There is no comparable Employment and Support Allowance or Income Support claimant count available at individual jobcentre level. However, the total numbers of new claims to Employment and Support Allowance made in the last 12 months in Pyle (March 16 to February 17) is 379. The total numbers of new claims to Income Support made in Pyle in the last 12 months (March 16 to February 17) is 10. Those who use our services do so to varying degrees, depending upon the type of claim they have. For example, those in the work-related activity group of Employment and Support visit the jobcentre for more regular interviews with an adviser, whilst those in the support group do not have to attend interviews unless they wish to speak to a personal adviser and for this reason there is no statistical information available for those required for daily signing.

The purpose of our equality analysis and public consultation was to help establish how many people are likely to be affected by these proposals, including any additional costs. Before announcing our proposals for the Pyle Jobcentre relocation, we considered travel costs between Pyle and Porthcawl and concluded that it would cost £5 for an adult day return ticket and £2.90 for those aged between 16-18 years old.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
28th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will place in the Library details of the evidence required of claimants of the housing cost element of universal credit aged between the ages of 18 and 21 to whom paragraph 4A does not apply as detailed under paragraph 4B, parts a, b, c, d, e, f and g; and if he will make a statement.

DWP will gather information to determine eligibility for many of these exemptions, such as whether the claimant has responsibility for a child or is exempt from the shared accommodation rate, as part of the standard claims process. Where a claimant qualifies for such an exemption no further information will be required.

For other exemptions, we will not expect a claimant who tells us that they are unable to live with their parents or that they have been subjected to domestic violence, for example, to provide documentary evidence. A reference from a third party – such as a local authority or a relevant charity – would be acceptable.

1st Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when he plans to publish his Department's response to the 2016 consultation on child maintenance deduction orders against joint accounts; and if he will make a statement.

The consultation on the introduction of deduction orders against joint accounts closed on 25th August 2016, the responses are being considered by the department and a response will be published in due course.

31st Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many completed repeat assessments there have been of people with (a) Parkinson's disease, (b) multiple sclerosis, (c) motor neurone disease, (d) rheumatoid arthritis and (e) cystic fibrosis by year of repeat assessment, since the introduction of personal independence payments in 2013; and if he will make a statement.

The table below gives statistics on the number of planned award reviews conducted on recipients of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) for a range of conditions. Award reviews ensure that claimants continue to receive the correct level of support, including increasing support where a long-term health condition or disability deteriorates and daily living or mobility needs increase.

Table 1 – PIP award reviews

Apr 2013 – Mar 2014

Apr 2014 – Mar 2015

Apr 2015 – Mar 2016

Apr 2016 – Oct 2016

Rheumatoid arthritis

0

100

1,200

2,000

Multiple sclerosis

0

100

800

1,000

Parkinson’s disease, Parkinson's syndrome and Parkinsonism

0

-

300

400

Motor neurone disease

0

-

100

100

Cystic fibrosis

0

-

-

-

Notes:

  • ‘-’ indicates fewer than 50 cases in the category.
  • Data is based on primary disabling condition as recorded on the PIP and DLA computer system. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which the decision is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics.
  • Data has been rounded to the nearest 100.
  • Data taken from the PIP computer system’s management information.
  • Figures are for Great Britain only.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
6th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when he plans to respond to the National Audit Office's report on Benefit Sanctions, published on 30 November 2016; and if he will make a statement.

The Public Accounts Committee hearing into the NAO Value for Money Study into Benefit Sanctions was held 12/12/2016 following publication of the report on 30/11/2016. The Public Accounts Committee has not yet published their final report and recommendations. DWP will respond to this once it has been published.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
27th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson's disease receive personal independence payment at the (a) daily living standard, (b) daily living enhanced, (c) mobility standard and (d) mobility enhanced rate.

Figures show numbers of people in Great Britain in receipt of Personal Independence Payment as at 31st July 2016 who have either Parkinson’s disease or Parkinson's syndrome / Parkinsonism as their main disabling condition.

Parkinson’s disease

Daily living

Enhanced

Standard

Nil

Enhanced

1,511

143

13

Mobility

Standard

662

444

56

Nil

416

899


Source: PIP Computer Systems

Parkinson's syndrome / Parkinsonism

Daily living

Enhanced

Standard

Nil

Enhanced

142

14

-

Mobility

Standard

71

40

7

Nil

35

75

-


Source: PIP Computer Systems

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
17th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 12 October 2016 to Question 47504, whether the Welsh Government has agreed to take responsibility for attendance allowance.

The consultation “Self-sufficient local government: 100% business rates retention”, published by the Department for Communities and Local Government, sought views on a range of options for devolving new responsibilities to local government in England including more responsibility for caring for older people. This was not a consultation on the devolution of Attendance Allowance.

If changes were to be considered in respect of Attendance Allowance for England and Wales, there would be further consultation and any proposals would be discussed with the Welsh Government.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
10th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson's disease and who are in receipt of disability living allowance are waiting reassessment for personal independence payments; and if he will make a statement.

As at February 2016 (the latest data available), I estimate there were about 4,600 working age people in receipt of Disability Living Allowance (DLA) whose main disabling condition is recorded as Parkinson’s disease on the DLA computer systems, and who will be invited to apply for Personal Independence Payment in the future, or may have been invited to claim within the past 6 months.

As at July 2016, there were 1,300 claimants in receipt of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) who have been reassessed in the last three years, having previously been in receipt of DLA, and whose main disabling condition is recorded as Parkinson's disease or Parkinson's syndrome on the PIP computer systems.

The length of a PIP award is based on an individual’s circumstances. For some of the most severely disabled claimants, a review could be as long as ten years after the initial award, at which point only a light-touch review, rather than a face-to-face assessment, will be necessary.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
10th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson's disease have been transferred from long-term disability living allowance to personal independence payment in the last three years.

As at February 2016 (the latest data available), I estimate there were about 4,600 working age people in receipt of Disability Living Allowance (DLA) whose main disabling condition is recorded as Parkinson’s disease on the DLA computer systems, and who will be invited to apply for Personal Independence Payment in the future, or may have been invited to claim within the past 6 months.

As at July 2016, there were 1,300 claimants in receipt of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) who have been reassessed in the last three years, having previously been in receipt of DLA, and whose main disabling condition is recorded as Parkinson's disease or Parkinson's syndrome on the PIP computer systems.

The length of a PIP award is based on an individual’s circumstances. For some of the most severely disabled claimants, a review could be as long as ten years after the initial award, at which point only a light-touch review, rather than a face-to-face assessment, will be necessary.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions he has had with the Welsh Assembly Government on the transfer of attendance allowance to local authorities; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is committed to working closely with the Welsh Government to ensure the implications of any reforms for devolved administration services or budgets are properly understood.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
12th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what investigations his Department carries out to confirm the accuracy of information provided by HM Revenue and Customs that an unreported adult is living at the property of a tax credit claimant prior to ceasing to pay the benefit; what evidence his Department accepts from such claimant to show that no unreported adult living at that property; and if he will make a statement.

Tax Credit fraud referrals are routed from HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) to the Fraud and Error Service (FES) within the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) if it is believed there is a DWP benefit interest.

Investigations of HMRC Tax Credit, Living Together fraud allegations are conducted by Local Service Investigation Team (LSI) within FES. LSI staff are employed to look at all types of welfare fraud from all sources of referral.

FES investigations are thorough to accurately establish the facts to prove or disprove the allegation made. Investigators use a range of information to confirm the accuracy of Tax Credit, Living Together allegations including local enquiries with bodies like the Police or schools to establish any links between customer and alleged partner. However, lines of enquiry can vary based on the differences in individual cases.

Please see further the full list of information that can be obtained by FES during investigations in the redacted guidance link below from page 480 onwards.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/523527/fraud-guide-feb-2016.pdf

On completion of the investigation if evidence is gathered to necessitate an Interview Under Caution the claimant will be notified to attend. Any evidence can be brought voluntarily by the customer to the interview which will then be assessed by DWP. However, following the interview, statements from third parties may be obtained to substantiate the evidence/answers given.

12th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many staff are employed by his Department to investigate claims from HM Revenue and Customs that an unreported adult is living in the home of a tax credit claimant; and if he will make a statement.

Investigations of HM Revenue and Customs Tax Credit, Living Together fraud allegations are investigated by Local Service Investigation Team (LSI) and the Central Criminal Intelligence Investigations team (CCIIS) as appropriate within the Fraud and Error Service (FES).

There are currently 1430 employed by the Department. FES investigators are employed to look at all types of welfare fraud from all sources of referral. None are employed specifically to look at individual types of welfare fraud referred from specific sources.

13th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson's disease qualified for attendance allowance in each of the last 10 years.

Statistical information on Attendance Allowance claimants, including the numbers of people suffering from Parkinson’s Disease, is available from the DWP Tabulation Tool: http://tabulation-tool.dwp.gov.uk/100pc/tabtool.html

These data relate to the claimant’s main disabling condition at the time their claim is awarded. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions, but these cannot be identified from the data the department holds. Therefore there may be other claimants in receipt of AA who have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease who are not captured in the above data.

13th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people transferred from disability living allowance to personal independence payments in each month since January 2014.

Data on clearances of claims by type (i.e. awarded, disallowed or withdrawn) to Personal Independence Payment (PIP), by a range of breakdowns including whether they were new claimants or Disability Living Allowance to PIP reassessment claimants, are available from Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/. Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here: https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html.

13th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have been awarded the enhanced rate mobility component of personal independence payment in each month since January 2014.

The available data on the number of claimants in receipt of Personal Independence Payment (PIP), by a range of breakdowns including award outcomes, are available from Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/. Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here: https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html.

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson's disease who leased a Motability vehicle under disability living allowance were assessed as being ineligible for that vehicle under personal independence payment prior to any subsequent appeal.

The Department does not hold this information. Motability is an independent charitable organisation that is wholly responsible for the administration of the Motability scheme, including collating its own management information and client statistics. Whilst the Department meets regularly with Motability to discuss scheme performance, questions relating to the details of the scheme’s operation should be directed to Motability itself.

We recognise that the transition from Disability Living Allowance to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) can be challenging for some individuals, which is why the Department worked closely with Motability as we developed our plans for the introduction of PIP. The Motability charity provides a one-off package of transitional support and advice to support customers who no longer meet the eligibility criteria for the Motability Scheme. For most of these customers who entered into their first lease agreement with Motability before January 2013, Motability will provide transitional support of £2,000. This will enable many former Scheme customers to continue to meet their mobility needs by purchasing a used car.

For customers who entered into their first lease agreement with the scheme during 2013, Motability will supply transitional support of £1,000 to assist with mobility costs. Motability is also providing help with the cost of adaptations made to non-scheme vehicles and information on non-scheme motoring and insurance. The Scheme also offers customers an opportunity to purchase their vehicle after the end of the lease.

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson's disease have been transferred from long-term disability living allowance to personal independence payment.

The available information is in the table below and shows the number of people with Parkinson’s disease who were in receipt of disability living allowance and have successfully claimed personal independence payment (PIP). Full PIP roll out began from July 2015 and is due to take several years to complete. This is unpublished data. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.

Claims in payment

Parkinson's disease

550

Parkinson's syndrome / Parkinsonism

50

Notes:

  1. The source of the data is the PIP computer system.
  2. Figures are correct as at 31st January 2016 and have been rounded to the nearest 10.
  3. Figures are for DLA reassessment claims only and include normal rules claims and claims under the special rules for terminally ill people.
  4. Data is based on primary disabling condition as recorded on the PIP computer system. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which the decision is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics.
  5. Figures are for Great Britain.

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, for what reasons 60 per cent of appeals made in personal independence payment cases have resulted in the initial decision being overturned.

The Department gathers information on the reasons why PIP decisions have been overturned from its Presenting Officers and the summary reasons it gets back from the Tribunal hearing. Internal Management Information for 2015/16 indicates that either new oral or documentary evidence supplied at the hearing are the leading reasons for PIP decisions being overturned in 75% of overturns recorded.

These figures are from internal DWP systems, where only one of possible multiple reasons can be recorded, and are derived from unpublished information and have not been quality assured to National Statistics or Official Statistics standard.

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with Parkinson's disease who were assessed as being ineligible under personal independence payment for a Motability vehicle to which they were entitled under disability living allowance have had that decision overturned at (a) mandatory reconsideration and (b) appeal.

Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service regularly publish statistics on Personal Independence Payment appeals, which can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics#social-security-and-child-support-statistics. However, these are not broken down by appellants’ main disabling condition and this information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

We recognise that the transition from Disability Living Allowance to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) can be challenging for some individuals, which is why the Department worked closely with Motability as we developed our plans for the introduction of PIP. The Motability charity provides a one-off package of transitional support and advice to support customers who no longer meet the eligibility criteria for the Motability Scheme. For most of these customers who entered into their first lease agreement with Motability before January 2013, Motability will provide transitional support of £2,000. This will enable many former Scheme customers to continue to meet their mobility needs by purchasing a used car.

For customers who entered into their first lease agreement with the scheme during 2013, Motability will supply transitional support of £1,000 to assist with mobility costs. Motability is also providing help with the cost of adaptations made to non-scheme vehicles and information on non-scheme motoring and insurance. The Scheme also offers customers an opportunity to purchase their vehicle after the end of the lease.

8th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with motor neurone disease are currently in receipt of the (a) lower and (b) higher rate of Attendance Allowance; and if he will make a statement.

Statistical information relating to Attendance Allowance claimants, including the numbers of people suffering from motor neurone disease, and the rate of Attendance Allowance in payment to them, is available from the DWP Tabulation Tool: http://tabulation-tool.dwp.gov.uk/100pc/tabtool.html

30th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many recipients of Access to Work claiming in excess of £40,800 have motor neurone disease; and what support his Department will provide for recipients in need of a grant in excess of £40,800 in order to remain in work.

The Department does not hold information on the number of Access to Work customers with motor neurone disease.

The limit of £40,800 will apply to new customers from October 2015, and from April 2018 for existing customers whose awards are above this limit in October 2015, provided their needs remain the same.

Customers’ progress towards meeting the cap will be monitored at their annual review points when they and their employers will receive support from teams of specialist advisers. These specialist advisers will work with customers and employers to explore how the maximum support can be deployed to greatest effect.

Advisers are able to discuss reasonable adjustments with employers and provide advice on additional cost effective ways of support employers may not have considered – for example on the latest technology which our advisers are made aware of from dedicated technology awareness sessions. They will also offer advice to customers on managing personal budgets when they are rolled out later in 2015/16.

27th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what support his Department makes available to ensure that people with (a) Parkinson's and (b) other progressive conditions are able to adequetely heat their home; and if he will make a statement.

People with Parkinson’s and other progressive conditions receive general financial provision towards costs, including heating, through Attendance Allowance, Disability Living Allowance (DLA) or Personal Independence Payment (PIP).

Additional help is available to those entitled to income-related benefits - such as Employment and Support Allowance - through the support component and additional disability premiums.

Help is also available through Cold Weather Payments, and this winter, over 2 million low income households will receive a bill rebate through the Warm Home Discount Scheme.

Winter Fuel Payments also provide assurance to older people, who may suffer the worst impacts of a progressive condition, so that they can keep warm during the winter months.

17th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he is taking to improve the personal independence claims and decision making process.

We are committed to driving up PIP performance, and I am in regular contact with providers to do this – as you would expect. Unlike DLA, PIP involves a face to face consultation for most applicants. Around 80% of claimants will see a health professional instead of around 6% of DLA.

We acknowledge that claims are currently taking too long and we have taken steps to improve performance. So far we have introduced:

  • A dedicated phone service;
  • An electronic transfer of information between claimant's health professional, DWP and assessment providers.
  • A new process to enable SRTI decisions to be made in-house with support from health care professionals.
  • A streamlined Assessment Report form.
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what protections have been built into Universal Job Match to ensure the service cannot be infiltrated with non-existent jobs with the aim of accessing personal data; and if he will make a statement.

The security of a user's data is of the utmost importance to us and built into the service are monitoring tools and vacancy checks, which help to detect, deter and remedy inappropriate use of the site. There are also warnings to users of the service advising them they should not be asked to reveal personal details. Additionally, a 'Contact Us' facility is provided so users can quickly highlight any employers that they may have concerns about. DWP then investigate such concerns.

4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the availability of the asthma drug serotide in pharmacies; and if he will make a statement.

The Department fully understands that maintaining access to Seretide inhalers for the management of asthma is vitally important to many people in this country. We are currently not aware of any supply issues with Seretide inhalers from GSK and they are available in volumes sufficient to meet normal United Kingdom demand.

We continue to work closely with industry and partners in the health system to help prevent shortages and to ensure that the risks to patients are minimised when supply issues do arise.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will allocate funding for (a) local promotion and (b) outreach programmes to increase the number of people claiming healthy start vouchers.

We are developing a digital approach to Healthy Start, which should make it easier for families to apply for, receive and use Healthy Start benefits. As part of the digitisation process, we are working with a number of local areas to consider how to encourage people to claim Healthy Start.

14th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the proportion of people in receipt of Healthy Start vouchers.

Between 29 April and 26 May 2019, 54% of people eligible to make an application for Healthy Start vouchers had made an application and been accepted onto the scheme.

20th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he is taking steps to bring forward legislative proposals to reduce the abuse of older people in social care; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has no plans to bring forward legislation to reduce the abuse of older people in social care.

The Government is committed to preventing and reducing the risk of harm to people in vulnerable situations.

The Care Act 2014 statutory guidance states that local authorities should ensure that the services they commission are safe, effective and of high quality. Where it is suspected that an individual may be at risk of abuse or neglect local authorities have a duty to carry out proportionate enquiries.

Regulated providers have a key role in safeguarding adults. All professions are subject to employer checks and controls and employers in the health and care sector must satisfy themselves regarding the skills and competence of their staff and the Care Quality Commission monitors how well providers are doing this.

14th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will seek a guarantee from the Health and Care Professions Council that there will be no further increases to their registration fees for at least the next four years.

The Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) is independent of the Government and funded by registrants’ fees on a cost recovery basis. It is the responsibility of the HCPC to determine the level of fees that it charges registrants. It would therefore not be appropriate for the Government to seek a guarantee from the HCPC that it will not increase its fees for at least the next four years.

Following public consultation, the HCPC is planning to raise its annual fees by £16, from £90 to £106 a year from October 2019. HCPC registration fees will remain the lowest of any of the United Kingdom-wide health and care regulators. Registration fees are tax-deductible and this fee rise will amount to just over £1 a month extra for most of the HCPC’s registrants.

6th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that people with Parkinson’s disease in each region of the UK are offered the full range of available treatments.

NHS England commissions the specialised elements of Parkinson’s care that patients may receive from 25 specialised neurological treatment centres across England. NHS England has published a service specification setting out what providers must have in place to deliver specialised neurological care. This supports equity of access to high quality services for patients wherever they live. The specification can be found at the following link:

www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/spec-services/npc-crg/group-d/d04/

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance ‘Parkinson’s disease: Diagnosis and management in primary and secondary care’, updated in 2017, sets out best practice for clinicians in the identification and treatment of Parkinson’s disease in line with the latest available evidence.

6th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data he holds on the treatments available for people with Parkinson’s disease in each region of the UK.

NHS England commissions the specialised elements of Parkinson’s care that patients may receive from 25 specialised neurological treatment centres across England. NHS England has published a service specification setting out what providers must have in place to deliver specialised neurological care. This supports equity of access to high quality services for patients wherever they live. The specification can be found at the following link:

www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/spec-services/npc-crg/group-d/d04/

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance ‘Parkinson’s disease: Diagnosis and management in primary and secondary care’, updated in 2017, sets out best practice for clinicians in the identification and treatment of Parkinson’s disease in line with the latest available evidence.

29th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on just in time delivery arrangements for medical devices of the UK leaving the EU Customs Union; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is working to mitigate the impact of any potential delays at borders in the unlikely event of a no-deal outcome to our negotiations on exiting the European Union. Our planning aims to ensure that from the day the United Kingdom leaves the EU, we will have the necessary resources and contingencies in place to maintain uninterrupted supplies of medical devices, including those delivered to National Health Service trusts on a just in time basis.

29th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many UK-based notified bodies for medical devices have registered under the EU Medical Devices Regulations 2017; how many of those bodies were registered under previous regulations; what assessment he has made of the effect on the NHS in the event that insufficient notified bodies register; and if he will make a statement.

There are currently four United Kingdom-based notified bodies designated under the Directive 93/42/EC on medical devices and Directive 98/79/EC on in vitro diagnostic medical devices. Of these four UK notified bodies, one is also designated Directive 90/385/EEC on active implantable medical devices. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is the designating authority in the UK and is responsible for designating and monitoring the performance of UK notified bodies. This includes undertaking regular audits of their activities.

New European Union Regulations for medical devices (Regulation 2017/745) and in vitro diagnostic medical devices (Regulation 2017/746) entered into force in May 2017, with Regulation 2017/745 fully applying from May 2020 and Regulation 2017/746 fully applying from May 2022. Each notified body will need to apply for separate designation under these Regulations. No notified body in the UK, or across the EU, is currently designated under either Regulation.

The new Regulations substantially strengthen the regulatory framework for medical devices and in vitro diagnostic devices and the MHRA recognises the importance of having competent notified bodies in place in sufficient time to ensure continuity of supply of products to the UK market.

To this end, the MHRA has been engaging with UK notified bodies on an ongoing basis to ensure that sufficient resources are in place and to ensure notified bodies are prepared for the designation process. The MHRA is also providing expert auditors to support the process of joint assessment of notified bodies under the new legislation across the EU to support the consistent application of the new Regulations across all EU Member States.

16th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS Continuing Healthcare assessments have taken place after a claimant has died to establish whether that claimant's family or estate are entitled to claim that funding retrospectively.

In March 2012, deadlines were introduced for requests for an assessment for NHS Continuing Healthcare ‘previously unassessed periods of care’ between 1 April 2004 and 31 March 2012 in England. The deadline for registering for a review of unassessed periods of care during this time period was 31 March 2013, after which approximately 63,000 requests for an assessment were received, with approximately 25,000 resulting in a full assessment.

Individuals, their families, or a representative are currently able to request an assessment from their responsible clinical commissioning group for an NHS Continuing Healthcare ‘previously unassessed period of care’ for periods from 1 April 2012 onwards. Data is not currently held on the number of requests received or assessments carried out for an NHS Continuing Healthcare ‘previously unassessed period of care’ for periods from 1 April 2012 onwards.

16th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many applicants for NHS Continuing Healthcare died before a decision was made on their case by the relevant clinical commissioning group.

This information is not held.

Data is published on the number of completed NHS Continuing Healthcare assessments in England on the NHS England statistical webpage, however, this does not specify whether or not the individual had died by the time of a decision on NHS Continuing Healthcare eligibility. The data is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/nhs-chc-fnc/2017-18/

28th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average waiting time people with Parkinson’s disease to (a) be assessed for deep brain stimulation and (b) receive deep brain stimulation treatment, in each of the last three years.

Information regarding the average waiting time people with Parkinson’s disease to be assessed for deep brain stimulation is not collected. The following table shows the number of finished admission episodes (FAEs) for patients with a primary diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and a main procedure of deep brain stimulation and the mean elective wait for the procedure in the financial years between 2014-15 and 2016-17.

Financial year

FAEs

Mean waiting time (days)

2014-15

135

53.64

2015-16

189

69.62

2016-17

264

107.47

Source: Hospital Episode Statistics, NHS Digital.

Note:

An FAE is the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year or month in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of inpatients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what provisions are in place for palliative care in privately managed prisons.

There are five privately managed prison contracts, all of which have provisions in place for palliative care. For those prisons where NHS England holds commissioning responsibility, they commission end of life and palliative care provision, support the prisons’ approach to the local authorities’ assessment and management of social care, and ensure that elderly patients are supported in accessing healthcare services.

NHS England has developed a ‘Dying Well in Custody Charter’, mirroring the community based Dying Well Charter, scheduled to be published this spring.

Information on receiving palliative care from Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service by age is not held centrally.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many prisoners aged over (a) 60, (b) 70 and (c) 80 receive palliative care from Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service.

There are five privately managed prison contracts, all of which have provisions in place for palliative care. For those prisons where NHS England holds commissioning responsibility, they commission end of life and palliative care provision, support the prisons’ approach to the local authorities’ assessment and management of social care, and ensure that elderly patients are supported in accessing healthcare services.

NHS England has developed a ‘Dying Well in Custody Charter’, mirroring the community based Dying Well Charter, scheduled to be published this spring.

Information on receiving palliative care from Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service by age is not held centrally.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what arrangements Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service has with the NHS in relation to palliative care for prisoners.

There are five privately managed prison contracts, all of which have provisions in place for palliative care. For those prisons where NHS England holds commissioning responsibility, they commission end of life and palliative care provision, support the prisons’ approach to the local authorities’ assessment and management of social care, and ensure that elderly patients are supported in accessing healthcare services.

NHS England has developed a ‘Dying Well in Custody Charter’, mirroring the community based Dying Well Charter, scheduled to be published this spring.

Information on receiving palliative care from Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service by age is not held centrally.

13th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessments the Government has made of the procedures for the potential repurposing of medicines; and if he will make a statement.

The Association of Medical Research Charities (AMRC), supported by the Department, is leading work to develop advice for those organisations and individuals who wish to make use of new indications for existing drugs where research has shown robust evidence for the new indication. This advice takes the form of a report which will provide insights into how the drug regulation system and national bodies can support drug repurposing. The report will include recommendations and next steps be driven forward by the AMRC and the medical research charities. We understand the report is due for publication later this year.

24th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when he plans to reply to the letter of 6 October 2017 from the hon. Member for Bridgend on Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group's proposed withdrawal of transport for renal dialysis patients.

The Department received the hon. Member’s letter of 6 October on 9 October. The Department responded on 1 November.

23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to improve the (a) transparency of publicly-funded medical research and development and (b) accessibility and affordability of medicines developed from public research.

Research can only improve the lives of people or the wider United Kingdom economy if it can be accessed. A culture of openness also improves the quality and relevance of the research we support.

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded through the Department to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. The NIHR invests over £1 billion into health and public health research and is committed to “adding value in research” by maximizing the potential impact of research that it funds for patients and the public. This means ensuring that it answers the right questions (including effectiveness and cost effectiveness of interventions), delivers research efficiently and publishes results in full in an accessible and unbiased way.

Full and open access to the knowledge generated by research is of the utmost importance to the NIHR. Our commitment to transparency, our NIHR Journals Library, open access policy, and our endorsement of the World Health Organization joint statement on the disclosure of results ensures that ideas and knowledge derived from publicly funded research are made available and accessible for public use.

The Government works to improve accessibility and affordability of medicines, whether funded through public research or in the private sector, through a number of activities involving a range of parties.

The Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Act 2017 (the Act) amends the NHS Act 2006 to:

- Put beyond doubt that the Secretary of State can require companies in the statutory scheme to make payments to control the cost of health service medicines;

- Enable the Secretary of State to require companies to reduce the price of an unbranded generic medicine, or to impose other controls on that company’s unbranded medicine, even if the company is in the voluntary scheme, currently the Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme 2014, for their branded medicines; and

- Enable the Secretary of State to make regulations to obtain information on sales and purchases of health service products from all parts of the supply chain, from manufacturer to pharmacy, for defined purposes.

The Government will respond shortly to the Accelerated Access Review (AAR). The AAR made recommendations to get transformative drugs and treatments to patients faster whilst ensuring the National Health Service gets value for money and remains at the forefront of innovation.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) technology appraisal guidance and the associated funding requirement plays an important role in ensuring that patients have access to cost-effective new medicines, including medicines developed from public research.

The NIHR provides support for the development of new medicines, primarily through its investment in early translational research infrastructure in the NHS and through a range of research funding programmes.

The funding provided for the NIHR research infrastructure provides the expertise and facilities the NHS needs for first-class research, which health and life sciences industry researchers can access at any stage of the clinical development process. This helps drive faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits, for patients and the health system and has been specifically designed to close the gaps in translation identified in the Cooksey review in 2006.

All NIHR research infrastructure actively supports contract and collaborative research with the life sciences industry, and supports the commercialisation of new research and related technologies, including through spin-outs and licensing arrangements. This supports the translation of new medicines and helps grow new companies (including small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)). This helps ensure the UK remains one of the best places to develop and launch innovative medicines, technologies and diagnostics, benefitting patients and the health system.

NIHR research programmes generate high quality evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of medicines for the NHS and public health services, including informing NICE guidance. The NIHR funds a number of programmes, of which The Health Technology Assessment programme is the largest. It funds independent research about the effectiveness, costs and broader impact of healthcare treatments and tests for those who plan, provide or receive care in the NHS. The NIHR also funds the Invention for Innovation (i4i) Programme that supports collaborative research and development projects in medtech SMEs, universities and the NHS on the development of innovative medical technologies by de-risking early stage projects that have a strong potential for acceptance for use in the NHS, as well as make them attractive to follow-on funders and investors.

The NIHR Innovation Observatory (NIHRIO) applies state-of-the-art data analytics to explore trends in health innovation across drugs, medical technologies, diagnostic tools and healthcare services. Using digital tools, NIHRIO appraises and supplies timely information to stakeholders including the Department, policymakers, academia and industry, so that developments leading to better and more cost effective healthcare can be identified.

The Department is also working alongside the Association of Medical Research Charities and a number of their members to look at how information from medical research into medicines can be translated more systematically to marketing authorisations and into patient care.

12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the compatibility of the system-wide cap of £20 million for NICE approved medicines proposed by NHS England with the aims and objectives of the Accelerated Access Review; and if he will make a statement.

The Government considers that the introduction of the budget impact test in April this year for technologies with an annual budget impact greater than £20 million per year is fully in line with the aims and objectives of the Accelerated Access Review.

Under the budget impact test, £20 million does not represent a cap on what the National Health Service will spend on any individual drug in a given year. The test is simply intended to provide an opportunity for NHS England to enter into commercial negotiations with companies to bring down the price of very high cost medicines. The opportunity for companies to negotiate with NHS England will enable new types of commercial arrangement, which means that ‘win-win’ scenarios are possible for the NHS and industry, a key aim of the Accelerated Access Review.

12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to promote opportunities for patients to participate in clinical research; and if he will make a statement.

The development of new and better treatments would not be possible without patients and the public taking part in research, and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is committed to their active involvement in National Health Service, public health and social care research. In 2015/16, more than 605,000 people participated in clinical research studies through the NIHR Clinical Research Network. INVOLVE, the NIHR’s national advisory group on patient and public involvement in research, help members of the public to advise on NIHR research, helps to identify and prioritise research topics, assess funding proposals, and carry out and disseminate findings. INVOLVE is also at the forefront of a growing international public involvement movement seeking to collectively promote and advance public involvement in health and social care research around the world.

The Government also supports the work of the James Lind Alliance, which brings patients, carers, clinicians and medical research charities together to identify and prioritise research topics. In addition, we fund the UK Clinical Trials Gateway and Join Dementia Research to enable patients and clinicians to find out about clinical trials that may be of interest to them.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of the use of silver-coated catheters in hospitals on (a) infection rates and (b) costs; and if he will make a statement.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has assessed the clinical and cost-effectiveness of silver-based catheters versus hydrophilic and silicone catheters in reducing healthcare-associated urinary tract infections in both primary and secondary settings.

The guidance is available here:

www.nice.org.uk/researchrecommendation/indwelling-urinary-catheters-catheter-selection-for-patients-using-a-long-term-indwelling-urinary-catheter-what-is-the-clinical-and-cost-effectiveness-of-impregnated-versus-hydrophilic-versus-silicone-catheters-in-reducing-symptomatic-urinary-tract-infect

This NICE guidance revealed a gap in the evidence for the effectiveness of indwelling catheters in the long term, with further evidence needed to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of silver-coated catheters.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people with Parkinson's disease have been sectioned under the Mental Health Act 1983 in each of the last 10 years.

The number of people detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 with specific conditions is not collected centrally.

13th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 21 November 2016 to Question 52602, whether he plans to publish the third annual report on Preventing suicide in England: A cross-government outcomes strategy to save lives by 1 April 2017; and if he will make a statement.

The Third Annual Report of the Cross-Government Suicide Prevention Strategy will be published in due course. The Annual Report will strengthen the existing strategy, originally published in 2012, in five key areas.

29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people who presented to hospital after self-harm were offered a psychosocial assessment in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

The Department does not hold annual breakdown of the information requested.

11th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when he plans to publish the third annual report on Preventing Suicide in England: a cross-government outcomes strategy to save lives; and if he will make a statement.

We expect to publish the third annual progress report of the cross-Government Suicide Prevention Strategy in due course.

12th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of kidney transplants in (a) England, (b) Wales, (c) Northern Ireland in each year since 2011; and if he will make a statement.

The information requested is as follows:

Transplants performed involving kidneys, 1 April 2011 to 31 March 2016: by nation of transplant unit

Nation/donor type

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

England

Deceased donor

1,494

1,649

1,825

1,796

1,914

Living Donor

866

907

941

886

863

Total

2,360

2,556

2,766

2,682

2,777

Northern Ireland

Deceased donor

27

26

40

44

50

Living donor

50

49

58

54

66

Total

77

75

98

98

116

Wales

Deceased donor

108

94

85

60

69

Living donor

38

43

37

36

29

Total

146

137

122

96

98

Source: NHS Blood and Transplant

Transplants performed involving kidneys, 1 April 2011 to 31 March 2016: by nation of patient residency

Nation/donor type

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

England

Deceased donor

1,463

1,623

1,796

1,774

1,881

Living Donor

830

877

895

842

822

Total

2,293

2,500

2,691

2,616

2,703

Northern Ireland

Deceased donor

30

33

42

48

56

Living donor

56

54

61

55

63

Total

86

87

103

103

119

Wales

Deceased donor

133

112

108

74

94

Living donor

50

52

49

44

46

Total

183

164

157

118

140

Source: NHS Blood and Transplant

A seven year United Kingdom-wide organ donation and transplantation strategy was jointly published by the four UK health ministers and NHS Blood and Transplant in July 2013. The strategy aims to increase donation and transplantation rates; to make the UK system comparable with the best of the world. 2015/16 saw the highest ever deceased donor rate in the UK with 1,364 deceased donors resulting in 3,529 transplants. We continue to support work to further increase donation and transplantation rates, particularly promoting collaborative working amongst organisations and raising awareness of donation in the Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic population.

14th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether any patients were sent out of Cornwall for kidney dialysis treatment in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

NHS England advises that the main dialysis unit in Cornwall is at Treliske and satellite units are at Penzance and Bodmin. The information requested on how many dialysis patients attended each such location is not collected centrally. The Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group confirms that it does not charge its patients for transport to renal dialysis and it has no plans to start charging for this.

Information on whether any patients were sent out of Cornwall for kidney dialysis treatment in each of the last five years and how many patients from Cornwall who were able to access a kidney transplant took the option of conservative care in each of the last five years is not held centrally.

14th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many patients from Cornwall who were able to access a kidney transplant took the option of conservative care in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

NHS England advises that the main dialysis unit in Cornwall is at Treliske and satellite units are at Penzance and Bodmin. The information requested on how many dialysis patients attended each such location is not collected centrally. The Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group confirms that it does not charge its patients for transport to renal dialysis and it has no plans to start charging for this.

Information on whether any patients were sent out of Cornwall for kidney dialysis treatment in each of the last five years and how many patients from Cornwall who were able to access a kidney transplant took the option of conservative care in each of the last five years is not held centrally.

14th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, which locations have provided renal dialysis in Cornwall; how many dialysis patients attended each such location; what transport charges were made to patients attending each location in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

NHS England advises that the main dialysis unit in Cornwall is at Treliske and satellite units are at Penzance and Bodmin. The information requested on how many dialysis patients attended each such location is not collected centrally. The Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group confirms that it does not charge its patients for transport to renal dialysis and it has no plans to start charging for this.

Information on whether any patients were sent out of Cornwall for kidney dialysis treatment in each of the last five years and how many patients from Cornwall who were able to access a kidney transplant took the option of conservative care in each of the last five years is not held centrally.

14th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many kidney transplants took place by region for which the source of the donated kidney was (a) cadaver, (b) a relative and (c) altruism in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

The information is provided in the attached table.

14th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the need to provide additional kidney organ donation surgery as a result of the change to an opt-out system in Wales; and if he will make a statement.

Government funding to NHS Blood and Transplant enables the provision of the UK National Organ Retrieval Service and ensures that there are fully staffed retrieval teams constantly available to retrieve donated organs from anywhere across the United Kingdom.

Donated kidneys, from wherever they are donated, are offered to transplant centres across the UK. The funding of transplant services lies with UK commissioners.

Over the last eight years organ donation rates have increased by 68% and transplant rates by some 47% giving many more people the opportunity of a transplant. We are monitoring how legislative change in Wales is affecting donation rates but our efforts remain focussed on encouraging donor registration and discussions within families about donation to increase consent rates.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when he plans to respond to the letter sent to him dated 23 February 2015 on prescription charges for people with long-term conditions by the Chairs of the All-Party Parliamentary Groups on Respiratory Health, Parkinson's, Motor Neurone Disease, HIV and AIDS, Sickle Cell and Thalassaemia and Heart Disease.

The Department responded to the Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Respiratory Health’s letter of 23 February 2015 on 2 April 2015.

7th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many prescriptions for Larium GPs issued in each year from 2010 to date; what the cost was of those prescriptions; and if he will make a statement.

The number of prescription items written in the United Kingdom and dispensed in the community in England and associated net ingredient cost is in the table.

Year

Prescription items

000s

Net ingredient cost

£000s

2010

14.5

306.9

2011

15.6

317.4

2012

17.7

346.7

2013

18.0

353.8

2014

17.6

367.2

Source: Prescription Cost Analysis provided by the Health and Social Care Information Centre

24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of attendances at A&E because of (a) urinary tract infections, (b) catheter-related infections and (c) stoma care issues in each of the last three years; and if he will make a statement.

This information is not collected.

While the Hospital Episode Statistics accident and emergency (A&E) data set does contain information about the diagnosis of patients attending A&E, it is not possible to identify the conditions requested as the diagnosis system in place is not detailed enough to classify these conditions.

Table 14 in the Health and Social Care Information Centre’s (HSCIC’s) annual publication demonstrates the diagnosis groupings published. Data for 2013/14 can be found at:

http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB16728/acci-emer-atte-eng-2013-14-data.xlsx

24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the annual cost of destroyed unused prescribed medication; and if he will make a statement.

Information is not held centrally on the annual cost or amount of unused or unnecessary medicines in the National Health Service.

The Department commissioned the York Health Economics Consortium and the School of Pharmacy at the University of London to carry out research to determine the scale, causes and costs of waste medicines in England. The report, Evaluation of the Scale, Causes and Costs of Waste Medicines, was published in November 2010 and is available at:

http://eprints.pharmacy.ac.uk/2605/1/Evaluation_of_NHS_Medicines_Waste__web_publication_version.pdf

This found that the gross cost of unused prescription medicines in primary and community care in the NHS in England in 2009 was estimated to be £300 million a year and that up to £150 million of this was avoidable.

A number of initiatives, led by NHS England, are currently underway to optimise the use of medicines in the NHS and better empower patients.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many continence advisors were employed in the NHS in each year since 2005; and if he will make a statement.

Information on the number of continence advisors employed in the National Health Service is not collected by the Department.

8th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people have been diagnosed with postural tachycardic syndrome; if his Department funds research into that condition; and if he will make a statement.

Information on the number of people diagnosed with postural tachycardia syndrome is not collected centrally.

The Department funds the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). Researchers at the NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre have undertaken a study exploring the characteristics of patients with postural tachycardia syndrome in the United Kingdom. The findings were published in the journal BMJ Open in 2014 which is available at:

http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/6/e004127.full

The NIHR welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including diagnosis and treatment of postural tachycardia syndrome. These applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the importance of the topic to patients and health and care services, value for money and scientific quality.

2nd Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what procedures are in place to prevent the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) transfering NHS data to Wales for storage; whether the HSCIC definition of overseas includes Wales; and if he will make a statement.

The Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) may arrange with other persons or bodies, including persons or bodies based in Wales, to make provision for the storage of information, provided that the HSCIC has a legal basis to collect and store the information, and provided that the holding of the information by those persons or bodies is lawful. Information can be transferred to Wales if there is a legal basis to do so.

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when his Department plans to report on progress on the National Service Framework for long-term conditions; and if he will make a statement.

There are no plans to report on the progress on the National Service Framework for Long Term Conditions (LTCs), published under the previous administration in 2005.

As you may be aware, since 1 April 2013, NHS England has been responsible for securing high quality outcomes for people with people with LTCs. In our mandate to the National Health Service, we set out ambitions to improve the care and support of patients with long term illnesses, helping them to live healthily and independently, with much better control over the care they receive. In response, NHS England set out a range of actions designed to deliver this, central to which was implementation of the House of Care model, which is designed to support the delivery of person-centred, coordinated care. The House of Care enables individuals to make informed decisions about their treatment and empowers them to self-manage their LTCs in partnership with health and care professionals.

26th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the effect of charging VAT on the installation, repair or replacement of heating systems in the homes of people with (a) Parkinson's and (b) other progressive conditions in the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement.

The Secretary of State for Health has had no discussion with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the effect of charging VAT on the installation, repair or replacement of heating systems in the homes of people with Parkinson's and other progressive conditions in the last 12 months.

Public Health England has published the Cold Weather Plan for England 2013 which identifies a range of groups at greater risk of harm from cold weather and appropriate actions for those working with these groups to take. Although there is no specific guidance for people with Parkinson’s, individuals with this condition may be included within these at-risk groups.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the reduction of avoidable harm by better medicines reconciliation for hospital patients with Parkinson's.

The Department has made no such assessment.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) issued joint guidance, Technical patient safety solutions for medicines reconciliation on admission of adults to hospital in December 2007, which aims to reduce medication errors, which occur most commonly on transfer between care settings and on admission to hospital. This guidance applies to all patients, including those with Parkinson's disease and is available at:

www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/live/11897/38560/38560.pdf

The NPSA also issued a Rapid Response Report on Reducing harm from omitted and delayed medicines in hospital in February 2010. This makes reference to medicines where timeliness of administration is crucial, including those for Parkinson's disease. This is available at:

www.nrls.npsa.nhs.uk/alerts/?entryid45=66720

NICE, the NPSA and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society have all identified the key role of pharmacists in medicines reconciliation and the majority of hospitals now have pharmacists on admission wards to help ensure patients' medicines are reconciled promptly.

A strong reporting culture, where safety incidents are reported and monitored is essential to improving safety for all patients, including those with Parkinson's disease. NHS England and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency jointly issued two patient safety alerts on 20 March 2014 to help healthcare providers increase incident reporting for medication errors and medical devices. The alerts instruct providers to take specific steps that will improve data reporting quality; and will see the establishment of national networks to maximise learning and provide guidance on minimising harm relating to these incident types.

The measures announced by my Rt Hon Friend, the Secretary of State for Health on 26 March, as part of his invitation to NHS organisations to ‘Sign up to Safety', are also likely to lead to an increase in the number of reported incidents of harm in the National Health Service even though care will be getting safer.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether the online system for members of the public to compare hospitals on the basis of safety indicators will include information on cases in which patients with conditions such as Parkinson's have not received their medication on time; and if he will make a statement.

We are working with NHS England to prepare for the publication on NHS Choices of an extended set of patient safety indicators later this year. These indicators are being gathered together in a manner that will allow patients to compare local hospitals on the basis of a more rounded picture of safety performance than has been previously available in one place. The initial focus of this presentation will be on indicators that are relevant to the general population of hospital inpatients and for which information is available. There is not currently, to our knowledge, a suitable source of data regarding delayed medication for those being treated for diseases such as Parkinson's.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to improve reporting of instances in which the medication regimes of hospital patients with Parkinson's are disrupted through delays or errors in medicines reconciliation; and if he will make a statement.

The Department has made no such assessment.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) issued joint guidance, Technical patient safety solutions for medicines reconciliation on admission of adults to hospital in December 2007, which aims to reduce medication errors, which occur most commonly on transfer between care settings and on admission to hospital. This guidance applies to all patients, including those with Parkinson's disease and is available at:

www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/live/11897/38560/38560.pdf

The NPSA also issued a Rapid Response Report on Reducing harm from omitted and delayed medicines in hospital in February 2010. This makes reference to medicines where timeliness of administration is crucial, including those for Parkinson's disease. This is available at:

www.nrls.npsa.nhs.uk/alerts/?entryid45=66720

NICE, the NPSA and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society have all identified the key role of pharmacists in medicines reconciliation and the majority of hospitals now have pharmacists on admission wards to help ensure patients' medicines are reconciled promptly.

A strong reporting culture, where safety incidents are reported and monitored is essential to improving safety for all patients, including those with Parkinson's disease. NHS England and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency jointly issued two patient safety alerts on 20 March 2014 to help healthcare providers increase incident reporting for medication errors and medical devices. The alerts instruct providers to take specific steps that will improve data reporting quality; and will see the establishment of national networks to maximise learning and provide guidance on minimising harm relating to these incident types.

The measures announced by my Rt Hon Friend, the Secretary of State for Health on 26 March, as part of his invitation to NHS organisations to ‘Sign up to Safety', are also likely to lead to an increase in the number of reported incidents of harm in the National Health Service even though care will be getting safer.

16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Hong Kong counterparts on the use of excessive police force against protesters.

We remain seriously concerned by the situation in Hong Kong and recent violent clashes between protesters and the police. It is essential that protests are conducted peacefully and within the law, and that the response of the authorities is proportionate. On 9 August, the Foreign Secretary spoke at length to the Hong Kong Chief Executive, Carrie Lam, about the police response to recent protests, and the UK Consul-General in Hong Kong is in regular contact with the authorities, including on this issue. We have made clear our view that there must be a robust, credible and independent investigation into events in Hong Kong. An inquiry is an important step in healing divisions and rebuilding trust that will support the process of dialogue and resolution.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
26th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Bahraini counterpart on reports of violence at the Bahraini Embassy in the UK on 26 July 2019.

Following the illegal entry of an individual onto the premises of the Bahrain Embassy on 26 July, I spoke to Dr Sheikh Abduallah, Bahraini Undersecretary for International Affairs on 27 July, to reiterate that the British Government takes the safety and security of foreign diplomats and the status of Embassies and High Commissions in the UK extremely seriously.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department have taken to ensure the UK’s obligations under the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration on Hong Kong are being fulfilled; and if he will make a statement.

We believe that meaningful political dialogue, taken forward by Hong Kong under its high degree of autonomy, is the best way to resolve the current impasse. It is important that the basic freedoms enshrined in the Sino-British Joint Declaration are maintained

The Sino-British Joint Declaration is a legally binding treaty, registered with the UN, that remains in force. The UK, as a co-signatory, has an obligation to monitor its implementation closely, and we are committed to doing so.

The Prime Minister discussed developments in Hong Kong with other leaders at the recent G7 Summit, and the Foreign Secretary has recently spoken with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi and Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many UK citizens are part of Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe patrol groups operating within 15 miles of the contact line in Eastern Ukraine; and if he will make a statement.

There are currently 62 British citizens seconded to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe's (OSCE) Special Monitoring Mission (SMM) to Ukraine. We are unable to provide information regarding the location of British citizens employed by the OSCE in Ukraine and their experience of kinetic events. Detailed information relating to these issues is owned by the OSCE and not the Government, and it would therefore be inappropriate for the Government to publish it. General information and reporting relating to kinetic, ceasefire and humanitarian incidents in eastern Ukraine is publicly available on the OSCE website (https://www.osce.org/special-monitoring-mission-to-ukraine).

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many UK citizens are employed in Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe patrol groups operating in Eastern Ukraine where their areas of responsibility have experienced kinetic incidents including (a) ceasefire incidents and (b) humanitarian issues; and if he will make a statement.

There are currently 62 British citizens seconded to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe's (OSCE) Special Monitoring Mission (SMM) to Ukraine. We are unable to provide information regarding the location of British citizens employed by the OSCE in Ukraine and their experience of kinetic events. Detailed information relating to these issues is owned by the OSCE and not the Government, and it would therefore be inappropriate for the Government to publish it. General information and reporting relating to kinetic, ceasefire and humanitarian incidents in eastern Ukraine is publicly available on the OSCE website (https://www.osce.org/special-monitoring-mission-to-ukraine).

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
28th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking to work with UN Security Council members to ensure that the Stockholm agreement is implemented in Yemen.

We have welcomed UN verification that Houthi forces have begun their withdrawal from the ports of Hodeidah, Saleef and Ras Issa. This was the first such withdrawal by the Houthis since the conflict began in 2014.

The UK encourages both parties to continue to constructively engage with the Special Envoy Martin Griffiths and General Lollesgaard. We will continue discussions with partners on how the UN Security Council can support the UN Special Envoy Martin Griffiths on the political process and improving the humanitarian situation, central to which is the implementation of agreements reached during the Stockholm talks.

20th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make representations to his Russian and Syrian counterparts on (a) halting military offensives in Syria’s Idlib province and (b) respecting the ceasefire.

​The UK has already made clear to Russia and the Syrian regime the need to halt their offensive in Idlib and to respect the ceasefire agreed last September at Sochi. We have said this publicly and at the UN Security Council, including at the emergency session on 18 June, as well as in direct representations to the Russian government. The UK does not maintain diplomatic engagement with the Syrian regime.

20th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with international partners on the merits of creating and upholding no-fly zones over Idlib, Syria.

We are deeply concerned by the civilian deaths caused by airstrikes by the Syrian regime and Russia in Idlib, however we do not consider imposition of a no-fly zone over Idlib to be a realistic option. We have urgently called on the regime and Russia to end their current offensive in Idlib and to respect the ceasefire agreed last year.

7th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, when he plans to lay before Parliament the Accession Protocol relating to Northern Macedonia's membership of NATO; and if he will make a statement.

We look forward to welcoming North Macedonia as the 30th member of NATO. My Written Ministerial Statement to Parliament on 26 February outlined the process of the entering into force of the Prespa Agreement and North Macedonia's NATO Accession. In line with that, UK ratification for North Macedonia's accession to NATO is progressing and we plan to lay the Accession Protocol before Parliament in the coming weeks.

18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 25 March 2019 to Question 234859 on Sri Lanka: Water, what progress has been made by the Sri Lankan Government on determining whether the Chunnakam power plant was responsible for pollution in that area.

​On 4 April 2019 the Supreme Court in Sri Lanka ordered the Northern Power Company, which operated a thermal power station in Chunnakam to allocate 20 million Sri Lanka Rupees to compensate residents affected by contamination of ground water and soil near the station. We understand that the plant is no longer functioning.

13th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with his Chinese counterpart on upholding the human rights of Uighur Muslims in China; and if he will make a statement.

We have serious concerns about the human rights situation in Xinjiang and the Chinese Government’s deepening crackdown; including credible reports of re-education camps and widespread surveillance and restrictions targeted at ethnic minorities.

During China’s Universal Periodic Review at the UN Human Rights Council on 6 November, the UK made a statement which described our concern about the treatment of ethnic minorities in China, including Uyghurs. We issued a specific recommendation, calling on China to implement the recommendations by the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on Xinjiang, and to allow the UN to monitor the implementation. We also raised our concerns about Xinjiang in our Item 4 statement at the September UN Human Rights Council, and we supported the statement of 26 October by the European External Action Service highlighting concerns about Xinjiang.

I raised our concerns about Xinjiang with Vice Minister Guo Yezhou during my visit to China on 22 July 2018. The Foreign Secretary, Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP, also raised our concerns about the region with Chinese State Councillor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi during his visit to China on 30 July 2018.

13th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2018 to Question 194629, whether his Department plans to award a civilian service medal to UK citizens to the OSCE mission to Ukraine.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office highly values the work of all UK citizens serving in the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission (SMM) in Ukraine. There are no plans to introduce a specific OSCE SMM civilian service medal. We will continue to support our secondees with a package of benefits and remuneration that recognises their work for this important Mission.

7th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2018 to Question 194629, what medals UK citizens who serve in OSCE missions are eligible to receive.

The Government supports recognition for UK civilians serving overseas, including via the OSCE Medal which is awarded annually to individuals who have made an outstanding contribution to the cause of security and cooperation in Europe. It is a civilian, not a military award.

22nd Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will recognise the contribution of UK citizens to the OSCE mission by awarding them the CSDP medal; and if he will make a statement.

The Common Security and Defence Policy Service (CSDP) Medal is an international military decoration awarded to individuals who have served with CSDP missions. The Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine is a separate mission outside the scope of the CSDP. UK citizens who serve in OSCE missions are not therefore eligible for CSDP medals. We fully support our secondees to OSCE with a package of benefits and remuneration for their work, and we continue to consider other ways to recognise our secondees’ service to this important Mission.

9th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many UK citizens working for the OSCE’s mission to Ukraine are employed by (a) the Government, (b) a UK contractor and (c) the OSCE; and if he will make a statement.

The UK currently provides 66 monitors to the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) Special Monitoring Mission (SMM), the second largest cohort of any participating state. This includes the recent appointment of a UK secondee to the senior position of Deputy Chief Monitor. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office funds these secondee postings through the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF). Since the OSCE is an independent multilateral organisation, we are unable to provide details of other UK citizens who may be contracted or employed by the organisation in Ukraine.

9th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what the average time spent in Ukraine was of UK representatives to the OSCE’s mission to that country.

Secondees are placed on contracts for one year which can be renewed on agreement, as the mandate for the mission is renewed by the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE). While in Ukraine they work full time and are subject to OSCE staffing regulations. As the OSCE is an independent multilateral organisation, any UK secondees are working for the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission and are not formally representatives of the UK.

9th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether his Department is taking steps to recognise the contribution of UK citizens to the OSCE mission in Ukraine; and if he will make a statement.

The UK is a long standing supporter of the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) and its Special Monitoring Mission. We fully support our secondees to the Mission and provide them with a package of benefits and remuneration for their work. This is in addition to the allowances they receive directly from the OSCE. This demonstrates both our commitment to the Mission and our recognition of the work of our secondees. We continue to consider other ways to recognise our secondees’ service to this important Mission.

15th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking to (a) support and (b) protect human rights defenders in the UK’s human rights priority countries.

​In November 2017 the then Foreign Secretary issued a revised version of the UK Guidelines on Working with Human Rights Defenders to the diplomatic network, giving it advice on how best to support human rights defenders. Depending on the local context, this might involve making public statements, attending trials, or working privately with the host government. In addition, posts in all Human Rights Priority Countries are required to have a Human Rights Strategy which includes working with human rights defenders. Funding for projects through the Magna Carta Fund further supports the work of the diplomatic network in supporting human rights defenders. Working at the multilateral level, in November 2017 we helped secure consensus on the UN General Assembly Resolution on Human Rights Defenders to support and protect human rights defenders.

2nd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make representations to (a) Russia, (b) China, (c) Norway and (d) South Korea on establishing a Marine Protected Area in the Weddell Sea.

​The Weddell Sea Marine Protected Area proposal is currently being finalised by those European Union Member States who are also Members of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). International consultations are underway at official and technical levels with CCAMLR Members including those from Russia, China, Norway and the Republic of Korea. The final proposal will be submitted to CCAMLR in September, when we will work with other EU Members to consider the most appropriate level of lobbying to secure agreement for the proposal.

26th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with his Israeli counterpart on adherence to international humanitarian law when responding to Palestinian protests on Gaza’s borders.

​We continue to raise our concerns about the high volume of live fire being used in response to the protests in Gaza. Our Ambassador to Israel raised this most recently with the Israeli authorities on 27 April. We have been clear that Israel has the right to secure itself against Hamas and other terrorist groups. Hamas and its operatives have been exploiting these protests for their own benefit. We are urging Israel to show restraint, and the Palestinian leadership to ensure the protests are peaceful.

26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make representations to the UN Security Council to ensure that the UN peacekeeping mission to Western Sahara is given a mandate to monitor and report on human rights in Western Sahara.

We will consider with our UN Security Council partners how best to ensure that MINURSO’s mandate continues to enable it to support peace and security in Western Sahara. UN Security Council Resolutions renewing MINURSO’s mandate have consistently encouraged the parties to continue their efforts to enhance the promotion and protection of human rights in Western Sahara.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many members of staff have left his Department since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

Between 1st January 2015 and 30th November 2017, 929 UK Based Staff have left the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO). This includes retirement, resignation, career breaks and dismissal. It also includes civil servants returning to their parent department at the end of their loan/secondment.

The Aliens' Employment Act 1955 makes it a requirement that all UK Based Staff in the FCO must be British nationals or dual nationals where one of those nationalities is British. We do not centrally hold details of the nationality of our staff who are dual nationals.

10th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make representations to the Government of Colombia on reports of anti-narcotics police firing on a UN-led humanitarian mission investigating the killing of farmers in Tumaco.

Recent events in Tumaco are deeply worrying. I, therefore welcome the investigation announced by President Santos. Our Embassy in Bogota is in contact with the Colombian authorities.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will impose sanctions on President Maduro and other high-ranking Venezuelan Government officials.

​​The UK does not have its own domestic sanctions regime but does act with the international community to implement UN and EU sanctions such as those on the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. We will continue working with partners, including EU Member States and those in the region, to consider a wide range of options, including sanctions.

5th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with his Egyptian counterpart on the release of the photojournalist Mahmoud Abu Zeid, known as Shawkan.

The Foreign Secretary raised our human rights concerns with Egypt's President Sisi during his visit to Cairo on 25 February 2017. This included emphasising the importance of a free and open society. Our Ambassador to Egypt, and other officials have previously raised Shawkan's case with the Egyptian authorities.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many UK nationals are held in detention in China; and if he will make a statement.

We are aware of 11 British nationals being held in detention in China. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office and its global network seeks to offer consular assistance to all British nationals in detention overseas.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether the UK has ratified Montenegro's accession to NATO; and if he will make a statement.

The Government laid Montenegro's Protocol of Accession before Parliament on 29 June 2016, under the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010. Following the summer recess, the Protocol completed its Parliamentary scrutiny period on 15 September. We are currently finalising the process to confirm the UK's acceptance of the Protocol and allow us to deposit it with the US Government (depositary for the Treaty), as stipulated by the North Atlantic Treaty. We expect to complete this shortly and look forward to welcoming Montenegro as the 29th NATO Ally, once all current NATO Allies have ratified according to their own national processes.

25th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what (a) direct and (b) other financial support his Department provides to the Afghan Mines Protection Force and (b) local police.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) provides policing assistance to Afghanistan via its £70m per annum contribution to the Afghan National Defence and Security Forces (ANDSF), which supports the payment of Afghan National Police salaries, via the Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan (LOTFA), administered by the UN Development Programme (UNDP). The FCO does not fund the Afghan Local Police.

The UK also deploys security advisers to the Ministry of Interior, NATO, and EUPOL, the EU’s policing mission in Afghanistan. They do not provide support to the Afghan Local Police.

The Department for International Development’s separate financial support to policing is aimed at capacity-building the Ministry of Interior and developing the Afghan National Police. The Afghan Public Protection Force is not a recipient of this support.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with the Russian Ambassador on the health of Vladimir Bukovsky; and if he will make a statement.

There have been no discussions between the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Russian Ambassador about Mr Bukovsky’s health.
5th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make representations to his Colombian counterpart on the status of the request for protection measures for Gustavo Adolfo Rengifo.

Officials from the Our Embassy in Bogotá have raised the case of Gustavo Adolfo Rengifo with the Colombian government's Presidential Advisor for Human Rights.

5th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make representations to his Colombian counterpart to support the efforts of the Interchurch Peace and Justice Commission to install a second humanitarian space adjacent to the Puente Nayero Humanitarian Space.

Our Embassy in Bogotá supports the Inter-Ecclesiastical Commission for Justice and Peace (CIJP) and its work to promote human rights and peace in Colombia. British Embassy officials have already scheduled a visit Buenaventura at the end of this month to gain a better understanding of the current situation and assess future requirements for humanitarian spaces.

9th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of continuing violence by paramilitaries in Colombia on the progress of peace talks in that country.

The government of Colombia has made significant progress on peace process negotiations with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). I am pleased that an agreement has been reached this week between the parties on the long-standing issue of Transitional Justice and reparations for victims. Both sides have committed to sign a final agreement by the end of March 2016 and the UK remains committed to supporting this deadline.

I am concerned about the continued negative influence of organised criminal gangs and resulting violence in Colombia. I am pleased to see that the Colombian Minister of Defence has announced that tackling organised crime is a top priority for 2016. The UK, through the work of the National Crime Agency and others, continues to support the government of Colombia on this issue.

Much of the government of Colombia’s success on tackling organised crime and related violence will depend on the progress of peace negotiations in Havana, which provide an opportunity to bring about real change for all Colombians.

2nd Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will hold discussions with his Mauritanian counterpart on the arrest and trial of Biram Abeid and others involved in anti-slavery campaigns in that country; and if he will make a statement.

The UK’s representative in Nouakchott has raised our concern at the Biram Abeid case with the Mauritanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in particular the length of the activists’ sentence. With other EU member states, the UK made a public statement to express our concern on 20 January. We understand that the activists are appealing the sentence, and we are considering what further representations will we make to the Government of Mauritania following the outcome of this appeal.

6th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Brazilian government in relation to protection for Laisa Santos Samaio; and if he will make a statement.

Her Majesty's Government has not made specific representations to the Brazilian government relating to Laísa Santos Sampaio, who has remained in the Brazilian government’s national protection programme for human rights defenders since November 2012. This programme receives UK support through EU-funded projects with the Brazilian Human Rights Secretariat. We are also active participants in the annual Brazil-EU Human Rights Dialogue which covers a range of human rights issues, including the protection of human rights defenders.

5th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will detail the (a) number and (b) cost of contacts with private military companies in each year since 2008; and if he will make a statement.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) does not contract with Private Military Companies. For details of FCO contracts with Private Security Companies, I refer the honourable Member to the answer I gave on 15 December 2014 to question 218225.
10th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many contracts his Department has held with private security companies in each year since 2008; what the cost of those contracts was; and if he will make a statement.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) continues to have a number of centrally awarded security contracts with private security companies (PSCs), covering our key conflict zone requirements including Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Somalia and Yemen.

These contracts are widely used by other Government Departments and continue to be retendered every 3-5 years. The current contracts are:
Afghanistan – guarding
Iraq (Baghdad) – guarding
Iraq (Erbil) – guarding
Libya – guarding
Somalia – guarding
Yemen – guarding
Various conflict zones – Overseas Security Managers and Analysts

Expenditure against these contracts is as detailed below:
2008/2009 £52.5 million
2009/2010 £49.5 million
2010/2011 £41.6 million
2011/2012 £50.4 million
2012/2013 £48.9 million
2013/2014 £45.4 million

These details are limited to these contracts and do not include local contracts let by our overseas Posts. Data for these could only be collected at disproportionate cost.

10th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department took to vet Libyan personnel prior to their commencing military training at Bassingbourn barracks; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my right hon. Friend the Member for Rayleigh and Wickford (Mr Francois) of 4 December to question 214126.

10th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with the Home Office on the decision to return 90 Libyan recruits from Bassingbourn; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my right hon. Friend the Member for Rayleigh and Wickford (Mr Francois) on 21 November to questions 214127 and 214130.

10th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with the Home Office on the behaviour of Libyan personnel on Bassingbourn base; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my right hon. Friend the Member for Rayleigh and Wickford (Mr Francois) on 21 November to questions 214127 and 214130.

10th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he had with the Home Office on decisions to return Libyan personnel home because of events at Bassingbourn base; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my right hon. Friend the Member for Rayleigh and Wickford (Mr Francois) on 21 November to questions 214127 and 214130.

24th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with the government of Malaysia on the trial of the leader of the opposition in that country, Anwar Ibrahim; and if he will make a statement.

My right hon. and noble Friend the former Minister of State, Baroness Warsi, raised Anwar Ibrahim’s case with senior members of the Malaysian government during her visit to Malaysia in April this year. Our High Commission in Malaysia has also discussed the matter with Malaysian ministers and officials on a number of occasions in recent months and is closely monitoring Anwar’s appeal against his conviction, including by attending court hearings alongside other diplomatic missions.

18th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with the government of the United Arab Emirates regarding migrant workers' rights in that country; and if he will make a statement.

We regularly discuss migrant workers' rights with the Government of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). In addition, we made recommendations relating to the living and working conditions of foreign workers during the UAE's last Universal Periodic Review at the UN Human Rights Council.

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will undertake a review of the tax exemption limit for cash redundancy payments; and if he will make a statement.

The Government confirmed in Finance (No. 2) Act 2017 that the first £30,000 of all termination payments remain exempt from income tax.

The UK has one of the most generous tax exemptions for termination payments in the OECD, and around 80% of the termination awards made each year will remain completely free from income tax. The £30,000 threshold also exceeds the maximum statutory redundancy payment of £15,750.

The Government has no plans to change the termination payments tax exempt threshold.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to issue a waiver for the tax due on redundancy payments to be received by Ford Bridgend workers.

The Government confirmed in Finance (No. 2) Act 2017 that the first £30,000 of all termination payments remain exempt from income tax. The UK has one of the most generous tax exemptions for termination payments in the OECD, and around 80% of the termination awards made each year will remain completely free from income tax.

HM Revenue and Customs does not have the data available to make an estimate on the cost of reducing tax from redundancy payments for Ford, Bridgend.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the value of reducing tax deductions from redundancy payments to workers at Ford Bridgend; and if he will make a statement.

The Government confirmed in Finance (No. 2) Act 2017 that the first £30,000 of all termination payments remain exempt from income tax. The UK has one of the most generous tax exemptions for termination payments in the OECD, and around 80% of the termination awards made each year will remain completely free from income tax.

HM Revenue and Customs does not have the data available to make an estimate on the cost of reducing tax from redundancy payments for Ford, Bridgend.

23rd Apr 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 10 April 2019 to Question 240486 on London Capital and Finance, when he plans to publish the terms of the investigation; and if he will make a statement.

Further details of this investigation, including its terms, will be communicated in due course.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Apr 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of establishing a compensation fund for investors who lost funds as a result of the collapse of London Capital and Finance; and if he will make a statement.

The administrators for London Capital & Finance (LCF) are currently estimating recoveries for investors affected by LCF’s failure.

LCF’s investors are unlikely to have access to the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS). However, this would be for the FSCS to determine as an independent body from both HM Treasury and the Financial Conduct Authority.

The FSCS is working closely with the administrators to understand more about LCF’s activities. If there are circumstances that give rise to potentially valid claims, the FSCS will begin to accept claims against LCF and communicate this on their website.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Oct 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that the Financial Conduct Authority has the necessary resources to enforce its rules on pay day lenders carrying out affordability checks on potential customers.

The Government has fundamentally reformed regulation of the consumer credit market, transferring regulatory responsibility to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) on 1 April 2014.

The legislative framework provides for the FCA to be operationally independent from Government. The FCA is funded via a levy on financial services firms, which is set by the FCA to cover its funding requirement each year following consultation. As such, resourcing decisions are a matter for the FCA.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many prosecutions have been made against people promoting disguised remuneration schemes in each year since 1999.

This Government is committed to tackling avoidance in all its guises. A core part of our strategy has been to tackle the people behind these tax avoidance schemes. We have introduced legislation every year since 2014 providing HMRC with suite of powers to tackle promoters and enablers of tax avoidance schemes, designed to change behaviour and influence those involved to move out of promoting and enabling for good, with various sanctions and penalties for those who don’t.

HMRC are using these powers to challenge all major promoters of avoidance schemes, including disguised remuneration (DR) avoidance schemes. This has resulted in several major promoters stopping selling avoidance schemes and HMRC have also, through court action where needed, required around 30 other high-profile promoters to disclose details of previously undisclosed schemes, enabling HMRC to take counter-action on these schemes much earlier.

HMRC is considering whether some schemes involving attempts to avoid tax through the use DR may be fraudulent in nature.

HMRC will consider criminal investigation where appropriate, for example, where there is evidence of fraudulent behaviour. Promoters of tax avoidance schemes have been prosecuted, leading to convictions and jail terms for example:

  • In 2016 four men were found guilty of promoting and operating a fraudulent tax avoidance scheme, to defraud taxpayers out of £100 million.

  • In 2017 a chartered accountant was sentenced to eight years in prison for setting up and promoting a number of fraudulent schemes to wealthy professionals.

15th Oct 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the maximum amount of time is that HMRC provides to people who cannot afford to pay the 2019 loan charge.

HMRC has published a specific arrangement for disguised remuneration (DR) scheme users who currently earn less than £50,000, are no longer in tax avoidance, and settle before the loan charge arises. In these specific circumstances HMRC will agree an extended payment arrangement of up to five years without the need for detailed supporting information about their income and assets.

DR scheme users who earn £50,000 or more, or who require longer, may still be able to pay in instalments over periods in excess of 5 years if agreed with HMRC. There is no maximum amount of time that a person can have, to settle their avoidance scheme debt – any agreed payment plan should be affordable and specific to an individual’s personal circumstances. These payment arrangements will be tailored to an individual’s financial circumstances so HMRC will require more detailed supporting information.

Anybody who is worried about being able to pay what they owe should get in touch with HMRC.

13th Jul 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on revenue to the public purse of corporations hiring workers as self-employed to circumvent their employer’s national insurance contributions and workers’ rights liabilities as a result of changes to IR35 regulations.

The Government is committed to robustly tackling false self-employment. HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) will investigate any evidence suggesting companies may have misclassified individuals for tax purposes. In these cases, HMRC will identify the facts and take steps to ensure the right tax and National Insurance contributions are paid.

Where the off-payroll working rules (IR35) apply, employer’s National Insurance contributions are payable. In April 2017, the Government introduced reform to IR35 for the public sector meaning responsibility shifted for determining whether the rules apply, from the individual’s own company to the public sector body engaging them. Early tax receipts are broadly in line with what was expected from the reform and the forecast of what the measure would raise.

30th Apr 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many HMRC investigations of taxpayers initiated in 2013 were ongoing for more than (a) one year (b) two years and (c) four years prior to prosecution; and if he will make a statement.

The HMRC data below relates to the number of people who were subject to a criminal investigation started in 2013/14, broken down by duration in years. The end point to determine duration is the outcome of the prosecution (conviction or acquittal). The number of investigation cases involved will be less as many cases involve more than one individual.

Criminal Investigations started in 2013-2014:

  • 147 individuals were subject to a criminal investigation which lasted one year or less.

  • 189 individuals were subject to a criminal investigation which lasted one to two years.

  • 228 individuals were subject to a criminal investigation which lasted two to four years.

  • 17 individuals were subject to a criminal investigation which lasted over 4 years.

  • 309 individuals are subject to a criminal investigation which is still ongoing.

30th Apr 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the average time is that the fraud investigation department of HMRC takes to (a) carry out investigations and (b) receive confirmation from the Crown Prosecution Service of a decision to prosecute; and if he will make a statement.

The duration of a case is calculated as the time from the start of the case to the close, which includes the trial outcome and where relevant the issuing of a confiscation order. Criminal cases can vary significantly in their size and complexity with some cases concluding within a few months, whilst others can take years. Last year, one of our longest running cases concluded after over ten years.

For cases that closed in 2018, the mean duration of a criminal case is 15 months and the median is 10 months.

7th Dec 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many members of staff have left his Department since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

HM Treasury leavers based on financial years and current year to date figures.

Apr 2014 to Mar 2015

Apr 2015 to Mar 2016

Apr 2016 to Mar 2017

Apr 2017 to Oct 2017

Total leavers

267

271

327

171

All Government Departments are bound by legal requirements concerning the right to work in the UK and, in addition, the Civil Service Nationality Rules.

Evidence of nationality is checked at the point of recruitment into the Civil Service as part of wider pre-employment checks, but there is no requirement on departments to retain this information beyond the point at which it has served its purpose.

More broadly, the Government will be consulting in due course on how we work with business to ensure that workers in this country have the skills that they need to get a job. But there are no proposals to publish lists of the number or proportion of foreign workers.

13th Apr 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 22 March 2017 to Question 67778, if he will make it his policy to end the practice of (a) the DVLA and (b) other Government agencies who impose a credit card surcharge greater than the 0.3 per cent cap for credit transactions.

HM Treasury has not made an analysis of the Government departments and agencies that apply a surcharge when customers make payments by credit card.

However, from January 2018 the Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2) introduces a ban on surcharging which means that retailers will no longer be able to charge consumers to use payment instruments for which interchange fees are regulated, which includes the majority of consumer debit and credit cards.

Merchants currently pay a merchant service charge to process all card transactions. Part of this covers the fees that a merchant acquirer can be charged by a card issuing bank for processing transactions known as interchange fees. The Interchange Fee Regulation (IFR), which came into force in December 2015, caps the fees that could be passed on to consumers from merchants in the form of higher prices at 0.2% and 0.3% for debit and credit cards respectively.

13th Apr 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish a list of government departments and agencies that apply a surcharge when customers make payments by credit card.

HM Treasury has not made an analysis of the Government departments and agencies that apply a surcharge when customers make payments by credit card.

However, from January 2018 the Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2) introduces a ban on surcharging which means that retailers will no longer be able to charge consumers to use payment instruments for which interchange fees are regulated, which includes the majority of consumer debit and credit cards.

Merchants currently pay a merchant service charge to process all card transactions. Part of this covers the fees that a merchant acquirer can be charged by a card issuing bank for processing transactions known as interchange fees. The Interchange Fee Regulation (IFR), which came into force in December 2015, caps the fees that could be passed on to consumers from merchants in the form of higher prices at 0.2% and 0.3% for debit and credit cards respectively.

13th Apr 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 22 March 2017 to Question 67778, what steps he is taking to ensure local trading standards officers are adequately resourced to effectively enforce the interchange fee regulation.

Local Trading Standards officers are not responsible for enforcing the Interchange Fee Regulation. The Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) is responsible for monitoring compliance with the interchange fee regulation in the UK and for taking enforcement action where appropriate.

14th Mar 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) airline and (b) other companies that charge over the 0.3 per cent cap for credit card transactions.

The Payment Systems Regulator is responsible for monitoring compliance with the Interchange Fee Regulation in the UK and for taking enforcement action where appropriate. Government has therefore not made an analysis of the number of companies that do not comply with the Regulation.

The Interchange Fee Regulation (IFR) caps the fees that a merchant acquirer can be charged by a card issuing bank at 0.2% and 0.3% for debit and credit cards respectively. This cost can be passed on to consumers through the practice of surcharging. The Government recently closed a consultation on how the revised Payment Services Directive should be implemented in the UK. One of the provisions in the Directive is a ban on merchants surcharging cards regulated under the IFR.

The interchange fee is part of the merchant service charge that a merchant pays to its bank or merchant acquirer to process its card transactions

14th Sep 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the average time taken was to complete an investigation into the alleged presence of an unreported adult in the household of a tax credit claimant in the past 12 months; and if he will make a statement.

Between 1 September 2015 and 31 August 2016, the average time taken to complete a tax credit undeclared partner investigation by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) from the point at which they first write to the customer to closure, was 51.27 days. During the same period, Concentrix acting on behalf of HMRC took an average of 65.34 days.

Where an alleged presence of an unreported adult occurs, claimants are given 30 days to contact HMRC or provide the relevant information. If after 30 days HMRC has had no contact, tax credit payments are either suspended or reduced. HMRC then gives the claimant a further 30 days to contact HMRC before making a decision on the household composition and tax credits award using all the available information.

12th Sep 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many letters his Department has sent to recipients of tax credits cancelling payments because of claims by HM Revenue and Customs that an unreported adult is living at the claimant's property in the last year; and if he will make a statement.

Between 1 September 2015 and 31 August 2016 HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) stopped 57,961 tax credit awards following a decision that the claimant was living with an undeclared partner. Where HMRC identifies an undeclared partner, the single tax credits claim is ended. The customer is able to reclaim in the correct joint capacity if entitlement exists.

10th Dec 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to reduce waiting times for the HMRC public service helpline.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has recruited 3,000 new staff into customer service roles this year. In particular, this has increased the number of people available on its telephone helplines outside normal office hours, when many customers choose to call.

HMRC has also undertaken its biggest-ever training programme as it seeks to build its customer support teams. This has included training 1,600 existing staff on a wider range of work to better meet customer demand.


Average call waiting times have improved significantly. From April to June it was 19 mins; from July to September it was 13 mins; in November it was under 10 minutes.

18th Nov 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what training is provided to HM Revenue and Customs staff to prepare them for handling applications for allowable expenses for ministers of religion; and if he will make a statement.

HM Revenue and Customs staff receive training on handling expenses claims from a range of customers. This includes training and guidance on how to handle claims from specific customer groups and professions, including ministers of religion.

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has agreed to the Top Level Budget holder in the Ministry of Defence making ex-gratia payments to members of the armed forces wrongly disciplined under AGAI 67 following receipt of a police caution; what estimate he has made of the level of such payments; when such payments are to start; and if he will make a statement.

The Treasury delegates ex-gratia payments that are not novel or contentious to the Ministry of Defence, below an agreed threshold. The Ministry of Defence (MOD) may then delegate further to Top Level Budget holders with the agreement with Treasury.

The MOD has not made any ex-gratia payments in response to claims from Armed Forces personnel that they had been wrongly disciplined under AGAI 67 on receipt of a police caution.

17th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how her Department plans to support the efficient management of migration flows and integration of refugees when the UK no longer receives funding from the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund.

All projects under the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund (AMIF) will continue to receive funding for the lifetime of their projects, even if the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
28th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 9 May 2019 to Question 250458, in what exceptional circumstances there is discretion to grant visas outside the Immigration Rules for extended family members.

Where a refugee family reunion application does not meet the requirements of the Immigration Rules, caseworkers must consider whether there are any exceptional circumstances or compassionate factors which may justify a grant of leave outside the Immigration Rules. We revised our guidance in 2016 to include more detail on the types of case that may benefit from a visa outside the Rules, this includes young adult sons or daughters who are dependent on family here and living in dangerous situations.

Specifically, exceptional circumstances or compassionate factors apply where a refusal would either breach the right to respect for family life under Article 8 of the ECHR or result in unjustifiably harsh consequences for the applicant or their family.
It is for the applicant to demonstrate what the exceptional circumstances or compassionate factors are in their case. Each case must be decided on its individual merits.

28th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps his department is taking to prevent the availability and distribution of child sexual abuse material online; and if he will make a statement.

Whilst there is no definitive number of child sex abuse images online, industry made over 10m referrals to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in 2017, and the Internet Watch Foundation last year processed 132,636 reports in 2017 (26% increase on 2016).

As well as working closely with the IWF, including the sharing of hashes with industry, the UK Government has invested in Project Arachnid – a tool that crawls the web to find indecent imagery and get it removed. It has issued approximately 1 million notices to service providers.

In September 2018, the Home Secretary called on industry to raise their response online child sexual exploitation and abuse, including to block child sexual abuse material as soon as companies detect it being uploaded. The Home Office and DCMS are also developing a White Paper which will set out a range of legislative and non-legislative measures to counter online harms and set clear responsibilities for tech companies to keep UK citizens safe online. Protecting children from exploitation and abuse online will be a central component of the White Paper.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
28th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number of child sexual abuse images online in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

Whilst there is no definitive number of child sex abuse images online, industry made over 10m referrals to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in 2017, and the Internet Watch Foundation last year processed 132,636 reports in 2017 (26% increase on 2016).

As well as working closely with the IWF, including the sharing of hashes with industry, the UK Government has invested in Project Arachnid – a tool that crawls the web to find indecent imagery and get it removed. It has issued approximately 1 million notices to service providers.

In September 2018, the Home Secretary called on industry to raise their response online child sexual exploitation and abuse, including to block child sexual abuse material as soon as companies detect it being uploaded. The Home Office and DCMS are also developing a White Paper which will set out a range of legislative and non-legislative measures to counter online harms and set clear responsibilities for tech companies to keep UK citizens safe online. Protecting children from exploitation and abuse online will be a central component of the White Paper.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will establish a royal commission on the role and future funding of policing.

The Home Office has no plans to establish a Royal Commission into police funding. Such a Commission would be a substantial undertaking requiring significant time and resource.

Instead, the Government is on the front foot in engaging with the police and we recognise the changing demands they are facing. The department supports forces to achieve their vision for policing through funding and work to improve forces' capabilities under five main strands: local policing; specialist capabilities; workforce; digital policing; and business enablers.

30th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many settlement visas his Department has issued in each of the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement.

Information on the number of visas granted by detailed category is published in the quarterly Immigration Statistics, Visas volume 1 table vi_01_q, latest edition at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-june-2018/list-of-tables#visas

2nd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will review the licence provisions to enable people to grow hemp for personal (a) food and (b) clothing use.

There are currently no plans to review the policy which gives rise to the licensing regime for cannabis cultivation.

The long-standing ‘industrial hemp’ licensing regime exists to enable growers- large or small- to cultivate low THC varieties of cannabis for use of the seed or fibre in clothing or culinary applications. Cultivation solely for ‘personal use’ would not be permitted within this policy.

21st Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for the publication of the consultation on offensive and dangerous weapons.

The Government published its consultation for proposals for new legislative measures on offensive and dangerous weapons on 14 October 2017 and the consultation closed on 9 December. The consultation received 10,712 responses.

My Right Honourable Friend, the Home Secretary, made a Written Ministerial Statement to the House on 20 June (Official Report HCWS780) announcing the publication of a summary of the responses that the consultation received. Copies of the summary are available in the House Library and on the Gov.uk website at https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/offensive-and-dangerous-weapons-new-legislation.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the evidential basis is for the proposed ban on .50 calibre rifles.

The Government introduced an Offensive Weapons Bill on 20 June which includes proposals to prohibit high energy rifles with a kinetic energy of more than 13,600 joules. This prohibition would include some 0.50 calibre rifles.

Concerns have been raised by UK Law Enforcement about the risks that high muzzle energy rifles might pose to public safety if they were to get into the hands of criminals or terrorists. Given the potential risk to public safety from these types of rifles the Government is taking action to address these risks.

The Home Office holds information on the number of offences involving a firearm recorded by the police in England and Wales, but does not hold information on the calibre of firearm used in these offences.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of a ban on .50 calibre rifles on the use of firearms in violent crime.

The Government introduced an Offensive Weapons Bill on 20 June which includes proposals to prohibit high energy rifles with a kinetic energy of more than 13,600 joules. This prohibition would include some 0.50 calibre rifles.

Concerns have been raised by UK Law Enforcement about the risks that high muzzle energy rifles might pose to public safety if they were to get into the hands of criminals or terrorists. Given the potential risk to public safety from these types of rifles the Government is taking action to address these risks.

The Home Office holds information on the number of offences involving a firearm recorded by the police in England and Wales, but does not hold information on the calibre of firearm used in these offences.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how his Department plans to prevent the sale and purchase of machetes and other dangerous knives.

It is already an offence under Section 141 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 to manufacture, import, sell and supply offensive weapons. The list of offensive weapons is below:
https://www.gov.uk/buying-carrying-knives
In addition, it is an offence under Section 141(A) of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 to sell articles with blade or point to a person under 18.
On 20 June we introduced an Offensive Weapons Bill which includes measures which will stop knives being sent to residential addresses after they have been bought online and will make it an offence to possess certain weapons in private.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many recorded instances of violent crime or robbery have involved a .50 calibre rifle.

The Government introduced an Offensive Weapons Bill on 20 June which includes proposals to prohibit high energy rifles with a kinetic energy of more than 13,600 joules. This prohibition would include some 0.50 calibre rifles.

Concerns have been raised by UK Law Enforcement about the risks that high muzzle energy rifles might pose to public safety if they were to get into the hands of criminals or terrorists. Given the potential risk to public safety from these types of rifles the Government is taking action to address these risks.

The Home Office holds information on the number of offences involving a firearm recorded by the police in England and Wales, but does not hold information on the calibre of firearm used in these offences.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
17th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people with Parkinson’s disease were held in custody by the police in 2017.

The arrest and detention of all individuals suspected of committing an offence is an operational matter for the chief officer of each force area. However, all detainees must be treated appropriately and in accordance with Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) Codes of Practice C&H (detention and detention in terrorism cases, respectively).

In particular, section 9 of PACE Code C sets out detailed requirements concerning health care of all detainees. Amongst other things, the Code requires the custody officer to ensure that detainees receive appropriate clinical attention as soon as reasonably practicable if, for example, the person appears to be suffering from physical illness, or appears to need clinical attention. This applies even if the detainee makes no request for clinical attention and whether or not they have already received clinical attention elsewhere. If the need for attention appears urgent, the nearest available healthcare professional or an ambulance must be called immediately.

The Government does not hold information on the number of individuals with a Parkinson’s diagnosis that have been detained in police custody.

In relation to police staff and officers, chief constables have a duty to manage and support their workforce effectively, ensuring the welfare of all officers and staff. Where officers and staff have been diagnosed with serious medical conditions, such as Parkinson’s Disease, it is for their managers, on the advice of their occupational health department, to ensure that the severity of their condition is reflected in risk assessments, and their role and duties are adjusted accordingly.

17th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what policies the police have in place to help support (a) staff with Parkinson’s disease and (b) people with Parkinson’s disease being held in custody.

The arrest and detention of all individuals suspected of committing an offence is an operational matter for the chief officer of each force area. However, all detainees must be treated appropriately and in accordance with Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) Codes of Practice C&H (detention and detention in terrorism cases, respectively).

In particular, section 9 of PACE Code C sets out detailed requirements concerning health care of all detainees. Amongst other things, the Code requires the custody officer to ensure that detainees receive appropriate clinical attention as soon as reasonably practicable if, for example, the person appears to be suffering from physical illness, or appears to need clinical attention. This applies even if the detainee makes no request for clinical attention and whether or not they have already received clinical attention elsewhere. If the need for attention appears urgent, the nearest available healthcare professional or an ambulance must be called immediately.

The Government does not hold information on the number of individuals with a Parkinson’s diagnosis that have been detained in police custody.

In relation to police staff and officers, chief constables have a duty to manage and support their workforce effectively, ensuring the welfare of all officers and staff. Where officers and staff have been diagnosed with serious medical conditions, such as Parkinson’s Disease, it is for their managers, on the advice of their occupational health department, to ensure that the severity of their condition is reflected in risk assessments, and their role and duties are adjusted accordingly.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many members of staff have left her Department since 1 January 2015; and how many of those members of staff were nationals of non-UK EU countries.

The number of people who have left the Home Office since 1 January 2015 is in the table (see attached). All Government Departments are bound by legal requirements concerning the right to work in the UK and, in addition, the Civil Service Nationality Rules.

Evidence of nationality is checked at the point of recruitment into the Civil Service as part of wider pre-employment checks, but there is no requirement on departments to retain this information beyond the point at which it has served its purpose.

More broadly, the Government will be consulting in due course on how we work with business to ensure that workers in this country have the skills that they need to get a job. But there are no proposals to publish lists of the number or proportion of foreign workers.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Answer of 20 April 2017 to Question 70559, on animal experiments, when she plans to publish her Department's response to the public consultation on section 24 of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986; and if she will place a copy of that response in the Library.

I intend to publish the response in due course.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish her Department's response to the public consultation on section 24 of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986; and if she will place a copy of that response in the Library.

I intend to publish the response in due course.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
10th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether attacks on police dogs will no longer be classed as damage to property and be treated as an aggravated attack on a sentient being; and if she will make a statement.

This Government is clear that an attack on a police animal is a very serious offence and while severe penalties are already in place to punish those who commit such crimes I am exploring with Ministerial colleagues and police leaders whether there is more that the law should do to offer the most appropriate protections to police and all other working animals.

I am also pleased to see that Sentencing Guidelines were updated 24 January 2017 and now include a new aggravating factor of causing unnecessary suffering to an animal being used in public service or as an assistance dog under section 4 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions she has had with the (a) Ministry of Justice and (b) Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on penalties available for those convicted of causing injury to police support animals; and if she will make a statement.

This Government is clear that an attack on a police animal is a very serious offence. Whilst severe penalties are already in place to punish those who commit such crimes I am exploring with Ministerial colleagues and police leaders whether there is more that the law should do to offer the most appropriate protections to police and all other working animals. I have written to Ministerial colleagues at the Ministry of Justice and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and will be meeting with them in due course to consider options further.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
12th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to her oral contribution of 10 October 2016, Official Report, column 62, how an EU citizen demonstrates their having lived in the UK for five or more years; how citizenship is claimed after six years; which Department will be responsible for confirming the right to (a) remain and (b) citizenship; what certification of these rights will be provided; what estimate she has made of the cost to the applicant of that process; and if she will make a statement.

We wish to guarantee the rights of EU citizens already in the UK, and the only circumstances in which this would not be possible would be if British citizens’ rights in EU Member States were not protected on a reciprocal basis.

The UK is currently a member of the EU, and remains one until Article 50 negotiations have concluded. This means EU law continues to apply. Although not mandatory, after 5 years of continuous and lawful residence in the UK, EU citizens may apply for a document to confirm their EU right to reside in the UK permanently. Further information is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/apply-for-a-document-certifying-permanent-residence-or-permanent-residence-card-form-eea-pr

In terms of British citizenship, under UK law, EU nationals who are married to or the civil partner of a British citizen can apply for naturalisation as a British citizen once they have obtained permanent residence in the UK.

Other EU nationals may apply for a certificate of naturalisation once they have resided in the UK for six years. This because they need to show they have completed 12 months of residence in the UK free of immigration time restrictions once they have acquired a permanent right to reside.

Further guidance on the application process to naturalise as a British citizen is available via the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/application-to-naturalise-as-a-british-citizen-form-an

15th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Wilson Doctrine has been consistently applied to the communications of the hon. Member for Bridgend; and whether she has been subject to surveillance.

The Government’s position on the Wilson Doctrine was set out by the Prime Minister in a written ministerial statement made on 4 November 2015.

As the Prime Minister made clear, the Wilson Doctrine has never been an absolute bar to the targeted interception of the communications of Members of Parliament or an exemption from the legal regime governing interception. The Doctrine recognised that there could be instances where interception might be necessary.

The Prime Minister announced that as matter of policy the PM will be consulted should there ever be a proposal to target any UK Parliamentarian’s communications under a warrant issued by a Secretary of State. This applies to Members of Parliament, members of the House of Lords, the Scottish Parliament, the Northern Ireland Assembly, the Welsh Assembly and UK members of the European Parliament. It applies to all activity authorised by a warrant issued by a Secretary of State: any instance of targeted interception and, electronic surveillance and equipment interference, when undertaken by the Security and Intelligence Agencies. This is in addition to the rigorous safeguards already in the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA) and the Code of Practice issued under it which set out a series of robust safeguards for any instance of interception.

It is long standing policy of successive Governments neither to confirm nor deny any specific activity by the Security and Intelligence Agencies. Under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 it is an offence for anyone to identify an individual interception warrant or an individual interception that takes place.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 10 August 2015 to Question 4785 on education institutions: licensing, how many applications for a Tier 4 sponsor licence made in each year since 2010 are still undetermined; and if she will make a statement.

All applications submitted during the year 2010 to 2013 have been concluded. There were 12 applications submitted during 2014, and 52 applications submitted during 2015 which are yet to be determined.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 10 August 2015 to Question 4785 on education institutions: licensing, how many staff were working on applications for a Tier 4 sponsor licence in each year since 2008; and if she will make a statement.

Home Office staff consider Tier 2, 4 and 5 sponsor licence applications. The number of staff working on applications for a Tier 4 sponsor licence varies according to level of demand and resource requirements. We do not record the number of staff working on Tier 4 casework, specifically.

1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications were made for asylum in the UK by Libyans between June 2014 and the end of November 2014; how many Libyans who made such applications (a) remain in the UK awaiting a decision and (b) have been refused asylum; and if she will make a statement.

Figures on asylum applications and initial decisions are published quarterly by the Home Office in the Immigration Statistics release, in table as_01q. The following table shows the number of asylum applications by nationals of Libya that were made, refused (based on initial decisions), and pending in quarter 3 (July-September) and quarter 4 (October-December) 2014, for main applicants.

Table: Number of asylum applications by nationals of Libya that were made, refused (based on initial decisions (1)) and pending (2) in Q3 (Jul-Sep) and Q4 (Oct-Dec) 2014, for main applicants
QuarterTotal applicationsTotal refusalsTotal pending
Q3 201411830336
Q4 201412659410
(1) Initial decisions do not necessarily relate to applications made in the same period and exclude the outcome of appeals or other subsequent decisions.
(2) 'Pending' cases are those asylum applications, including fresh claims, lodged since 1 April 2006 which are still under consideration at the end of the reference period.

A copy of the latest release, Immigration Statistics January – March 2015 is available from https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/home-office/series/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release and the Library of the House.

30th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 25 June 2015 to Question 3116, when copies of the Estyn and QAA inspection were requested from Bridgend College; and if she will make a statement.

The Estyn report has not been requested from the college as it is available online. Officials requested the QAA inspection report from the college on 23 June.

30th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will confirm how many publicly-funded colleges have been (a) granted and (b) refused international licences to run privately-funded courses in each year since 2008.

The number of publicly-funded colleges that had an application for a Tier 4 sponsor licence (a) granted and (b) refused, in each year since 2008, is:

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total

Granted

188

333

37

33

32

38

21

5

687

Refused

6

36

13

13

4

7

11

2

92

An application may be refused for various reasons. We do not collate information on the courses each sponsor offers or the reason(s) for the refusal of each application.

18th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she expects that a decision will be reached on pre-licence application SPL5298000134 made by Bridgend College Coleg Penybont on 2 July 2014; and if she will make a statement.

This is a complex application in relation to a publicly funded college also seeking to run privately funded courses and we need to ensure the correct educational oversight has been provided for all courses.

There are a number of outstanding enquiries with the college that need to be resolved before a decision can be made. My officials have been back in contact with the college on 22 June and have asked for a response to be provided by 29 June, at which point my officials will contact the Honourable Lady directly to provide an update.

17th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Libyans formerly based at Bassingbourn barracks remain in the UK having claimed asylum; and if she will make a statement.

The general policy of the Home Office is not to disclose personal information about another person. This is because we have obligations under the Data Protection Act and in law generally to protect this information.

The UK has a proud history of granting asylum to those who need our protection and every claim will be considered on its individual merits.

28th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers are involved in the monitoring and investigation of child sex crimes online.

Figures on the number of police officers involved in the monitoring and investigation of child sex crimes online are not centrally held by the Home Office.

However, the Home Office does collect statistics on the number of police officers employed within the Child/Sex/Domestic/Missing function. The table provided shows the number and proportion of full-time equivalent police
officers within the Child/Sex/Domestic/Missing function in England and Wales, as at 31 March 2010 to 31 March 2014.

The deployment of police resources is a matter for operational police leaders, working with Police and Crime Commissioners.

17th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what role her Department had in formulating the walking out policy covering Libyan recruits being trained at Bassingbourn barracks; and what role (a) her Department and (b) the police had in monitoring that policy.

As an incentive to promote good behaviour and thereby improve the effectiveness of the training programme the Army proposed to allow the trainees some very limited unsupervised access to the local amenities. These proposals were discussed across Government (including the Home Office) prior to implementation.

The Home Office requested that the Army liaise closely with Cambridgeshire Police on the monitoring of such visits.

17th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions her Department has had with the (a) Ministry of Defence and (b) Foreign and Commonwealth Office on constraining and restricting the undisciplined behaviour of Libyan personnel on Bassingbourn base; and if she will make a statement.

Prior to General Purpose Force training, the Home Office worked closely with the Ministry of Defence and Foreign Office on planning for the vetting and selection of trainees and, along with the Libyan command and supervisory team, on contingency planning for indiscipline. We worked closely with the Ministry of Defence, Foreign Office, Libyan command and supervisory team, Police and the Defence Section of the Libyan embassy to address trainee behaviour concerns and take appropriate action, including withdrawing trainees who failed to meet the expected standard of behaviour and performance.

11th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for (a) Defence and (b) Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on the return of the Libyan armed forces personnel; and if she will make a statement.

During the planning, implementation and conclusion of training, the Home Office worked closely with the Cabinet Office, Ministry of Defence, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Libyan command and supervisory team, Defence Section of
the Libyan Embassy in London, Cambridgeshire Police and the Ministry of Defence Police.In particular, we worked closely with the MoD, Libyan Defence Section and Libyan command and supervisory team to return trainees who withdrew during the programme and once training had concluded.