Gavin Robinson Portrait

Gavin Robinson

Democratic Unionist Party - Belfast East

Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Defence)

(since July 2017)

Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Home Affairs)

(since May 2015)
Committees on Arms Export Controls
10th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
31st Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committees on Arms Export Controls (formerly Quadripartite Committee)
10th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Defence Sub-Committee
12th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Defence Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Justice)
8th May 2015 - 8th Jun 2017
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Human Rights)
8th May 2015 - 8th Jun 2017
Defence Committee
5th Dec 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Defence Sub-Committee
5th Dec 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
28th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 5th Dec 2016


Department Event
Monday 20th September 2021
14:30
Ministry of Defence
Oral questions - Main Chamber
20 Sep 2021, 2:30 p.m.
Defence (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Protecting the Public and Justice for Victims
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 8 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 0 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 0
Speeches
Wednesday 21st July 2021
Northern Ireland Protocol

The Secretary of State will know that aerospace is a key industry in my constituency. If we needed a good …

Written Answers
Thursday 22nd July 2021
Dental Services: Cancer
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the potential …
Early Day Motions
Monday 12th April 2021
80th Anniversary of the city of Belfast blitz
That this House commemorates the 80th anniversary of the city of Belfast blitz in 1941; remembers those men, women and …
Bills
Wednesday 6th February 2019
Armed Forces Covenant (Duty of Public Authorities) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
MP Financial Interests
Saturday 11th January 2020
1. Employment and earnings
Payments from ComRes, 4 Millbank, London SW1P 3JA, for surveys:
EDM signed
Wednesday 21st July 2021
Anniversary of bombings in Belfast
That this House sadly notes that 21 July 2021 marks the 49th Anniversary of the Bloody Friday Bombings in Belfast …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Gavin Robinson has voted in 236 divisions, and 5 times against the majority of their Party.

13 Oct 2020 - Fisheries Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Gavin Robinson voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 4 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 197 Noes - 331
12 Oct 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Gavin Robinson voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 7 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 332 Noes - 279
23 Sep 2020 - PUBLIC HEALTH - View Vote Context
Gavin Robinson voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 4 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 337 Noes - 6
23 Sep 2020 - Deferred Division - View Vote Context
Gavin Robinson voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 4 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 335 Noes - 6
23 Sep 2020 - Deferred Division - View Vote Context
Gavin Robinson voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 4 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 334 Noes - 6
View All Gavin Robinson Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Robin Walker (Conservative)
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
(15 debate interactions)
Brandon Lewis (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
(14 debate interactions)
Jim Shannon (Democratic Unionist Party)
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Human Rights)
(10 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Scotland Office
(37 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(17 debate contributions)
Home Office
(16 debate contributions)
Ministry of Defence
(11 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Gavin Robinson's debates

Belfast East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Belfast East signature proportion
Petitions with most Belfast East signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

Leading veterinary and welfare bodies are concerned by the alarming rise in ear-cropped dogs in the UK. Ear cropping is illegal in the UK and an unnecessary, painful mutilation with no welfare benefit. The practice involves cutting off part of the ear flap, often without anaesthesia or pain relief.

In light of the recent outbreak and lock down, those on maternity leave should be given 3 extra months paid leave, at least. This time is for bonding and social engaging with other parents and babies through baby groups which are vital for development and now everything has been cancelled.


Latest EDMs signed by Gavin Robinson

20th July 2021
Gavin Robinson signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 21st July 2021

Anniversary of bombings in Belfast

Tabled by: Jim Shannon (Democratic Unionist Party - Strangford)
That this House sadly notes that 21 July 2021 marks the 49th Anniversary of the Bloody Friday Bombings in Belfast by the Provisional IRA; further notes the horrific acts of violence, some of the worst carried out by the IRA, including 20 bombs exploding in the space of 80 minutes, …
5 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Jul 2021)
Signatures by party:
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Conservative: 1
Alliance: 1
1st July 2021
Gavin Robinson signed this EDM on Wednesday 14th July 2021

Service reductions at the British Council

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House acknowledges the vital role of the British Council in promoting education, training and language across the globe; notes that it was created in 1934 to improve global cultural relations and social mobility and currently works with over 100 countries worldwide changing the lives of millions and helping …
28 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Jul 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 9
Labour: 9
Liberal Democrat: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Alliance: 1
Independent: 1
Green Party: 1
Conservative: 1
View All Gavin Robinson's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Gavin Robinson, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Gavin Robinson has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Gavin Robinson has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Gavin Robinson


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require public authorities to deliver services in accordance with the armed forces covenant; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 6th February 2019
(Read Debate)

Gavin Robinson has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


98 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
25th Mar 2021
What progress has been made by the UK-EU Joint Committee on revising the Northern Ireland Protocol.

The Joint Committee has been working on the many difficulties presented to the operation of the Northern Ireland Protocol by the EU’s decision to activate Article 16 on 29 January. There are outstanding issues to be resolved and we have taken temporary operational steps to avoid disruption to everyday life. We remain committed to working within the Joint Committee process to find solutions.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish further information on duty free arrangements for Northern Ireland to and from (a) Great Britain, (b) the EU and (c) the Rest of the World.

All guidance on duty free arrangements for Northern Ireland traders has been published, and can be found at https://www.gov.uk/duty-free-goods.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what (a) discussions, (b) meetings and (c) correspondence took place between members of the Cabinet and Lord Saville in (i) 1997, (ii)1998 and (iii) 1999.

The information requested is not held centrally. It could be held across a very wide range of paper files and could only be provided at disproportionate cost. Under the Public Records Act, the records from 1997-1999 will be reviewed and transferred to The National Archives by 2022.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of recognising online marketplaces as actors in the supply chain.

The Government is committed to ensuring that only safe consumer products can be sold in the UK, including through online marketplaces. Product safety legislation places obligations on distributors to act with due care to ensure products they are selling are safe and this includes online retailers selling goods via marketplaces.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) continues to engage with major online marketplaces to ensure that they are playing their part in protecting UK consumers from unsafe products. This includes developing a new voluntary commitment for online marketplaces to agree actions they will take to reduce the risks from unsafe products, including white goods subject to recall, being sold online, enabling them to publicly demonstrate their commitment to the safety of their consumers in the UK.

In order to ensure that the UK’s Product Safety framework is flexible and fit for the future, the OPSS is conducting a review. The review will ensure we have a framework that delivers safety for consumers while supporting businesses to innovate and grow and will consider the impact on product safety of non-traditional business models, including third-party sales conducted via online marketplaces.

The OPSS is currently running a Call for Evidence that is open until 3 June to ensure a wide range of views and evidence are gathered: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/uk-product-safety-review-call-for-evidence.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to take steps to help prevent the sale of white goods that have been recalled by the manufacturer on online marketplaces.

The Government is committed to ensuring that only safe consumer products can be sold in the UK, including through online marketplaces. Product safety legislation places obligations on distributors to act with due care to ensure products they are selling are safe and this includes online retailers selling goods via marketplaces.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) continues to engage with major online marketplaces to ensure that they are playing their part in protecting UK consumers from unsafe products. This includes developing a new voluntary commitment for online marketplaces to agree actions they will take to reduce the risks from unsafe products, including white goods subject to recall, being sold online, enabling them to publicly demonstrate their commitment to the safety of their consumers in the UK.

In order to ensure that the UK’s Product Safety framework is flexible and fit for the future, the OPSS is conducting a review. The review will ensure we have a framework that delivers safety for consumers while supporting businesses to innovate and grow and will consider the impact on product safety of non-traditional business models, including third-party sales conducted via online marketplaces.

The OPSS is currently running a Call for Evidence that is open until 3 June to ensure a wide range of views and evidence are gathered: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/uk-product-safety-review-call-for-evidence.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his policy is on retrofit solutions for publicly funded housing.

The Government remains committed to the ambition set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, that as many homes as possible are improved to Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective, and affordable.

At the Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer provided up to £50m for a UK-wide Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund (SHDF) Demonstrator, to support jobs, improve energy efficiency and reduce bills for social tenants whilst demonstrating the benefits of the Whole House Retrofit approach to reduce costs overall. At the recent spending review the chancellor announced £60 million in 2021/22 for the SHDF in England.

The Government has also recently published the Social Housing White Paper where we committed to review the Decent Homes Standard to consider how it can better support the decarbonisation and energy efficiency of social homes. This will apply to England only, with the Devolved Administrations setting their own standards in social housing.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 21 July 2020, Official Report column 193, how the figure of £8.5bn financial support for the aviation and aerospace sector was calculated.

The aerospace sector and its aviation customers are being supported with over £8.5 billion worth of support through the Bank of England’s Covid Corporate Financing Facility, grants for research and development (R&D), loan guarantees, and support for aerospace exports over the next 18 months.

The amount is made up of support across the Covid Credit Financing Facility (£2.7 billion), expected UK Export Finance support for aerospace and its aviation customers (£5.5 billion) and R&D support for aerospace (across 3 years over £500 million).

We will continue to back businesses strongly through the Covid-19 pandemic and as we return to growth.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 22 June 2020 to Question 59788; if will provide a breakdown of the £6 billion figure referenced in the Answer.

As stated previously, the Government is providing over £6 billion of support to the aviation and aerospace sectors. UK Export Finance expects to support £3.5 billion of aerospace exports over the next 18 months, up sharply from £1.15 billion over the past two financial years.

Under the Bank of England’s Covid Corporate Finance Facility, £2.16 billion of loans have been made to airlines and aerospace companies affected by a short-term funding squeeze.

We are also providing support over the next three years for research on the next generation of aerospace technologies, through £450 million of Aerospace Technology Institute programme funding, as well as £70 million through the Future Flight programme.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that consumers who were unable to travel on package holidays due to the covid-19 outbreak receive (a) a full refund or (b) a Government-backed transferable voucher equal to the amount paid.

The Package Travel and Linked Travel Arrangements Regulations 2018 protect consumers who have bought package holidays. Consumers are entitled to a refund?if forced to cancel a package holiday due to unavoidable and extraordinary circumstances, which should be issued?within 14 days, depending on the nature of the contract in place. Businesses in the sector are offering consumers vouchers or refund credit notes but acceptance must be the choice of the consumer who retains the right to a cash refund. Further information on the rights and responsibilities of consumers and businesses was published on 30 April by the Competition and Markets Authority who have also set up a covid-19 taskforce for consumers seeking refunds.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress has been made on the Government's inquiry into the collapse of the Football Index.

As outlined in my Written Ministerial Statement of 7 June, the Secretary of State has appointed Malcolm Sheehan QC to lead the independent review of the Football Index gambling product and we have published its scope and terms of reference on gov.uk. That independent review is underway and is expected to provide a report for publication in the summer. The statement can be found at: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2021-06-07/hcws63

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when the Government plans to implement the recommendations from Part 2 of the Leveson Inquiry.

The Government has made clear that it does not intend to proceed with Part 2 of the Leveson Inquiry. This decision was reached following a public consultation and having taken into account all of the views and evidence submitted. Reopening the inquiry is no longer appropriate, proportionate, or in the public interest. This position was reiterated in the 2019 Conservative manifesto.

The media landscape has changed significantly since the Leveson Inquiry. Today, our press is facing new and critical challenges that threaten its livelihood and sustainability.

The Inquiry and subsequent police investigations were comprehensive. More than 300 people gave evidence to the Inquiry, and over 40 people were convicted during the three major investigations. There have been extensive reforms to policing practices as well as significant changes to press self-regulation.

There now exists a strengthened, independent, self-regulatory system for the press. The majority of traditional publishers—including 95% of national newspapers by circulation—are members of IPSO. A number of smaller publishers have joined IMPRESS.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what (a) support and (b) guidance he is providing to students who have returned home from university during the covid-19 lockdown and are being required to (i) pay rent for their accommodation, (ii) remove their belongings but not return and (iii) pay for storage, removal and cleaning costs.

As my right hon. Friends, the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer have both made clear, the government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID-19. Students will continue to receive scheduled payments of loans towards their living costs for the remainder of the current 2019/20 academic year.

To provide further support, we have worked closely with the Office for Students to enable providers to draw upon existing funding to increase hardship funds and to support disadvantaged students impacted by COVID-19. As a result, providers will be able to use the funding – worth around £23 million per month for April and May - towards student hardship funds, including for the purchase of IT equipment and mental health support.

The government encourages universities and private hall providers to be fair in their decisions about rent charges for this period. A number of universities and large companies have waived rents for the summer term or released students early from their contracts.

The government guidance makes clear that tenants should continue to pay rent and abide by all other terms of their tenancy agreement to the best of their ability during the COVID-19 outbreak.

The government’s COVID-19 recovery strategy, published on 11 May, sets out a cautious roadmap to ease existing measures in a safe and measured way. The strategy allows for certain necessary travel if people take precautions.

In light of this, we are developing guidance on students travelling to and from student accommodation and this will be published today.

We have made clear meanwhile that we do not believe that students should be fined for failing to collect their belongings if this is because they are complying with the government’s travel advice.

If a student has asked their accommodation provider to store their belongings for collection once the COVID-19 lockdown period is over, there may be costs to the provider associated in carrying out this service. We would not expect a provider to make a profit from such a service.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme (a) applies to England only and (b) is funded through new resource; and what the value is of any Barnett consequential for each of the Devolved areas.

The Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme (AGOSS) will apply only to England. AGOSS constitutes new spend for the Department for Transport and Barnett consequentials will apply as standard.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the effect of travel corridors on the the aerospace sector.

Ministers and officials in the Department for Transport have held extensive discussions about the effect of travel corridors on the aerospace sector?with their counterparts across Government, including in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

BEIS is a member of the Global Travel Taskforce, which is tasked with considering robust and sustainable proposals that will facilitate safer international travel.

Specialist aerospace engineers and specialist workers responsible for ensuring the safe operation of aircraft are exempt from self-isolation measures.

Additionally, Department for Transport officials are working closely with BEIS officials as part of the Aerospace Growth Partnership Group.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to support decarbonisation of the maritime sector.

The Clean Maritime Plan, published in July 2019, is the environmental route map of the Maritime 2050 Strategy, outlining the UK’s pathway to zero carbon emissions in domestic maritime. In launching the Clean Maritime Plan, the UK became one of the first countries to publish a strategy on domestic action to reduce shipping emissions following the agreement of the International Maritime Organization’s initial IMO strategy on the Reduction of GHG Emissions from Ships. Government has continued to make good progress in implementing the commitments in the Clean Maritime Plan.

At the end of March 2020, the Government published a document “Decarbonising Transport: Setting the Challenge” kicking off our work on preparing a Transport Decarbonisation Plan, which will include further details of the Government plans regarding the decarbonisation of the maritime sector. Following extensive consultation, the Transport Decarbonisation Plan will be published later this year.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how an airline passenger flying from Northern Ireland to Great Britain can demonstrate to an airline that they are exempt from wearing a face covering for medical reasons.

The use of face coverings on public transport is mandatory in both Northern Ireland and England. Guidance for both Northern Ireland and England can be found at: https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/articles/coronavirus-covid-19-face-coverings and https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/face-coverings-when-to-wear-one-and-how-to-make-your-own/face-coverings-when-to-wear-one-and-how-to-make-your-own.

Some circumstances make it difficult for certain people to wear face coverings.

If a passenger has a condition which means they cannot wear a face covering they only need to say, if asked, that they cannot wear a face covering because they are exempt.

The reasons for a person not wearing a face covering may not always be visible.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to his Department's survey, Transport decarbonisation plan: call for ideas, for what reasons Northern Ireland is omitted from that survey.

It was an error to not include Northern Ireland in the list of options in response to the question “What region do you live in?”. I apologise for this error, which was not a purposeful omission. The question was part of the demographic information which was not a mandatory field and did not prevent responses to other questions being provided.

The online public feedback opportunity welcomed responses from across the United Kingdom, and was one of a number of ways people have fed into the development of the Transport Decarbonisation Plan. Department for Transport officials regularly engage with counterparts from the Northern Ireland Executive, who participated in recent workshops on decarbonising transport.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether there is a (a) legislative, (b) health and safety and (c) regulatory requirement for ferry passengers to alight from their vehicles during travel.

For domestically trading passenger ferries, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency’s Merchant Shipping Notice, MSN 1823(M) sets out the requirements for compliance with Statutory Instrument, SI 2010 No. 680 - the Merchant Shipping (Passenger Ships) (Safety Code for UK Categorised Waters) Regulations 2010. It only permits the carriage of passengers in their vehicles under certain conditions, where the vehicle decks are open, and the voyage is of less than 30 minutes. This limitation is applied to other to similar vessels trading under equivalent legislation.

For larger vessels on international voyages, the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974 Chapter II-1 Regulation 23 specifically excludes passengers from enclosed vehicle decks, when the vessel is in navigation.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of permitting ferry passengers to remain in their cars in line with social distancing measures during the covid-19 outbreak.

The carriage of passengers on vehicle decks of ferries was considered early in the Department’s mitigations to the COVID-19 outbreak weighing risk against the need to maintain life-line services.

Limited exemptions were provided on the basis of risk assessments developed by operators for domestic operators with open-decked passenger vessels on short voyages to facilitate safe transport with passengers remaining in their cars on vehicle decks.

For larger vessels on international voyages no exemptions have been requested, though a framework of considerations was developed with our European partners to guide industry on areas for consideration should an exemption be requested specifically to the carriage of a limited number of freight drivers in the cabs of their vehicles.

There are no (a) legislative, (b) health and safety or (c) regulatory requirements for ferry passengers to remain in vehicles during travel.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether there is a (a) legislative, (b) health and safety or (c) regulatory requirement for ferry passengers to remain in their vehicles during travel.

The carriage of passengers on vehicle decks of ferries was considered early in the Department’s mitigations to the COVID-19 outbreak weighing risk against the need to maintain life-line services.

Limited exemptions were provided on the basis of risk assessments developed by operators for domestic operators with open-decked passenger vessels on short voyages to facilitate safe transport with passengers remaining in their cars on vehicle decks.

For larger vessels on international voyages no exemptions have been requested, though a framework of considerations was developed with our European partners to guide industry on areas for consideration should an exemption be requested specifically to the carriage of a limited number of freight drivers in the cabs of their vehicles.

There are no (a) legislative, (b) health and safety or (c) regulatory requirements for ferry passengers to remain in vehicles during travel.

9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether any funding from the public purse was formally committed to Flybe prior to its administration.

We explored a range of funding options with the company but the directors decided it was not viable to keep Flybe operating. Following a commercial decision by the company Flybe ceased trading. Not a single penny of taxpayer’s money has been given to Flybe.

9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether any funding from the public purse was allocated to Flybe prior to its administration.

We explored a range of funding options with the company but the directors decided it was not viable to keep Flybe operating. Following a commercial decision by the company Flybe ceased trading. Not a single penny of taxpayer’s money has been given to Flybe.

24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with devolved administrations on the provision of a veterans' railcard.

Most railcards can be used across Great Britain given the interconnected nature of rail services, and I have written to my counterparts in Wales and Scotland to encourage them to accept the Veterans’ Railcard on services for which they are responsible. I will also be engaging with my counterpart in Northern Ireland to explore options for ensuring it is also valid there. Passengers will be fully appraised of the railcard’s validity before it goes live, and this will include how to apply and the detailed terms and conditions.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of increasing the universal credit standard allowance for claimants aged under 25 who live independently to align with the amount received by claimants aged over 25.

The £20 per week uplift to everyone on Universal Credit and Working Tax Credit was announced by the Chancellor as a temporary measure in March 2020 to support those facing the most financial disruption as a result of the public health emergency. This measure remains in place until March 2021.

The lower rates for younger claimants under 25 years reflects the fact that they are more likely to live in someone else's household and have lower living costs and lower earnings expectations. It also reinforces the stronger work incentives that Universal Credit creates for this age group which have been aided by the Department’s £2bn Kickstart scheme which is already creating thousands of high-quality jobs for young people.

For claimants who live independently, Universal Credit already includes separate elements to provide support for housing costs, children and childcare costs and support for disabled people and carers.

Care leavers up to the age of 22 are exempt from the Local Housing Allowance (LHA) Shared Accommodation Rate and are entitled to the higher, one bed LHA rate.

For those who require additional support Discretionary Housing Payments are available. Since 2011 we have provided over £1 billion in DHPs to local authorities to support households with their housing costs.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of awarding a retrospective £20 uplift that was received by universal credit claimants to people who remain on legacy benefits such as (a) employment and support allowance, (b) income support and (c) jobseeker's allowance.

The temporary Universal Credit Standard Allowance uplift was introduced to support those facing the most financial disruption due to the pandemic. There are no plans to extend the uplift to legacy benefits. Claimants on legacy benefits can make a claim for Universal Credit (UC) if they believe that they will be better off. Claimants should check carefully their eligibility and entitlements under UC before applying as legacy benefits will end when claimants submit their claim and they will not be able to return to them in the future.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of making dental care free for cancer patients.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made a recent assessment of the potential merits of banning the advertising of hybrid nicotine-based products.

No specific assessment has been made recently. Product standards and requirements of e-cigarettes, including how they are advertised, is regulated by the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016 (TRPR).

The Department will be carrying out a post implementation review of TRPR, and this will include a public consultation on the regulations which will be published shortly. The consultation will provide an opportunity to comment on the current advertising regulations for e-cigarettes.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to provide a substantive Answer to Named Day Question 115688, tabled by the hon. Member for Belfast East on 16 November 2020, on Coronavirus: Screening.

We take parliamentary scrutiny incredibly seriously and it is fundamentally important that hon. Members are provided with accurate and timely information to enable them to hold the Government to account. We are working rapidly to provide all Members with accurate answers to their questions, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s question will be answered as soon as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of missed and late cancelled covid-19 tests for each testing centre in the UK to date.

We do not publish data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is planning to take to mitigate the effect of the Border Operating Model on the supply of (a) urgent medical supplies and (b) other goods from Great Britain to Northern Ireland after the transition period.

After the end of the transition period, the United Kingdom will have autonomy over the regulation of goods, including medicines. As set out in the Northern Ireland Protocol, which will take effect on 1 January 2021, Northern Ireland will continue to follow the European Union acquis for medicines. The Government has been in intensive discussion with the European Commission on how to safeguard the crucial flows of medicines and medical products into Northern Ireland from other parts of the UK from the end of the transition period.

The parties have agreed a pragmatic approach to implementation, including a one year time-limited approach to the application of the regulatory requirements for imports and the ‘safety feature’ elements of the Falsified Medicines Directive. This was set out in the UK Government statement of 5 November following the fourth meeting of the Ireland/Northern Ireland Specialised Committee. This approach gives industry the time and flexibility it needs and ensure that medicines can continue to flow to Northern Ireland. Further industry guidance on moving medicines to Northern Ireland after the end of the transition period will be published shortly.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of (a) the adequacy of and (b) progress on disbursing the additional financial support available to mental health charities since 22 May 2020.

During the COVID-19 outbreak the Government provided £10.2 million of additional funding to mental health charities to support adults and children. This includes £6 million provided to the Coronavirus Mental Health Response Fund (CMHRF), led by Mind and the Mental Health Consortia and £4.2 million to mental health charities through the Government’s £750 million Coronavirus Charities Fund. We have also provided local authorities with £3.7 billion for COVID-19 pressures, including social care services provided by charitable organisations.

The CMHRF has supported over 130 charities to date. The list of charities that have received funding through this process was announced on 29 May 2020. The press release can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/5-million-funding-given-to-mental-health-community-projects

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of (a) the adequacy of and (b) progress on disbursing the additional financial support available to mental health charities since 22 May 2020.

During the COVID-19 outbreak the Government provided £10.2 million of additional funding to mental health charities to support adults and children. This includes £6 million provided to the Coronavirus Mental Health Response Fund (CMHRF), led by Mind and the Mental Health Consortia and £4.2 million to mental health charities through the Government’s £750 million Coronavirus Charities Fund. We have also provided local authorities with £3.7 billion for COVID-19 pressures, including social care services provided by charitable organisations.

The CMHRF has supported over 130 charities to date. The list of charities that have received funding through this process was announced on 29 May 2020. The press release can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/5-million-funding-given-to-mental-health-community-projects

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the timeframe is for the publication of the report on BAME covid-19 deaths.

Public Health England led a rapid review to better understand how different factors can impact on how people are affected by COVID-19. This includes analysis of ethnicity, deprivation, age, sex (male and female) and obesity, where data was available. The review’s findings have now been published and can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-review-of-disparities-in-risks-and-outcomes

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 5 May 2020 to Question 41469, what payments the NHS has made to the private sector since the beginning of March 2020; and what the average value is of those payments.

An emergency agreement was put in place on 21 March to block book almost the entirety of the private hospital sector’s services, facilities and nearly 20,000 clinical staff for the foreseeable future to help cope with the surge of COVID-19 patients. Information about what payments the National Health Service has made to the private sector since this agreement was made or the average value of such payments is not currently available. All providers have agreed to a fully transparent approach and to provide services at cost price.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 28 April 2020 to Question 38931 on Hospital Beds: Private Sector, if he will set out the (a) costs and (b) number of beds that have been used.

National Health Service patients are benefitting from an unprecedented partnership with private hospitals in the United Kingdom as we battle the COVID-19 outbreak. The NHS is accessing these facilities at cost, with those costs judged by an independent auditor. Reimbursements to the independent sector will be for reasonable and narrowly-defined costs only.

As it is not currently known how extensively and for how long this extra capacity will be used, it is not possible to estimate the cost to the public purse, nor the number of beds that will have been used.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) routine appointments and (b) red flag referrals were cancelled or postponed during the covid-19 outbreak.

The collection of information on cancelled appointments has been suspended to free up capacity within the health system during the COVID-19 outbreak.

‘Red flag referrals’ are only used in Northern Ireland. Health is a devolved issue and is dealt with by Health and Social Care Northern Ireland and therefore the information requested is not available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak how many private healthcare hospital beds the NHS has requisitioned; how many of those beds have been used; and what the cost of that requisitioning has been to date.

The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement have worked with the independent sector to increase capacity and resource within the National Health Service, adding around 8,000 beds and 20,000 clinical staff. This will ensure that more facilities are available for patients diagnosed with COVID-19.

Under the agreement, the independent sector will be reimbursed at cost.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with his Iranian counterpart on the (a) welfare and (b) situation of (i) Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe and (ii) Anoosheh Ashoori.

The Government remains extremely concerned about all dual British nationals detained in Iran, including Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe and Anoosheh Ashoori. Iran does not recognise dual nationality and therefore does not permit access to British-Iranian detainees. The safety and security of dual British national detainees in Iran is of paramount importance, and we call on Iran to uphold its commitments under international law to treat all detainees in line with international standards. We continue to urge the Iranian Government immediately to release all British-Iranian nationals arbitrarily detained in Iran to enable them to return to their families in the UK. We continue to raise these cases at the most senior levels and discuss them at every opportunity with our Iranian counterparts. We continue to raise Ms. Zaghari-Ratcliffe's case at the most senior levels, and discuss it at every opportunity with our Iranian counterparts.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of (a) recent unrest in Nigeria and (b) reported abuses being conducted by the special anti-robbery squad.

The UK Government is deeply concerned by reports of widespread violence during recent protests in Lagos and other major cities in Nigeria, including horrific reports of protestors being killed. We are following events closely and offer condolences to the families of those affected. The Foreign Secretary issued a statement on 21 October calling for an end to the violence and for the Nigerian Government to urgently investigate reports of brutality by its security forces and hold those responsible to account. I also tweeted on 21 October to urge the Nigerian Government to restore peace and address concerns about brutality towards civilians. The British High Commissioner in Abuja has raised the protests with representatives of the Nigerian Government. I expressed my concern over recent violence in Nigeria to Foreign Minister Onyeama on 23 October.

The Nigerian security services must uphold human rights and the rule of law in all operations, investigate any incidents of brutality towards civilians and hold those responsible to account. We will continue to work with the Nigerian Government and international and civil society partners to support justice, accountability and a more responsive policing model in Nigeria.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of imposing sanctions against Nigeria in the event of the continuation of human rights abuses against people in that country.

The UK Government has made clear to the Nigerian authorities at the highest levels the importance of protecting human rights for all. We encourage all parties to work together to enable the people of Nigeria to exercise their rights safely, peacefully and in line with the rule of law. On 6 July, the Government established the Global Human Rights sanctions regime by laying regulations in Parliament under the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018. This sanctions regime gives the UK a powerful new tool to target individuals involved in serious human rights violations or abuses. It is longstanding practice not to speculate on future sanctions designations as to do so could reduce the impact of the designations. We will keep all evidence and potential listings under close review.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what progress he has made on protecting tariff and quota free access to the EU for the Falkland Islands after the transition period.

The Government always represents the interests of the Falkland Islands robustly, particularly in relation to supporting the Islands' exports to the EU, and elsewhere. The Government is confident that a viable and profitable trading relationship between the Falkland Islands and the EU will continue after the transition period.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the blacklisting of the Cayman Islands by the EU ECOFIN Committee on 18 February 2020.

As a self-governing and fiscally autonomous jurisdiction, the Cayman Islands make commitments independently of the UK. We encourage the Cayman Islands and the EU to work closely together to resolve any outstanding issues.

The UK supports adherence to international tax standards and we encourage the governments of all Overseas Territories to work with the EU to deliver on their commitments. This is a message the Minister for the Overseas Territories conveys in her regular contact with the governments of the Overseas Territories. We welcome the measures which the Cayman Islands have put in place.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he has plans to provide support to his counterpart in the Cayman Islands for the removal of that country from the list of blacklisted countries held by the EU ECOFIN Committee.

As a self-governing and fiscally autonomous jurisdiction, the Cayman Islands make commitments independently of the UK. We encourage the Cayman Islands and the EU to work closely together to resolve any outstanding issues.

The UK supports adherence to international tax standards and we encourage the governments of all Overseas Territories to work with the EU to deliver on their commitments. This is a message the Minister for the Overseas Territories conveys in her regular contact with the governments of the Overseas Territories. We welcome the measures which the Cayman Islands have put in place.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to his EU counterparts on the blacklisting of the Cayman Islands by the EU ECOFIN Committee.

As a self-governing and fiscally autonomous jurisdiction, the Cayman Islands make commitments independently of the UK. We encourage the Cayman Islands and the EU to work closely together to resolve any outstanding issues.

The UK supports adherence to international tax standards and we encourage the governments of all Overseas Territories to work with the EU to deliver on their commitments. This is a message the Minister for the Overseas Territories conveys in her regular contact with the governments of the Overseas Territories. We welcome the measures which the Cayman Islands have put in place.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the risk that Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories other than the Cayman Islands may be blacklisted by the EU ECOFIN Committee.

As a self-governing and fiscally autonomous jurisdiction, the Cayman Islands make commitments independently of the UK. We encourage the Cayman Islands and the EU to work closely together to resolve any outstanding issues.

The UK supports adherence to international tax standards and we encourage the governments of all Overseas Territories to work with the EU to deliver on their commitments. This is a message the Minister for the Overseas Territories conveys in her regular contact with the governments of the Overseas Territories. We welcome the measures which the Cayman Islands have put in place.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of inviting applications for the fourth grant of the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme earlier than mid-April 2021.

The Government announced at Budget 2021 that the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) will continue until September, with a fourth and a final fifth grant.

The Government also announced a significant change in access to the SEISS. Basing the fourth and fifth grants on 2019-20 Self Assessment tax returns means more than 600,000 people are brought into scope who either became self-employed in 2019-20; or were ineligible for previous grants, but now may be eligible for the fourth grant on the basis of submitting their 2019-20 tax return.

Using these returns requires time to deliver, due to the increased population and new data. In order to allow HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) time to process 2019-20 tax returns it has not been possible to invite applications or open the claims service earlier.

Individuals must have submitted their 2019-20 tax return by 2 March to be considered for the SEISS. This date balances access for the vast majority of eligible self-employed individuals, with the duty to protect the taxpayer against fraud as the details of the SEISS grants became public.

HMRC will open the online claims service for the fourth SEISS grant from late April 2021 and expects to notify potentially eligible people of their personal claim date from mid-April.

The SEISS is just one part of a wider package of support for the self-employed, including Restart Grants, the Recovery Loan scheme, business rates relief, and other business support schemes.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of reducing the rate of VAT on refurbishment, repair and maintenance of buildings from 20 per cent to five per cent.

The Government already maintains a reduced rate of VAT at five per cent, subject to certain conditions, for residential renovations.

Introducing a zero rate of VAT would come at a significant cost to the Exchequer, estimated at about £4 billion per year, which would have to be balanced by a reduction in public spending, higher borrowing or increased taxation elsewhere. While the Government keeps all taxes under review, there are no plans to change the VAT treatment of the repair and renovation of buildings.A

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of extending the deadline for submission of tax returns given the varying and continuing covid-19 restrictions throughout the UK.

The Government has carefully considered the arguments for extending the Self-Assessment filing date from 31 January and has decided on balance not to do so. The January deadline has been in place for many years and changing it could undermine customer understanding and trust in how the Self-Assessment system works. However, the Government recognises that some taxpayers will have difficulty submitting their Self-Assessment return due to the impact COVID-19 has had on their personal or business circumstances.

HMRC do not charge penalties for failure to submit a return on time where taxpayers have a reasonable excuse. HMRC’s guidance explains that they will accept the impact of COVID-19 as a reasonable excuse for submitting a return late, provided that taxpayers explain how they were affected and submit the return as soon as they can. More information is available in the HMRC online guidance covering the reasonable excuse provisions.

Once they have submitted their return, taxpayers who are unable to pay all of their Self-Assessment tax due on 31 January can access HMRC’s enhanced Time to Pay arrangements. These allow liabilities of up to £30,000 – increased from £10,000 – to be paid in up to 12 instalments without having to contact HMRC beforehand.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of delaying plans to bring funeral plan providers under the remit of the Funeral Planning Authority in the context of the covid-19 outbreak.

The government is committed to strengthening regulation of the pre-paid funeral plan sector. As part of the Budget, and following consultation, the Chancellor announced the government’s intention to legislate to bring pre-paid funeral plan firms within the remit of the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). This will ensure that, for the first time, all firms offering pre-paid funeral plans are subject to compulsory and robust regulation.

The government intends to lay the necessary legislation very soon. Once this legislation is made, there will be an implementation period before the new regulatory framework comes fully into force. This will allow time for funeral plan providers and firms which sell plans to take the necessary steps to meet the new regulatory requirements.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of applying the Stamp Duty exemption retrospectively for house sales within the agreed thresholds since the start of the (a) covid-19 lockdown and (b) current financial year.

To boost the housing market and confidence, the Government has decided to cut Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) by temporarily increasing the nil band rate of SDLT to £500,000. This applies from 8 July 2020 to 31 March 2021.

Property sales which have not yet been substantially performed will still be eligible to take advantage of the Stamp Duty Holiday.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of including the 2019-20 tax returns of self-employed graduates under the Self-employed Income Support Scheme.

It has not been possible to include those who began trading after the 2018-19 tax year in the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme. This was a very difficult decision and it was taken for practical reasons. It is correct that individuals can now submit Income Tax Self Assessment returns for 2019-20, but there would be significant risks for the public purse if the Government relied on these returns for the scheme. HMRC would not be able to distinguish genuine self-employed individuals who started trading in 2019-20 from fake applications by fraudulent operators and organised criminal gangs seeking to exploit the SEISS. The Government cannot expose the tax system to these risks.

However, those who entered self-employment after April 2019 may still be eligible for other support. For example, the self-employed can benefit from the Government’s relaxation of the earnings rules (known as the Minimum Income Floor) in Universal Credit. The SEISS supplements the significant support already announced for UK businesses, including the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, and the deferral of tax payments. More information about the full range of business support measures is available at www.businesssupport.gov.uk/coronavirus-business-support/

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of giving directors of limited companies capped access to the Self-employed Income Support Scheme of up to £2,500 per month; and if he will make a statement.

Those who pay themselves a salary through their own company may be eligible to claim for 80% of usual monthly wage costs, up to £2,500 a month, through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS). The CJRS is available to employers, including personal service companies, and individuals paying themselves a salary through a PAYE scheme are eligible. Where furloughed directors need to carry out particular duties to fulfil the statutory obligations they owe to their company, they may do so provided they do no more than would reasonably be judged necessary for that purpose, i.e. they should not do work of a kind they would carry out in normal circumstances to generate commercial revenue or provides services to or on behalf of their company.

Income from dividends is a return on investment in the company, rather than wages, and is not eligible for support. Under current reporting mechanisms it is not possible for HM Revenue and Customs to distinguish between dividends derived from an individual’s own company and dividends from other sources, and between dividends in lieu of employment income and as returns from other corporate activity. Expanding the scope would require HMRC to collect and verify new information. This would take longer to deliver and put at risk the other schemes which the Government is committed to delivering as quickly as possible.

Those who are not eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme might be able to access the other support Government is providing, including the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, the Bounce Back Loans Scheme for small businesses, and the deferral of tax payments. More information about the full range of business support measures is available at?www.businesssupport.gov.uk/coronavirus-business-support/

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of including medical service providers within the Expanded Retail Discount Scheme.

The Government has provided enhanced support to the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors in England through business rates relief, given the direct and acute impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on those sectors. Business rates in Northern Ireland are devolved.

A range of further measures to support all businesses, including those not eligible for the business rates holiday, such as medical service providers, has also been made available. For example, the Government has launched the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help firms continue to keep people in employment, and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme offering loans of up to £5 million for SMEs through the British Business Bank. The Government is also deferring VAT payments for this quarter.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he plans to take to prevent foreign companies and hedge funds benefiting from the fall in share prices of British companies by purchasing shares at a cheaper cost.

This question likely refers to the practise of short selling. We are working closely with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to monitor the volatility in market prices over the past weeks as a result of the impacts of coronavirus (Covid-19).

On Monday 23 March, the FCA stated that aggregate net short selling activity reported to it had been low as a percentage of total market activity and had decreased in recent days. The FCA also stated that there is no evidence that short selling has been the driver of recent market falls. The FCA is continuing to monitor short selling activity closely.

Some European countries have introduced short selling bans, which the FCA has followed in respect of shares for which relevant European National Competent Authorities (NCAs) are responsible. The FCA has not introduced such a ban in the UK? ?and neither has any other major financial market outside the EU, including the United States. It is our view that there should be a high bar to imposing such a ban in the UK given the ?role short selling can ?play in the maintenance of open and liquid markets. This is, however, an evolving situation and we are continually evaluating our approach to ensure it is the right one for consumers.

Significant research has previously been done to examine whether bans on short selling, such as those enforced during the financial crisis in 2008, can be effective in stopping stock market falls. The evidence suggested that they were not – pricing continued to fall and so the volatility of the markets persisted.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the timescale is for the completion of the review of IR35 tax regulations.

The review of the off-payroll working rules reform (also known as IR35) was announced on 7 January 2020. As set out at Budget 2018, the reform is due to be extended to medium and large organisations in all sectors from 6 April 2020. The review is looking to determine if any further steps can be taken to ensure smooth and successful implementation of the reform. The review will conclude by mid-February 2020, after which point the recommendations will be made public.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will agree to a further visa extension beyond 31 July 2020 due to the covid-19 pandemic.

The latest information in respect of advice for visa holders can be found on GOV.UK at: www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-for-uk-visa-applicants-and-temporary-uk-residents. This is kept under review.

The Home Office has put in place a range of measures to support those affected by the covid-19 outbreak. We recognise that further adjustments are likely to be required to cater for all scenarios, and we are working through these, to ensure people are not unduly affected by circumstances beyond their control.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with the Northern Ireland Executive on ensuring that relevant authorities are equipped to deal with a potential increase in the number of asylum seekers after the end of the transition period.

The Home Office have not currently suspended asylum case decision making. Following health advice and government guidance we temporarily suspected evictions for asylum seekers who had a decision on their claim and continued to support them.

We have been engaging with the NI Executive on asylum matters through the Covid-19 pandemic and will continue to do so.

A comprehensive cessation plan, on how to recommence support cessations and evictions is being worked through with discussions with Local Authorities, Other Government Departments and Stakeholders.

We remain committed to working closely with the accommodation providers and communicating with local authorities to relieve pressure and capacity as much as possible and ensure that health guidance is being followed.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with the Northern Ireland Executive on plans to lift the current suspension on asylum case decision-making to ensure that (a) the Northern Ireland Housing Executive and Health Trusts and (b) other stakeholders are equipped to meet additional demand in the next six months.

The Home Office have not currently suspended asylum case decision making. Following health advice and government guidance we temporarily suspected evictions for asylum seekers who had a decision on their claim and continued to support them.

We have been engaging with the NI Executive on asylum matters through the Covid-19 pandemic and will continue to do so.

A comprehensive cessation plan, on how to recommence support cessations and evictions is being worked through with discussions with Local Authorities, Other Government Departments and Stakeholders.

We remain committed to working closely with the accommodation providers and communicating with local authorities to relieve pressure and capacity as much as possible and ensure that health guidance is being followed.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of (a) providing financial support for, (b) extending the terms of the visas of and (c) granting leave to remain to family members of key NHS workers residing in the UK on a Tier 2 visa in the event that those key NHS workers die as a result of covid-19.

As set out in the announcement by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on 27 April, family members of NHS workers who die as a result of contracting Coronavirus (Covid-19) will receive £60,000.

The Home Secretary has also confirmed the Home Office will grant Indefinite Leave to Remain to family members of migrant NHS workers who die as a result of contracting Coronavirus (Covid-19).

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support her Department is offering to visa applicants whose eligibility for a visa has been negatively affected by the covid-19 outbreak.

The Home Office has put in place a range of measures to support those affected by the covid-19 outbreak, full details of which are published on GOV.UK at:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-for-uk-visa-applicants-and-temporary-uk-residents.

These are unprecedented times and we may make further adjustments to requirements where necessary and appropriate, to ensure people are not unduly affected by circumstances beyond their control.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance she has published to reinforce social distancing since the clap for key workers that took place on Westminster Bridge on 16 April 2020.

Social distancing measures should be followed in order to stop the spread of the coronavirus. The guidance was published on the 26th March 2020 and is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-on-social-distancing-and-for-vulnerable-people/guidance-on-social-distancing-for-everyone-in-the-uk-and-protecting-older-people-and-vulnerable-adults .

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 9 March 2020 to Question 3232, on Immigration: Northern Ireland, what the timeframe is for changing the immigration rules to allow the family members of people from Northern Ireland to apply for immigration status on broadly the same terms as family members of Irish citizens.

The Home Office intends to change the UK’s Immigration Rules so family members of the people of Northern Ireland can apply for immigration status on broadly the same terms as family members of Irish citizens and will open the route in the near future.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to answer Question 3232 tabled by the hon. Member for West Dunbartonshire on 14 January 2020.

The responses for UIN 3232 and 3233 were given on the 9th March 2020.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress his Department is making on the awarding of the contract for the Fleet Solid Support ships.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the right hon. Member for Warley (John Spellar), on 16 April 2021, in response to Question number 174726.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department spent on (a) items of clothing, (b) uniform and (c) personal protective clothing in each year since 2015.

The Ministry of Defence has a number of contracts for clothing, uniforms and personal protective clothing with a number of suppliers, but also procures items through local procurement arrangements. Details of the spend on items of clothing, uniform and personal protective clothing in each year since 2015 are not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the drop-out rates were for applicants to the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) Royal Air Force in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Responses from the single Services are as follows:

Naval Service

Application Year

Applications

% Withdrawn

% Rejected

% Entered Service

% of applications still Active

2019-20

28,420

50.3%

29.2%

10.2%

10.3%

Army

Recruiting Year 2019-20

Stream

Total Applications

Total Withdrawn

Withdrawn – Non Productive Enquiry

Withdrawn - Other

Basic Training Started

Regular Officer

10,113

6,051

3,673

2,378

701

Regular Other Rank

89,114

53,320

38,419

14,901

8,905

Royal Air Force

Recruiting Year 2019-20

Career Type

All Applications

Intake

Withdrawn

Rejected

% Entered Service

Regular Officer/SNCO

11,229

416

5,356

5,457

3.7%

Regular Other Rank

19,185

1,875

9,704

7,606

9.7%

Note:

The figures include applications processed via the Defence Recruiting System and all completed applications prior to initial eligibility vetting but do not include in-progress applications. Candidates who have been rejected or withdrawn their applications can reapply.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average time taken was to process applications to join the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) Royal Air Force Reserves in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Responses from the single Services are as follows:

Naval Service

At the end of Recruiting Year 2019-20, applicants to join the Regular Naval Service took a median of 244 days from the point of application to being offered a start date for basic training. For the Maritime Reserve, the median was 256 days.

Army

At the end of Recruiting Year 2019-20, applicants to join the Regular Army took a median of 176 days from the point of application to being offered a start date for basic training. The average for Army Reserves is not measured.

Royal Air Force (RAF)

Recruiting Year 2019-20 (Regulars)

Career Type

Average Days between Application submission to Entrant

Regular Officer

469

Regular Other Rank

315

Regular Senior Non-Commissioned Officers

425

Recruiting Year 2019-20 (Reserves)

The average time taken to process applications to join the Royal Air Force Reserves, in the last recruiting year 2019-20, is shown in the following table:

Average Days between Application submission to Entrant

RAF Reserves Officer

618

RAF Reserves Other Ranks

437

Notes:

Data for Officers and Other Ranks is shown separately as the length of time in the RAF recruitment process differs for Officers and Other Ranks. The Officer data includes sponsorship candidates who can stay in the system for 2-4 years.

The data provided for the RAF spans the time a candidate fully completes their application form to the point that they commence phase one training (rather than the point at which they are offered a start date for basic training). Individuals are not recorded as entrants to the RAF until they have commenced their phase one training and have attested into the RAF. Figures include all application scheme types, except for reactivated applications.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average time taken was to process applications to join the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) Royal Air Force in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Responses from the single Services are as follows:

Naval Service

At the end of Recruiting Year 2019-20, applicants to join the Regular Naval Service took a median of 244 days from the point of application to being offered a start date for basic training. For the Maritime Reserve, the median was 256 days.

Army

At the end of Recruiting Year 2019-20, applicants to join the Regular Army took a median of 176 days from the point of application to being offered a start date for basic training. The average for Army Reserves is not measured.

Royal Air Force (RAF)

Recruiting Year 2019-20 (Regulars)

Career Type

Average Days between Application submission to Entrant

Regular Officer

469

Regular Other Rank

315

Regular Senior Non-Commissioned Officers

425

Recruiting Year 2019-20 (Reserves)

The average time taken to process applications to join the Royal Air Force Reserves, in the last recruiting year 2019-20, is shown in the following table:

Average Days between Application submission to Entrant

RAF Reserves Officer

618

RAF Reserves Other Ranks

437

Notes:

Data for Officers and Other Ranks is shown separately as the length of time in the RAF recruitment process differs for Officers and Other Ranks. The Officer data includes sponsorship candidates who can stay in the system for 2-4 years.

The data provided for the RAF spans the time a candidate fully completes their application form to the point that they commence phase one training (rather than the point at which they are offered a start date for basic training). Individuals are not recorded as entrants to the RAF until they have commenced their phase one training and have attested into the RAF. Figures include all application scheme types, except for reactivated applications.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 27 April 2020 to Question 38930, how many Military Aid to Civil Authority (MACA) requests were (a) made of and (b) approved by his Department from Northern Ireland up to 12 January 2021.

Between 27 April 2020 and 12 January 2021, 10 MACA requests related to Northern Ireland were received by Defence, all of which were approved. Of these 10, seven are related to COVID-19 support.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of the July 2018 Dunne Report findings on the disparity in defence spending across the UK.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 29 June 2020 to Questions 64207 and 64208.

Informed by the Dunne Review and our own refreshed Industrial Policy, the Defence Prosperity Programme announced on 5 March 2019 aims to grow our contribution to the economy, including through sustaining an internationally competitive and productive UK Defence sector.

Activity underway includes a pilot with Invest Northern Ireland on a Defence Technology Exploitation Programme to help SMEs develop stronger links and new routes to market through primes and upper tier companies across the UK.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much and what proportion of his Department's procurement budget has been spent in Northern Ireland in each of the last five financial years.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) regularly publishes expenditure with UK industry, broken down by both region and industry group.

The latest bulletin on MOD regional expenditure can be found at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/mod-regional-expenditure-with-uk-industry-and-supported-employment-201819

For Northern Ireland, MOD expenditure over the last five financial years is detailed in the table below.

Financial Year

Expenditure (£ million)

2014-15

123

2015-16

103

2016-17

107

2017-18

110

2018-19

117

The figures in this table have been rounded to the nearest £1 million and adjusted for inflation using HM Treasury Gross Domestic Product deflators (September 2019).

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department has spent on procurement in each UK region, in each of the last five financial years.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) regularly publishes expenditure with UK industry, broken down by both region and industry group.

The latest bulletin on MOD regional expenditure can be found at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/mod-regional-expenditure-with-uk-industry-and-supported-employment-201819

For Northern Ireland, MOD expenditure over the last five financial years is detailed in the table below.

Financial Year

Expenditure (£ million)

2014-15

123

2015-16

103

2016-17

107

2017-18

110

2018-19

117

The figures in this table have been rounded to the nearest £1 million and adjusted for inflation using HM Treasury Gross Domestic Product deflators (September 2019).

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what plans he has to ensure his Department's budget on procurement is spent equitably throughout the UK.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is committed to ensuring that its procurement and contract award processes obtain the best commercial outcome for the taxpayer. We do this in a way that looks to strengthen UK economy and prosperity, where it is relevant to what is being procured and is fair and non-discriminatory.

To maximise UK economic benefits from defence procurement, the MOD uses the Treasury's Green Book framework. As required in that policy, our spending and investment decisions are appraised on the basis of costs and benefits to UK society overall, irrespective of the location of the expenditure.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the funding allocated by Government Research & Development investment to each programme in each of the last five financial years.

Ministry of Defence Research and Development expenditure from 2007-19 is available from the Office for National Statistics Dataset for Research and development expenditure by the UK Government.

The report can be found using the following link:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/governmentpublicsectorandtaxes/researchanddevelopmentexpenditure/datasets/scienceengineeringandtechnologystatisticsreferencetables

The figures are contained in the table below:

MOD Research and Development Expenditure 2007-19

Total Net Expenditure (£ million) at current Prices

Year

Research

Development

Total

2007-08

635

1,505

2,139

2008-09

584

1,406

1,991

2009-10

575

1,177

1,752

2010-11

534

1,159

1,693

2011-12

553

753

1,306

2012-13

565

895

1,460

2013-14

586

931

1,516

2014-15

616

1,088

1,704

2015-16

604

1,032

1,636

2016-17

605

1,018

1,623

2017-18

553

1,081

1,634

2018-19

546

1,101

1,647

Note: R&D expenditure meets the Frascati international definition of R&D.

Research and Development expenditure often covers multiple programme areas and therefore MOD cannot breakdown expenditure at programme level.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much and what proportion of British armed forces dress and combat uniforms are produced in (a) the UK, (b) China and (c) other countries.

The Ministry of Defence has a number of contracts for clothing with UK and international suppliers. However, details of the quantities and location of where British Armed Forces dress and combat uniforms are produced are not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the 77th Brigade has been deployed as part of the response to the covid-19 outbreak in the UK.

A team from the Ministry of Defence, including members of the Army's 77th Brigade, is currently supporting the UK Government's Rapid Response Unit in the Cabinet Office and are working to counter dis/misinformation about COVID-19. Additionally, 77th Brigade planners, including from the Brigade's Engineer and Logistic Staff Corps, have also deployed as part of Defence's wider support to the Government's response to this national emergency.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Military Aid to Civil Authority (MACA) requests have been made to his Department from Northern Ireland; and how many have been approved.

Defence has received four Military Aid to Civil Authority (MACA) requests from Northern Ireland for support during the COVID-19 outbreak. Three were approved and one was not undertaken because a commercial alternative was identified.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when procurement on Fleet Solid Support Ships will recommence.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my hon. Friend, the Minister for Defence People and Veterans (Johnny Mercer) to the right hon. Member for North Durham (Kevan Jones) on 27 February 2020 in response to Question 19771.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the renewed procurement for Fleet Solid Support Ships will be open to international competition.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my hon. Friend, the Minister for Defence People and Veterans (Johnny Mercer) to the right hon. Member for North Durham (Kevan Jones) on 27 February 2020 in response to Question 19771.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress he has made on the Future Littoral Strike Ship.

The Prime Minister has committed to undertake the deepest review of Britain's security, defence and foreign policy. This review will examine how we strengthen and prioritise our alliances, diplomacy and development and will consider all aspects of our defence and security capabilities, including our approach to procurement and maintaining our technological edge. The work already undertaken on the future Littoral Strike Ship will feed into this review.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to bring forward legislation to provide a statutory duty to implement the Armed Forces Covenant as outlined in New Decade New Approach.

Legislation will be brought forward at the earliest opportunity. The UK Government will be engaging fully with Ministerial colleagues across the country, including those in the Northern Ireland Executive, in due course.

20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the document entitled New Decade, New Approach, published on January 2020, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland on creation of a Veterans Commissioner for Northern Ireland.

We have regular discussions about areas of mutual interest with colleagues across Government, including the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. The UK Government's commitment in the 'New Decade, New Approach' (NDNA) Agreement to create a Northern Ireland Veterans' Commissioner is an important one. It builds on the UK Government's establishment in 2019 of the Office for Veterans' Affairs to provide lifelong support to ex-military personnel. Officials in Defence, the Office for Veterans Affairs, and the Northern Ireland Office are engaging to ensure effective implementation of the UK Government's commitments relating to veterans within the NDNA, and both I, and the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, will be monitoring the progress of that work closely.

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of including the reuse of existing buildings in the Planning for the Future reforms.

The Planning White Paper consultation closed on 29 October 2020, and we are currently considering the responses. My Department is undertaking further detailed policy development on individual elements of the proposals. Policy developed as part of these reforms will apply to England only.

The existing National Planning Policy Framework expects local authorities to prioritise brownfield land, which includes land containing existing buildings, for development wherever possible. Local authorities are best placed to assess the potential of individual sites, and each authority is required to publish a register of its developable brownfield suitable for new homes.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
16th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress the Government has made in bringing forward legislative proposals to ensure that people who desecrate war memorials are subject to appropriate sanctions.

Any vandalism or attack on property should be met with the full force of the law. Attacking any memorial is an insult, and this is particularly true of a war memorial commemorating those who have given their lives fighting for our freedom.

The Government is currently reviewing the law in this area to ensure that where memorials are damaged or desecrated the courts are able to sentence appropriately at every level for this particular type of offending.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prosecutions for use of nitrous oxide have been brought since the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016 came into force.

The Ministry of Justice has published data on the number of prosecutions and convictions in England & Wales up to December 2019. This data is available in the Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code data tool available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/888344/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2019.xlsx

Select the pull down for ‘Detailed Offence’, and in the field search bar type ‘psychoactive substance’ and select all the options that appear.

The total number of prosecutions and convictions under the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016 in each year since 2016 can be found in row 31 and row 32 of the pivot table, respectively.

To identify the number of prosecutions and convictions specifically for use of nitrous oxide under the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016 would require a manual search of court records as this level of detail (specific substance) is not held within the courts proceedings database; which would be of disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prosecutions have been brought under the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016; and how many of those prosecutions were successful.

The Ministry of Justice has published data on the number of prosecutions and convictions in England & Wales up to December 2019. This data is available in the Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code data tool available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/888344/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2019.xlsx

Select the pull down for ‘Detailed Offence’, and in the field search bar type ‘psychoactive substance’ and select all the options that appear.

The total number of prosecutions and convictions under the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016 in each year since 2016 can be found in row 31 and row 32 of the pivot table, respectively.

To identify the number of prosecutions and convictions specifically for use of nitrous oxide under the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016 would require a manual search of court records as this level of detail (specific substance) is not held within the courts proceedings database; which would be of disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, pursuant to the Answer of 18 May 2020 to Question 45240, when he plans to publish the responses to his Department's consultation on same-sex religious marriage and entitlements in Northern Ireland, which closed on 23 February 2020.

On 16 July 2020, we published the Government response to the consultation on same-sex religious marriage in Northern Ireland; the same day the Marriage and Civil Partnership (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2020 were laid in Parliament to provide for same-sex religious marriage in Northern Ireland from 1 September 2020.

The Government response can be accessed on nio.gov.uk and outlines the background to the consultation, including the relevant legal powers of the Government to change the law, analysis undertaken for each question asked in the consultation and what the regulations provide.

The Government remains committed to delivering conversion entitlements regulations and publishing the Government response to that consultation as soon as possible before the end of 2020.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, when he will publish the responses to his Department's consultation on same-sex religious marriage and entitlements in Northern Ireland which closed on 23 February 2020.

The Government is still carefully analysing the submissions received in response to both consultations. We appreciate the input of the individuals and organisations who took the time to respond.

The Government responses to the consultations on same-sex religious marriage and conversion entitlements will be published in due course.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, pursuant to the Answer of 10 Feb 2020 to Question 13025 on Life Imprisonment, for what reasons the number of life prisoners licences revoked under section 9 of the Life Sentences (Northern Ireland) Order 2001 between 2001 and 2010 was not provided; and whether any licences have been revoked under Article 7 of Schedule 5 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998 (Devolution of Policing and Justice Functions) Order 2010.

We do not hold the information requested. As noted in the answer of 10 February 2020, the recall of individuals released on a life licence is primarily a matter for the Department of Justice (DoJ), who hold all the information requested, including data dated before 2010.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what estimate he has made of the number of life prisoners licences revoked under Section 9 of the Life Sentences (NI) Order 2001 in each year since 2001.

Since the devolution of policing and justice to the Northern Ireland Executive in 2010, the recall of individuals released on a life licence, further to Section 9 of the Life Sentences (NI) Order 2001, has been a matter for the Department of Justice in Northern Ireland, except where this relates to national security. The Department of Justice shall be able to provide details relating to the number of licences revoked.

5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what estimate he has made of the number of licences revoked under Section 8 of the Northern Ireland (Sentences) Act 1998 in each year since1998.

Section 8 of the NI (Sentences) Act 1998 relates to the revocation of a declaration by the Sentence Review Commissioners that a prisoner is eligible for release. To date, two declarations have been revoked under this provision since 1998.